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Arts > Films > British / American actors > Born early - mid 20th century > Timeline in pictures

 

 

 

 

The Silence of the Lambs - back in cinemas across the UK | BFI

 

Jonathan Demme's classic chiller thriller,

The Silence of the Lambs

starring Jodie Foster and Anthony Hopkins,

returns to cinemas on 3 November 2017

as part of the UK-wide BFI Thriller season.

 

With a new trailer and a new 4K transfer,

don't miss this iconic thriller.

 

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=gSQciiKhqXc

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anthony Hopkins        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/anthony-hopkins 

 

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/04/23/
604350829/westworld-returns-with-more-plot-less-philosophy

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2018/may/26/
anthony-hopkins-most-nonsense-most-lie-lear

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/nov/01/
the-silence-of-the-lambs-review-anthony-hopkins-jodie-foster-jonathan-demme

 

 

https://www.npr.org/2016/09/29/
495913292/old-west-gunslinging-meets-futuristic-androids-in-hbos-westworld

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2013/feb/10/hitchcock-review 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2010/jan/20/anthony-hopkins-paintings-interview 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/Player/Player_Page/0,,45392,00.html 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1993/11/05
/movies/review-film-remains-of-the-day-blind-dignity-a-butler-s-story.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1981/02/18/
movies/elephant-man-and-bull-up-for-8-oscars-each.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/watching/recommendations/
watching-film-the-elephant-man

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Steve Carell        USA

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/video/2016/jan/19/
steve-carell-the-big-short-video-interview

 

 

http://www.npr.org/2015/12/11/
459344815/on-the-money-how-the-big-short-and-its-jerk-heroes-explain-finance

http://www.npr.org/2015/12/10/
459283786/the-big-short-puts-a-suspenseful-comic-spin-
on-the-2008-financial-meltdown

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2015/jan/11/
foxcatcher-review-steve-carell-excels-real-life-tragedy-wrestling-schultz

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2015/jan/08/
foxcatcher-review-undoing-of-underdog-sports-movie

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/14/
movies/steve-carell-and-channing-tatum-in-foxcatcher.html

 

http://www.npr.org/2013/05/10/
182639427/the-real-life-of-actor-steve-carell

 

http://www.npr.org/2011/04/28/
135795707/office-says-goodbye-to-steve-carell

 

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=15592867
Updated June 13, 2008 11:22 AM ET Published October 24, 2007 12:37 PM ET

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=91471205
Updated June 13, 2008 4:38 PM ET Published June 13, 2008 9:43 AM ET

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Channing Tatum        USA

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2015/jan/08/
foxcatcher-review-undoing-of-underdog-sports-movie

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/14/
movies/steve-carell-and-channing-tatum-in-foxcatcher.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

George Clooney        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/2016/05/12/
477782927/big-money-bad-guys-are-back-in-money-monster

http://www.npr.org/2016/04/17/
474585666/george-clooney-on-a-big-money-difference-
between-clinton-and-sanders

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2016/mar/03/
george-clooney-donald-trump-is-a-xenophobic-fascist

http://www.npr.org/2016/02/04/
465312506/hail-caesar-will-make-you-miss-movies-with-exclamation-points

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2013/nov/07/
gravity-review

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/monkeysee/2012/02/09/
146643092/george-clooney-on-acting-fame-and-putting-down-your-cell-phone-camera

 

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?
storyId=4963561
- December 27, 2005

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Viggo Peter Mortensen, Jr        DAN / USA

 

http://www.npr.org/2014/09/25/
351421070/two-faces-of-reinvention-and-deceptive-identity

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2005/09/23/
movies/once-disaster-hits-it-seems-never-to-end.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Willem Dafoe        USA

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/willem-dafoe

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2018/sep/03/
at-eternitys-gate-review-van-gogh-willem-dafoe-julian-schnabel

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1989/12/03/
movies/film-willem-dafoe-looking-for-characters-with-possibility.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1988/08/12/
movies/review-film-last-temptation-scorsese-s-view-of-jesus-sacrifice.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2018/aug/10/
the-last-temptation-of-christ-scorcese-30th-anniversary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Christoph Waltz        AUSTRIA / GER

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/christoph-waltz

 

 

http://www.npr.org/2013/01/05/
168554487/fresh-air-weekend-tarantino-waltz-downton

 

http://www.npr.org/2012/12/18/
167062665/unchained-admiration-between-actor-and-director

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liam John Neeson        Northern Ireland / UK

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1993/12/15/
movies/review-film-schindler-s-list-imagining-the-holocaust-to-remember-it.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1993/12/12/
movies/film-steven-spielberg-faces-the-holocaust.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1993/06/13/
movies/film-spielberg-grapples-with-the-horror-of-the-holocaust.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whoopi Goldberg        USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1985/12/18/
movies/film-the-color-purple-from-steven-spielberg.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shirley Knight Hopkins        USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1993/03/07/
arts/television-a-soap-actress-days-of-her-life.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1984/07/08/
nyregion/for-shirley-knight-to-act-is-to-risk.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1974/02/03/
archives/whatever-shirley-thinks-shirley-says-shirley-knight.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1973/04/24/
archives/tv-man-without-a-country-and-lie.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mary Elizabeth "Sissy" Spacek        USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/16/
movies/carrie-is-back-like-a-bloody-hand-from-the-grave.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1973/10/15/
archives/malicks-impressive-badlands-screened-at-festival.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Geneviève Bujold        CAN

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1976/08/02/
archives/screen-obsessionmystery-film-by-brian-de-palma-at-coronet.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Samuel L. Jackson        USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/watching/titles/jackie-brown - 1997

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Robert Forster        USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/watching/titles/jackie-brown - 1997

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pam Grier        USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/watching/titles/jackie-brown - 1997

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sandra Bullock        USA

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/sandra-bullock 

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2013/nov/07/
gravity-review

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Susan Sarandon        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/09/14/movies/14elah.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jeff Goldblum        USA

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2018/aug/30/
the-mountain-review-jeff-goldblum

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/15/
movies/jeff-goldblum-jurassic-world.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1986/08/15/
movies/film-the-fly-with-jeff-goldblum.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Judi Dench        UK

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/21/
style/dame-judi-dench.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Helen Mirren        UK

 

 

 

 Helen Mirren as Queen Elizabeth II

in the 2006 film “The Queen,”

for which she won the Academy Award for best actress.

 

Credit Laurie Sparham/Miramax Films

 

Helen Mirren Goes Back to the Palace in ‘The Audience’

By CHARLES ISHERWOOD        NYT        FEB. 11, 2015

https://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/15/
theater/helen-mirren-goes-back-to-the-palace-in-the-audience.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/culture/helen-mirren

 

 

http://www.npr.org/2016/03/11/
469980318/do-you-sacrifice-one-for-many-mirrens-latest-film-has-no-easy-answers

 

http://www.theguardian.com/culture/2015/sep/26/
helen-mirren-interview-sally-hughes

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2015/jun/21/
the-long-good-friday-review-john-mackenzie-bob-hoskins-
helen-mirren-barrie-keeffe

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2015/jun/17/
helen-mirren-ageism-hollywood-women

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/15/theater/
helen-mirren-goes-back-to-the-palace-in-the-audience.html

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/stage/2013/mar/05/
the-audience-review-helen-mirren

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2011/sep/25/
helen-mirren-the-debt-interview

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2010/dec/09/
helen-mirren-sexism-hollywood-penis

 

http://www.theguardian.com/uk/2007/feb/11/
film.oscars2007

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/the-queen - 2006

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Forest Steven Whitaker III        USA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/forest-whitaker

 

 

http://www.npr.org/2015/07/23/
424995597/southpaw-makes-a-bruised-bruiser-out-of-jake-gyllenhaal

http://www.npr.org/2015/03/05/
390493279/two-men-in-town-covers-old-desert-ground

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2013/nov/17/
the-butler-forest-whitaker-oprah-winfrey-review

http://www.npr.org/2013/08/09/
210506171/the-butler-not-a-movie-its-a-movement-says-director

http://www.theguardian.com/film/movie/155322/butler

 

http://tv.nytimes.com/2011/02/16/
arts/television/16criminal.html

 

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=113032763
Published September 21, 2009 1:29 PM ET
Updated September 21, 2009 8:02 PM ET
 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/11/
movies/11stre.html - Street Kings

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/filmblog/2007/jan/09/
forestwhitakerslongwalkto

 

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?
storyId=7030749 - January 26, 2007

 

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=6283205
Updated October 17, 2006 11:30 AM ET Published October 17, 2006 11:00 AM ET

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=6152988
Updated September 27, 2006 11:59 AM ET Published September 27, 2006 8:45 AM ET

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/movie/115233/last.king.of.scotland

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Andrés Arturo García Menéndez,

professionally known as Andy García        USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1987/06/28/
movies/new-york-untouchables-lurches-between-playing-it-straight-and-playing-it-cool.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Denzel Hayes Washington Jr.         USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1993/12/22/
movies/review-film-philadelphia-tom-hanks-aids-victim-who-fights-establishment.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tom Hanks        USA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.npr.org/tags/126916063/tom-hanks 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/tomhanks

 

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/monkeysee/2017/12/22/
572411864/pop-culture-happy-hour-tension-beckons-and-a-caftan-billows-in-the-post

https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/10/24/
559815944/listen-tom-hanks-on-weinstein-allegations-some-think-this-is-how-it-works

http://www.npr.org/2017/10/16/
557636219/tom-hanks-is-obsessed-with-typewriters-so-he-wrote-a-book-about-them

http://www.npr.org/2017/04/30/
526105460/it-is-neither-nor-it-is-both-tom-hanks-finds-no-easy-answers-in-the-circle

 

http://www.npr.org/2016/09/09/
493150297/in-sully-a-pilots-heroic-water-landing-and-its-real-life-fallout

http://www.npr.org/2016/04/26/
475573489/tom-hanks-says-self-doubt-is-a-high-wire-act-that-we-all-walk

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/16/
movies/review-in-bridge-of-spies-spielberg-considers-the-cold-war.html

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2013/oct/10/
tom-hanks-diabetes-captain-phillips-interview

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1993/12/22/
movies/review-film-philadelphia-tom-hanks-aids-victim-who-fights-establishment.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Karen Lynn Gorney        USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1977/12/11/
archives/tvs-teen-idol-comes-down-with-adult-movie-fever-john-travolta.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Travolta            USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/26/
movies/saturday-night-fever-at-40-you-should-still-be-dancing.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/16/
movies/carrie-is-back-like-a-bloody-hand-from-the-grave.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1981/07/24/
movies/travolta-stars-in-depalma-s-blow-out.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1977/12/11/
archives/tvs-teen-idol-comes-down-with-adult-movie-fever-john-travolta.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sylvester Gardenzio Stallone        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/14/
movies/how-sylvester-stallone-faced-his-fears-for-creed.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1976/11/22/
archives/westchester-weekly-film-rocky-pure-30s-makebelieve.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marisa Berenson        USA

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/barry-lyndon

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2016/jul/28/
barry-lyndon-review-stanley-kubrick-ryan-o-neal

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2016/jul/25/
stanley-kubrick-barry-lyndon-time-to-reassess

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2016/jul/14/
stanley-kubrick-barry-lyndon-put-spell-on-people

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Elizabeth Alice "Ali" MacGraw        USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1972/12/20/
archives/thief-and-wife-in-getaway.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1970/12/18/
archives/screen-perfection-and-a-love-story-erich-segals-romantic-tale.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ryan O'Neal        USA

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/barry-lyndon

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2016/jul/28/
barry-lyndon-review-stanley-kubrick-ryan-o-neal

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2016/jul/25/
stanley-kubrick-barry-lyndon-time-to-reassess

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2016/jul/14/
stanley-kubrick-barry-lyndon-put-spell-on-people

 

 

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1970/12/18/
archives/screen-perfection-and-a-love-story-erich-segals-romantic-tale.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sally Margaret Field        USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1979/03/02/
archives/film-norma-rae-milltown-story-unionism-in-the-south.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Robert De Niro        USA

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/robertdeniro

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/global/video/2016/oct/08/
robert-de-niro-id-like-to-punch-donald-trump-in-the-face-video

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/26/
health/vaccines-autism-robert-de-niro-tribeca-film-festival-andrew-wakefield-vaxxed.html

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2013/oct/28/
robert-de-niro-the-family

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/theobserver/2012/nov/24/
robert-de-niro-silver-linings-interview

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2010/oct/19/
deer-hunter-action

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1987/06/28/
movies/new-york-untouchables-lurches-between-playing-it-straight-and-playing-it-cool.html

 

https://archive.nytimes.com/www.nytimes.com/
packages/html/movies/bestpictures/deer-re.html - Dec. 15, 1978

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dustin Hoffman        USA

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/dustinhoffman

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/05/
books/review/beverly-gray-seduced-by-mrs-robinson-the-graduate.html

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2013/aug/06/
dustin-hoffman-cancer-treatment

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2012/apr/28/
dustin-hoffman-john-burnham-schwartz

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2003/07/26/
arts/john-schlesinger-77-dies-directed-midnight-cowboy.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1973/12/17/
archives/the-screen-papillon-escapist-film-stars-mcqueen-hoffman.html

https://www.nytimes.com/1971/07/24/
archives/pravda-finds-little-big-man-exposes-crimes-of-capitalism.html

https://www.nytimes.com/1971/02/21/
archives/dustin-calls-him-grandpa-chief-dan-george.html

https://archive.nytimes.com/www.nytimes.com/packages/
html/movies/bestpictures/cowboy-re.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1969/12/15/
archives/screen-john-and-mary-at-the-sutton-a-familiar-love-story-is-told.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1969/05/26/
archives/film-midnight-cowboy-dustin-hoffman-and-jon-voight-are-starred.html

 

https://archive.nytimes.com/www.nytimes.com/
packages/html/movies/bestpictures/cowboy-re.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gene Hackman        USA

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/gene-hackman

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2001/12/16/
movies/gene-hackman-hollywood-s-every-angry-man.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2013/apr/28/
scarecrow-review-hackman-pacino-1973

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

F Murray Abraham        USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1983/12/09/
movies/screen-al-pacino-stars-in-scarface.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Al Pacino        USA

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/alpacino

 

 

https://www.npr.org/2016/11/15/
502250244/to-make-the-godfather-his-way-francis-ford-coppola-waged-a-studio-battle

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2015/jul/23/
al-pacino-whats-the-point-of-quitting

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2014/aug/30/
venice-film-festival-al-pacino-manglehorn

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2013/apr/28/
scarecrow-review-hackman-pacino-1973

 

http://www.npr.org/2011/08/26/
139913728/scarface-over-the-top-but-ahead-of-its-time

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1996/10/06/
movies/al-pacino-slouching-again-toward-shakespeare.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1993/11/10/
movies/review-film-carlito-s-way-triumph-atmosphere-over-detail-spanish-harlem.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1983/12/09/
movies/screen-al-pacino-stars-in-scarface.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1975/09/22/
archives/screen-lumets-dog-day-afternoon.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1973/12/16/
archives/serpico-the-saint-francis-of-copdom-saint-francis-of-cops.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1971/07/14/
archives/screen-schatzbergs-the-panic-in-needle-park-drug-addicts-trapped-on.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kitty Winn        USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1971/07/14/
archives/screen-schatzbergs-the-panic-in-needle-park-drug-addicts-trapped-on.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Candice Bergen        USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1970/08/13/
archives/candice-bergen-stars-in-violent-western-two-other-films-open-at.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ben Kingsley        UK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/ben-kingsley

 

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/08/29/
642645179/in-operation-finale-ben-kingsley-summons-the-evil-of-a-holocaust-architect

 

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/gallery/2015/mar/23/
beekeeping-in-london-in-pictures

 

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2013/nov/09/
ben-kingsley-interview-rosanna-greenstreet

 

https://www.npr.org/2011/11/18/
142508464/cabret

 

https://www.npr.org/templates/
story/story.php?storyId=111992543 - August 18, 2009

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2005/sep/16/2

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1994/03/02/
movies/the-german-premiere-of-schindler-s-list-brings-tears-and-praise.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/watching/recommendations/
watching-film-schindlers-list -1993

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1993/12/16/
movies/new-york-critics-honor-schindler-s-list.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1993/12/15/
movies/review-film-schindler-s-list-imagining-the-holocaust-to-remember-it.html

 

https://archive.nytimes.com/www.nytimes.com/
packages/html/movies/bestpictures/schindler-ar1.html - Dec. 12, 1993

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1982/12/08/
movies/ben-kingsley-in-panoramic-gandhi.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Daniel Day-Lewis        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/danieldaylewis

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/jun/21/
daniel-day-lewis-an-extraordinary-career-of-acting-artistry-is-it-really-all-over

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2012/oct/09/
lincoln-review-spielberg-day-lewis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kris Kristofferson        USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1975/03/02/
archives/ellen-burstyn-pays-alice-from-the-inside-out.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ellen Burstyn        USA

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/ellen-burstyn

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2018/apr/26/
ellen-burstyn-women-on-screen-were-prostitutes-or-victims-i-wanted-to-embody-a-hero

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1975/03/02/
archives/ellen-burstyn-pays-alice-from-the-inside-out.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tommy Lee Jones        USA

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/tommyleejones

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2014/may/18/
tommy-lee-jones-the-homesman-cannes-film-festival-hilary-swank

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2014/may/18/
the-homesman-cannes-review-tommy-lee-jones-hilary-swank

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2013/sep/30/
tommy-lee-jones-emperor

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2012/oct/09/
lincoln-review-spielberg-day-lewis

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2008/jan/18/
drama.thriller

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/09/14/movies/14elah.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meryl Streep        USA

 

 

 

 

August Osage County Official Trailer #2 (2013)

 

Meryl Streep, Julia Roberts

A look at the lives of the strong-willed women of the Weston family,

whose paths have diverged until a family crisis

brings them back to the Midwest house they grew up in,

and to the dysfunctional woman who raised them.

 

YouTube > MOVIECLIPS Trailers        12 September 2013

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4VBEZrkCT8Q

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/merylstreep

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2018/feb/22/
meryl-streep-harvey-weinstein-sexual-misconduct-lawsuit

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/monkeysee/2017/12/22/
572411864/pop-culture-happy-hour-tension-beckons-and-a-caftan-billows-in-the-post

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/10/
opinion/streep-vs-trump-for-america.html

 

http://www.npr.org/2016/04/26/
475616824/meryl-streeps-first-acting-gig-becoming-pretty-and-popular-in-high-school

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/07/
movies/review-ricki-and-the-flash-puts-meryl-streep-behind-a-telecaster.html

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2014/may/18/
tommy-lee-jones-the-homesman-cannes-film-festival-hilary-swank

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2014/may/18/t
he-homesman-cannes-review-tommy-lee-jones-hilary-swank

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2012/feb/15/
iron-lady-meryl-streep-thatcher-feminist

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2011/nov/14/
the-iron-lady-first-review

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hZrAKdlX0SA

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2011/feb/08/
meryl-streep-margaret-thatcher-iron-lady

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1995/06/02/
movies/film-review-love-comes-driving-up-the-road-and-in-middle-age-too.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jeffrey Leon "Jeff" Bridges        USA

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/jeff-bridges

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/27/
movies/jeff-bridges-the-dude-really-is-laid-back.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/20/
movies/in-ripd-jeff-bridges-doesnt-bring-em-back-alive.html

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2011/may/26/
jeff-bridges-career

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2011/feb/13/
true-grit-coen-brothers-review

 

https://www.nytimes.com/watching/recommendations/watching-film-true-grit - 2010

https://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/12/
movies/12grit.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/22/
movies/22true.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/19/
movies/19crazy.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1998/03/06/
movies/film-review-a-bowling-ball-s-eye-view-of-reality.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hugh Grant        UK

 

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/06/23/
622678900/a-very-english-scandal-stars-who-else-but-a-very-english-hugh-grant

 

https://www.npr.org/2015/02/14/
385763623/hugh-grant-on-smart-romantic-comedies-and-standing-up-to-the-tabloids

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/monkeysee/2011/11/22/
142644319/hugh-grant-hes-been-a-fop-and-a-cad-and-now-hes-an-activist

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Richard Gere        USA

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2013/feb/24/
richard-gere-arbitrage-acting-high-finance

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diane Keaton        USA

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/diane-keaton 

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/filmblog/2013/may/24/
diane-keaton-five-best-moments

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Glenn Close        USA

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/glenn-close

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/sep/15/
glenn-close-people-dont-realise-that-you-keep-your-sexuality-up-until-you-die

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/11/
fashion/glenn-close-sunset-boulevard-patrick-kennedy-addiction.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Annette Bening

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/07/
movies/ed-harris-and-annette-bening-in-the-face-of-love.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bruce Dern        USA

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2013/nov/28/
bruce-dern-alexander-payne-nebraska

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1976/04/10/
archives/screen-hitchcocks-family-plot-bubbles-over.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Harvey Keitel        USA

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/filmblog/2014/mar/07/
harvey-keitel-five-best-moments

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Joseph "Jack" Nicholson        USA

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/jacknicholson

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2013/sep/05/
jack-nicholson-retires-memory-loss

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2010/aug/05/
jack-nicholson-david-thomson

 

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?
storyId=100986753 - February 22, 2009

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2007/apr/22/1 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/movie/review?
res=9907EEDF163CF93AA25752C0A9679C8B63 - The Pledge - Jan. 19, 2001

 

http://movies.nytimes.com/movie/review?
res=EE05E7DF1739E76CBC4851DFB767838E669EDE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Malcolm McDowell        UK

 

http://www.theguardian.com/profile/malcolm-mcdowell

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/filmblog/2014/jul/29/
malcolm-mcdowell-mick-travis-if-role-model

http://www.theguardian.com/film/filmblog/2013/dec/17/
malcolm-mcdowell-peter-otoole-caligula-graves

http://www.theguardian.com/film/video/2011/may/20/
cannes-2011-clockwork-orange-malcolm-mcdowell-video

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2008/may/24/1

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2007/nov/01/2

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2004/apr/24/1

http://www.theguardian.com/film/bad-timing

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/movie/75644/clockwork.orange

http://www.nytimes.com/movie/review?res=9a02e1d61038ef34bc4851dfb467838a669ede

http://www.nytimes.com/movies/movie/63498/If-/overview

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jeremy Irons        UK

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/jeremy-irons

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2016/mar/24/
jeremy-irons-have-natural-tendency-benign-dictator-batman-v-superman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Terence Stamp        UK

 

 

 

‘I don’t have to get on with a director’ … Terence Stamp.

