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Arts > Films > Cinematographers

 

 

 

 

Gordon Willis, Cinematography Master | The New York Times        20 May 2014

 

Gordon Willis,

the cinematographer behind several seminal films of the 1970s

including "The Godfather" and "Manhattan," died on Sunday.

 

Produced by: Robin Lindsay and Gabe Johnson

Watch more videos at: http://nytimes.com/video

 

YouTube

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aW64DCGYp3U 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rachel Morrison        USA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/02/28/
588825661/i-can-t-believe-i-am-the-first-says-oscar-nominated-female-cinematographer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bradford Young        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/2015/03/01/
389481636/a-most-vibrant-year-for-cinematographer-bradford-young

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Robby Müller        DUT        1940-2018

 

 

 

Robby Müller in 1989.

 

Photograph: Alamy Stock Photo

 


Robby Müller obituary

Cinematographer who helped shape the visions of film-makers

including Wim Wenders and Jim Jarmusch

G

Thu 5 Jul 2018        15.50 BST

Last modified on Sun 22 Jul 2018        18.00 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2018/jul/05/
robby-muller-obituary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Müller rose

to venerated status

in the film industry

with sublime work

for Wim Wenders,

Jim Jarmusch

and Lars von Trier

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2018/jul/04/
robby-muller-cinematographer-down-by-law-paris-texas-dies-wenders

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2019/jun/22/
private-polaroids-robby-muller-cinematographer-arles-like-sunlight-coming-through-clouds

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/10/
obituaries/robby-muller-inventive-cinematographer-is-dead-at-78.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2018/jul/05/
robby-muller-obituary

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2018/jul/04/
robby-muller-cinematographer-down-by-law-paris-texas-dies-wenders

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Walter Lassally        GER / UK / GR        1926-2017

 

Oscar-winning

cinematographer

whose eye

and innovative techniques

contributed to the success

of films by Tony Richardson,

the Merchant Ivory group

and many others

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/27/
obituaries/walter-lassally-oscar-winning-cinematographer-dies-at-90.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/27/
obituaries/walter-lassally-oscar-winning-cinematographer-dies-at-90.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/oct/24/
walter-lassally-obituary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Douglas Slocombe        UK        1913-2016

 

British

cinematographer

who filmed

the Nazi invasion

of Poland,

the adventures

of “Indiana Jones”

and the madcap farce

of Ealing Studios

comedies

 

(...)

 

One of Britain’s

most acclaimed

cinematographers,

Mr. Slocombe

shot some 80 films,

working with director

as varied as

George Cukor,

John Huston,

Norman Jewison

and Roman Polanski.

 

His career began

with the famed

Ealing black comedies

of the late 1940s

and early ’50s,

and ended with three

“Indiana Jones” films

for Steven Spielberg.

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/24/arts/douglas-slocombe-indiana-jones-cinematographer-dies-at-103.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/24/
arts/douglas-slocombe-indiana-jones-cinematographer-dies-at-103.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vilmos Zsigmond        HUN / USA        1930-2016

 

 

 

Vilmos Zsigmond, far right, filming “The Deer Hunter."

 

Universal Pictures, via Photofest

 

Vilmos Zsigmond,

Cinematographer Who Gave Hollywood Films a New Look, Dies at 85

By BRUCE WEBER        NYT        JAN. 4, 2016

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/05/
movies/vilmos-zsigmond-cinematographer-who-gave-hollywood-films-a-new-look-dies-at-85.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hungarian-born

cinematographer

who helped shape

the look

of American movies

in the 1970s, ’80s

and beyond,

among other things

lending a hyper-real glow

to the arrival

of space aliens

and winning an Oscar

for Steven Spielberg’s

1977 science fiction

extravaganza

“Close Encounters

of the Third Kind”

 

(...)

 

Known

for creating dramatic,

story-propelling images

in muted colors

and natural light,

Mr. Zsigmond (...)

referred

to his desired imagery

as “poetic realism.”

 

Along with

other cinematographers,

including his countryman

Laszlo Kovacs,

with whom he escaped

the Soviet dominance

of Hungary in 1956,

he helped usher in

a new era in the look

of Hollywood movies,

one in which

light and color

and whole images

superseded

the importance

of making the star

look gorgeous.

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/05/
movies/vilmos-zsigmond-cinematographer-who-gave-hollywood-films-a-new-look-dies-at-85.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/05/
movies/vilmos-zsigmond-cinematographer-
who-gave-hollywood-films-a-new-look-dies-at-85.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Haskell Wexler        USA        1922-2015

 

one of the most

inventive

cinematographers

in Hollywood

and an outspoken

political firebrand

 

(...)