 

Photograph: Linda Nylind for the Guardian

 

Terence Stamp:

‘I was in my prime, but when the 60s ended, I ended with it’

G

Thursday 12 March 2015        18.36 GMT

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2015/mar/12/terence-stamp-i-was-in-my-prime-but-when-the-60s-ended-i-ended-with-it

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2015/mar/12/
terence-stamp-i-was-in-my-prime-but-when-the-60s-ended-i-ended-with-it

http://www.bfi.org.uk/news-opinion/news-bfi/interviews/
meetings-remarkable-men-terence-stamp-interview

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ed Harris        USA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Double Time: Seeing a Ghost, Romantically

Ed Harris and Annette Bening in ‘The Face of Love’

By MANOHLA DARGIS        NYT        MARCH 6, 2014

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/07/
movies/ed-harris-and-annette-bening-in-the-face-of-love.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.npr.org/2016/09/29/
495913292/old-west-gunslinging-meets-futuristic-androids-in-hbos-westworld

 

https://www.npr.org/2014/03/08/
287296921/the-unforgettable-performance-ed-harris-doesnt-remember

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/07/
movies/ed-harris-and-annette-bening-in-the-face-of-love.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Robert Duvall        USA

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/05/
magazine/robert-duvall-is-not-sick-of-talking-about-the-godfather.html

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2010/feb/07/
robert-duvall-his-own-words

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2001/08/03/
movies/critic-s-notebook-aching-heart-of-darkness.html

 

https://archive.nytimes.com/www.nytimes.com/
library/film/apostle-film-review.html
- October 9, 1997

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1991/11/27/
movies/review-film-coppola-s-apocalypse-then-the-making-of-a-screen-epic.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1987/08/20/
movies/apocalypse-now-to-be-re-released.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Christopher Walken        USA

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1983/10/21/
movies/film-dead-zone-from-king-novel.html

 

https://archive.nytimes.com/www.nytimes.com/packages/html/
movies/bestpictures/deer-re.html - The Deer Hunter - 1978

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Morgan Freeman        USA

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/morganfreeman 

 

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2018/05/24/
614134391/women-accuse-morgan-freeman-of-harassment-inappropriate-behavior-cnn-reports

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2010/oct/17/
morgan-freeman-this-much-know-red-film-actor

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2004/12/15/
movies/3-people-seduced-by-the-bloody-allure-of-the-ring.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1995/09/22/
movies/film-review-a-sickening-catalogue-of-sins-every-one-of-them-deadly.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nick Nolte        USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1983/10/21/
movies/screen-under-fire.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Donald Sutherland        CAN

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/donald-sutherland

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2015/nov/20/
donald-sutherland-five-best-moments-hunger-games-mockingjay-part-2

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2013/nov/19/
donald-sutherland-hunger-games-catching-fire

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2010/may/16/
fellini-casanova-french-classic-dvd

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1977/02/06/
archives/fellinis-unlovable-casanova-the-chilling-vision-in-his-most-recent.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mia Farrow        USA

 

https://www.npr.org/2014/02/07/
273058780/abuse-allegations-revive-woody-allens-trial-by-media

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1971/10/17/
archives/-rosemary-shes-andres-baby-now-mia-farrow.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1969/12/15/
archives/screen-john-and-mary-at-the-sutton-a-familiar-love-story-is-told.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1968/06/13/
archives/the-screen-rosemarys-baby-a-story-of-fantasy-and-horror-john.html

https://www.nytimes.com/watching/recommendations/
watching-film-rosemarys-baby

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Faye Dunaway        USA

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/faye-dunaway

https://www.theguardian.com/film/bonnie-and-clyde

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1971/07/24/
archives/pravda-finds-little-big-man-exposes-crimes-of-capitalism.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1971/02/21/
archives/dustin-calls-him-grandpa-chief-dan-george.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1971/02/08/
archives/-puzzle-of-downfall-child-with-faye-dunaway-here.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Robert Redford        USA

 

 

 

 

Three Days of the Condor - Trailer        8 November 2013

 

In Sydney Pollack's

critically acclaimed suspense-thriller,

Robert Redford (Spy Game ) stars

as CIA Agent Joe Turner.

 

Code name: Condor.

 

When his entire office is massacred,

Turner goes on the run from his enemies...

and his so-called allies.

 

After reporting the murders to his superiors,

the organization wants to bring Condor in --

but somebody is trying to take him out.

 

In his frantic hunt for answers,

and in a desperate run for his life,

Turner abducts photographer Kathy Hale

(Faye Dunaway, The Thomas Crown Affair)

eventually seducing her into helping him

 

YouTube > ParamountmoviesUK

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DE3yZXQQnPo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/robertredford 

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2018/aug/09/
robert-redfords-greatest-screen-roles-ranked

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/gallery/2018/aug/06/
the-sundance-kid-to-all-is-lost-robert-redfords-greatest-roles-in-pictures

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/feb/22/
the-sting-best-picture-oscar-1974

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/video/2016/aug/11/
robert-redford-petes-dragon-video-interview

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2014/jan/17/
robert-redford-may-leave-sundance-film-festival

 

http://www.npr.org/2013/12/12/
249975711/at-77-robert-redford-goes-back-to-his-roots

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/13/
movies/robert-redford-goes-to-sea-in-all-is-lost.html

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2013/apr/20/
robert-redford-reinvents-himself

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/talk/2008/07/
robert_redford_slammin.html

 

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php
?storyId=1423825 - September 9, 2003

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2002/12/28/
movies/george-roy-hill-director-of-the-sting-dies-at-81.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/watching/recommendations/
watching-film-three-days-of-the-condor
- 1975

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Michael Caine        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/michael-caine

 

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/11/01/
662710016/actor-michael-caine-85-on-his-long-career-the-alternative-was-a-factory

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2018/aug/30/
michael-caine-crime-poverty-suffering-king-thieves-hatton-garden

 

 

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2015/may/20/
youth-review-cannes-film-festival-2015-michael-caine

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2015/may/20/
youth-review-cannes-film-festival-2015-michael-caine

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/picture/2014/nov/07/
michael-caine-infographic

 

https://www.npr.org/2013/05/30/
187296744/michael-caine-i-spent-my-life-doing-something-that-i-love

 

https://www.npr.org/2010/11/02/
130895606/michael-caine-reflects-on-his-hollywood-career

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/10/12/
movies/12sleu.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sidney Poitier        USA

 

 

 

 

Guess Who's Coming To Dinner? (1967) - Trailer        16 April 2013

 

A daughter brings her fiancé home to meet her parents,

not having told them he's black.

(Original Title - Guess Who's Coming To Dinner (1967))

© 1967, renewed 1995 Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc.

All Rights Reserved.Sony Pictures Home Entertainment

 

YouTube > Sony Pictures Home Entertainment

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YZycqHfmrzQ

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1967/12/12/
archives/screen-guess-whos-coming-to-dinner-arrives-tracyhepburn-picture.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Warren Beatty        USA

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/bonnie-and-clyde

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/07/
movies/if-warren-beatty-is-directing-shooting-can-wait-for-years.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/30/
movies/30penn.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/watching/recommendations/
watching-film-bonnie-and-clyde

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nathalie Kay "Tippi" Hedren        USA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.npr.org/2016/11/05/
500668082/for-tippi-hedren-hitchcocks-scares-came-off-screen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Michael Douglas        USA

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/michael-douglas

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2014/sep/18/
michael-douglas-the-reach-interview

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2010/oct/02/
michael-douglas-cancer-catherine-zeta-jones

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kirk Douglas        USA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/kirkdouglas

 

 

https://www.npr.org/2017/08/28/
546730779/celebrating-30-years-of-fresh-air-the-kirk-douglas-interview

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/feb/12/
kirk-douglas-i-never-thought-id-live-to-100-thats-shocked-me

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/06/
movies/diana-douglas-actress-and-first-wife-of-kirk-douglas-dies-at-92.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/news/2006/mar/28/
guardianobituaries.usa

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1991/04/18/
movies/spartacus-a-classic-restored.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/watching/recommendations/
watching-film-paths-of-glory

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sean Connery        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/seanconnery 

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/gallery/2010/aug/24/
sean-connery-80

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1987/06/28/
movies/new-york-untouchables-lurches-between-playing-it-straight-and-playing-it-cool.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jane Fonda        USA

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2011/jan/09/
this-much-know-jane-fonda

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eva Marie Saint        USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1959/08/07/
archives/hitchcock-takes-suspenseful-cooks-tour-north-by-northwest-opens-at.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kim Novak        USA

 

 

 

Vertigo review – still spinning its dizzying magic

 

Hitchcock’s masterpiece,

rereleased after 60 years,

combines his flair for psychological shocks

with a genius for dapper stylishness

G

Thu 12 Jul 2018        08.00 BST

Last modified on Thu 12 Jul 2018        08.26 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2018/jul/12/
vertigo-review-alfred-hitchcock-james-stewart-kim-novak

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2018/jul/12/
vertigo-review-alfred-hitchcock-james-stewart-kim-novak

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1958/05/29/
archives/vertigo-hitchcocks-latest-melodrama-arrives-at-the-capitol.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Angie Dickinson        USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1964/07/18/
archives/screen-killers-remade-angie-dickinson-stars-in-hemingway-story.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ian McKellen    UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/culture/ian-mckellen

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2016/apr/03/
ian-mckellen-10-best-shakespeare-roles-on-film

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2015/jun/18/
mr-holmes-review-peter-bradshaw-film-of-the-week-ian-mckellen

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/filmblog/2014/jul/10/
ian-mckellen-sherlock-holmes-first-picture

http://www.theguardian.com/stage/2014/mar/31/
best-shakespeare-productions-richard-iii-mckellen-olivier

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/2011/apr/12/
ian-mckellen-gay-tour-schools

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Olivia De Havilland        USA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.npr.org/2016/07/01/
484309271/100-years-of-olivia-de-havilland-handling-sexism-her-sister-and-scarlett-ohara

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peter Fonda        USA        1940-2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Doris Day        USA        1922-2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Albert Finney        UK        1936-2019

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/albert-finney

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2019/feb/08/
albert-finney-obituary

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/stage/2019/feb/08/
albert-finney-on-stage-theatre-modern-classics

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/video/2019/feb/08/
a-look-back-albert-finney-most-memorable-performances-video

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/gallery/2019/feb/08/
king-of-kitchen-sink-albert-finney-a-life-in-pictures

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2019/feb/08/
albert-finney-an-almighty-physical-screen-presence

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2019/feb/08/
albert-finney-obituary

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2019/feb/08/
albert-finney-dies-film-tom-jones-orient-express-millers-crossing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sondra Locke        USA        1944-2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gloria Jean Schoonover        USA        1926-2018

 

(...) former child

singing sensation

remembered for her popular

1940s Universal Studios films

and her leading part

in W. C. Fields’s

antic comedy

“Never Give a Sucker

an Even Break”

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/05/
obituaries/gloria-jean-dead.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/05/
obituaries/gloria-jean-dead.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maria Grazia Morgana Messina        USA        1930-2018

 

Before March 1972,

Morgana King

was known as a jazz singer

with an impressive vocal range

and an ability

to put a distinctive spin

on an eclectic selection

of songs.

 

But by late that month,

although she remained

an accomplished singer,

millions of moviegoers

thought of her

as Vito Corleone’s wife.

 

Ms. King had never been

in a feature film

before playing Mama Corleone

in “The Godfather,”

which after its release that month

became one of the most

acclaimed movies of all time.

 

She was in “Godfather II” as well

and had a smattering

of other television and film credits,

but music was always her passion.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/15/
obituaries/morgana-king-jazz-singer-and-godfather-actor-is-dead-at-87.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/15/
obituaries/morgana-king-jazz-singer-and-godfather-actor-is-dead-at-87.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mary Carlisle (born Gwendolyn Witter)        USA        1914-2018

 

 

 

Mary Carlisle and Bing Crosby in “Double or Nothing” (1937).

 

She made dozens of movies in the 1930s and early ’40s,

often playing a perky innocent.

 

Credit Paramount Pictures/Photofest

NYT

December 3, 2018

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/03/
obituaries/mary-carlisle-depression-era-movie-ingenue-dies-at-104.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(...) angel-faced blond actress

who often played spunky

but innocent ingénues

in scores

of Depression-era films

 

(...)

 

From 1932 to 1939,

when she wa

in her late teens

and early 20s,

Ms. Carlisle

made 50 movies,

including three musicals

opposite Bing Crosby:

“College Humor” (1933),

“Double or Nothing” (1937)

and “Doctor Rhythm” (1938).

 

Even in pre-Code films

(those made

before censorship

ruled Hollywood studios)

like “Should Ladies Behave” (1933),

she was more curious than sinful.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/03/
obituaries/mary-carlisle-depression-era-movie-ingenue-dies-at-104.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/03/
obituaries/mary-carlisle-depression-era-movie-ingenue-dies-at-104.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tab Hunter (born Arthur Andrew Kelm)        USA        1931-2018

 

(...) tall, blond,

blue-eyed movie star

who as a teenage idol

in the 1950s was one

of the last products

of the Hollywood

studio system

— and who made

an unlikely comeback

in a very un-Hollywood film

when he was almost 50 —

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/09/
obituaries/tab-hunter-86-1950s-hollywood-heartthrob-is-dead.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/09/
obituaries/tab-hunter-86-1950s-hollywood-heartthrob-is-dead.html

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/monkeysee/2018/07/10/
627315564/hollywood-and-tab-hunter-the-marriage-that-ended-amicably

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peggy Cummins        IR / USA        1925-2018

 

an actress

best remembered

for her turn

as a femme fatale

with a hair trigger

in the influential

low-budget film noir

“Gun Crazy”

 

(...)

 

Slender,

blond and young,

Ms. Cummins,

who grew up in Ireland

and moved to

the United States

in 1945,

had more often

played innocents

before being cast

in “Gun Crazy.”

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/05/
obituaries/peggy-cummins-seductive-star-of-a-cult-film-dies-at-92.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/05/
obituaries/peggy-cummins-seductive-star-of-a-cult-film-dies-at-92.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Burton Leon Reynolds Jr.        USA        1936-2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Actor Burt Reynolds

(...) played good ol' boys

and rugged action heroes

in an acting career

that spanned seven decades

 

(...)


Reynolds

came to stardom in Deliverance

and Smokey and the Bandit

in the 1970s

and was still making movies

more than 40 years later.

 

In 1977's

Smokey and the Bandit,

Jackie Gleason

was Smokey the sheriff,

Burt Reynolds was Bandit,

and the plot hinged

on whether Bandit

and a truck-driving pal

could blow through

Smokey's roadblocks

and make the run in 28 hours.

 

The smile, the mustache,

the twinkle in his eye ...

without them,

would anyone have buckled up

for that bootlegging run

from Texarkana, Texas,

to Atlanta?

https://www.npr.org/2018/09/06/
614547035/burt-reynolds-swaggering-star-actor-has-died-at-82

 

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/09/11/
646723297/sally-field-wasnt-sure-shed-have-the-guts-to-publish-her-new-memoir

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/09/06/
614547035/burt-reynolds-swaggering-star-actor-has-died-at-82

 

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/gallery/2018/sep/06/
burt-reynolds-a-life-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Barbara Densmoor Harris        USA        1935-2018

 

(...) founding member

of the Second City

improvisational theater

(who won) a Tony Award

for her lead role

in the musical “The Apple Tree”

and to appear in films

like “A Thousand Clowns”

and “Nashville”

 

(...)

 

She received

an Oscar nomination

for her supporting role

in “Who Is Harry Kellerman

and Why Is He Saying

Those Terrible Things About Me?”

(1971),

starring Dustin Hoffman,

and Golden Globe nominations

for her roles

in Robert Altman’s

“Nashville” (1975),

Alfred Hitchcock’s

“Family Plot” (1976)

and Mark Waters’s

“Freaky Friday” (1976),

in which she

and Jodie Foster,

as mother and daughter,

traded bodies.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/21/
obituaries/barbara-harris-stage-screen-and-improv-actress-dies-at-83.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/21/
obituaries/barbara-harris-stage-screen-and-improv-actress-dies-at-83.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Roger George Moore        UK        1927-2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/roger-moore

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/may/23/
sir-roger-moore-obituary-james-bond

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/may/25/
one-of-natures-true-gentlemen-your-roger-moore-stories

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/05/23/
509559759/he-called-himself-one-lucky-bastard-sir-roger-moore-dies-at-89

https://www.theguardian.com/film/gallery/2017/may/23/
bond-actor-roger-moore-a-life-in-pictures

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/may/23/
a-force-of-nature-tributes-pour-in-for-bond-and-the-saint-actor-roger-moore

https://www.theguardian.com/film/filmblog/2017/may/23/
roger-moore-the-modest-self-deprecating-007-peter-bradshaw

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/may/23/
sir-roger-moore-obituary-james-bond

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/may/23/
roger-moore-saint-persuader-and-the-suavest-james-bond-dies-aged-89

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Harry Dean Stanton        USA        1926-2017

 

 

 

Harry Dean Stanton shot for the Observer Magazine

in New York on 23 October 2013

 

Photograph: Steve Pyke for the Observer

 

A life in pictures – Harry Dean Stanton

G

Saturday 16 September 2017        00.40 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/film/gallery/2017/sep/15/
a-life-in-pictures-harry-dean-stanton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/harry-dean-stanton

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/17/
movies/harry-dean-stanton.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/sep/15/
harry-dean-stanton-actor-dies-paris-texas-alien-repo-man

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/gallery/2017/sep/15/
a-life-in-pictures-harry-dean-stanton

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/15/
movies/harry-dean-stanton-dead-actor.html

 

http://www.npr.org/2017/09/15/
547023879/harry-dean-stanton-a-supporting-actor-who-became-a-star-dies-at-91

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jerry Lewis        USA        1926-2017

 

 

 

Jerry Lewis, left,

in Paris during the production of “The Day the Clown Cried” in 1972.

 

Credit Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

 

‘The Day the Clown Cried’:

Why Jerry Lewis’s Lost Holocaust Film Is Still Lost

NYT

Dec. 28, 2018

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/28/
movies/jerry-lewis-day-the-clown-cried.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

comedian and filmmaker

who was adored by many,

disdained by others,

but unquestionably

a defining figure

of American entertainment

in the 20th century

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/20/
movies/jerry-lewis-dead-celebrated-comedian-and-filmmaker.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/28/
movies/jerry-lewis-day-the-clown-cried.html

 

 

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/sep/01/
jerry-lewis-martin-scorsese-king-comedy-nutty-professor

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/20/
movies/jerry-lewis-dead-celebrated-comedian-and-filmmaker.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/20/
arts/jerry-lewis-critic-comedians-influence.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/20/
watching/jerry-lewis-movies-best.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Vincent Hurt        UK        1940-2017

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/john-hurt

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/jan/28/
john-hurt-dead-the-elephant-man-alien-harry-potter-midnight-express

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/video/2017/jan/28/
john-hurt-diverse-british-actor-dies-77-video-obituary

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/27/
movies/john-hurt-dead.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/27/
movies/watch-john-hurt-in-his-most-memorable-roles.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/video/2017/jan/28/
john-hurt-diverse-british-actor-dies-77-video-obituary 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/jan/28/john-hurt-obituary

https://www.theguardian.com/film/filmblog/2017/jan/28/
john-hurt-10-key-performances-alien-elephant-man-doctor-who

https://www.theguardian.com/film/gallery/2017/jan/28/
a-life-in-pictures-john-hurt

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/jan/28/
john-hurt-dead-the-elephant-man-alien-harry-potter-midnight-express

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/27/movies/john-hurt-dead.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/stage/video/2015/jan/29/
john-hurt-shakespeare-romeo-video

 

http://www.theguardian.com/theobserver/2013/sep/08/john-hurt-bees-doctor-who

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/filmblog/2011/sep/26/john-hurt-questions-live 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2011/sep/06/john-hurt-a-rubbish-spy  

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2006/mar/27/film.rwanda 

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2006/mar/19/comment.media 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2006/apr/02/philipfrench 

http://www.bfi.org.uk/features/interviews/caton-jones_hurt.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2000/apr/27/guardianinterviewsatbfisouthbank

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1981/02/18/
movies/elephant-man-and-bull-up-for-8-oscars-each.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2006/03/17/
movies/who-is-this-masked-avenger-guy-fawkes-count-of-monte-cristo-or-a.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1985/03/08/
movies/screen-terence-stamp-in-the-hit.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1985/01/18/
movies/the-screen-john-hurt-in-1984-adaptation-of-orwell-novel.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1981/02/18/
movies/elephant-man-and-bull-up-for-8-oscars-each.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/watching/
recommendations/watching-film-the-elephant-man - 1980

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mary Frances Reynolds        USA        1932-2016

 

(...) wholesome ingénue

in 1950s films

like “Singin’ in the Rain”

and “Tammy and the Bachelor”

 

(...)


Mr. Fisher

told the television station

ABC 7 Los Angeles

that she had suffered

a stroke.

 

According to TMZ,

she had been discussing

funeral plans for Ms. Fisher,

who died on Tuesday

after having a heart attack

during a flight to Los Angeles

last Friday.

 

“She’s now with Carrie,

and we’re all heartbroken,”

Mr. Fisher said from

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center,

where Ms. Reynolds

was taken by ambulance,

The Associated Press said.

 

He said the stress

of his sister’s death

“was too much”

for his mother.

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/28/movies/debbie-reynolds-dead.html

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/culture/gallery/2016/dec/29/
debbie-reynolds-and-carrie-fisher-in-pictures

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/29/
movies/debbie-reynolds-carrie-fisher-photo.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/28/
movies/debbie-reynolds-dead.html

 

http://www.gocomics.com/jeffstahler/2016/12/30

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carrie Frances Fisher        USA        1956-2016

 

 

 

‘That American girl’ … Carrie Fisher in the 1970s.

 

Photograph: Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

 

My friend, Carrie Fisher:

'You could have lit a candle with the twinkle in her eyes'

G

Friday 30 December 2016        11.53 GMT

Last modified on Friday 30 December 2016        12.57 GMT

https://www.theguardian.com/culture/filmblog/2016/dec/30/my-friend-carrie-fisher-selina-cadell-tribute

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(...) actress,

author and screenwriter

who brought

a rare combination

of nerve, grit

and hopefulness

to her most indelible role,

as Princess Leia

in the “Star Wars”

movie franchise

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/27/
movies/carrie-fisher-dead-star-wars-princess-leia.html

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/culture/carrie-fisher

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/culture/filmblog/2016/dec/30/
my-friend-carrie-fisher-selina-cadell-tribute

https://www.theguardian.com/culture/gallery/2016/dec/29/
debbie-reynolds-and-carrie-fisher-in-pictures

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/29/
movies/debbie-reynolds-carrie-fisher-photo.html

http://www.gocomics.com/mike-lester/2016/12/29

http://www.gocomics.com/danasummers/2016/12/28

http://www.gocomics.com/phil-hands/2016/12/28

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/28/
movies/debbie-reynolds-dead.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/28/
opinion/the-honesty-of-carrie-fisher.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/27/
arts/carrie-fisher-bipolar-disorder.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/27/
movies/carrie-fisher-dead-star-wars-princess-leia.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/27/
arts/carrie-fisher-a-princess-a-rebel-and-a-brave-comic-voice.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

William Goldwyn Nunn III        USA        1953-2016

 

versatile actor

best known for playing

the role of Radio Raheem,

the boombox-toting

neighborhood philosopher

killed by police officers

in Spike Lee’s 1989 film

“Do the Right Thing”

 

(...)

 

The first major acting role

for Mr. Nunn,

the son of a well-known

professional football scout,

was in the 1988 film

“School Daze,”

also written and directed

by Mr. Lee.

 

The next year brought

the critically acclaimed

“Do the Right Thing,”

in which he played

the iconic Radio Raheem,

who carries a boombox blaring

Public Enemy’s “Fight the Power”

through the streets

of the Bedford-Stuyvesant

area of Brooklyn

on the hottest day of summer.

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/25/
movies/bill-nunn-who-played-radio-raheem-in-do-the-right-thing-dies-at-63.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/25/
movies/bill-nunn-who-played-radio-raheem-in-do-the-right-thing-dies-at-63.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gene Wilder (born Jerome Silberman)        USA        1933-2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gene Wilder (...)

established himself

as one of America’s

foremost comic actors

with his delightfully

neurotic performances

in three films

directed by Mel Brooks;

 

his eccentric star

turn in the family classic

“Willy Wonka

and the Chocolate Factory”;

and his winning chemistry

with Richard Pryor

in the box-office smash

“Stir Crazy”

 

(...)


Mr. Wilder’s rule

for comedy was simple:

Don’t try to make it funny;

try to make it real.

 

“I’m an actor, not a clown,”

he said more than once.

 

With his haunted blue eyes

and an empathy born

of his own history

of psychic distress,

he aspired to touch audiences

much as Charlie Chaplin had.

 

The Chaplin film

“City Lights,” he said,

had “made

the biggest impression

on me as an actor;

it was funny, then sad,

then both at the same time.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/30/movies/gene-wilder-dead.html

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/gene-wilder

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/31/
movies/gene-wilder-understated-nuttiness.html

https://www.theguardian.com/film/video/2016/aug/30/
actor-gene-wilder-willy-wonka-star-dies-at-83-video

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/30/
movies/gene-wilder-dead.html

http://www.npr.org/2016/08/30/
491944275/in-this-2005-interview-gene-wilder-explains-how-he-learned-to-get-laughs

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/08/29/
491847509/gene-wilder-star-of-willy-wonka-and-young-frankenstein-dies

https://www.theguardian.com/film/gallery/2016/aug/29/
gene-wilder-life-in-pictures

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2014/02/07/
272452677/blazing-saddles-the-best-interracial-buddy-comedy-turns-40

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David William Huddleston        USA        1930-2016

 

burly, cantankerous

and prolific character actor

who had the title role opposite

Jeff Bridges

in “The Big Lebowski,”

Joel and Ethan Coen’s

1998 mistaken-identity

noir comedy

 

(...)

 

“The Big Lebowski”

was one of two cult film

in which Mr. Huddleston

was immortalized.

 

In the other, Mel Brooks’s

goofy 1974 Western,

“Blazing Saddles,”

he played the blowhard Mayor

Olson Johnson.

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/06/
movies/david-huddleston-the-title-lebowski-in-the-big-lebowski-dies-at-85.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/06/
movies/david-huddleston-the-title-lebowski-in-the-big-lebowski-dies-at-85.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gloria Mildred DeHaven        USA        1925-2016

 

perky daughter

of vaudeville stars

who grew up

to sing, dance and play

vulnerable,

pouty-lipped ingénues

in movie musicals

of the 1940s and ’50s

 

(...)

 

Ms. DeHaven

never became

a major movie star,

but she was the fantasy

hometown sweetheart

of many a wartime

serviceman.

 

She first won attention

in “Best Foot Forward” (1943),

a musical comedy

with Lucille Ball.

 

In “Two Girls and a Sailor” (1944),

she and June Allyson

were young women

determined to start

a canteen for military men.

 

She starred opposite

a hot young newcomer,

Frank Sinatra,

in “Step Lively” (1944),

a musical

about producing a musical,

and with George Murphy

and Lena Horne

in “Broadway Rhythm” (1944).

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/02/
movies/gloria-dehaven-sweetheart-in-many-a-movie-musical-dies-at-91.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/02/
movies/gloria-dehaven-sweetheart-in-many-a-movie-musical-dies-at-91.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marie Madeleine Berthe Lebeau        FR        1923-2016

 

 

 

Humphrey Bogart and Madeleine Lebeau,

who played a spurned girlfriend in “Casablanca.”

 

Warner Bros., via Photofest

 

Madeleine Lebeau, Jilted by Bogart in ‘Casablanca,’ Dies at 92

NYT        By WILLIAM GRIMES        MAY 16, 2016

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/17/movies/madeleine-lebeau-casablanca-actress-dies-at-92.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

French actress

who attained movie immortality

with one scene,

when the camera zoomed in

on her tear-stained face

as she sang “La Marseillaise”

in “Casablanca”

 

(...)

 

She had an uncredited role

as a student

in the G. W. Pabst film

“Young Girls in Trouble” (1939)

before fleeing France

ahead of the German advance

with her husband, Marcel Dalio.

 

Mr. Dalio, who was Jewish,

was known throughout France

for his performances

in “The Rules of the Game,”

“Grand Illusion”

and “Pépé le Moko.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/17/movies/madeleine-lebeau-casablanca-actress-dies-at-92.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/17/
movies/madeleine-lebeau-casablanca-actress-dies-at-92.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rita Eleanore Mackay        USA        1927-2016

 

Rita Gam (...)

made her eye-catching

Hollywood debut

without saying a word

and played a real-life bridesmaid

at the fairy-tale wedding

of her former roommate

Grace Kelly

 

(...)

 

She also appeared

in two movies

with Gregory Peck,

“Night People” (1954)

and “Shoot Out”(1971);

 

“Sign of the Pagan” (1954),

with Jack Palance

and Jeff Chandler;

 

“Hannibal” (1959),

with Victor Mature;

 

“King of Kings” (1961),

in which she played

Queen Herodias;

 

and “Klute” (1971),

with Jane Fonda

and Donald Sutherland.

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/24/movies/rita-gam-midcentury-hollywood-actress-dies-at-88.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/24/
movies/rita-gam-midcentury-hollywood-actress-dies-at-88.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gilbert Roland Hill        USA        1931-2016

 

former police detective

and Detroit city councilman

who played a salty-tongued

police inspector

in three “Beverly Hills Cop” films

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/02/
arts/gil-hill-detroit-detective-and-beverly-hills-cop-actor-dies-at-84.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/02/
arts/gil-hill-detroit-detective-and-beverly-hills-cop-actor-dies-at-84.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

George Harris Kennedy Jr.        USA        1925-2016

 

George Kennedy (...)

played tough guys, oafs, G.I.’s

and a bonanza of cowboys

as one of Hollywood’s

most versatile and durable

character actors

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/01/
movies/george-kennedy-versatile-actor-who-won-an-oscar-for-cool-hand-luke-dies-at-91.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/01/
movies/george-kennedy-versatile-actor-
who-won-an-oscar-for-cool-hand-luke-dies-at-91.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

George Gaynes (born George Jongejans in Helsinki, Finland)        USA        1917-2016

 

George Gaynes (...)

played a grouchy foster parent

on the 1980s sitcom “Punky Brewster,”

the beleaguered commandant

in seven “Police Academy” films

and a soap opera star with a crush

on Dustin Hoffman in drag

in the Hollywood hit “Tootsie”

 

(...)

 

With his baritone voice,

chiseled good looks

and versatility as a character actor

and singer,

Mr. Gaynes appeared

in hundreds

of episodes of sitcoms

and dramas on television,

35 Hollywood

and made-for-TV films,

and many plays,

musical comedies and operas

in New York and Europe.

 

Critics often applauded

his work in supporting roles,

and his face became familiar

to millions of Americans.

 

But he never achieved

leading man stardom.

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/17/
arts/television/george-gaynes-a-versatile-character-actor-dies-at-98.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/17/
arts/television/george-gaynes-a-versatile-character-actor-dies-at-98.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thomas Francis Kelly        USA        1925-2016

 

actor who played

a Hollywood Tom Sawyer

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/14/
movies/tommy-kelly-who-played-a-hollywood-tom-sawyer-dies-at-90.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/14/
movies/tommy-kelly-who-played-a-hollywood-tom-sawyer-dies-at-90.html
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alan Rickman        UK        1946-2016

 

British actor

who brought an erudite dignity

to film roles like Hans Gruber,

the nefarious mastermind

of “Die Hard,”

and Severus Snape,

the dour master of potions

in the “Harry Potter” series

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/15/obituaries/alan-rickman-dies-at-69.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/15/
obituaries/alan-rickman-dies-at-69.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Louis Jourdan (born Louis Robert Gendre)        FR        1921-2015

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/16/
movies/louis-jourdan-dashing-star-of-gigi-is-dead-at-93.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1948/04/29/
archives/the-screen-letter-from-unknown-woman-with-fontaine-and-jourdan.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nova Margery Pilbeam        UK        1919-2015

 

(...) English actress

who was best known

for her roles

in the Alfred Hitchcock thrillers

“The Man Who Knew Too Much”

and “Young and Innocent,”

but who retired

from motion pictures

in the late 1940s,

before she was 30

 

(...)

 

A delicate beauty

who worked entirely in Britain,

Ms. Pilbeam began her career

as a child actress in the early ’30s.

 

She came

to international attention

in the original version

of “The Man Who Knew Too Much” (1934),

in which she portrayed

the kidnapped daughter of a man,

played by Leslie Banks,

who has stumbled

onto an assassination plot.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/24/
movies/nova-pilbeam-an-early-and-brief-star-for-hitchcock-dies-at-95.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/24/
movies/nova-pilbeam-an-early-and-brief-star-for-hitchcock-dies-at-95.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Robert Loggia (born Salvatore Loggia)        USA        1930-2015

 

Oscar-nominated actor

who had a durable career

in television and movies,

notably in Brian De Palma’s

gangster film “Scarface”

and Penny Marshall’s comedy

“Big”

 

(...)


Mr. Loggia’s career began

on the New York stage

in the 1950s

and soon moved

into film and television

in its early years.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/12/05/
movies/robert-loggia-rugged-but-versatile-character-actor-dies-at-85.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/12/05/
movies/robert-loggia-rugged-but-versatile-character-actor-dies-at-85.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maureen O’Hara        (born Maureen FitzSimons)        IR        1920-2015

 

spirited Irish-born actress

who played strong-willed,

tempestuous beauties

opposite all manner of adventurers

in escapist movies

of the 1940s and ’50s

 

(...)

 

Ms. O’Hara was called

the Queen of Technicolor,

because when that film process

first came into use,

nothing seeme

 to show off its splendor

better than her rich red hair,

bright green eyes

and flawless peaches-and-cream

complexion.

 

One critic praised her

in an otherwise negative review

of the 1950 film

“Comanche Territory”

with the sentiment

“Framed in Technicolor,

Miss O’Hara somehow seems

more significant

than a setting sun.”

 

Even the creators of the process

claimed her as its best advertisement.

 

Yet many of the films

that made the young

Ms. O’Hara a star

were in black and white.

 

They included

her first Hollywood movie,

“The Hunchback of Notre Dame” (1939),

in which she played the haunted

Gypsy girl Esmeralda

to Charles Laughton’s

Quasimodo;

 

the Oscar-winning

“How Green Was My Valley” (1941),

in which she was memorable

as a Welsh mining family’s

beautiful daughter

who marries the wrong man;

 

“This Land Is Mine” (1943),

a war drama

in which she was directed

by Jean Renoir;

 

and “Miracle on 34th Street” (1947),

the holiday classic

in which she played a cynical,

modern Macy’s executive

who tries to prevent

her daughter from believing

in Santa Claus.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/25/
movies/maureen-ohara-irish-born-actress-known-as-queen-of-technicolor-dies-at-95.html

 

 

http://www.npr.org/2015/10/24/
451472169/maureen-ohara-hollywoods-queen-of-technicolor-dies-at-95

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/25/
movies/maureen-ohara-irish-born-actress-known-as-queen-of-technicolor-dies-at-95.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joan Leslie (bornJoan Agnes Brodel)        USA        1925-2015

 

actress remembered

for fresh-faced ingénue roles

in movies of the 1940s,

including “High Sierra,”

“Sergeant York”

and “Yankee Doodle Dandy”

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/16/movies/joan-leslie-a-hollywood-girl-next-door-dies-at-90.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/16/
movies/joan-leslie-a-hollywood-girl-next-door-dies-at-90.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dean Carroll Jones        USA        1931-2015

 

actor and singer

who made his name

in a string of popular

Disney films

in the 1960s and ’70s,

notably as a racecar driver

in the “Love Bug” franchise

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/03/movies/dean-jones-star-of-disneys-the-love-bug-dies-at-84.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/03/
movies/dean-jones-star-of-disneys-the-love-bug-dies-at-84.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coleen Gray (born Doris Bernice Jensen)        USA        1922-2015

 

 

 

Coleen Gray with Tyrone Power in “Nightmare Alley” (1947)

 

Her character refused to cooperate

in her husband’s deceptions.

 

20th Century Fox

 

Coleen Gray, Who Played Film Noir Naïfs, Dies at 92

By DANIEL E. SLOTNIK        NYT        AUG. 7, 2015

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/09/arts/television/coleen-gray-who-played-film-noir-naifs-dies-at-92.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

actress who dreamed

of playing femmes fatales

but was repeatedly cast

as innocents in noir films

like Stanley Kubrick’s

“The Killing”

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/09/arts/television/coleen-gray-who-played-film-noir-naifs-dies-at-92.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/09/
arts/television/coleen-gray-who-played-film-noir-naifs-dies-at-92.html
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alex Rocco (born Alexander Federico Petricone Jr.)        USA        1936-2015

 

gravelly-voiced actor

whose gallery

of memorable characters

included Moe Greene,

the cocky, bespectacled

Las Vegas casino owner

who made the mistake

of talking back

to Michael Corleone

in “The Godfather”

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/20/
arts/alex-rocco-actor-known-for-role-in-the-godfather-dies-at-79.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/20/
arts/alex-rocco-actor-known-for-role-in-the-godfather-dies-at-79.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Omar Sharif        EGY        1932-2015

 

 

 

Omar Sharif photographed by Eamonn McCabe for the Guardian, 2004

 

Omar Sharif: a life in pictures

G        Friday 10 July 2015        15.45 BST

http://www.theguardian.com/film/gallery/2015/jul/10/omar-sharif-a-life-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/omar-sharif

 

 

http://www.npr.org/2015/07/13/
422490063/egypt-mourns-omar-sharif-its-homegrown-cinema-star

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/11/
movies/omar-sharif-a-star-in-dr-zhivago-dies-at-83.html

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2015/07/10/
314250228/remembering-omar-sharif-a-star-in-two-skies

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2015/jul/10/
omar-sharif

http://www.theguardian.com/film/filmblog/2015/jul/10/
omar-sharif-a-career-in-clips-film-doctor-zhivago-lawrence-of-arabia

http://www.theguardian.com/film/filmblog/2015/jul/10/
omar-sharif-an-exquisite-actor-whose-charisma-baffled-hollywood

http://www.theguardian.com/film/gallery/2015/jul/10/
omar-sharif-a-life-in-pictures

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2015/may/25/
omar-sharif-alzheimers-lawrence-of-arabia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ronald Moodnick        USA        1924-2015

 

British character actor

who rose to prominence

in the role of Fagin,

Dickens’s guru of thievery,

in “Oliver!”,

the stage and movie versions

of “Oliver Twist”

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/12/theater/ron-moody-actor-who-redefined-fagin-in-oliver-dies-at-91.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/12/
theater/ron-moody-actor-who-redefined-fagin-in-oliver-dies-at-91.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Elizabeth Welter Wilson        USA        1921-2015

 

actress

who distinguished herself onstage,

on television and in films

like “The Graduate” and “9 to 5”

in supporting roles

that were often meaty

but rarely glamorous

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/11/
arts/television/elizabeth-wilson-a-character-actress-of-stage-screen-and-tv-dies-at-94.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/11/
arts/television/elizabeth-wilson-a-character-actress-of-stage-screen-and-tv-dies-at-94.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Geoffrey Bond Lewis        USA        1935-2015

 

actor who appeared

alongside Clint Eastwood

in a string of films

in the 1970s and ’80s

 

(...)

 

Mr. Lewis

was an Eastwood regular,

starting as a tough guy

in “High Plains Drifter” (1973).

 

He went on to appear

in “Thunderbolt and Lightfoot” (1974),

“Every Which Way but Loose” (1978),

“Bronco Billy” (1980),

“Any Which Way You Can” (1980)

and “Pink Cadillac” (1989),

often playing a sidekick

or a lighter comedic role.

 

He and Mr. Eastwood

last worked together

on “Midnight in the Garden

of Good and Evil” in 1997.

 

Mr. Lewis also had hundreds

of other film and television roles.

 

He appeared

on television series

like “Falcon Crest,”

“Magnum P.I.”

and “My Name Is Earl,”

and in action movies

like “10 to Midnight,”

gangster films

like “Dillinger,”

horror pictures

like Rob Zombie’s

“The Devil’s Rejects”

and westerns

like “My Name Is Nobody”

and “They Died With Their Boots On.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/10/movies/geoffrey-lewis-actor-in-clint-eastwood-films-dies-at-79.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/10/
movies/geoffrey-lewis-actor-in-clint-eastwood-films-dies-at-79.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gregory Walcott        USA        1928-2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Christopher Frank Carandini Lee        UK        1922-2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leonard Simon Nimoy        USA        1931-2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lizabeth Scott (born Emma Matzo)        USA        1922-2015

 

sultry blonde

with a come-hither voice

cut out for the seething romantic

and homicidal passions

of her Hollywood film noir roles

in the late 1940s and early ’50s

 

(...)

 

Ms. Scott was billed

as another Lauren Bacall

or Veronica Lake,

and in many of her 22 films

she portrayed

a good-bad girl

with love in her head

and larceny in her heart,

or vice versa.

 

Her co-stars

were Humphrey Bogart,

Kirk Douglas,

Burt Lancaster

and other tough gents,

and her movies’ titles

were lurid stuff:

“The Strange Love

of Martha Ivers,”

“Dead Reckoning,”

“Pitfall,”

“Dark City,”

“I Walk Alone”

and “Bad for Each Other.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/07/movies/lizabeth-scott-film-noir-siren-dies-at-92.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/07/
movies/lizabeth-scott-film-noir-siren-dies-at-92.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rodney Sturt Taylor        AUS        1930-2015

 

ruggedly handsome

Australian-born actor

who fended off

attacks from above

in Alfred Hitchcock’s

revered horror film

“The Birds”

and helped

an 8,000th-century people

escape a monster race

in the film version

of the science-fiction classic

“The Time Machine”

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/10/
movies/rod-taylor-hollywood-leading-man-who-battled-the-birds-dies-at-84.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/10/
movies/rod-taylor-hollywood-leading-man-who-battled-the-birds-dies-at-84.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edward Kirk Herrmann        USA        1943-2014

 

stalwart American actor

of patrician bearing

and earnest elocutionary style

who became familiar

across a spectrum

of popular entertainment,

from movies

and television shows

to plays, audiobooks

and advertisements

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/01/arts/television/edward-herrmann-actor-with-a-noble-air-dies-at-71.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/01/arts/television/
edward-herrmann-actor-with-a-noble-air-dies-at-71.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Virna Lisi        1936-2014

 

Virna Lisi (...)

first captivated

Italian moviegoers

with her smoldering eyes,

sulky smile

and stunning beauty

before sweeping

into Hollywood

in the 1960s

to star opposite

such leading men

as Frank Sinatra

and Tony Curtis

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/19/arts/virna-lisi-actress-who-rose-in-60s-dies-at-78.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/19/
arts/virna-lisi-actress-who-rose-in-60s-dies-at-78.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Luise Rainer        1910-2014

 

Luise Rainer (...)

left Nazi Germany

for Hollywood

and soared to fame

in the 1930s

as the first star

to win back-to-back Oscars,

then quit films

at the peak of her career

for occasional stage work

and roles as a wife,

mother and mountain climber

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/31/arts/luise-rainer-award-winning-actress-dies-at-104.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/31/
arts/luise-rainer-award-winning-actress-dies-at-104.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Angus Lennie        UK        1930-2014

 

diminutive Scottish actor

who played the persistent

but ultimately despairing

“tunnel man”

known as the Mole

in the 1963

prison-camp movie

“The Great Escape”

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/20/movies/angus-lennie-actor-in-the-great-escape-dies-at-84.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/20/
movies/angus-lennie-actor-in-the-great-escape-dies-at-84.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Donald Sinden        UK        1923-2014

 

British actor

whose versatility

and deep, resonant voice

kept him steadily

employed on stage,

screen and television

for more than 60 years

https://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/14/
arts/donald-sinden-british-actor-of-stage-and-screen-for-60-years-dies-at-90.html 

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/14/
arts/donald-sinden-british-actor-of-stage-and-screen-for-60-years-dies-at-90.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Richard Dawson Kiel        USA        1939-2014

 

actor

whose intimidating frame

and striking features

made him a natural choice

to play thugs, giants,

alien creatures

and villains of various stripes

— notably Jaws,

the assassin with metal dentition

in two James Bond films

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/12/arts/richard-kiel-dies-at-74-played-jaws-in-bond-films.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/12/
arts/richard-kiel-dies-at-74-played-jaws-in-bond-films.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

James Scott Bumgarner / James Garner        USA        1928-2014

 

wry and handsome

leading man

who slid seamlessly

between television

and the movies

but was best known

as the amiable gambler

Bret Maverick

in the 1950s western

“Maverick”

and the cranky sleuth

Jim Rockford

in the 1970s series

“The Rockford Files”

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/21/movies/james-garner-actor-dies-at-86.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/21/
movies/james-garner-actor-dies-at-86.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Richard Percy Jones Jr.        USA        1927-2014

 

actor whose face

should be more

familiar than it is,

given the dozens of movie

and television roles

he played from the time

he was a child,

but whose boyhood voice

— the voice of Pinocchio

in the original animated

Disney film —

remains indelibly memorable

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/10/movies/dick-jones-gave-voice-to-disneys-pinocchio-dies-at-87.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/10/
movies/dick-jones-gave-voice-to-disneys-pinocchio-dies-at-87.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eli Wallach        USA        1915-2014

 

one of his generation’s

most prominent

and prolific character actors

in film, onstage and on television

for more than 60 years

 

(...)

 

A self-styled journeyman actor,

the versatile Mr. Wallach

appeared in scores of roles,

often with his wife, Anne Jackson.

 

No matter the part,

he always seemed

at ease and in control,

whether playing

a Mexican bandit

in the 1960 western

“The Magnificent Seven,”

a bumbling clerk in Ionesco’s

allegorical play “Rhinoceros,”

a henpecked French general

in Jean Anouilh’s

“Waltz of the Toreadors,”

Clark Gable’s sidekick

in “The Misfits”

or a Mafia don

in “The Godfather: Part III.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/25/movies/eli-wallach-multifaceted-actor-dies-at-98.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/25/
movies/eli-wallach-multifaceted-actor-dies-at-98.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rebekah Isabelle Laemmle        USA        1909-2014

 

dancer and actress

whose screen career

began in the silent era

and ended with newfound celebrity

in the Internet age

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/20/movies/carla-laemmle-actress-with-silent-screen-debut-dies-at-104.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/20/
movies/carla-laemmle-actress-with-silent-screen-debut-dies-at-104.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monica Elizabeth Freeman        USA        1926-2014

 

Mona Freeman (...)

had never ridden a subway

when she was crowned

New York City’s

first Miss Subways in 1941

— an appointment

that led to a modest career

as a film and television actress —

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/10/nyregion/mona-freeman-first-miss-subways-dies-at-87.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/10/nyregion/
mona-freeman-first-miss-subways-dies-at-87.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anna Berger        USA        1922-2014

 

character actress

known for playing

matriarchal figures

from different

ethnic backgrounds

in films like Woody Allen’s

“Crime and Misdemeanors”

and television shows

like “The Sopranos”

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/04/arts/anna-berger-an-actress-with-a-gift-for-matriarchs-dies-at-91.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/04/arts/
anna-berger-an-actress-with-a-gift-for-matriarchs-dies-at-91.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Herb Jeffries        USA        1913? - 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Robert William Hoskins / Bob Hoskins        1942-2014

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/bob-hoskins

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2014/apr/30/bob-hoskins

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mickey Rooney (born Joseph Yule Jr.)        1920-2014

 

exuberant entertainer

who led a roller-coaster life

— the world’s top box-office star at 19

as the irrepressible Andy Hardy,

a bankrupt has-been in his 40s,

a comeback kid on Broadway

as he neared 60 —

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/07/arts/mickey-rooney-master-of-putting-on-a-show-dies-at-93.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/08/opinion/mickey-rooneys-quietest-role.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/07/arts/mickey-rooney-master-of-putting-on-a-show-dies-at-93.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

James Rebhorn        1948-2014

 

character actor

who appeared in dozens

of popular movies

and television shows

and recently starred

on the Showtime hit

“Homeland”

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/24/movies/james-rebhorn-character-actor-dies-at-65.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/24/
movies/james-rebhorn-character-actor-dies-at-65.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Harold Ramis        1944-2014

 

writer, director and actor

whose boisterous but sly silliness

helped catapult comedies

like “Groundhog Day,” “Ghostbusters,”

“Animal House” and “Caddyshack”

to commercial and critical success

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/25/
movies/harold-ramis-who-helped-redefine-what-makes-us-laugh-on-screen-dies-at-69.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/25/
movies/harold-ramis-who-helped-redefine-what-makes-us-laugh-on-screen-dies-at-69.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/25/
movies/remaking-film-comedy-with-a-straight-face.html

http://www.theguardian.com/film/filmblog/2014/feb/24/
harold-ramis-ghostbusters-caddyshack-knocked-up

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shirley Jane Temple        1928-2014

 

 

 

From 1935 to 1939,

Shirley Temple was the most popular movie star in America.