 

With two Academy Awards

and a star on the Hollywood

Walk of Fame,

Mr. Wexler

was a prominent member

of the artistic elite.

 

But he was also

a lifelong advocate

of progressive causes

whose landmark

“Medium Cool”

— a fiction film shot

during the 1968

Democratic National

Convention in Chicago —

demolished boundaries

between

documentary and fiction,

reflecting his refusal

to recognize limitations

in either art or politics.

 

Mr. Wexler

received the last Oscar

that would be given for

black-and-white

cinematography,

for “Who’s Afraid

of Virginia Woolf?”

(1966).

 

He won again

a decade later

for “Bound for Glory”

(1976),

a biography

of the folk singer

Woody Guthrie

(whom Mr. Wexler

had met

during World War II,

when both served

in the merchant marine).

 

He had five

Oscar nominations in all,

over a career that began

more than auspiciously:

His first genuine credit

was on an Oscar-nominated

1953 documentary short,

“The Living City.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/12/28/movies/haskell-wexler-oscar-winning-cinematographer-dies-at-93.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/12/28/
movies/haskell-wexler-oscar-winning-cinematographer-dies-at-93.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Andrew Lesnie        AUS        1956-2015

 

Oscar-winning

cinematographer

who filmed

Peter Jackson’s

“Lord of the Rings”

trilogy

and three “Hobbit”

movies

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/29/movies/andrew-lesnie-cinematographer-dies-at-59.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/29/
movies/andrew-lesnie-cinematographer-dies-at-59.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Miroslav Ondricek        CZE / USA        1934-2015

 

cameraman

whose intimate,

realist style

propelled him

from Communist

Czechoslovakia

to a successful career

in Hollywood,

where he was nominated

for two Academy Awards

for cinematography

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/03/
movies/miroslav-ondricek-oscar-nominated-czech-cinematographer-is-dead-at-80.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/03/
movies/miroslav-ondricek-oscar-nominated-czech-cinematographer-
is-dead-at-80.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gordon Hugh Willis        USA        1931-2014

 

master

cinematographer

whose work on

“The Godfather,”

“Manhattan,”

“Annie Hall,”

“Klute,”

“All the President’s Men”

and other seminal movies

of the 1970s

made his name synonymous

with that pathbreaking decade

in American moviemaking

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/20/
movies/gordon-willis-godfather-cinematographer-dies-at-82.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/20/
movies/gordon-willis-godfather-cinematographer-dies-at-82.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oswald Norman Morris        UK        1915-2014

 

British cinematographer

who helped redefine

the color in Technicolor

with filters, fog machines

and makeshift devices

like the brown silk stocking

he stretched over a lens

for the life-in-amber look

of “Fiddler on the Roof”

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/27/arts/oswald-morris-artful-cinematographer-is-dead-at-98.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/27/
arts/oswald-morris-artful-cinematographer-is-dead-at-98.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bruce Surtees        USA        1937-2012

 

Oscar-nominated

cinematographer

known as

the Prince of Darkness

for his skill at summoning

sharply etched figures

from the inky depths

of prisons, nightclubs

and other inhospitably

lighted places

 

(...)

 

Cinematography

was part

of Mr. Surtees’s

genetic

endowment.

 

His father,

Robert Surtees,

was a cinematographer

who won Oscars for

“King Solomon’s Mines”

(1950),

“The Bad and the Beautiful”

(1952)

and “Ben-Hur”

(1959).

 

The younger

Mr. Surtees,

born in Los Angeles

on Aug. 3, 1937,

was named

Bruce Mohr Powell Surtees

in honor of his father’s

mentor Hal Mohr,

also an esteemed

cinematographer.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/29/arts/bruce-surtees-oscar-nominated-cinematographer-dies-at-74.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/29/
arts/bruce-surtees-oscar-nominated-cinematographer-dies-at-74.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jack Cardiff        UK        1914-2009

 

film director

and cinematographer

 

 

As a cinematographer,

Jack Cardiff, (...)

was known as

"the man who makes

women look beautiful".

 

Some of the glamorous women

whose beauty

he accentuated

through his lens

were Ava Gardner

(Pandora

and the Flying Dutchman,

The Barefoot Contessa),

Audrey Hepburn

and Anita Ekberg

(War and Peace)

and Marilyn Monroe

(The Prince

and the Showgirl).

 

In fact,

when Monroe

was in London

to shoot

The Prince

and the Showgirl

with Laurence Olivier

in 1956,

she said of Cardiff:

"He's the best cameraman

in the world,

and I've got him."