 

Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

 

Shirley Temple Black, Screen Darling, Dies at 85

By ALJEAN HARMETZ        NYT        FEB. 11, 2014

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/12/arts/shirley-temple-black-screen-star-dies-at-85.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

as a dimpled, precocious

and determined little girl in the 1930s

(she) sang and tap-danced her way

to a height of Hollywood stardom

and worldwide fame

that no other child has reached

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/12/arts/shirley-temple-black-screen-star-dies-at-85.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/12/arts/shirley-temple-black-screen-star-dies-at-85.html

http://www.theguardian.com/film/shirley-temple

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2014/feb/11/shirley-temple-black

 

 

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2014/02/11/
275190468/shirley-temple-dies-childhood-movie-star-became-diplomat

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2014/feb/11/
shirley-temple-dies-85-child-sttar

http://www.theguardian.com/film/gallery/2014/feb/11/
shirley-temple-black--a-life-in-pictures

http://www.theguardian.com/film/filmblog/2014/feb/11/
shirley-temple-a-career-in-movie-clips

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2009/nov/22/
shirley-temple-screen-legend

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Etta Drucille Guyse        1925-2014

 

popular actress and singer

who appeared on Broadway

and in so-called race movies

in the 1940s and ’50s,

and who for a time,

despite limited opportunities

in the entertainment industry,

appeared headed for broader fame

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/16/arts/sheila-guyse-singer-and-actress-is-dead-at-88.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/16/
arts/sheila-guyse-singer-and-actress-is-dead-at-88.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peter O'Toole / born Peter Seamus (some sources say Seamus Peter)        1932-2013

 

 

The Guardian        p. 3        30 October 2004

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Actor Peter O'Toole.

 

Date taken: February 1982

 

Life Images

http://images.google.com/hosted/life/l?imgurl=e31cbba23ff95d58

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Irish bookmaker’s son

with a hell-raising streak

whose performance

in the 1962 epic film

“Lawrence of Arabia”

earned him overnight fame

and established him

as one of his generation’s

most charismatic actors

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/16/movies/peter-otoole-lawrence-of-arabia-is-dead-at-81.html

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/peter-o-toole

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/16/
movies/peter-otoole-lawrence-of-arabia-is-dead-at-81.html

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2013/dec/15/peter-o-toole-dies-81

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=251664470

http://www.npr.org/2013/12/15/
251331360/peter-otoole-a-life-even-larger-than-lawrence

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2013/dec/15/peter-otoole-60s-hellraiser

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2013/dec/15/peter-otoole-career

http://www.theguardian.com/film/gallery/2013/dec/15/peter-o-toole-life-career-in-stills

http://www.theguardian.com/film/filmblog/2013/dec/15/peter-o-toole-dies-81-movies-clips

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2013/dec/15/peter-o-toole-dies-81

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/16/movies/peter-otoole-lawrence-of-arabia-is-dead-at-81.html

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2013/dec/15/peter-o-toole-dies-lawrence-arabia

http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2013/12/16/movies/16otoole-obit-html-ss.html

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2012/sep/28/peter-otoole-passion-of-christ-prequel

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2007/jan/21/awardsandprizes.oscars 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joan Fontaine

(born Joan de Beauvoir de Havilland)

USA        1917-2013

 

patrician blond actress

who rose to stardom

as a haunted second wife

in the Alfred Hitchcock film

“Rebecca” in 1940

and won

an Academy Award

for her portrayal

of a terrified newlywed

in Hitchcock’s

“Suspicion”

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/16/arts/joan-fontaine-who-won-an-oscar-for-hitchcocks-suspicion-dies-at-96.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/13/
movies/letter-from-an-unknown-woman-max-ophuls.html

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2013/dec/16/
joan-fontaine-death-hollywood-mourns

http://www.npr.org/2013/12/16/251664478/
academy-award-winning-actress-joan-fontaine-dead-at-96

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/16/arts/
joan-fontaine-who-won-an-oscar-for-hitchcocks-suspicion-dies-at-96.html

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2013/dec/16/joan-fontaine-oscar-winning-actor-dies-at-96

http://www.theguardian.com/film/filmblog/2013/dec/16/joan-fontaine-a-career-in-clips

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1948/04/29/
archives/the-screen-letter-from-unknown-woman-with-fontaine-and-jourdan.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1941/11/21/
archives/suspicion-a-hitchcock-thriller-at-music-hall-shadow-of-thin-man-at.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1940/03/29/
archives/the-screen-splendid-film-of-du-mauriers-rebecca-is-shown-at-the.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Louis Willard Waldon        USA        1934-2013

 

actor who appeared

in several Andy Warhol films

including

“Lonesome Cowboys”

and “Blue Movie,”

which the authorities

seized for obscenity

shortly after it was released

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/11/movies/louis-waldon-actor-in-warhol-films-dies-at-78.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/11/
movies/louis-waldon-actor-in-warhol-films-dies-at-78.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anthony Peter Musante        USA        1936-2013

 

rugged-looking

American actor

who was seen on television,

in films and on stage

in the United States

and Europe for over 50 years

but who was probably

best known for a TV series

he left after one season

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/28/arts/tony-musante-actor-known-for-role-in-toma-dies-at-77.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/28/
arts/tony-musante-actor-known-for-role-in-toma-dies-at-77.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edward Matthew Lauter II / Ed Lauter        USA        1938-2013

 

character actor

whose long, angular face

and stern bearing

in scores of roles made him

an instantly recognizable figure

in movies and on television

for five decades

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/18/movies/ed-lauter-actor-with-a-familiar-face-dies-at-74.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/18/
movies/ed-lauter-actor-with-a-familiar-face-dies-at-74.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Karen Black (born Karen Blanche Ziegler)        USA        1939-2013

 

actress whose roles

in several signature films

of the late 1960s and ’70s

included a prostitute

who shared an LSD trip

with the bikers

played by Dennis Hopper

and Peter Fonda

in “Easy Rider”

and a waitress

unhappily devoted

to the alienated musician

played by Jack Nicholson

in “Five Easy Pieces”

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/09/movies/karen-black-versatile-character-actress-dies-at-74.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/09/
movies/karen-black-versatile-character-actress-dies-at-74.html

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2013/aug/09/
karen-black-actress-dies-cancer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Michael Ansara        USA        1922-2013

 

busy and widely

recognizable character actor

who was best known

for portraying American Indians

and later a Klingon

in three different

“Star Trek” series

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/03/arts/michael-ansara-actor-who-played-cochise-and-kang-dies-at-91.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/03/
arts/michael-ansara-actor-who-played-cochise-and-kang-dies-at-91.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Verla Eileen Regina Brennen / Eileen Brennan        USA        1932-2013

 

smoky-voiced actress

who had worked in show business

for more than 20 years

before gaining her widest attention

as a gleefully tough Army captain

in both the film and television versions

of “Private Benjamin”

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/31/movies/eileen-brennan-of-private-benjamin-dies-at-80.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/31/
movies/eileen-brennan-of-private-benjamin-dies-at-80.html

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2013/jul/31/
eileen-brennan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dean Kent Brooks        USA        1916-2013

 

superintendent

of the Oregon psychiatric hospital

where the Oscar-winning picture

“One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest”

was shot — and who had a small,

well-received on-screen role

as the fictional hospital’s

superintendent —

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/01/arts/dean-brooks-cuckoos-nest-doctor-dies-at-96.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/01/
arts/dean-brooks-cuckoos-nest-doctor-dies-at-96.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edna Mae Durbin        USA        1921-2013

 

as a plucky child movie star

with a sweet soprano voice

(she) charmed

American audiences

during the Depression

and saved Universal Pictures

from bankruptcy

before she vanished

from public view 64 years ago

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/01/movies/deanna-durbin-1930s-star-of-universal-pictures-dies-at-91.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/01/
movies/deanna-durbin-1930s-star-of-universal-pictures-dies-at-91.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Richard Griffiths        1947-2013

 

rotund British actor

whose stage career

reached a pinnacle

with his Tony-winning performance

as an idealistic

but tormented pedagogue

in Alan Bennett’s play

“The History Boys”

and who achieved popular fame

in the movies

as Harry Potter’s mean-spirited

Uncle Vernon Dursley

http://theater.nytimes.com/2013/03/30/theater/richard-griffiths-falstaffian-history-boys-star-dies-at-65.html

 

 

http://theater.nytimes.com/2013/03/30/
theater/richard-griffiths-falstaffian-history-boys-star-dies-at-65.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Grinham Kerr        USA        1931-2013

 

Tony Award-winning actor

who was best known for roles

that challenged bigotry in the 1950s

in films like “Tea and Sympathy”

and “South Pacific,”

and who turned down

a starring movie role

because of ideological differences

with its subject

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/09/movies/john-kerr-star-of-tea-and-sympathy-dies-at-81.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/09/
movies/john-kerr-star-of-tea-and-sympathy-dies-at-81.html
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ernest Borgnine (born Ermes Effron Borgnino)        USA        1917-2012

 

rough-hewn actor

who seemed destined

for tough-guy characters

but won an Academy Award

for embodying

the gentlest of souls,

a lonely Bronx butcher,

in the 1955 film “Marty“

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/09/
movies/ernest-borgnine-tough-but-tender-actor-is-dead-at-95.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/09/
movies/ernest-borgnine-tough-but-tender-actor-is-dead-at-95.html

https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2012/07/08/
156461070/oscar-winner-ernest-borgnine-dies-at-95

 

https://www.npr.org/2011/01/29/
133303846/ernest-borgnine-still-building-a-lifes-work-at-94

 

http://www.nytimes.com/movie/
review?res=9A06E7D61131E632A2575BC2A9609C946990D6CF
- Convoy - June 28, 1978

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Henry George Carey / Harry Carey Jr.        USA        1921-2012

 

American character actor

who appeared

in seven westerns

directed by John Ford,

including The Searchers

and She Wore a Yellow Ribbon

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2012/dec/30/harry-carey-jr

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2012/dec/30/harry-carey-jr

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/02/
movies/harry-carey-jr-boyish-sidekick-to-john-wayne-dies-at-91.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Charles Edward Durning        USA        1923-2012

 

(he) overcame poverty,

battlefield trauma

and nagging self-doubt

to become

an acclaimed character actor,

whether on stage as Big Daddy

in “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof”

or in film as the lonely widower smitten

with a cross-dressing Dustin Hoffman

in “Tootsie”

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/26/movies/charles-durning-prolific-character-actor-dies-at-89.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/26/
movies/charles-durning-prolific-character-actor-dies-at-89.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Turhan Selahattin Sahultavy        USA        1922-2012

 

Turhan Bey ('s) dark good looks,

swept-back hair and soothing,

continental voice brought him fame

in swashbuckling films of the 1940s

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/12/movies/turhan-bey-actor-dies-at-90.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/12/
movies/turhan-bey-actor-dies-at-90.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Norman Adelberg        USA        1924-2012

 

character actor

who played a soda jerk

in “Back to the Future,”

a cameraman

in Tim Burton’s

“Ed Wood,”

and the title role

in the cult director

Richard C. Sarafian’s

first film, “Andy”

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/02/movies/norman-alden-character-actor-dies-at-87.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/02/
movies/norman-alden-character-actor-dies-at-87.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Therese Ann Rutherford        1917-2012

 

actress

who became famous

in the late 1930s

as Mickey Rooney’s

sweetheart

in the hugely successful

Andy Hardy series

and earned a role in one

of the biggest movies

in Hollywood history,

as Scarlett O’Hara’s sister

in “Gone With the Wind”

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/13/movies/ann-rutherford-andy-hardys-screen-sweetheart-dies-at-94.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/13/
movies/ann-rutherford-andy-hardys-screen-sweetheart-dies-at-94.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joyce Redman        1915-2012

 

distinguished

Irish-born actress

widely acclaimed

for her intelligent stage presence

in Shakespearean drama

and French comedy,

though probably best known

to American audiences

for her silent improvisation

with a lobster, an oyster,

a pear and Albert Finney

in the exuberantly

lascivious eating scene

in the 1963 film “Tom Jones”

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/12/movies/joyce-redman-actress-who-feasted-on-roles-dies-at-96.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/12/
movies/joyce-redman-actress-who-feasted-on-roles-dies-at-96.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

William Franklin Finley III        1940-2012

 

character actor

who appeared in many films

by Brian De Palma,

most memorably

as the title character

in the 1974 rock opera

“The Phantom of the Paradise”

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/18/movies/william-finley-actor-in-de-palma-films-dies-at-71.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/18/
movies/william-finley-actor-in-de-palma-films-dies-at-71.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/movie/
review?res=9403E1DE153BE63BBC4A53DFB767838F669EDE
- The Phantom of the Paradise - November 2, 1974

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Michael Clarke Duncan        1957-2012

 

Michael Clarke Duncan (...)

rose from working

as a ditch digger

to employ his booming bass voice

and immense physical presence

in many movie roles,

most notably a tragic prisoner

with a healing touch

in the 1999 film “The Green Mile”

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/04/movies/michael-clarke-duncan-actor-dies-at-54.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/04/
movies/michael-clarke-duncan-actor-dies-at-54.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leonardo Anthony Cimino        1917-2012

 

Leonardo Cimino (...)

once thought

his singular appearance

would make an acting career

improbable

but (he) ended up

spending more than 60 years

as an in-demand character actor

whose roles included

gangsters, grandfathers, the pope,

Vincent van Gogh

and “Scary German Guy”

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/10/arts/leonardo-cimino-a-distinctive-actor-dies-at-94.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/10/
arts/leonardo-cimino-a-distinctive-actor-dies-at-94.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ben Gazzara (born Biagio Anthony Gazzara)        1930-2012

 

an intense actor whose long career

included playing Brick in the original

“Cat on a Hot Tin Roof” on Broadway,

roles in influential films

by John Cassavetes

and work with several generations

of top Hollywood directors

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/04/movies/ben-gazzara-actor-of-stage-and-screen-dies-at-81.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/04/
movies/ben-gazzara-actor-of-stage-and-screen-dies-at-81.html

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2012/feb/04/
ben-gazzara

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

George William Duell        1923-2011

 

diminutive character actor

whose puckishness

and understated comic flair

enlivened Broadway shows,

television series

and Hollywood films

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/06/theater/william-duell-puckish-character-actor-dies-at-88.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/06/
theater/william-duell-puckish-character-actor-dies-at-88.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Barbara Kent (born Barbara Cloutman)        1906 or 1907-2011

 

one of the last surviving

stars of silent films,

she performed alongside

Gloria Swanson,

Greta Garbo

and Harold Lloyd

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/20/movies/barbara-kent-silent-film-star-dies-at-103.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/20/
movies/barbara-kent-silent-film-star-dies-at-103.html

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2011/oct/21/barbara-kent

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Charles Napier        1936-2011

 

character actor

who portrayed ruffians,

military officers

and other strong men

in films like the second

Rambo movie,

but played against type

as a judge in “Philadelphia”

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/07/movies/charles-napier-actor-who-played-strong-men-dies.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/07/
movies/charles-napier-actor-who-played-strong-men-dies.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Frances Bay / Goffman        1919-2011

 

character actress

who late in life became

a mainstay of television

— playing roles

from Arthur Fonzarelli’s

grandmother on “Happy Days”

to the woman who scraps

with Jerry Seinfeld

over a loaf of marble rye —

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/19/
arts/television/frances-bay-actress-known-for-old-lady-roles-dies-at-92.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/19/
arts/television/frances-bay-actress-known-for-old-lady-roles-dies-at-92.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clifford Parker Robertson III        1923-2011

 

ruggedly handsome actor

who won an Oscar

for “Charly”

but found himself

frozen out of jobs

for almost four years

after he exposed

a prominent Hollywood

studio boss

as a forger and embezzler

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/11/
movies/cliff-robertson-oscar-winning-rebel-dies-at-88.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/11/
movies/cliff-robertson-oscar-winning-rebel-dies-at-88.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1976/08/02/
archives/screen-obsessionmystery-film-by-brian-de-palma-at-coronet.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eve Brent (born Jean Ewers)        USA        1930-2011

 

veteran character actress

whose most recognizable role

was Jane to Gordon Scott’s

Tarzan

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/08/movies/eve-brent-played-jane-in-tarzan-movies-dies-at-81.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/08/
movies/eve-brent-played-jane-in-tarzan-movies-dies-at-81.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sybil Jason (born Sybil Jacobson)        Nov. 23, 1927-2011

 

cherubic child actress

signed by Warner Brothers

to compete with Shirley Temple

in the 1930s

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/30/movies/sybil-jason-cherubic-child-actress-dies-at-83.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/30/movies/
sybil-jason-cherubic-child-actress-dies-at-83.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Googie (Georgette Lizette) Withers        1917-2011

 

A striking presence on stage

and in the great days of British film,

she played the prison governor

of TV's Within These Walls

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2011/jul/16/googie-withers-obituary

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2011/jul/16/googie-withers-obituary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anna Massey        1937-2011

 

member of an acting dynasty

whose roles ranged

from lonely spinsters

to Margaret Thatcher

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/culture/anna-massey 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/culture/2011/jul/04/anna-massey-obituary

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/filmblog/2011/jul/04/anna-massey-career-clips

http://www.guardian.co.uk/culture/gallery/2011/jul/04/anna-massey-life-in-pictures

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2011/jul/04/anna-massey-dies-aged-73

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edith Marilyn Fellows        1923-2011

 

a child star of the 1930s

who was known

for playing orphans and urchins

but whose own life

was more Dickensian

than that of any character

she portrayed

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/03/arts/edith-fellows-child-star-shadowed-by-dickensian-troubles-dies-at-88.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/03/arts/
edith-fellows-child-star-shadowed-by-dickensian-troubles-dies-at-88.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peter Michael Falk        USA        1927-2011

 

Peter Falk

marshaled actorly tics,

prop room appurtenances

and his own physical idiosyncrasies

to personify Columbo,

one of the most famous

and beloved fictional detectives

in television history

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/25/
arts/television/peter-falk-columbo-actor-dies-at-83.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/movie/
review?res=9402E6D7143DE63BBC4C52DFB667838F669EDE
- A Woman Under Influence - October 14, 1974

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Farley Earle Granger        USA        1925-2011

 

http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/obituaries/
farley-granger-star-of-alfred-hitchcock-thrillers-dies-at-85/2011/03/29/AFmTEG0B_story.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/30/arts/actor-farley-granger-dies-at-85.html

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2011/mar/29/farley-granger-obituary

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2011/mar/29/farley-granger-dies-aged-85

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2001/jan/25/filmnews.film?INTCMP=ILCNETTXT3487

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Elizabeth Rosemond Taylor        USA        1932-2011

 

actress who dazzled

generations of moviegoers

with her stunning beauty

and whose name

was synonymous

with Hollywood glamour

http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/t/elizabeth_taylor/index.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/topic/person/elizabeth-taylor 

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/24/
movies/elizabeth-taylor-obituary.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Betty Garrett        USA        1919-2011

 

brassy comic actress

who played Frank Sinatra’s ardent,

taxi-driving pursuer

in the movie “On the Town,”

Archie Bunker’s liberal foil

of a neighbor in “All in the Family”

and a sardonic landlady

in “Laverne & Shirley”

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/14/arts/television/14garrett.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/14/arts/television/14garrett.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Susannah York        UK        1939-2011

 

British actress

whose gamine looks

and demure persona

made her an icon

of the swinging 60s

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/17/arts/television/17york.html

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2011/jan/16/susannah-york-dies-battle-cancer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pete Postlethwaite        1945-2011

 

lanky, craggy-faced

character actor

whose range stretched

from sweet sentimentality

to acid menace

and who was nominated

for an Academy Award in 1994

for his role as the father of a man

unjustly accused of terrorism

in “In the Name of the Father”

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/pete-postlethwaite

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2011/jan/04/pete-postlethwaite-film-actor

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2011/jan/03/actor-pete-postlethwaite-dies

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/filmblog/2011/jan/03/pete-postlethwaite-career-clips

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2011/jan/03/pete-postlethwaite-actor

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ingrid Pitt        1937-2010

 

Lovely and voluptuous,

the actress Ingrid Pitt

was given a choice

early in her film career:

pornography or horror.

 

Ms. Pitt,

who had spent her childhood

in a Nazi concentration camp,

later scoured Europe

in search of her vanished father

and still later was forced

to flee East Germany

a step ahead of the police,

chose horror.

 

It was a genre

she knew firsthand.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/25/arts/25pitt.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jill Clayburgh        1944-2010

 

Oscar-nominated actress

known for portraying

strong, independent women

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/06/arts/06clayburgh.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lisa Blount        1957-2010

 

Lisa Blount

was nominated

for a Golden Glob

as new star of the year

for her portrayal

of Lynette Pomeroy,

the cynical friend

of Debra Winger’s character,

Paula Pokrifki,

in “An Officer and a Gentleman,”

which also starred Richard Gere.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/29/arts/29blount.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Johnny Sheffield        USA        1931-2010

 

Johnny Sheffield

played the character Boy

in the Tarzan movies

of the 1930s and ’40s

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/20/arts/20sheffield.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tony Curtis (born Bernard Schwartz)        USA        1925-2010

 

classically handsome movie star

who came out of the Hollywood

studio system in the 1950s

to find both wide popularity

and critical acclaim

in dramatic and comic roles alike,

from “The Defiant Ones”

to “Some Like It Hot”

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/tony-curtis 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/03/weekinreview/03dave.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/01/movies/01curtis.html

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2010/sep/30/tony-curtis-obituary

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2010/sep/30/tony-curtis-tributes-film-world

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/filmblog/2010/sep/30/tony-curtis-true-hollywood-star

 

https://www.nytimes.com/watching/recommendations/
watching-film-some-like-it-hot - 1959

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joseph Mantel / Joe Mantell        USA       1915-2010

 

a familiar figure

on television beginning

in the 1950s,

appearing in guest roles

on numerous series — dramas

including

“Alfred Hitchcock Presents,”

“Wanted: Dead or Alive,”

“The Twilight Zone,”

“The Defenders,”

“Mission: Impossible”

and “Lou Grant”;

and situation comedies

like “My Three Sons,”

“Maude”

and “Barney Miller.”

 

In the early ’60s

he had a regular role

on the comedy

“Pete and Gladys,”

and in the late ’60s

he had a recurring part

on the detective drama

“Mannix.”

 

In the movies

he appeared

in “Onionhead,”

with Andy Griffith,

and “The Sad Sack,”

with Jerry Lewis.

 

In “The Birds,”

Hitchcock’s

classic horror film

about avian madness

in a California town,

he played a traveling salesman

who advises, “Kill them all!”

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/01/arts/01mantell.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/01/arts/01mantell.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gloria Frances Stewart        USA        1910-2010

 

 

 

Fright night … Melvyn Douglas and Gloria Stuart in The Old Dark House.

 

Photograph: ITV/Rex/Shutterstock

 

The Old Dark House review

– James Whale’s horror classic still chills

 

A couple seek refuge from a sinister couple

in this prototype creepy-house tale

that takes its cues from Shelley and Brontë

 

G

Fri 27 Apr 2018        06.00 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2018/apr/27/
the-old-dark-house-review-james-whale-horror-classic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

glamorous blond actress

during Hollywood’s

golden age

who was largely forgotten

until she made

a memorable comeback

in her 80s

in the 1997 epic “Titanic”

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/05/
movies/the-old-dark-house-james-whale-quad-cinema.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/28/movies/28stuart.html

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2010/sep/27/
gloria-stuart-titanic-actor-dies 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kevin McCarthy        1914-2010

 

star

of the 1956 science fiction movie

“Invasion of the Body Snatchers”

https://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/13/
movies/13mccarthy.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/13/
movies/13mccarthy.html 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lawrence Vonetta McGee        USA        1945-2010

 

film and television actress

originally known

for blaxploitation pictures

like “Blacula,” “Hammer”

and “Shaft in Africa”

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/16/
movies/16mcgee.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/16/movies/16mcgee.html 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dennis Lee Hopper        USA        1936-2010

 

his portrayals

of drug-addled,

often deranged misfits

in the landmark films

“Easy Rider,”

“Apocalypse Now”

and “Blue Velvet”

drew on his early

out-of-control experiences

as part of a new generation

of Hollywood rebel

https://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/30/
movies/30hopper.html

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/dennis-hopper

https://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/30/
movies/30hopper.html

http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE64S1OJ20100529

http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE64S1QZ20100529

http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE64S1RH20100529

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2010/jan/07/
dennis-hopper-dies-74 

http://www.usatoday.com/life/people/obit/2010-05-29-dennis-hopper_N.htm

http://mediagallery.usatoday.com/Dennis-Hopper:-May-17,-1936---May-29,-2010/G1419

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/theobserver/2018/oct/20/
observer-archive-dennis-hopper-24-october-1982

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2007/jul/04/art.usa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lynn Redgrave        UK        1943-2010

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2010/may/04/l
ynn-redgrave-life-in-clips 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/04/arts/04redgrave.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2010/may/03/
lynn-redgrave-dies 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Christopher de Lerisson Cazenove        1943-2010

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/09/arts/television/09cazenove.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ian Gillett Carmichael        1920-2010

 

https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2010/feb/06/
ian-carmichael-obituary 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jean Simmons        1929-2010

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/24/movies/24simmons.html

https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2010/jan/23/
the-unforgettable-jean-simmons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David Carradine        USA        1936-2009

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2009/06/05/
movies/05carradine.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/
watching/recommendations/kill-bill-vol-2 - 2004

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2004/04/19/
movies/sweet-revenge-kill-bill-vol-2-is-financial-hit.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2004/04/16/
movies/film-review-vengeance-still-mine-saieth-the-lethal-bride.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2003/07/16/
movies/new-tarantino-film-to-be-released-in-2-parts.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Henry Gibson (James Bateman)        1935-2009

 

https://www.theguardian.com/theguardian/2009/sep/24/
henry-gibson-obituary 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jennifer Jones (Phylis Isley)        USA        1919-2009

 

Jennifer Jones (...)

achieved

Hollywood stardom

in “The Song of Bernadette”

and other films

of the 1940s and ’50s

while gaining almost

as much attention

for a tumultuous

personal life

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/18/movies/18jones.html

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2009/dec/18/
jennifer-jones-obituary

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/18/movies/18jones.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1947/05/08/
archives/duel-in-the-sun-selznicks-lavish-western-that-stars-jennifer-jones.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Richard Andrew Palethorpe Todd        1919-2009

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2009/dec/04/
secondworldwar-margaretthatcher 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edward Woodward        1930-2009

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/gallery/2009/nov/16/
edward-woodward-wicker-man

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/filmblog/2009/nov/16/
edward-woodward-wicker-man-callum

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/tv-and-radio/2009/nov/16/
edward-woodward-dies-aged-79

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Karl Malden        1912-2009

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2009/jul/02/
karl-malden-obituary 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/02/movies/02malden.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/watching/recommendations/
watching-film-a-streetcar-named-desire -1951

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Paul Leonard Newman        USA        1925-2008

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/feb/22/
the-sting-best-picture-oscar-1974

 

http://www.usatoday.com/life/people/2008-09-27-newman-obit_N.htm

http://www.reuters.com/article/newsOne/idUSTRE48Q25W20080927

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/09/28/movies/28newman.html

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2008/sep/27/paulnewman.usa

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/gallery/2008/aug/20/paulnewman?picture=336781394

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2008/sep/27/paulnewman.usa1

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/filmblog/2008/sep/27/paulnewman

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2008/sep/27/paulnewman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Charlton Heston        USA        1924-2008

 

http://www.npr.org/2017/10/10/
556578593/the-nra-wasnt-always-against-gun-restrictions

 

http://fish.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/04/13/
larger-than-life-charlton-heston/index.html

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2008/apr/06/news.culture 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2008/apr/06/obituaries.culture 

http://blogs.guardian.co.uk/film/2008/04/charlton_heston.html

http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/film-and-tv/news/
heston-a-movie-legend-805319.html

http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/film-and-tv/news/
ben-hur-star-charlton-heston-dies-805318.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/06/movies/06heston.html

http://www.usatoday.com/life/people/2008-04-06-heston-obit_N.htm

http://www.reuters.com/article/newsOne/idUSN0622681720080406

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1968/02/09/
movies/020968apes.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Richard Weedt Widmark        USA        1914-2008

 

 

 

Richard Widmark

 

Date taken: July 07, 1950

 

Photographer: J R Eyerman

Life Images

http://images.google.com/hosted/life/l?imgurl=486d1ed4982d2c78

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/26/arts/26cnd-widmark.html

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2008/mar/27/obituaries.usa 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deborah Kerr        1921-2007

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2007/oct/18/obituaries.news 

https://www.theguardian.com/news/gallery/2007/oct/18/obituaries?picture=331010949 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2007/oct/18/film.guardianobituaries

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yvonne de Carlo        1922-2007

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/01/11/
arts/television/11decarlo.html
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jane Wyman (born Sarah Jane Mayfield)        USA        1917-2007

 

Jane Wyman (...)

won an Oscar for her portrayal

of a victimized deaf woman

in the 1948 movie “Johnny Belinda,”

played a fierce matriarch

in the 1980s television series

“Falcon Crest”

and was the first wife

of President Ronald Reagan

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/09/11/movies/11wyman.html

 

 

http://www.usatoday.com/life/people/2007-09-10-
jane-wyman-obit_N.htm

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/09/11/
movies/11wyman.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

William Dennis Weaver        USA        1924-2006

 

Dennis Weaver (s')

portrayal of Deputy Chester Goode

in the classic television western "Gunsmoke"

made him the favorite sidekick

of the early television era

 

(...)

 

The lanky Mr. Weaver

became famous

for his limping deputy with a drawl,

the buddy of Marshal Matt Dillon,

a portrayal for which

he won an Emmy in 1959.

 

But he starred

in nine television series.

 

From 1955 to 1964,

he was on "Gunsmoke,"

the longest-running

prime-time drama series

on television.

 

He also starred in "Gentle Ben,"

from 1967 to 1969,

playing Tom Wedloe,

an Everglades ranger

who adopts a black bear as a pet.

 

He went from nerd

to sex symbol in "McCloud,"

playing Sam McCloud,

a New Mexico deputy marshal

on loan to the New York City police,

who sometimes rode his horse

through the city streets.

 

"McCloud,"

which was broadcast from 1970 to 1977,

earned him two Emmy nominations.

 

Mr. Weaver

also had leading roles

in 40 motion pictures,

including Orson Welles's 1958 film

"Touch of Evil,"

and the 1971 classic "Duel,"

directed by a young Steven Spielberg,

made for television

but released theatrically in Europe.

 

In it he played

the prey of a murderous truck,

with an unseen driver.

https://www.nytimes.com/2006/02/28/
arts/dennis-weaver-81-sidekick-on-gunsmoke-dies.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2006/02/28/
arts/dennis-weaver-81-sidekick-on-gunsmoke-dies.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/watching/titles/duel - 1971

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gwyllyn Samuel Newton Ford / Glenn Ford        CAN        1916-2006

 

laconic, soft-spoken actor

whose leading roles in westerns,

melodramas and romantic films

made his name a familiar  one

on movie-house marquees

from the early 1940’s

through the 60’s

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/08/31/movies/31ford.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/08/31/movies/31ford.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Natalie Wood (born Natalia Zakharenko)        USA        1938-2008

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/08/03/
style/lana-wood-natalie-sister-death.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/20/
fashion/natalie-wood-natasha-gregson-wagner.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anna Maria Louisa Italiano        USA        1931-2005

 

known professionally

as Anne Bancroft

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/05/
books/review/beverly-gray-seduced-by-mrs-robinson-the-graduate.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jocelyn Rickards, artist and designer        1924-2005

 

"The new look

in English films is reality,"

declared Pauline Kael

in 1961.

 

Much of that look

was created

by Australian-born

costume designer

Jocelyn Rickards,

who dressed

some of the defining

British films of the 1960

- from Look Back In Anger

to Blowup,

not to mention

the classiest

of the Bond series.

 

As films increasingly

left the studios

to explore real locations

- the excited muddle

of central London,

the grime

of precarious bohemia -

so Rickards (...)

mastered a look

of everyday comfort

and high fashion

innovation.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/2005/jul/14/guardianobituaries.filmnews

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/2005/jul/14/
guardianobituaries.filmnews

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ruth Hussey        1911-2005

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/2005/apr/22/
guardianobituaries.artsobituaries1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anna Lee (Joan Boniface Winnifrith)        1913-2004

The Guardian        18.5.2004

https://www.theguardian.com/news/2004/may/18/
guardianobituaries.film

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Janet Leigh        1927-2004

 

demure but sexy

blond movie star of the 1950's

who will always be remembered

for the 45-second shower scene

in which she was slashed to death

in Hitchcock's "Psycho" in 1960

http://www.nytimes.com/2004/10/05/movies/05leigh.html

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/news/2004/oct/05/
guardianobituaries.artsobituaries

http://www.nytimes.com/2004/10/05/
movies/05leigh.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1995/05/01/
movies/psycho-in-janet-leigh-s-psyche.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Richard St. John Harris        IR        1930-2002

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/news/2002/oct/31/
guardianobituaries.filmnews

 

https://www.theguardian.com/news/2002/oct/28/
guardianobituaries.arts

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2002/10/26/
movies/richard-harris-versatile-and-volatile-star-72-dies.html

 

http://catalog.afi.com/Catalog/
MovieDetails/55837 - The Return of a Man Called Horse - 1976

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Katharine Hepburn        USA        1907-2003

 

(...) actress

whose independent life

and strong-willed

movie characters

made her a role model

for generations of women

and a beloved heroine

to filmgoers

for more than 60 years (...)

https://www.nytimes.com/2003/06/29/
obituaries/katharine-hepburn-spirited-actress-dies-at-96.html

 

 

https://archive.nytimes.com/www.nytimes.com/ref/movies/30HEPBURN-REF.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2003/06/29/
obituaries/katharine-hepburn-spirited-actress-dies-at-96.html 

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/filmblog/2011/dec/29/
favourite-film-breakfast-at-tiffanys

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2011/jan/20/
audrey-hepburn-breakfast-at-tiffanys

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2003/06/29/
obituaries/katharine-hepburn-spirited-actress-dies-at-96.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eldred Gregory Peck        USA        1916 -2003

 

 

Gregory Peck ('s)

chiseled, slightly

melancholy

good looks,

resonant baritone

and quiet strength

made him

an unforgettable

presence

in films like

''To Kill a Mockingbird,''

''Gentleman's Agreement''

and ''Twelve O'Clock High,''

(...)

 

In a career

that spanned

half a century,

Mr. Peck

often played

morally

anguished heroes

who displayed grace

under fire.

 

In his most

memorable role,

as Atticus Finch

in the 1962 film

''To Kill a Mockingbird,''

he won

the Academy Award

as best actor

for his performance

as a gentle

Southern lawyer

who incurs the wrath

of his fellow townsfolk

when he defends

a black man

accused of raping

a white woman.

 

In this

and other movies

his persona

as the embodiment

of American decency

made him

a persuasive advocate

for the liberal

candidates and causes

he supported.

https://www.nytimes.com/2003/06/13/
movies/gregory-peck-is-dead-at-87-film-roles-had-moral-fiber.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2003/06/13/
movies/gregory-peck-is-dead-at-87-film-roles-had-moral-fiber.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1963/02/15/
archives/screen-to-kill-a-mockingbird-one-adult-omission-in-a-fine-film-2.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1947/05/08/
archives/duel-in-the-sun-selznicks-lavish-western-that-stars-jennifer-jones.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1945/11/02/
archives/tide-screen-in-review-spellbound-a-psychological-hit-starring.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

James Harrison Coburn        USA        1928-2002

 

(...) rugged actor

who reveled

in playing

rakish men of action

and slyly humorous villains

and overcame

a debilitating illness

to win an Academy Award

for his performance

in ''Affliction'' in 1998

 

(...)

 

A man of lean good looks,

Mr. Coburn first established

his reputation

in ''The Magnificent Seven''

in 1960

and went on to star

in more than 80 movies,

many of them Westerns

and action films,

including

''The Great Escape,''

''Charade,''

and ''Our Man Flint.''

 

His lanky body

and Mephistophelean laugh

led directors

to type him as a villain,

and though he became

well known for those roles

he never made it

to the front rank

of Hollywood stars.

http://www.nytimes.com/2002/11/19/
us/james-coburn-74-is-dead-a-sly-presence-in-80-films.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2002/11/19/
us/james-coburn-74-is-dead-a-sly-presence-in-80-films.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mary Brian (born Louise Byrdie Dantzler)        USA        1906-2002

 

 

 

Mary Brian

The Virginian

THE VIRGINIAN

Paramount Famous Lasky Corp., 1929.

Directed by Victor Fleming.

Camera: J. Roy Hunt and Edward Cronjager.

With Gary Cooper, Walter Huston, Richard Arlen, Mary Brian, Chester Conklin,

Eugene Pallette, E.H. Calvert, Helen Ware, Victor Potel, Tex Young, Charles Stevens.

Dr Macro's high qualilty movie scans

http://www.doctormacro.com/Movie%20Summaries/V/Virginian,%20The%20%281929%29.htm

http://www.doctormacro.com/Images/Brian,%20Mary/Annex/Annex%20-%20Brian,%20Mary%20%28Virginian,%20The%29_01.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

film star

and memorable ingénue

who bridged the silent

and early sound eras

 

(...)
 

 

Between ''Peter Pan''

in 1924

and ''Dragnet''

in 1947

Ms. Brian appeared

in 82 films.

 

Petite,

with blue-gray eyes

and dark-brown curls,

she was one of Hollywood's

romantic leading ladies

from the mid-1920's

through the late 30's.

 

While she did not rank

with superstars

like Clara Bow

or Mary Pickford,

she was a bankable

contract player

and a gratifying attraction

at the box office.

 

Her leading men

were the likes

of Gary Cooper,

Lew Ayres,

James Cagney,

Cary Grant,

William Haines,

Warner Oland

and Dick Powell.

http://www.nytimes.com/2003/01/02/arts/mary-brian-96-an-actress-in-silent-films-and-the-talkies.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2003/01/02/arts/
mary-brian-96-an-actress-in-silent-films-and-the-talkies.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jack Lemmon        USA        1925-2001

 

https://www.bfi.org.uk/news-opinion/news-bfi/lists/
jack-lemmon-10-essential-films

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2001/06/28/
obituaries/jack-lemmon-academy-award-winning-actor-dies-at-76-2001062892218652797.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1974/12/19/
archives/wilders-uneven-film-of-front-page-the-cast.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/watching/recommendations/
watching-film-some-like-it-hot - 1959

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hedy Lamarr (born Hedwig Eva Maria Kiesler)        AUSTRIA / USA        1914-2000

 

(...) raven-haired

Viennese beauty

who became one

of the reigning

temptresses

in Hollywood films

in the 1930's and 40's,

especially as

Delilah vamping

Victor Mature's

Samson

 

(...)

 

Miss Lamarr

was forever identified

with ''Ecstasy,''

a 1933 Czech film

in which she appeared nude

in a swimming scene

and in a lovemaking sequence

that was torrid for its time.

 

The film was banned

in many places

in the United States

for a number of years.

 

But even though

most Americans

never saw it,

''Ecstasy''

excited their interest

in the actress

and shaped

her career.

http://www.nytimes.com/2000/01/20/
arts/hedy-lamarr-sultry-star-who-reigned-in-hollywood-of-30-s-and-40-s-dies-at-86.html

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2018/mar/09/
bombshell-the-hedy-lamarr-story-review-alexandra-dean

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2000/01/20/
arts/hedy-lamarr-sultry-star-who-reigned-in-hollywood-of-30-s-and-40-s-dies-at-86.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sir John Gielgud        UK        1904-2000

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2000/may/22/
news.obituaries
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Walter Matthau        USA        1920-2000

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/movie/
review?res=9406E6D91E31EF34BC4152DFB467838F669EDE
- Front Page - December 19, 1974

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Derek Niven Van den Bogaerde / Dirk Bogarde        UK        1921-1999

 

Nicknamed

the British Rock Hudson,

Sir Dirk was Britain's

leading movie star

during the 1950's,

when he starred

in adventure films

and lightweight comedies,

among them an immensely

popular series that included

''Doctor in the House''

(1954),

''Doctor at Sea''

(1956),

''Doctor at Large''

(1957)

and ''Doctor in Distress''

(1963).

 

In the 1960's,

Sir Dirk gave a series

of brilliant performances

as intelligent, complex

and often morally

compromised men

in such movies

as ''The Servant,''

''King and Country,''

''Darling''

and ''Accident.''

 

 

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?
res=9C0DE7DE143FF933A25756C0A96F958260

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/1999/may/10/features

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

James Maitland "Jimmy" Stewart        USA        1908-1997

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/jamesstewart  

http://www.nytimes.com/learning/general/onthisday/bday/0520.html

https://www.nytimes.com/1997/07/03/
movies/james-stewart-the-hesitant-hero-dies-at-89.html

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2018/jul/12/
vertigo-review-alfred-hitchcock-james-stewart-kim-novak

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1958/05/29/
archives/vertigo-hitchcocks-latest-melodrama-arrives-at-the-capitol.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1955/02/14/
archives/the-screen-tall-in-the-saddle-james-stewart-rides-to-the-far.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1954/02/11/
archives/the-screen-in-review-the-glenn-miller-story-stars-james-stewart-and.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1952/05/08/
archives/the-screen-in-review-carbine-williams-with-james-stewart-and-jean.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1951/09/22/
archives/the-screen-in-review-no-highway-in-the-sky-wit-james-stewart-and.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1946/12/23/
archives/the-screen-in-review-at-three-theatres-its-a-wonderful-life-with.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1940/01/26/
archives/the-screen-in-review-ernst-lubitsch-offers-james-stewart-and.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Robert Charles Durman Mitchum        USA        1917-1997

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2014/jan/19/night-of-the-hunter-review-mark-kermode 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/News_Story/Critic_Review/Observer/0,4267,39827,00.html 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/the-night-of-the-hunter 

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2001/oct/07/
biography.highereducation

 

https://www.nytimes.com/watching/recommendations/
watching-film-the-night-of-the-hunter - 1955

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eugene Curran "Gene" Kelly        USA        1912-1996

 

dancer, actor, director

and choreographer

who brought

a vigorous

athleticism,

casual grace

and an earthy

masculinity

to the high romance

of lavish Hollywood

musicals

http://www.nytimes.com/learning/general/onthisday/bday/0823.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/learning/general/onthisday/bday/0823.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Donald Henry Pleasence        UK        1919-1995

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1989/10/14/
movies/review-film-halloween-5-and-sinister-rustlings.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1970/08/13/
archives/candice-bergen-stars-in-violent-western-two-other-films-open-at.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ginger Rogers        USA        1911-1995

 

vivacious actress

whose supple grace

in the arms

of Fred Astaire

lifted the spirits

of Depression-era

moviegoers

in some of the most

elegantly romantic

musical films

ever made

http://www.nytimes.com/learning/general/onthisday/bday/0716.html

 

 

https://archive.nytimes.com/www.nytimes.com/learning/general/onthisday/bday/0716.html 

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/16/arts/dance/16maca.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joseph Cheshire Cotten Jr.        USA        1905-1994

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1994/02/07/
obituaries/joseph-cotten-88-is-dead-actor-on-stage-and-in-films.html

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/gallery/2019/sep/05/
the-third-man-behind-the-scenes-film-noir-in-pictures

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1947/05/08/
archives/duel-in-the-sun-selznicks-lavish-western-that-stars-jennifer-jones.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1943/01/13/
archives/shadow-of-a-doubt-a-thriller-with-teresa-wright-joseph-cotten-at.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Burt Lancaster        USA        1913-1994

 

rugged former

circus acrobat

who achieved

Hollywood

stardom in 1946

in his first film,

"The Killers,"

and maintained

a magnetic

screen presence

in some 70 movies

that spanned

45 years

http://www.nytimes.com/1994/10/22/
obituaries/burt-lancaster-rugged-circus-acrobat-turned-hollywood-star-is-dead-at-80.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1994/10/22/
obituaries/burt-lancaster-rugged-circus-acrobat-turned-hollywood-star-is-dead-at-80.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1972/11/16/
archives/ulzanas-raidaldrich-directs-cast-led-by-lancaster.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1963/08/13/
archives/screen-the-leopard-at-the-plaza-burt-lancaster-stars-in-adaptation.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Audrey Hepburn        UK        1929-1993

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/culture/audrey-hepburn

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2015/may/19/
breakfast-at-audreys-the-hepburn-family-photo-album-unlocked-in-pictures

 

http://www.theguardian.com/culture/2014/dec/02/
audrey-hepburn-back-scene-big-break-national-portrait-gallery

 

http://video.nytimes.com/video/2010/08/30/movies/1248068947058/
critics-picks-charade.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marie Magdalene "Marlene" Dietrich        GER / USA        1901-1992

 

 

https://archive.nytimes.com/www.nytimes.com/
learning/general/onthisday/bday/1227.html
- 1992

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1992/05/07/
us/marlene-dietrich-90-symbol-of-glamour-dies.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/04/
movies/homevideo/marlene-dietrichs-dishonored-and-shanghai-express.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1935/05/04/
archives/the-paramount-presents-mr-von-sternbergs-the-devil-is-a-woman-on.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1934/09/15/
archives/mr-von-sternberg-presents-miss-dietrich-and-the-scarlet-empress-at.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Laurence Kerr Olivier        1907-1989

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/stage/olivier

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1989/07/12/
obituaries/olivier-is-dead-after-6-decade-acting-career.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/
the-running-blog/2013/feb/18/10-best-running-movies

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marathon_Man_(film)

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1940/03/29/
archives/the-screen-splendid-film-of-du-mauriers-rebecca-is-shown-at-the.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

George Orson Welles        USA        1915-1985

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/gallery/2019/sep/05/
the-third-man-behind-the-scenes-film-noir-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Richard Burton        UK        1925-1984

 

 

https://archive.nytimes.com/www.nytimes.com/
learning/general/onthisday/bday/1110.html

https://www.nytimes.com/1984/08/06/
obituaries/richard-burton-58-is-dead-rakish-stage-and-screen-star.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1985/01/18/
movies/the-screen-john-hurt-in-1984-adaptation-of-orwell-novel.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1984/08/06/
obituaries/richard-burton-58-is-dead-rakish-stage-and-screen-star.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ida Lupino        1918-1995

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ida_Lupino

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ruth Elizabeth "Bette" Davis        USA        1908-1989

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/bettedavis

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1962/11/07/
archives/screen-bette-davis-and-joan-crawfordthey-portray-sisters-in.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rita Hayworth        1918-1987

 

legendary Hollywood beauty

who rose to international fame

in the 1940's and 1950's

http://www.nytimes.com/learning/general/onthisday/bday/1017.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/learning/general/onthisday/bday/1017.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Archibald Alexander Leach / Cary Grant        UK        1904-1986

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/carygrant 

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/filmblog/2016/jul/08/
cary-grant-festival-bristol-hollywood-film

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/filmblog/2013/oct/03/
why-i-love-cary-grant

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2009/jan/16/
notorious-film-review

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1959/08/07/
archives/hitchcock-takes-suspenseful-cooks-tour-north-by-northwest-opens-at.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1955/08/05/
archives/screen-cat-man-out-to-catch-a-thief-grant-is-exburglar-in-hitchcock.html

 

https://archive.nytimes.com/www.nytimes.com/library/film/
081646hitch-notorious-review.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clarence Leroy Van Cleef Jr.        USA        1925-1989

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1989/12/17/
obituaries/lee-van-cleef-actor-dies-at-64-played-villains-in-many-westerns.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rock Hudson (born Roy Harold Scherer, Jr.)        1925-1985

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1985/10/03/
arts/rock-hudson-screen-idol-dies-at-59.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Johnny Weissmuller

(born Johann Peter Weißmüller)

AUS/HUNG        1904-1984

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1984/01/22/
obituaries/johnny-weissmuller-dies-at-79-movie-tarzan-and-olympic-gold-medalist.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Warren Mercer Oates        USA        1928-1982

 

(...) character actor

who appeared in ''Easy Rider,''

''In the Heat of the Night''

and ''Dillinger''

 

(...)