 

Cardiff

was certainly one

of the best colour

cinematographers

in the world,

whose career

in that capacity

began

with the emergence

of Technicolor

and continued

through the golden

(or rainbow) age

of that process.

 

As camera operator

on Wings of the Morning

(1937),

Britain's

first three-strip

Technicolor film,

he became

a colour expert

and photographed

many travelogue shorts

as well as being

second unit cameraman

on The Four Feathers

(1939).

 

However,

his greatest achievement

was as the cinematographer

on three of Michael Powell

and Emeric Pressburger's

best films,

A Matter of Life and Death

(1946),

Black Narcissus

(1947),

which won him an Oscar,

and The Red Shoes

(1948).

 

Cardiff's dramatic

use of colour played

an essential part

in the success

of these films,

if only for

the splashes of red

- the red rose

in the first,

the nun Deborah Kerr's hair

seen in flashback

in the second,

and Moira Shearer's

hair and shoes

in the third.

 

Cardiff's view

was that a cameraman

is "the man

who paints the movie".

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2009/apr/23/jack-cardiff-obituary

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/filmblog/2011/sep/23/
jack-smith-muse-maria-montez

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/filmblog/2009/apr/22/
jack-cardiff-black-narcissus

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2009/apr/23/
jack-cardiff-obituary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gábor Pogány        HUN / ITA        1915-1999

 

Born in Budapest

and educated in Britain,

Pogány

emigrated to Italy

and spent

much of his career

in the country.

 

He worked

on over a hundred films

during his career,

mainly Italian films

as well as some

international productions.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G%C3%A1bor_Pog%C3%A1ny

 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G%C3%A1bor_Pog%C3%A1ny

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stanley Cortez        USA        1908-1997

 

He worked on

over seventy films,

including

Orson Welles'

The Magnificent Ambersons

(1942),

Charles Laughton's

The Night of the Hunter

(1955),

Nunnally Johnson's

The Three Faces of Eve

(1957),

and Samuel Fuller's

Shock Corridor

(1963)

and The Naked Kiss

(1964).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stanley_Cortez

 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stanley_Cortez

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dale H. "Ted" Tetzlaff        USA        1903-1995

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ted_Tetzlaff

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Robert L. Surtees        USA        1906-1985

 

http://movies2.nytimes.com/books/97/12/07/
home/mcmurtry-screen.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eugen Schüfftan        GER        1893-1977

 

 

https://www.bfi.org.uk/films-tv-people/4ce2ba8cb7843

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/06/
movies/homevideo/triumph-of-the-will-fascist-rants-and-the-hollywood-response.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/15/
movies/homevideo/15kehr.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2009/nov/05/
architecture-film-riba

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arthur Edeson        USA        1891-1970

 

(...) film

cinematographer,

born

in New York City.

 

His career ran

from the formative years

of the film industry

in New York,

through the silent era

in Hollywood,

and the sound era there

in the 1930s and 1940s.

 

His work included

many landmarks

in film history,

including

The Thief of Bagdad

(1924),

Frankenstein

(1931),

The Maltese Falcon

(1941),

and Casablanca

(1942)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_Edeson

 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_Edeson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Karl W. Freund        GER        1890-1969

 

(...) German Jewish

cinematographer

and film director

best known

for photographing

Metropolis

(1927),

Dracula

(1931)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karl_Freund

 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karl_Freund

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/30/
movies/cat-people-and-a-gallery-of-horror-predators.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/26/
movies/homevideo/universal-classic-monsters-puts-horror-on-parade.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/22/
movies/homevideo/22dvds.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2005/09/02/
movies/classic-dvd-sets-star-lugosi-and-garbo.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2004/10/19/
movies/van-helsing-the-universal-monster-legacy-collection-and-eyes-without.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1969/05/06/
archives/karl-freund-oscarwinning-cameraman-for-the-good-earfh-dies-af-79.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

George S. Barnes        USA        1892-1953

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/
George_Barnes_(cinematographer)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chester A. Lyons        USA        1885-1936

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2008/12/09/
movies/homevideo/09dvds.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1991/11/01/
movies/review-film-naivete-and-sophistication-join-in-a-1929-silent.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1929/07/22/
archives/the-screen-more-on-melodrama-etched-in-moonlight-from-sudermanns.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Related > Anglonautes > Arts

 

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NYT > Anatomy of a Scene

 

 

 

 

 

Related > Anglonautes > Images

 

Films > Actors

 

 

 

 

 

Related > The Guardian > In the director's chair

 

Jason Solomons

interviews film-makers on video,

discussing their latest work,

career to date and their visions

https://www.theguardian.com/film/series/inthedirectorschair