 

Mr. Oates,

who began his career

in ''Have Gun, Will Travel''

on television,

was frequently cast

in character roles.

 

In the early 60's,

he played a rodeo rider

on the ''Stoney Burke'' series

with Jack Lord and Bruce Dern

and, in 1980, starred

in the television movie

''My Old Man''

with Kristy McNichol

and Eileen Brennan.

 

His other television films

included ''Baby Makes Six''

and ''East of Eden.''

 

Among

his motion-picture credits

were ''The Hired Hand,''

''Two-Lane Blacktop,''

''Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia,''

''Badlands,''

''The Thief Who Came to Dinner,''

''Tom Sawyer,''

''Clay Pigeon,''

''The Brink's Job,''

'92 in the Shade,''

''1941,''

''Sleeping Dogs''

and the recently released

''The Border.''

 

Mr. Oates,

who frequently

appeared in westerns,

said in an interview:

 

''I want to be

like Ben Johnson.

 

Not just Ben Johnson

on the screen,

but Ben Johnson

in every aspect of his life.

 

He's a straight, wonderful,

natural performer.

He's a purist.''

https://www.nytimes.com/1982/04/05/
obituaries/warren-oates-52-character-actor.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/03/
movies/a-retrospective-of-warren-oates-symbol-of-frontier-machismo.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2008/dec/27/
sam-peckinpah-alfredo-garcia

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1982/04/05/
obituaries/warren-oates-52-character-actor.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ingrid Bergman        SWE        1915-1982

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grace Patricia Kelly        USA        1929-1982

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1982/09/15/world/
princess-grace-is-dead-after-riviera-car-crash.html

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/filmblog/2012/jul/25/my-favourite-hitchcock-rear-window

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1952/07/25/arts/high-noon-oscars.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Henry Jaynes Fonda        USA        1905-1982

 

 

 

Jane And Henry Fonda

No date

 

Photographer: Allan Grant

Life Images

http://images.google.com/hosted/life/l?imgurl=97ef63bbcd961429

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1982/08/13/
obituaries/henry-fonda-dies-on-coast-at-77-played-100-stage-and-screen-roles.html?pagewanted=all

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2010/feb/07/screen-legends-henry-fonda-french

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1982/08/13/
obituaries/henry-fonda-dies-on-coast-at-77-played-100-stage-and-screen-roles.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

William Holden        1918-1981

 

 

 

Time Covers - The 50S

TIME cover 02-27-1956

ill. of actor William Holden.

 

Date taken: February 27, 1956

 

Photographer: Boris Chaliapin

Life Images

http://images.google.com/hosted/life/5899109c203a5d75.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1981/11/17/
obituaries/william-holden-dead-at-63-won-oscar-for-stalag-17.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peter Sellers (born Richard Henry Sellers)        1925-1980

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/peter-sellers 

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2013/dec/12/
peter-sellers-lost-short-films-mordecai-richler-london

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marion Mitchell Morrison

(born Marion Robert Morrison)

stage name:

John Wayne / nickname: the Duke        USA        1907-1979

 

 

In more than 200 films

made over 50 years,

John Wayne saddled up

to become the greatest figure

of one of America's

greatest native art forms,

the Western.

 

The movies

he starred in

rode the range from

out-of-the-money

sagebrush quickies

to such classics

as "Stagecoach"

and "Red River."

 

He won an Oscar

as best actor

for another western,

"True Grit," in 1969.

 

Yet some of the best

films he made

told stories far

from the wilds of the West,

such as "The Quiet Man"

and "The Long Voyage Home."

— Richard F. Shepard / NYT

http://www.nytimes.com/topic/person/john-wayne 

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/johnwayne

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2019/jun/11/
true-grit-john-wayne-1969-henry-hathaway

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2019/feb/20/
john-wayne-racist-homophobic-views-1971-playboy-interview

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Holland Cazale        USA        1935-1978

 

(...) actor perhaps

best known

as Al Pacino's

weak, elder brother

in the film ‘The Godfather”

and its sequel,

“The Godfather, Part II”

https://www.nytimes.com/1978/03/14/
archives/john-cazale-actor-on-stage-and-screen-was-in-shakespeare-festival.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/08/
movies/tribeca-film-festival-godfather-cast-reunion.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/03/
movies/michael-cimino-director-of-the-deer-hunter-and-heavens-gate-dies-at-77.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1979/02/04/
archives/the-rising-star-of-meryl-streep.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1978/12/10/
archives/ready-for-vietnam-a-talk-with-michael-cimino-cimino.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1978/03/14/
archives/john-cazale-actor-on-stage-and-screen-was-in-shakespeare-festival.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Harry Lillis "Bing" Crosby Jr.        1903-1977

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1977/10/15/
archives/bing-crosby-73-dies-in-madrid-at-golf-course-bing-crosby-73-dies-at.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joan Crawford        USA        1905-1977

 

Joan Crawford

rose from waitress

and chorus girl

to become one

of the great movie stars

 

https://archive.nytimes.com/www.nytimes.com/learning/
general/onthisday/bday/0323.html

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2019/jun/25/
christina-crawford-on-life-after-mommie-dearest-my-mother-should-have-been-in-jail

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1962/11/07/
archives/screen-bette-davis-and-joan-crawfordthey-portray-sisters-in.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Robert Bushnell Ryan        USA        1909-1973

 

The husky rugged

actor's renown

was anchored

in some 90 motion pictures

in which he appeared

over the last 30 years.

 

He considered

only four or five of them

to be any good,

he said in an interview

a couple of years ago.

 

His favorite

was “The SetUp,”

which was

released in 1949

and in which

he played the role

of Stoker Thompson,

an aging

but determined

pugilist.

 

He also esteemed

“Crossfire,”

a 1947 movie

in which he portrayed

a bigoted marine

who kills a Jewish

war veteran.

 

The depiction

was “frighteningly real,”

the critic

for The New York Times

wrote.

http://www.nytimes.com/1973/07/12/
archives/robert-ryan-actor-dies-at-63-made-90-moviesscored-on-stage-in.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/07/
movies/the-quiet-furies-of-robert-ryan.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1973/07/12/
archives/robert-ryan-actor-dies-at-63-made-90-moviesscored-on-stage-in.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

George Henry Sanders        RUS / UK        1906-1972

 

http://movies.nytimes.com/2013/05/01/
movies/rossellinis-voyage-to-italy-with-ingrid-bergman.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vivien Leigh        UK        1913-1967

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/vivien-leigh

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/video/2013/nov/21/
why-gone-with-the-wind-is-the-one-film-you-should-watch-this-week-video

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2013/nov/22/vivien-leigh-life-on-screen

 

http://www.theguardian.com/theguardian/from-the-archive-blog/2013/nov/05/
vivien-leigh-anniversary-obituary-observer-1967

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spencer Bonaventure Tracy        1900-1967

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2003/06/29/
obituaries/katharine-hepburn-spirited-actress-dies-at-96.html
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edward Montgomery "Monty" Clift        USA        1920-1966

 

 

 

Montgomery Clift

 

Date taken: November 1948

 

Photographer: J.R. Eyerman

Life Images

http://images.google.com/hosted/life/decff69007b1c84a.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1978/05/26/
archives/brando-dean-and-clift-the-young-mavericks-clift-brando-and-dean-at.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clara Gordon Bow        USA        1905-1965

 

 

 

 ‘I’m a curiosity in Hollywood. I’m a big freak, because I’m myself!’

said Clara Bow.

 

Photograph: John Kobal Foundation/Getty Images

 

Clara Bow:

the hard-partying jazz-baby airbrushed from Hollywood history

G

Tuesday 21 June 2016        11.45 BST

Last modified on Tuesday 21 June 2016        11.46 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/film/filmblog/2016/jun/21/clara-bow-wild-child-hollywood-history-silent-film

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/filmblog/2016/jun/21/
clara-bow-wild-child-hollywood-history-silent-film

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/06/07/
movies/07silent.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peter Lorre (born László Löwenstein)        AUS / HUN / USA        1904-1964

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/24/
movies/nova-pilbeam-an-early-and-brief-star-for-hitchcock-dies-at-95.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1964/03/24/
archives/peter-lorre-dies-in-hollywood-symbol-of-film-horror-was-59-actor.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1950/02/03/
archives/the-screen-in-review-the-third-man-carol-reeds.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marilyn Monroe        USA        1926-1962

 

 

 

Portrait of actress Marilyn Monroe on patio of her home.

 

Location: Hollywood, CA, US

Date taken: May 1953

 

Photographer: Alfred Eisenstaedt

Life Images

http://images.google.com/hosted/life/14b565d371ddf701.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/marilynmonroe

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/13/nyregion/
marilyn-monroe-skirt-blowing-new-york-film.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/05/
arts/design/george-barris-photographer-who-captured-the-last-images-of-marilyn-monroe-
dies-at-94.html

http://www.theguardian.com/film/gallery/2016/feb/10/
marilyn-monroe-femme-fatale-sex-symbol-model-and-muse-in-pictures

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2015/aug/07/
nude-images-marilyn-taboo-hollywood-history

http://www.theguardian.com/film/gallery/2012/jul/22/
marilyn-monroe-in-pictures

http://www.theguardian.com/sport/gallery/2015/apr/11/
memory-lane-sport-stars-weddings-in-pictures#img-14

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2014/aug/06/
marilyn-monroe-dead-film-movies

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2014/jul/18/
some-like-it-hot-marilyn-monroe-bfi-restored

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/13/
arts/music/hal-schaefer-jazz-pianist-and-marilyn-monroes-vocal-coach-dies.html

http://www.npr.org/2012/08/05/
158156525/marilyn-monroe-as-an-all-around-comedian

http://www.npr.org/2012/08/03/
157483945/monroes-legacy-is-making-fortune-but-for-whom

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2012/aug/03/
marilyn-monroe-banville-50-death

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2012/may/30/
lawrence-schiller-marilyn-monroe-photography

http://www.thedailybeast.com/galleries/2012/05/31/
marilyn-and-me-lawrence-schiller-s-photos-of-marilyn-monroe.html

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2012/mar/16/
marilyn-monroe-getty-images-gallery

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/pictureshow/2010/08/06/
129025524/monroe

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/pictureshow/2009/06/
unpublished_photos_of_marilyn.html

http://foia.fbi.gov/foiaindex/monroe.htm

http://news.bbc.co.uk/onthisday/hi/dates/stories/august/5/newsid_2657000/2657289.stm

http://www.nytimes.com/learning/general/onthisday/bday/0601.html

http://www.nytimes.com/books/98/11/22/specials/monroe-obit1.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/watching/recommendations/
watching-film-some-like-it-hot - 1959

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gary Cooper        USA        1901-1961

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1952/07/25/arts/high-noon-oscars.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clark Gable        USA        1901-1960

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/video/2013/nov/21/
why-gone-with-the-wind-is-the-one-film-you-should-watch-this-week-video

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Errol Leslie Thomson Flynn        USA        1909-1959

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2013/jan/24/
kevin-kline-errol-flynn-sex-scandal

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

James Byron Dean        USA        1931-1955

 

 


Dennis Stock—Magnum

 

James Dean in the Fairmount, Indiana, cemetery in 1955,

where he found the grave of one of his ancestors

with the same same name of the character, Cal,

he played in East of Eden.

http://life.time.com/culture/james-dean-dennis-stock-photos-1955/#9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/02/08/james-dean-dennis-stock-life-lens-photos/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/02/08/
james-dean-dennis-stock-life-lens-photos/

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/10/02/
national/02dean.html

https://www.npr.org/templates/story/
story.php?storyId=4930897 - 30 Sept. 2005

https://www.npr.org/templates/
story/story.php?storyId=4679790 - 3 June 2005

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/05/29/
movies/29raff.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1978/05/26/
archives/brando-dean-and-clift-the-young-mavericks-clift-brando-and-dean-at.html

 

http://life.time.com/culture/james-dean-dennis-stock-photos-1955/#1

http://news.bbc.co.uk/onthisday/hi/dates/stories/september/30/newsid_3722000/3722463.stm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ann Savage,

Cult Movie Actress,

Dies at 87

 

December 30, 2008

The New York Times

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

 

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Ann Savage, who earned a cult following as a femme fatale in 1940s pulp-fiction movies, most notably as the ruthless villain in “Detour,” died on Dec. 27. She was 87.

The cause was complications of a series of strokes, said her manager, Kent Adamson.

Ms. Savage’s Hollywood career had largely been over since the mid-1950s, but in the last year she had a starring role in a film by the Canadian filmmaker Guy Maddin, “My Winnipeg.”

Starting with her 1943 debut in the crime story “One Dangerous Night,” she made more than 30 films through the 1950s, including westerns (“Saddles and Sagebrush,” “Satan’s Cradle”), musicals (“Dancing in Manhattan,” “Ever Since Venus”) and wartime tales (“Passport to Suez,” “Two-Man Submarine”).

In “Detour,” her best-known film, directed by Edgar G. Ulmer in 1945, she played a woman blackmailing a stranger, played by Tom Neal.

“It’s actually a showcase role,” Mr. Adamson said. “Neal and Savage really reversed the traditional male-female roles of the time. She’s vicious and predatory. She’s been called a harpy from hell, and in the film, too, she’s very sexually aggressive, and he’s very, very passive.”

Decades later, “Detour” and Ms. Savage gained a new audience on television and video.

Mr. Adamson said Mr. Maddin had been a longtime fan of “Detour” when he cast Ms. Savage to play his mother in “My Winnipeg,” a documentary, drama and memoir about his native city.

She did some television in the 1950s, including “Death Valley Days” and “The Ford Television Theater,” then left Hollywood for New York, where she appeared in commercials.

In 1986, Ms. Savage returned to acting with an appearance in the drama “Fire With Fire.”

Ann Savage, Cult Movie Actress, Dies at 87,
NYT,
30.12.2008,
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/12/30/movies/30savage.html

 

 

 

 

 

Van Johnson,

Film Actor,

Is Dead at 92

 

December 13, 2008
The New York Times
By ALJEAN HARMETZ

 

Van Johnson, a film actor whose affable charm and boyish good looks helped turn him into a major Hollywood star during World War II, died Friday in Nyack, N.Y. He was 92.

His death, at the Tappan Zee Manor assisted living facility, was announced by a spokesman, Daniel Demello, of Shirley Herz Associates in New York.

Mr. Johnson won praise in his first dramatic role, as the pilot whose story is told in “Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo” (1944). He drew good notices for his work in “The Caine Mutiny,” Edward Dmytryk’s 1954 adaptation of the Herman Wouk novel, in which he played the naval lieutenant who is compelled to relieve the erratic Captain Queeg (Humphrey Bogart) of command while at sea. And critics liked him as well the following year in Dmytryk’s adaptation of Graham Greene’s novel “The End of the Affair,” he which Mr. Johnson played an illicit lover opposite Sarah Miles.

But it was his wartime film career that catapulted Mr. Johnson to fame, and it gave him a boy-next-door image that he could never live down. He was the red-haired, freckle-faced soldier, sailor or B-25 bomber pilot who used to live down the street in a dozen MGM movies between 1942 and 1946. He attracted hordes of bobby-soxers during the war years. Indeed, the numbers of screaming teen-aged girls who swooned for Mr. Johnson were second only to those who threw themselves at Frank Sinatra.

Mr. Johnson got his big break in “A Guy Named Joe” (1943), playing a young fighter pilot who acquires an older pilot (Spencer Tracy) as his guardian angel after the older man is killed in a crash.

In real life, it was Mr. Johnson who was almost killed in an automobile accident that occurred midway through the movie’s production. It was obvious by then that his charming, likable screen presence would make him a star. During the months Mr. Johnson was hospitalized, both Tracy and his co-star, Irene Dunne, refused to allow the studio to recast the part.

Mr. Johnson had supporting roles in movies like “The War Against Mrs. Hadley” (1942) and “Madame Curie” (1943), but “A Guy Named Joe” gave him two things: a lot of publicity and a steel plate in his head that kept him from being drafted at a time when major MGM stars like Robert Taylor, Jimmy Stewart and Clark Gable were joining the armed services. The film was a huge box-office success.

In 1944, a time when actors worked under contract in a studio caste system, Mr. Johnson was promoted from featured player to MGM’s official star list. He was paired with Miss Williams in “Thrill of a Romance” (1945) and with Lana Turner in “Weekend at the Waldorf” (1945). At studio premieres and parties, he wore red socks with his tuxedo, a trademark.

By 1945, Mr. Johnson was second behind Bing Crosby on the list of the Top 10 box-office stars chosen yearly by the nation’s theater owners. In 1946, he was third. Then Hollywood’s bit male stars came back from the war, and he dropped off the list.

Like many MGM stars of that era, including June Allyson, with whom he starred in four films, Mr. Johnson did not find his contract burdensome. He was never known to have asked for a raise or turned down a part he was told to play.

In 1985, he said of his years at MGM: “It was one big happy family and a little kingdom. Everything was provided for us, from singing lessons to barbells. All we had to do was inhale, exhale and be charming. I used to dread leaving the studio to go out into the real world, because to me the studio was the real world.”

Mr. Johnson said he wasn’t even upset when the studio head L.B. Mayer learned that he was living with a young actress and insisted that he move out: “That was the way of the studio.”

MGM dropped Mr. Johnson in 1954, after he appeared as the drunken novelist opposite Elizabeth Taylor in “The Last Time I Saw Paris,” based on F. Scott Fitzgerald’s short story “Babylon Revisited,” and in the film version of the Broadway musical fantasy “Brigadoon,” as one of two American tourists (Gene Kelly played the other) visiting an enchanted Scottish village.

In his 12 years at the studio, Mr. Johnson had acted and mostly starred in nearly 50 movies. But as he once asked a reporter rhetorically: “How long can you go on being the boy next door?”

He was born Charles Van Johnson on Aug. 25, 1916, in Newport, R.I. His mother, an alcoholic, deserted the family when he was a boy, and he was dutifully but coldly raised by the dour Swedish-American father, a plumber, for whom he was named. According to his stepson, Ned Wynn, when Mr. Johnson became a star, he invited his father to California and proudly took him to the famous Chasen’s restaurant. Charles Johnson refused to eat anything but a tuna fish sandwich.

“Van was devastated,” Mr. Wynn wrote in a memoir, “We Have Always Lived in Beverly Hills.” “He had wanted to show his father that now, after years of a gray, loveless, miserly life, he was a star, he could afford steak. And the old bastard had beaten him down one more time.”

As soon as he graduated from high school in 1935, Mr. Johnson fled to New York. He sang, danced and played the violin, and after several months got a job touring New England as a substitute dancer. He first set foot on a Broadway stage in the successful revue “New Faces” in May 1936.

After “New Faces” closed, his career was a mosaic of chorus boy jobs, resort hotel gigs and finally, nightclub work in “Eight Young Men of Manhattan” at the Rainbow Room, an act built around Mary Martin.

He was an understudy to Desi Arnaz and Eddie Bracken in George Abbott’s Broadway musical “Too Many Girls,” which earned him a small role in Abbott’s “Pal Joey,” which earned him two trips to Hollywood. Columbia didn’t like his screen test, but Warner Bros. offered him a contract at $300 a week, gave him the leading role of a cub reporter opposite Faye Emerson in “Murder in the Big House (1942), and dropped him after six months.

He was on his way back to New York when Lucille Ball, whom he knew from his years of bouncing around the East Coast, took him to the MGM casting director Billy Grady. He made his debut as a young soldier in the Clark Gable-Lana Turner drama “Somewhere I’ll Find You” (1942). He was the pilot who survived in “Pilot No. 5” (1943), the soldier who died in William Saroyan’s “Human Comedy” (1943) and the sailor who had his choice of June Allyson or Gloria DeHaven in “Two Girls and a Sailor.”

He also replaced Lew Ayres in the successful Dr. Kildare series, which was renamed the Dr. Gillespie series for the co-star, Lionel Barrymore, after Ayres announced he was a conscientious objector. Mr. Johnson shocked MGM and dismayed his fans in 1947 when he stole the wife of his best friend, the MGM character actor Keenan Wynn. But by the time he married Evie Wynn, he was too big a star for the studio to punish. They had a daughter, Schuyler, in 1948, separated in 1962 and were divorced in 1968. Mr. Johnson did not remarry.

The actor’s screen image was all laughter and sunshine. “Cheery Van,” he later defined himself ironically. Actually, the deprivations of his childhood cast long shadows, and he was, by nature, moody and morose. “His tolerance of unpleasantness was minuscule,” his stepson wrote. “If there was the slightest hint of trouble with one of the children, or with the house, the car, the servants, the delivery of the newspaper, the lack of ice in the silver ice bucket, the color of the candles on the dining room table, Van immediately left the couch, the dinner table, the pool, the tennis court, the party, the restaurant, the vacation, and strode off to his bedroom.”

Long after World War II was over, Mr. Johnson was still fighting it: in ““Command Decision” (1948) as a staff sergeant; as a happy-go-lucky private in William Wellman’s excellent recreation of the Battle of the Bulge, “Battleground” (1949); and as a prejudiced army lieutenant in charge of a group of Japanese-American soldiers in “Go For Broke” (1951).

He also co-starred with Janet Leigh (“The Romance of Rosy Ridge” 1947), with Judy Garland (“In the Good Old Summertime” 1949), and most often with Esther Williams and June Allyson.

After floundering for more than a decade after he left MGM, Mr. Johnson made the mistake of turning down the Eliot Ness role in the television series “The Untouchables” — Robert Stack got the role — but he found frequent work on television all the same for decades, making guest appearances on a wide range of shows, from “Batman” in the ’60s (he played The Minstrel) to “Murder, She Wrote” in the ’80s. He also had a small part in Woody Allen’s 1985 film “The Purple Rose of Cairo.”

Mr. Johnson had lived at Tappan Zee Manor, an assisted living facility, for the last seven years. Before that he lived at 405 East 54th Street in Manhattan. He had been estranged from his daughter for many years, his spokesman, Mr. Demello, said, adding that he had no other information on survivors.

In the 1970s Mr. Johnson began a second career in summer stock and dinner theater. When he turned 60, he told a reporter that he had beaten cancer twice and was so booked up with summer theater jobs that he never got home to his Manhattan penthouse and his two cats.

At 69, he went back to New York and Broadway to replace Gene Barry as Georges in “La Cage aux Folles,” playing the role for a year. At 75, with his red hair turned white and his figure grown rotund, he toured as Captain Andy in “Show Boat.”

“These are supposed to be my September years,” Mr. Johnson told an interviewer. “I’m supposed to be at home enjoying them, but I still love to tour.”

Spencer Tracy had given him two pieces of advice: to take up painting as a hobby and never to read reviews. He traveled everywhere with a paint box and with his embroidery, a hobby he chose for himself.

When Mr. Johnson was a few years shy of 80, he mused: “Maybe Garbo and Crawford and Marlene had the right idea. Get out of the damned spotlight while you can still be remembered for your earlier glories, not as some old relic.”

But he never took his own advice.

    Van Johnson, Film Actor, Is Dead at 92, NYT, 13.12.2008,
    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/12/13/movies/13johnson.html

 

 

 

 

 

Paul Newman Dies at 83

 

September 27, 2008
Filed at 10:32 a.m. ET
By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The New York Times

 

WESTPORT, Conn. (AP) -- Paul Newman, the Academy-Award winning superstar who personified cool as the anti-hero of such films as ''Hud,'' ''Cool Hand Luke'' and ''The Color of Money'' -- and as an activist, race car driver and popcorn impresario -- has died. He was 83.

Newman died Friday after a long battle with cancer at his farmhouse near Westport, publicist Jeff Sanderson said. He was surrounded by his family and close friends.

In May, Newman had dropped plans to direct a fall production of ''Of Mice and Men,'' citing unspecified health issues.

He got his start in theater and on television during the 1950s, and went on to become one of the world's most enduring and popular film stars, a legend held in awe by his peers. He was nominated for Oscars 10 times, winning one regular award and two honorary ones, and had major roles in more than 50 motion pictures, including ''Exodus,'' ''Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid,'' ''The Verdict,'' ''The Sting'' and ''Absence of Malice.''

Newman worked with some of the greatest directors of the past half century, from Alfred Hitchcock and John Huston to Robert Altman, Martin Scorsese and the Coen brothers. His co-stars included Elizabeth Taylor, Lauren Bacall, Tom Cruise, Tom Hanks and, most famously, Robert Redford, his sidekick in ''Butch Cassidy'' and ''The Sting.''

He sometimes teamed with his wife and fellow Oscar winner, Joanne Woodward, with whom he had one of Hollywood's rare long-term marriages. ''I have steak at home, why go out for hamburger?'' Newman told Playboy magazine when asked if he was tempted to stray. They wed in 1958, around the same time they both appeared in ''The Long Hot Summer,'' and Newman directed her in several films, including ''Rachel, Rachel'' and ''The Glass Menagerie.''

With his strong, classically handsome face and piercing blue eyes, Newman was a heartthrob just as likely to play against his looks, becoming a favorite with critics for his convincing portrayals of rebels, tough guys and losers. ''I was always a character actor,'' he once said. ''I just looked like Little Red Riding Hood.''

Newman had a soft spot for underdogs in real life, giving tens of millions to charities through his food company and setting up camps for severely ill children. Passionately opposed to the Vietnam War, and in favor of civil rights, he was so famously liberal that he ended up on President Nixon's ''enemies list,'' one of the actor's proudest achievements, he liked to say.

A screen legend by his mid-40s, he waited a long time for his first competitive Oscar, winning in 1987 for ''The Color of Money,'' a reprise of the role of pool shark ''Fast'' Eddie Felson, whom Newman portrayed in the 1961 film ''The Hustler.''

Newman delivered a magnetic performance in ''The Hustler,'' playing a smooth-talking, whiskey-chugging pool shark who takes on Minnesota Fats -- played by Jackie Gleason -- and becomes entangled with a gambler played by George C. Scott. In the sequel -- directed by Scorsese -- ''Fast Eddie'' is no longer the high-stakes hustler he once was, but rather an aging liquor salesman who takes a young pool player (Cruise) under his wing before making a comeback.

He won an honorary Oscar in 1986 ''in recognition of his many and memorable compelling screen performances and for his personal integrity and dedication to his craft.'' In 1994, he won a third Oscar, the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award, for his charitable work.

His most recent academy nod was a supporting actor nomination for the 2002 film ''Road to Perdition.'' One of Newman's nominations was as a producer; the other nine were in acting categories. (Jack Nicholson holds the record among actors for Oscar nominations, with 12; actress Meryl Streep has had 14.)

As he passed his 80th birthday, he remained in demand, winning an Emmy and a Golden Globe for the 2005 HBO drama ''Empire Falls'' and providing the voice of a crusty 1951 car in the 2006 Disney-Pixar hit, ''Cars.''

But in May 2007, he told ABC's ''Good Morning America'' he had given up acting, though he intended to remain active in charity projects. ''I'm not able to work anymore as an actor at the level I would want to,'' he said. ''You start to lose your memory, your confidence, your invention. So that's pretty much a closed book for me.''

He received his first Oscar nomination for playing a bitter, alcoholic former star athlete in the 1958 film ''Cat on a Hot Tin Roof.'' Elizabeth Taylor played his unhappy wife and Burl Ives his wealthy, domineering father in Tennessee Williams' harrowing drama, which was given an upbeat ending for the screen.

In ''Cool Hand Luke,'' he was nominated for his gritty role as a rebellious inmate in a brutal Southern prison. The movie was one of the biggest hits of 1967 and included a tagline, delivered one time by Newman and one time by prison warden Strother Martin, that helped define the generation gap, ''What we've got here is (a) failure to communicate.''

Newman's hair was graying, but he was as gourgeous as ever and on the verge of his greatest popular success. In 1969, Newman teamed with Redford for ''Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid,'' a comic Western about two outlaws running out of time. Newman paired with Redford again in 1973 in ''The Sting,'' a comedy about two Depression-era con men. Both were multiple Oscar winners and huge hits, irreverent, unforgettable pairings of two of the best-looking actors of their time.

Newman also turned to producing and directing. In 1968, he directed ''Rachel, Rachel,'' a film about a lonely spinster's rebirth. The movie received four Oscar nominations, including Newman, for producer of a best motion picture, and Woodward, for best actress. The film earned Newman the best director award from the New York Film Critics.

In the 1970s, Newman, admittedly bored with acting, became fascinated with auto racing, a sport he studied when he starred in the 1972 film, ''Winning.'' After turning professional in 1977, Newman and his driving team made strong showings in several major races, including fifth place in Daytona in 1977 and second place in the Le Mans in 1979.

''Racing is the best way I know to get away from all the rubbish of Hollywood,'' he told People magazine in 1979.

Despite his love of race cars, Newman continued to make movies and continued to pile up Oscar nominations, his looks remarkably intact, his acting becoming more subtle, nothing like the mannered method performances of his early years, when he was sometimes dismissed as a Brando imitator. ''It takes a long time for an actor to develop the assurance that the trim, silver-haired Paul Newman has acquired,'' Pauline Kael wrote of him in the early 1980s.

In 1982, he got his Oscar fifth nomination for his portrayal of an honest businessman persecuted by an irresponsible reporter in ''Absence of Malice.'' The following year, he got his sixth for playing a down-and-out alcoholic attorney in ''The Verdict.''

In 1995, he was nominated for his slyest, most understated work yet, the town curmudgeon and deadbeat in ''Nobody's Fool.'' New York Times critic Caryn James found his acting ''without cheap sentiment and self-pity,'' and observed, ''It says everything about Mr. Newman's performance, the single best of this year and among the finest he has ever given, that you never stop to wonder how a guy as good-looking as Paul Newman ended up this way.''

Newman, who shunned Hollywood life, was reluctant to give interviews and usually refused to sign autographs because he found the majesty of the act offensive, according to one friend.

He also claimed that he never read reviews of his movies.

''If they're good you get a fat head and if they're bad you're depressed for three weeks,'' he said.

Off the screen, Newman had a taste for beer and was known for his practical jokes. He once had a Porsche installed in Redford's hallway -- crushed and covered with ribbons.

''I think that my sense of humor is the only thing that keeps me sane,'' he told Newsweek magazine in a 1994 interview.

In 1982, Newman and his Westport neighbor, writer A.E. Hotchner, started a company to market Newman's original oil-and-vinegar dressing. Newman's Own, which began as a joke, grew into a multimillion-dollar business selling popcorn, salad dressing, spaghetti sauce and other foods. All of the company's profits are donated to charities. By 2007, the company had donated more than $175 million, according to its Web site.

Hotchner said Newman should have ''everybody's admiration.''

''For me it's the loss of an adventurous freindship over the past 50 years and it's the loss of a great American citizen,'' Hotchner told The Associated Press.

In 1988, Newman founded a camp in northeastern Connecticut for children with cancer and other life-threatening diseases. He went on to establish similar camps in several other states and in Europe.

He and Woodward bought an 18th century farmhouse in Westport, where they raised their three daughters, Elinor ''Nell,'' Melissa and Clea.

Newman had two daughters, Susan and Stephanie, and a son, Scott, from a previous marriage to Jacqueline Witte.

Scott died in 1978 of an accidental overdose of alcohol and Valium. After his only son's death, Newman established the Scott Newman Foundation to finance the production of anti-drug films for children.

Newman was born in Cleveland, Ohio, the second of two boys of Arthur S. Newman, a partner in a sporting goods store, and Theresa Fetzer Newman.

He was raised in the affluent suburb of Shaker Heights, where he was encouraged him to pursue his interest in the arts by his mother and his uncle Joseph Newman, a well-known Ohio poet and journalist.

Following World War II service in the Navy, he enrolled at Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio, where he got a degree in English and was active in student productions.

He later studied at Yale University's School of Drama, then headed to New York to work in theater and television, his classmates at the famed Actor's Studio including Brando, James Dean and Karl Malden. His breakthrough was enabled by tragedy: Dean, scheduled to star as the disfigured boxer in a television adaptation of Ernest Hemingway's ''The Battler,'' died in a car crash in 1955. His role was taken by Newman, then a little-known performer.

Newman started in movies the year before, in ''The Silver Chalice,'' a costume film he so despised that he took out an ad in Variety to apologize. By 1958, he had won the best actor award at the Cannes Film Festival for the shiftless Ben Quick in ''The Long Hot Summer.''

In December 1994, about a month before his 70th birthday, he told Newsweek magazine he had changed little with age.

''I'm not mellower, I'm not less angry, I'm not less self-critical, I'm not less tenacious,'' he said. ''Maybe the best part is that your liver can't handle those beers at noon anymore,'' he said.

Newman is survived by his wife, five children, two grandsons and his older brother Arthur.

------

On the Net:

http://www.newmansown.com/

    Paul Newman Dies at 83, NYT, 27.9.2008,
    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/09/28/movies/28newman.html

 

 

 

 

 

Anita Page, Silent-Film Siren, Dies at 98

 

September 8, 2008
The New York Times
By ROBERT BERKVIST

 

Anita Page, one of the last surviving stars of the silent screen and a popular Hollywood siren before her surprisingly early — and seemingly permanent — retirement in the 1930s, died on Saturday. She was 98.

Randal Malone, her friend and longtime companion, told The Associated Press that she died at her home in Los Angeles.

Ms. Page was still a teenager when she left New York for California. She appeared in small, uncredited roles in several silent films, making her screen debut as an extra in “A Kiss for Cinderella” (1925), based on the fairy tale. Soon she was offered a contract by MGM. A petite, sexy blonde, Ms. Page was the ideal love interest, whether playing the girl next door or a flirtatious flapper out to conquer the opposite sex.

She became a star when she appeared with Joan Crawford in the Jazz Age silent drama “Our Dancing Daughters” (1928), in which they competed for the love of a millionaire (Johnny Mack Brown). Ms. Crawford was the loser until the film’s melodramatic end, when a drunken Ms. Page tumbled down a stairway to her death.

The film was a smash hit, and Ms. Page began receiving sacks of fan mail, including, she said, a spate of marriage proposals from none other than Mussolini.

Ms. Page made two more movies with Ms. Crawford, “Our Modern Maidens” (1929) and “Our Blushing Brides” (1930), neither of which matched the success of their first. She also appeared opposite Lon Chaney in “While the City Sleeps” (1928) and Ramon Novarro in “The Flying Fleet” (1929).

By then the age of silent films was at an end, and Ms. Page, along with other stars of the silent era, faced the challenge of making a successful transition to the talkies. Her chance came with “The Broadway Melody” (1929), which MGM billed as an “All-Talking, All-Singing, All-Dancing” picture. Ms. Page and her co-star Bessie Love played sisters with a vaudeville act who leave the Midwest with hopes of success on Broadway.

The film won the Academy Award for best picture, the first talkie to achieve that honor.

Ms. Page was born Anita Pomares on Aug. 4, 1910, in Flushing, Queens, one of two children of an electrical engineer and a homemaker. She broke into films after graduating from Washington Irving High School, taking small parts in independent films in New York before heading to Hollywood and signing with MGM. (“She is that rarest and most interesting type of beauty,” a studio publicity release said in 1932. “A Spanish blonde.”)

In 1934 she married the composer Nacio Herb Brown, whose tune “You Were Meant for Me,” from “The Broadway Melody,” had become Ms. Page’s signature song. The marriage ended in divorce a year later.

In 1937 she married Herschel A. House, who died in 1991. They had two daughters, Sandra and Linda.

In the early 1930s Ms. Page found an unlikely co-star in Buster Keaton and appeared opposite that deadpan clown in “Free and Easy” (1930) and “Sidewalks of New York” (1931). That same year she played the wife of a struggling laundryman (Clark Gable) in “The Easiest Way.”

When her contract expired in 1933, Ms. Page was feeling pressured by MGM. Denied a pay raise, she promptly announced her retirement. She was 23.

After one more appearance, in the British-made “Hitch Hike to Heaven” (1936), about the struggles of a touring repertory company, she took a 60-year vacation from moviemaking.

Ms. Page came out of retirement to appear in a little-noticed 1996 film, “Sunset After Dark,” which also featured another Hollywood veteran, the former child star Margaret O’Brien. Ms. Page went on to play small roles in low-budget horror films, including “The Crawling Brain” (2002). It was a world — and a lifetime — away from “Our Dancing Daughters.”

    Anita Page, Silent-Film Siren, Dies at 98, NYT, 8.9.2008,
    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/09/08/movies/08page.html

 

 

 

 

 

Charlton Heston,

Epic Film Star and Voice of N.R.A.,

Dies at 83

 

April 6, 2008
The New York Times
By ROBERT BERKVIST

 

Charlton Heston, who appeared in some 100 films in his 60-year acting career but who is remembered chiefly for his monumental, jut-jawed portrayals of Moses, Ben-Hur and Michelangelo, died Saturday night at his home in Beverly Hills, Calif. He was 83.

His death was confirmed by a spokesman for the family, Bill Powers, who declined to discuss the cause. In August 2002, Mr. Heston announced that he had been diagnosed with neurological symptoms “consistent with Alzheimer’s disease.”

“I’m neither giving up nor giving in,” he said.

Every actor dreams of a breakthrough role, the part that stamps him in the public memory, and Mr. Heston’s life changed forever when he caught the eye of the director Cecil B. De Mille. De Mille, who was planning his next biblical spectacular, “The Ten Commandments,” looked at the young, physically imposing Mr. Heston and saw his Moses.

When the film was released in 1956, more than three and a half hours long and the most expensive that De Mille had ever made, Mr. Heston became a marquee name. Whether leading the Israelites through the wilderness, parting the Red Sea or coming down from Mount Sinai with the tablets from God in hand, he was a Moses to remember.

Writing in The New York Times nearly 30 years afterward, when the film was re-released for a brief run, Vincent Canby called it “a gaudy, grandiloquent Hollywood classic” and suggested there was more than a touch of “the rugged American frontiersman of myth” in Mr. Heston’s Moses.

The same quality made Mr. Heston an effective spokesman, off-screen, for the causes he believed in. Late in life he became a staunch opponent of gun control. Elected president of the National Rifle Association in 1998, he proved to be a powerful campaigner against what he saw as the government’s attempt to infringe on a Constitutional guarantee — the right to bear arms.

In Mr. Heston, the N.R.A. found its embodiment of pioneer values — pride, independence and valor. In a speech at the N.R.A.’s annual convention in 2000, he brought the audience to its feet with a ringing attack on gun-control advocates. Paraphrasing an N.R.A. bumper sticker (“I’ll give you my gun when you take it from my cold, dead hands”) he waved a replica of a colonial musket above his head and shouted defiantly, “From my cold, dead hands!”

Mr. Heston’s screen presence was so commanding that he was never dominated by mammoth sets, spectacular effects or throngs of spear-waving extras. In his films, whether playing Buffalo Bill, an airline pilot, a naval captain or the commander of a spaceship, he essentially projected the same image — muscular, steely-eyed, courageous. If critics regularly used terms like “marble-monumental” or “granitic” to describe his acting style, they just as often praised his forthright, no-nonsense characterizations.

After his success in “The Ten Commandments,” Mr. Heston tried a change of pace. Another legendary Hollywood director, Orson Welles, cast him as a Mexican narcotics investigator in the thriller “Touch of Evil,” in which Welles himself played a murderous sheriff in a border town. Also starring Janet Leigh and Marlene Dietrich, the film, a modest success when it opened in 1958, came to be accepted as a noir classic.

But the following year Mr. Heston stepped back into the world of the biblical epic, this time under the director William Wyler. The movie was “Ben-Hur.” Cast as a prince of ancient Judea who rebels against the rule of Rome, Mr. Heston again dominated the screen. In the film’s most spectacular sequence, he and his co-star, Stephen Boyd, as his Roman rival, fight a thrilling duel with whips as their horse-drawn chariots careen wheel-to-wheel around an arena filled with roaring spectators.

“Ben-Hur” won 11 Academy Awards — a record at the time — including those for best picture, best director and, for Mr. Heston, best actor.

He went on to star opposite Sophia Loren in the 1961 release “El Cid,” battling the Moors in 11th-century Spain. As a Marine officer stationed in the Forbidden City in 1900, he helped put down the Boxer Rebellion in Nicholas Ray’s 1963 epic “55 Days at Peking.” In “Khartoum” (1966), he played Gen. Charles (Chinese) Gordon, who was killed in a desert uprising led in the film by Laurence Olivier’s Mahdi. When George Stevens produced and directed “The Greatest Story Ever Told” in 1965, there was Mr. Heston, back in ancient Judea, playing John the Baptist to Max von Sydow’s Jesus.

He portrayed Andrew Jackson twice, in “The President’s Lady” (1954) and “The Buccaneer” (1958). There were westerns (“Major Dundee,” “Will Penny,” “The Mountain Men”), costume dramas (“The Three Musketeers” and its sequel, “The Four Musketeers,” with Mr. Heston cast as the crafty Cardinal Richelieu in both) and action films aplenty. Whether playing a hard-bitten landowner in an adaptation of James Michener’s novel “The Hawaiians” (1970), or a daring pilot in “Airport 1975,” he could be relied on to give moviegoers their money’s worth.

In 1965 he was cast as Michelangelo in the film version of Irving Stone’s novel “The Agony and the Ecstasy.” Directed by Carol Reed, the film pitted Mr. Heston’s temperamental artist against Rex Harrison’s testy Pope Julius II, who commissioned Michelangelo to create frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. Mr. Heston’s performance took a critical drubbing, but to audiences, the larger-than-life role seemed to be another perfect fit. Mr. Heston once joked: “I have played three presidents, three saints and two geniuses. If that doesn’t create an ego problem, nothing does.”

Mr. Heston was catapulted into the distant future in the 1968 science-fiction film “Planet of the Apes,” in which he played an astronaut marooned on a desolate planet and then enslaved by its rulers, a race of anthropomorphic apes. The film was a hit. He reprised the role two years later in the sequel, “Beneath the Planet of the Apes.”

 

Son of the Midwest

It was all a long way from Evanston, Ill., where Charlton Carter was born on Oct. 4, 1924, and from the small town of St. Helen, Mich., where his family moved when he was a small boy and where his father ran a lumber mill. He attended a one-room school and learned to fish and hunt and to savor the feeling of being self-reliant in the wild, where his shyness was no handicap.

When his parents divorced in the 1930s and his mother remarried — his stepfather’s surname was Heston — the family moved to the Chicago suburb of Winnetka. He joined the theater program at his new high school and went on to enroll at Northwestern University on a scholarship. By that time, he was convinced he had found his life’s work.

Mr. Heston also found a fellow drama student, Lydia Clarke, whom he married in 1944, just before enlisting in the Army Air Force. He became a radio-gunner and spent three years stationed in the Aleutian Islands. After his discharge, the Hestons moved to New York, failed to find work in the theater and, somewhat disenchanted but still determined, moved to North Carolina, where they spent several seasons working at the Thomas Wolfe Memorial Theater in Asheville.

When they returned to New York in 1947, Mr. Heston got his first big break, landing the role of Caesar’s lieutenant in a Broadway production of Shakespeare’s “Antony and Cleopatra” staged by Guthrie McClintick and starring Katharine Cornell. The production ran for seven months and proved to be the high point of Mr. Heston’s New York stage career. He appeared in a handful of other plays, most of them dismal failures, although his performance in the title role of a 1956 revival of “Mr. Roberts” won him praise.

If Broadway had little to offer him, television was another matter. He made frequent appearances in dramatic series like “Robert Montgomery Presents” and “Philco Playhouse.” The door to Hollywood opened when the film producer Hal B. Wallis saw Mr. Heston’s performance as Rochester in a “Studio One” production of “Jane Eyre.” Wallis offered him a contract.

Mr. Heston made his film debut in 1950 in Wallis’s “Dark City,” a low-grade thriller in which he played a small-time gambler. Two years later, he did his first work for De Mille as a hard-driving circus boss in “The Greatest Show on Earth.”

Throughout his career he studied long and hard for his roles. He prepared for the part of Moses by memorizing passages from the Old Testament. When filming began on the sun-baked slopes of Mount Sinai, he suggested to De Mille that he play the role barefoot — a decision that he felt lent an edge of truth to his performance.

Preparing for “The Agony and the Ecstasy,” he read hundreds of Michelangelo’s letters and practiced how to sculpt and paint convincingly. When filming “The Wreck of the Mary Deare” (1959), in which he played the pilot of a salvage boat, he learned deep-water diving. And he mostly rejected stunt doubles. In “Ben-Hur,” he said, he drove his own chariot for “about 80 percent of the race.”

“I worked six weeks learning how to manage the four white horses,” he said. “Nearly pulled my arms right out of their sockets.”

As the years wore on, the leading roles began to go to younger men, and by the 1980s, Mr. Heston’s appearances on screen were less frequent. He turned to stage work again, not on Broadway but in Los Angeles, at the Ahmanson Theater, where he played roles ranging from Macbeth to James Tyrone in “Long Day’s Journey into Night.” He also returned to television, appearing in 1983 as a paternalistic banker in the miniseries “Chiefs” and as an oil baron in the series “The Colbys.”

 

Rifles and a ‘Cultural War’

Mr. Heston was always able to channel some energies into the public arena. He was an active supporter of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., calling him “a 20th-century Moses for his people,” and participated in the historic march on Washington in 1963.

He served as president of the Screen Actors Guild from 1966 to 1971, following in the footsteps of his friend and role model Ronald Reagan. A registered Democrat for many years, he was nevertheless selective in the candidates he chose to support and often campaigned for conservatives.

In 1981, President Reagan appointed him co-chairman of the President’s Task Force on the Arts and Humanities, a group formed to devise ways to obtain financing for arts organizations. Although he had reservations about some projects supported by the National Endowment for the Arts, Mr. Heston wound up defending the agency against charges of elitism.

Again and again, he proved himself a cogent and effective speaker, but he rejected suggestions that he run for office, perhaps for a seat in the Senate. “I’d rather play a senator than be one,” he said.

He became a Republican after Democrats in the Senate blocked the confirmation of Judge Robert Bork, a conservative, to the Supreme Court in 1987. Mr. Heston had supported the nomination and was critical of the Reagan White House for misreading the depth of the liberal opposition.

Mr. Heston frequently spoke out against what he saw as evidence of the decline and debasement of American culture. In 1992, appalled by the lyrics on “Cop Killer,” a recording by the rap artist Ice T, he blasted the album at a Time Warner stockholders meeting and was a force in having it withdrawn from the marketplace.

In the 1996 elections, he campaigned on behalf of some 50 Republican candidates and began to speak out against gun control. In 1997, he was elected vice president of the N.R.A.

In December of that year, as the keynote speaker at the 20th anniversary gala of the Free Congress Foundation, Mr. Heston described “a cultural war” raging across America, “storming our values, assaulting our freedoms, killing our self-confidence in who we are and what we believe.”

 

A Relentless Drive

The next year, at 73, he was elected president of the N.R.A. In his speech at the association’s convention before his election, he trained his oratorical artillery on President Bill Clinton’s White House: “Mr. Clinton, sir, America didn’t trust you with our health care system. America didn’t trust you with gays in the military. America doesn’t trust you with our 21-year-old daughters, and we sure, Lord, don’t trust you with our guns.”

He was in the news again after the shootings at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colo., in April 1999, when he said that the N.R.A.’s annual membership meeting, scheduled to be held the following week in Denver, would be scaled back in light of the killings but not canceled.

In a memorable scene from “Bowling for Columbine,” his 2002 documentary about violence in America, the director, Michael Moore, visited Mr. Heston at his home and asked him how he could defend his pro-gun stance. Mr. Heston ended the interview without comment.

In May 2001, he was unanimously re-elected to an unprecedented fourth term by the association’s board of directors. The association had amended its bylaws in 2000 to allow Mr. Heston to serve a third one-year term as president. Two months after his celebrated speech at the 2000 convention, it was disclosed that Mr. Heston had checked himself into an alcohol rehabilitation program after the convention had ended.

Mr. Heston was proud of his collection of some 30 guns at his longtime home in the Coldwater Canyon area of Beverly Hills, where he and his wife raised their son, Fraser, and daughter, Holly Ann. They all survive him, along with three grandchildren.

Never much for socializing , he spent his days either working, exercising, reading (he was fond of biographies) or sketching. An active diarist, he published several accounts of his career, including “The Actor’s Life: Journals 1956-1976.”

In 2003, Mr. Heston was among the recipients of the Presidential Medal of Freedom awarded by President Bush. In 1997, he was also a recipient of the annual Kennedy Center honors.

Mr. Heston continued working through the 1990s, acting more frequently on television but also in occasional films. His most recent film appearance found him playing a cameo role, in simian makeup, in Tim Burton’s 2001 remake of “Planet of the Apes.”

He had announced in 1999 that he was receiving radiation treatments for prostate cancer.

He had always hated the thought of retirement and once explained his relentless drive as an actor. “You never get it right,” he said in a 1986 interview. “Never once was it the way I imagined it lying awake at 4 o’clock in the morning thinking about it the next day.” His goal remained, he said, “To get it right one time.”

    Charlton Heston, Epic Film Star and Voice of N.R.A., Dies at 83, NYT, 6.4.2008,
    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/06/movies/06heston.html

 

 

 

 

 

Actor Richard Widmark Dies at 93

 

March 26, 2008
The New York Times
By ALJEAN HARMETZ

 

Richard Widmark, who created a villain in his first movie role who was so repellent and frightening that the actor became a star overnight, died Monday at his home in Roxbury, Conn. He was 93.

His death was announced Wednesday morning by his wife, Susan Blanchard. She said that Mr. Widmark had fractured a vertebrae in recent months and that his conditioned had worsened.

As Tommy Udo, a giggling, psychopathic killer in the 1947 gangster film “Kiss of Death,” Mr. Widmark tied up an old woman in a wheelchair (played by Mildred Dunnock) with a cord ripped from a lamp and shoved her down a flight of stairs to her death.

“The sadism of that character, the fearful laugh, the skull showing through drawn skin, and the surely conscious evocation of a concentration-camp degenerate established Widmark as the most frightening person on the screen,” the critic David Thomson wrote in “The Biographical Dictionary of Film.”

The performance won Mr. Widmark his sole Academy Award nomination, for best supporting actor.

Tommy Udo made the 32-year-old Mr. Widmark, who had been an established radio actor, an instant movie star, and he spent the next seven years playing a variety of flawed heroes and relentlessly anti-social mobsters in 20th Century Fox’s juiciest melodramas.

His mobsters were drenched in evil. Even his heroes, including the doctor who fights bubonic plague in Elia Kazan’s “Panic in the Streets” (1950), the daredevil pilot flying into the eye of a storm in “Slattery’s Hurricane” (1949) and the pickpocket who refuses to be a traitor in Samuel Fuller’s “Pickup on South Street” (1953) were nerve-strained and feral.

“Movie audiences fasten on to one aspect of the actor, and then they decide what they want you to be,” Mr. Widmark once said. “They think you’re playing yourself. The truth is that the only person who can ever really play himself is a baby.”

In reality, the screen’s most vicious psychopath was a mild-mannered former teacher who had married his college sweetheart, the actress Jean Hazelwood, and who told a reporter 48 years later that he had never been unfaithful and had never even flirted with women because, he said, “I happen to like my wife a lot.”

He was originally turned down for the role of Tommy Udo by the movie’s director, Henry Hathaway, who told Mr. Widmark that he was too clean-cut and intellectual. It was Darryl Zanuck, the Fox studio head, who, after watching Mr. Widmark’s screen test, insisted that he be given the part.

Among the 65 movies he made over the next five decades were “The Cobweb” (1955), in which he played the head of a psychiatric clinic where the staff seemed more emotionally troubled than the patients; “Saint Joan” (1957) , as the Dauphin to Joan Seberg’s Joan of Arc; John Wayne’s “The Alamo” (1960), as Jim Bowie, the inventor of the Bowie knife; “Judgment at Nuremberg” (1961), as an American army colonel prosecuting German war criminals; and John Ford’s revisionist western “Cheyenne Autumn” (1963), as an army captain who risks his career to help the Indians.

The genesis of “Cheyenne Autumn” was research Mr. Widmark had done at Yale into the suffering of the Cheyenne. He showed his work to John Ford and, two years later, Ford sent Mr. Widmark a finished screenplay.

Mr. Widmark created the role of Detective Sergeant Daniel Madigan in Don Siegel’s 1968 film “Madigan.” It proved so popular that later played the loner Madigan on an NBC television series during the 1972-73 season.

As his blonde hair turned grey, Mr. Widmark moved up in rank, playing generals in the nuclear thriller “Twilight’s Last Gleaming” (1977) and “The Swarm” (1978), in which he waged war on bees. He was the evil head of a hospital in “Coma” (1978) and a United States Senator in “True Colors” (1991).

He was forever fighting producers’ efforts to stereotype him. Indeed, he became so adept at all types of roles that he consistently lent credibility to inferior movies and became an audience favorite over a career that spanned more than half a century.

“I suppose I wanted to act in order to have a place in the sun,” he once told a reporter. “I’d always lived in small towns, and acting meant having some kind of identity.”

Richard Widmark (he had no middle name) was born on Dec. 26, 1914, in Sunrise, Minn., and grew up throughout the Midwest. His father, Carl Widmark, was a traveling salesman who took his wife, Mae Ethel, and two sons from Minnesota to Sioux Falls, S.D.; Henry, Ill.; Chillicothe, Mo.; and Princeton, Ill., where Mr. Widmark graduated from high school as senior class president.

Movie crazy, he was afraid to admit his interest in the “sissy” job of acting. On a full scholarship at Lake Forest College in Illinois, he played end on the football team, took third place in a state oratory contest, starred in plays and was, once again, senior class president.

Graduating in 1936, he spent two years as an instructor in the Lake Forest drama department, directing and acting in two dozen plays. Then he headed to New York City in 1938, where one of his classmates was producing 15-minute radio soap operas and cast Mr. Widmark in a variety of roles.

“Getting launched was easy for me — too easy, perhaps,” he said of his success playing “young, neurotic guys” on “Big Sister,” “Life Can Be Beautiful,” “Joyce Jordan, M.D.,” “Stella Dallas,” “Front Page Farrell,” “Aunt Jenny’s Real Life Stories” and “Inner Sanctum.”

At the beginning of World War II, Mr. Widmark tried to enlist in the army but was turned down three times because of a perforated eardrum. So he turned, in 1943, to Broadway. In his first stage role, he played an Army lieutenant in F. Hugh Herbert’s “Kiss and Tell,” directed by George Abbott. Appearing in the controversial play “Trio,” which was closed by the License Commissioner after 67 performances because it touched on lesbianism, he received glowing reviews as a college student who fights to free the girl he loves from the domination of an older woman.

After a successful, 10-year career as a radio actor, he tried the movies with “Kiss of Death,” which was being filmed in New York. Older than most new recruits, he was, to his surprise, summoned to Hollywood after the movie was released. “I’m probably the only actor who gave up a swimming pool to go out to Hollywood,” Mr. Widmark told The New Yorker in 1961.

He had never expected 20th Century Fox to pick up the option on the contract he was forced to sign to get the role of Tommy Udo. During the seven years of his Fox contract, he starred in 20 movies, including “Yellow Sky” (1948), as the blackguard who menaces Gregory Peck; “Down to the Sea in Ships” (1949), as a valiant whaler; Jules Dassin’s “Night and the City” (1950), as a small- time hustler who dreams of becoming a wrestling promoter; and “Don’t Bother to Knock” (1952), in which the tables were turned and he was the prey of a psychopathic Marilyn Monroe.

A passionate liberal Democrat, Mr. Widmark played a bigot who baits a black doctor in Joseph Mankiewicz’s “No Way Out” (1950). He was so embarrassed by the character that after every scene he apologized to the young actor he was required to torment, Sidney Poitier. In 1990, when Mr. Widmark was given the D.W. Griffith Career Achievement Award by the National Board of Review, it was Mr. Poitier who presented it to him.

Within two years after his Fox contract ended, Mr. Widmark had formed a production company and produced “Time Limit” (1957), a serious dissection of possible treason by an American prisoner of war that The New York Times called “sobering, important and exciting.” Directed by the actor Karl Malden, “Time Limit” starred Mr. Widmark as an army colonel who is investigating a major (Richard Basehart) who is suspected of having broken under pressure during the Korean War and aided the enemy.

Mr. Widmark produced two more films: “The Secret Ways” (1961) in which he went behind the Iron Curtain to bring out an anti-Communist leader; and “The Bedford Incident” (1964), another Cold War drama, in which he played an ultraconservative naval captain trailing a Russian submarine and putting the world in danger of a nuclear catastrophe.

Mr. Widmark told The Guardian in 1995 that he had not become a producer to make money but to have greater artistic control. “I could choose the director and my fellow actors,” he said. “I could carry out projects which I liked but the studios didn’t want.”

He added: “The businessmen who run Hollywood today have no self-respect. What interests them is not movies but the bottom line. Look at ‘Dumb and Dumber,’ which turns idiocy into something positive, or ‘Forrest Gump,’ a hymn to stupidity. ‘Intellectual’ has become a dirty word.”

He also vowed he would never appear on a talk show on television, saying, “When I see people destroying their privacy — what they think, what they feel — by beaming it out to millions of viewers, I think it cheapens them as individuals.”

In 1970, he won an Emmy nomination for his first television role, as the president of the United States in a mini-series based on Fletcher Knebel’s novel “Vanished.” By the 1980s, television movies had transformed the jittery psychopath of his early days into a wise and stalwart lawman. He played a Texas Ranger opposite Willie Nelson’s train robber in “Once Upon a Texas Train,” a small-town police chief in “Blackout” and, most memorably, a bayou country sheriff faced with a group of aged black men who have confessed to a murder in “A Gathering of Old Men.”

“The older you get, the less you know about acting,” he told one reporter, “but the more you know about what makes the really great actors.” The actor he most admired was Spencer Tracy, because, he said, Tracy’s acting had a reality and honesty that seemed effortless.

Mr. Widmark, who hated the limelight, spent his Hollywood years living quietly on a large farm in Connecticut and an 80-acre horse ranch in Hidden Valley, north of Los Angeles. Asked once if he had been “astute” with his money, he answered, “No, just tight.”

He sold the ranch in 1997 after the death of Ms. Hazelwood, his wife of 55 years. “I don’t care how well known an actor is,” Mr. Widmark insisted. “He can lead a normal life if he wants to.”

Besides his wife, Ms. Blanchard, Mr. Widmark is survived by his daughter, Anne Heath Widmark, of Santa Fe, N.M., who had once been married to the Hall of Fame pitcher Sandy Koufax.

Well into his later years, the nonviolent, gun-hating Mr. Widmark, who described himself as “gentle,” was accosted by strangers who expected him to be a tough guy. There is even a story that Joey Gallo, the New York mobster, was so taken by Mr. Widmark’s performance in “Kiss of Death” that he copied the actor’s natty posture, sadistic smirk and tittering laugh.

“It’s a bit rough,” Mr. Widmark once said, “priding oneself that one isn’t too bad an actor and then finding one’s only remembered for a giggle.”

    Actor Richard Widmark Dies at 93, NYT, 26.3.2008,
    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/26/arts/26cnd-widmark.html

 

 

 

 

 

Deborah Kerr, Actress, Dies at 86

 

October 18, 2007
Filed at 11:45 a.m. ET
By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The New York Times

 

LONDON (AP) -- Deborah Kerr, who shared one of Hollywood's most famous kisses and made her mark with such roles as the correct widow in ''The King and I'' and the unhappy officer's wife in ''From Here to Eternity,'' has died. She was 86.

Kerr, who suffered from Parkinson's disease, died Tuesday in Suffolk in eastern England, her agent, Anne Hutton, said Thursday.

For many she will be remembered best for her kiss with Burt Lancaster as waves crashed over them on a Hawaiian beach in the wartime drama ''From Here to Eternity.''

Kerr's roles as forceful, sometimes frustrated women pushed the limits of Hollywood's treatment of sex on the screen during the censor-bound 1950s.

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences nominated Kerr a six times for best actress, but never gave her an Academy Award until it presented an honorary Oscar in 1994 for her distinguished career as an ''artist of impeccable grace and beauty, a dedicated actress whose motion picture career has always stood for perfection, discipline and elegance.''

She had the reputation of a ''no problem'' actress.

''I have never had a fight with any director, good or bad,'' she said toward the end of her career. ''There is a way around everything if you are smart enough.''

Kerr (pronounced CARR) was the only daughter of Arthur Kerr-Trimmer, a civil engineer and architect who died when she was 14.

Born in Helensburgh, Scotland, she moved with her parents to England when she was 5, and she started to study dance in the Bristol school of her aunt, Phyllis Smale.

Kerr won a scholarship to continue studying at the Sadler's Wells Ballet School in London. A 17 she made her stage debut as a member of the corps de ballet in ''Prometheus.''

She soon switched to drama, however, and began playing small parts in repertory theater in London until it was shut down by the 1939 outbreak of World War II.

After reading children's stories on British Broadcasting Corp. radio, she was given the part of a hatcheck girl with two lines in the film ''Contraband,'' but her speaking role ended on the cutting-room floor.

After more repertory acting she had another crack at films, reprising her stage role of Jenny, a Salvation Army worker, in a 1940 adaptation of George Bernard Shaw's ''Major Barbara,'' and receiving favorable reviews both in Britain and the United States.

She continued making films in Britain during the war, including one -- ''Colonel Blimp'' -- in which she played three different women over a span of decades.

''It is astonishing how she manages to make the three parts distinctly separate as characterizations,'' said New Movies magazine at the time.

Kerr was well-reviewed as an Irish spy in ''The Adventuress'' and as the tragic girlfriend of a Welsh miner in ''Love on the Dole.''

She was invited to Hollywood in 1946 to play in ''The Hucksters'' opposite Clark Gable. She went on to work with virtually all the other top American actors and with many top directors, including John Huston, Otto Preminger and Elia Kazan.

Tired of being typecast in serene, ladylike roles, she rebelled to win a release from her MGM contract and get the role of Karen Holmes in ''From Here to Eternity.''

Playing the Army officer's alcoholic, sex-starved wife in a fling with Lancaster as a sergeant opened up new possibilities for Kerr.

She played virtually every part imaginable from murderer to princess to a Roman Christian slave to a nun.

In ''The King and I,'' with her singing voice dubbed by Marni Nixon, she was Anna Leonowens, who takes her son to Siam so that she can teach the children of the king, played by Yul Brynner.

Her best-actress nominations were for ''Edward, My Son'' (1949), ''From Here to Eternity'' (1953), ''The King and I'' (1956), ''Heaven Knows, Mr. Allison'' (1957), ''Separate Tables'' (1958), and ''The Sundowners'' (1960).

Among her other movies is ''An Affair to Remember'' with Cary Grant.

Other notable roles were in ''The Sundowners,'' ''Beloved Infidel,'' ''The Innocents'' (an adaptation of the Henry James novella ''Turn of the Screw''), ''The Night of the Iguana'' with Richard Burton and ''The Arrangement'' with Kirk Douglas.

After ''The Arrangement'' in 1968, she took what she called a ''leave of absence'' from acting, saying she felt she was ''either too young or too old'' for any role she was offered.

Kerr told The Associated Press that she turned down a number of scripts, either for being too explicit or because of excessive violence.

She refused to play a nude scene in ''The Gypsy Moths,'' released in 1968. ''It was when they started that `Now everybody has got to take their clothes off,''' she said. ''My argument was that it was completely gratuitous. Had it been necessary for the dramatic content, I would have done it.''

In fact she undressed for ''The Arrangement,'' even though the scene was later cut. ''There the nude scene was necessary, husband and wife in bed together,'' Kerr said. ''That was real.''

She returned to the stage, acting in Edward Albee's ''Seascape'' on Broadway and ''Long Day's Journey Into Night'' in Los Angeles.

Her Broadway debut was in 1953, when she was acclaimed as Laura Reynolds, a teacher's wife who treats a sensitive student compassionately in ''Tea and Sympathy.''

After a full season in New York, she took it on a national tour and recreated the role in a movie in 1956.

Kerr was active until the mid-1980s, with ''The Assam Garden,'' ''Hold the Dream'' and ''Reunion at Fairborough'' all in 1985.

She told the AP that TV reruns of her old movies have ''kept me alive'' for a new generation of film fans.

In 1946 Kerr married Anthony Charles Bartley, whom she had met as a squadron leader in the Royal Air Force. They had two daughters and were divorced in 1959. A year later she married Peter Viertel, a novelist-screenwriter, with whom she lived on a large estate with two trout ponds in the Swiss Alpine resort of Klosters and in a villa in Marbella, Spain.

Kerr is survived by Viertel, two daughters and three grandchildren.

    Deborah Kerr, Actress, Dies at 86, NYT, 18.10.2007,
    http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/arts/AP-Obit-Kerr.html

 

 

 

 

 

Jack Palance, 87,

Film and TV Actor,

Dies

 

Published: November 11, 2006
The New York Times
By RICHARD SEVERO

 

Jack Palance, a coal miner’s son who spent most of a long Hollywood career playing memorable heavies in movies like “Shane” and “Sudden Fear,” only to win an Academy Award in his 70s for a self-parodying comic performance in “City Slickers,” died yesterday at his home in Montecito, Calif.

His death was announced by a family spokesman, Dick Guttman, The Associated Press said. His family said he was 87, though some biographical records indicate he was 85.

Mr. Palance (he pronounced it PAL-ance and grew annoyed when others insisted on the more flowery pa-LANCE) first gained wide notice in 1953, when he electrified movie audiences with his serpentine portrayal of the nasty gunfighter Jack Wilson in the classic film “Shane.”

He had only 16 lines in the film, as well as a few ice-cold gothic murmurs of laughter off screen, before he was dispatched by a heroic Alan Ladd in a barroom duel. But the performance drew an Oscar nomination for him for best supporting actor, and it all but sealed his fate as a perennial Hollywood bad guy for years, even though he had always thought he would be good at comedy.

His big chance for that came nearly four decades later, when he was cast in “City Slickers,” a 1991 western comedy about midlife crisis. Mr. Palance played Curly, a leather-tough trail boss shepherding about some urban greenhorns looking for weekend adventure. His co-stars were Billy Crystal, Daniel Stern and Bruno Kirby, who died in August.

It was a comedy of the sort Mr. Palance had always wanted, and the performance brought him his only Oscar, in 1992, for best supporting actor.

Throughout his career, Mr. Palance, an imposing presence at 6 feet 4, was instantly recognizable for his rugged profile, deep-set dark eyes, high cheekbones and, when the part called for it, which was almost always, a deliciously sinister sneer. It was put to use over and over as he played crooks, murderers, maniacs, barbarians (like Attila the Hun), uncouth lovers and at least one violence-prone carrier of pneumonic plague.

When reporters asked him what he thought about most of his films, he tended to dismiss them as “garbage.” Still, his part as a homicidal husband stalking Joan Crawford in “Sudden Fear” (1952) also won him an Oscar nomination, and his role as a robber with a heart in “I Died a Thousand Times” (1955), a remake of Humphrey Bogart’s “High Sierra,” won him better reviews than the movie itself.

Walter Jack Palance was born Feb. 18, 1918, or Feb. 18, 1920, in Lattimer Mines, Pa., the third child of Vladimir Palahniuk, a coal miner, and the former Anna Gramiak, both immigrants from Ukraine. (Named after his father, he changed his name after he became an actor.) The family lived in a rough-and-tumble company town that Mr. Palance later said was where he “learned how to hate,” even though he said he loved the Pennsylvania countryside and owned property there.

Mr. Palance worked in the mines himself before he escaped into acting by way of professional boxing, modeling, short-order cooking, waiting on tables, repairing radios, selling and working as a lifeguard.

In 1942, during World War II, he joined the Army Air Corps, only to be discharged a year later after he was knocked unconscious when his B-24 bomber lost power on takeoff. After the service he used the G.I. Bill of Rights to attend the University of North Carolina and later Stanford University, where he considered becoming a journalist. But journalists’ wages were so poor then, he recalled, that he was drawn to acting, which he saw as potentially more lucrative, and joined the university drama club. He graduated in 1947 with a degree in drama.

Producers and casting directors were taken with his unusual looks and rich voice, and he got parts in the Broadway productions of “The Big Two” (1947), “Temporary Island” (1948) and “The Vigil,” also 1948. That same year he also played Anthony Quinn’s understudy as Stanley Kowalski in the touring company of the Tennessee Williams play “A Streetcar Named Desire.” He later replaced Marlon Brando in the role on Broadway.

His first movie role came in 1950, playing Blackie, an antisocial carrier of pneumonic plague in “Panic in the Streets,” which starred Richard Widmark. Then came a war picture, “Halls of Montezuma,” and after that, , his Oscar-nominated performance in “Sudden Fear.”

His second nomination came the following year, for his portrayal of Jack Wilson, the menacing gunslinger in “Shane.”

The acclaim from those roles brought him parts in “Arrowhead” (as a renegade Apache), “Man in the Attic” (as Jack the Ripper), “Sign of the Pagan” (as Attila the Hun) and “The Silver Chalice” (as a fictional challenger to Jesus).

Among his other films were “Kiss of Fire,” “The Big Knife,” “Attack!” “The Lonely Man,” “House of Numbers” and “Oklahoma Crude.” He also made a number of movies abroad.

Mr. Palance married Virginia Baker in 1949; they had three children, Holly, Brooke and Cody. Cody died of a melanoma in 1998 at 43. The marriage ended in divorce in 1966; Mr. Palance’s 1987 marriage to Elaine Rogers also ended in divorce.

Mr. Palance did some television as well, winning an Emmy Award for his performance in 1956 as a prizefighter in the “Playhouse 90” production of Rod Serling’s “Requiem for a Heavyweight.” Jack Gould, reviewing it for The New York Times, said Mr. Palance gave a “brilliant interpretation” of a fighter who “projected man’s incoherence and bewilderment with a superb regard for details.”

There were other sides to Jack Palance, and it took some aging to bring them out. Late in life, in 1996, he wrote “Forest of Love,” a prose poem about male sexuality and fears of loneliness. It was accompanied by his own pen-and-ink drawings, inspired in part by his feelings about his farm near Wilkes-Barre, Pa. He had been drawing and painting since the late 1950s, when he lived in Rome, but hardly anyone knew of that talent until “Forest of Love” was published.

After the success of “City Slickers,” he had several television roles and parts in commercials that exploited his droll streak.

Perhaps Mr. Palance’s most memorable television appearance came when he received his Oscar in 1992. Striding to accept his statuette, he suddenly dropped to the stage and did a series of one-arm push-ups, not only showing his physical strength but also giving Billy Crystal, the host of the ceremony and his “City Slickers” co-star, a rich running joke for the rest of the evening.

Jack Palance, 87, Film and TV Actor, Dies,
NYT, 11.11.2006,
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/11/movies/11palance.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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