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Arts > Music > 20th, 21st century > UK, USA > Timeline in pictures

 

Country, Country Rock, Bluegrass, Folk, Folk Rock

 

 

 

 

Dolly Parton, Tammy Wynette, Loretta Lynn - Silver Threads and Golden Needles

 

"Music video by Dolly Parton;Tammy Wynette;Loretta Lynn

performing Silver Threads And Golden Needles.

(C) 1993 Sony BMG Music Entertainment"

 

YouTube > DollyPartonVEVO        25 October 2009

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VO4SYPRa3pI

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Billy Ray Cyrus        USA

 

 

 

Lil Nas X - Old Town Road (Official Movie) ft. Billy Ray Cyrus        Lil Nas X        17 May 2019

 

Official video for Lil Nas X’s Billboard #1 hit,

“Old Town Road (Remix)” featuring Billy Ray Cyrus.

 

Special guest appearances

from Chris Rock, Haha Davis, Rico Nasty,

Diplo, Jozzy, Young Kio, and Vince Staples.

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=w2Ov5jzm3j8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.npr.org/2019/05/17/
724339197/lil-nas-xs-old-town-road-video-is-here-to-lasso-the-yeehaw-agenda

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Steve Earle        USA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/allsongs/2019/01/09/
683332861/steve-earle-sings-to-his-hero-guy-clark

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jason Eady        USA

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/08/02/
633950286/first-listen-jason-eady-i-travel-on

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kathy Mattea        USA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/09/19/
649318596/how-kathy-mattea-got-back-her-voice-with-pretty-bird

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Priscilla Renea        USA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/06/23
/622316454/priscilla-renea-refuses-to-be-quiet-about-racism-in-country-music

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bobbie Gentry        USA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.npr.org/2019/02/09/
692443686/bobbie-gentrys-the-delta-sweete-gets-a-much-belated-tribute

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tom Paxton        USA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.npr.org/2013/11/04/
243014999/tom-paxton-on-mountain-stage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shania Twain        CAN

 

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2017/sep/28/
shania-twain-now-review-bouncing-back-with-country-pop-queen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Garth Brooks        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/05/
arts/music/garth-brooks-yankee-stadium.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Prine        USA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/world-cafe/2018/06/01/
616122495/john-prine-on-world-cafe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maren Larae Morris        USA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.npr.org/2016/04/01/
472543486/one-year-later-maren-morris-on-the-song-that-changed-her-life

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reba McEntire        USA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.npr.org/2017/02/04/
513315456/reba-mcentires-new-album-is-a-dedication-to-family-and-faith

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bellowhead        UK

 

http://www.theguardian.com/music/bellowhead

 

http://www.theguardian.com/music/2014/jun/19/
bellowhead-revival-review

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

folk music archive > The Full English

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2013/jul/25/
full-english-revive-musical-heritage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Margaret LeAnn Rimes Cibrian

known professionally as LeAnn Rimes        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/02/
arts/music/spitfire-by-leann-rimes.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blake Tollison Shelton        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/28/
arts/music/blake-shelton-gets-naughty-on-based-on-a-true-story.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bridie Monds-Watson – aka SOAK        IR

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/video/2013/jan/26/
soak-sea-creatures-other-voices-festival-video

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Martin Carthy        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/music/martin-carthy 

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2011/apr/17/
martin-carthy-interview-ed-vulliamy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mumford & Sons        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/music/mumford-and-sons

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2013/jul/01/
mumford-and-sons-glastonbury-2013-review

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2010/oct/24/
pass-notes-mumford-sons

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2010/may/30/
mumford-and-sons-music-festivals

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Laura Beatrice Marling    UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/music/laura-marling

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2016/jun/19/
laura-marling-review-meltdown-royal-festival-hall-london

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2013/apr/28/
laura-marling-interview-once-eagle

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2011/sep/01/
laura-marling-interview-confidence

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2010/sep/05/
laura-marling-mercury-prize-marcus-mumford

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/musicblog/audio/2010/mar/31/
music-weekly-laura-marling

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/musicblog+laura-marling

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Taylor Swift

 

https://www.nytimes.com/topic/person/taylor-swift 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/07/
business/media/losing-a-few-hay-bales-country-music-goes-mainstream.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

George Strait

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/06/01/
arts/music/01strait.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diana Jones

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/05/31/
arts/music/31warr.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Rich

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/03/31/arts/music/
31rich.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lucinda Williams        USA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.npr.org/2016/02/09/
465334832/on-her-new-album-lucinda-williams-is-driven-not-comfortable

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dolly Parton        USA

 

 

 

 

Dolly Parton - Jolene -1973

from The Porter Wagoner Show

YouTube > SNOWMAN1793

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTuQ9cKGSdM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dolly Parton on Getting Dirty | Blank on Blank | PBS Digital Studios

 

"Mama just always said,

'you be what you are and you don't have to worry about nothing'"

- Dolly Parton as told to Lawrence Grobel on March 13, 1978

 

Dolly Parton was not your typical model

to appear on the cover of Playboy magazine.

 

But that's just what Dolly did in 1978.

 

She wouldn't take her clothes off,

yet that issue still became one of Playboy's

most popular issues of all time.

 

Inside that issue of Playboy

was an amazing interview

done by Lawrence Grobel.

 

The recording of this interview

has never been heard until now.

 

Dolly was at the height of her stardom.

She was in her early 30s.

And what we loved hearing were her stories

about growing up with 11 siblings in Tennessee.

 

They slept four to the bed.

The little ones often peed on her at night.

In the summertime everybody bathed in the river.

 

And Dolly was into tight clothes and makeup

even as a little girl.

 

It's quintessential Dolly.

There is nobody in show business like her.

 

YouTube > PBS > Blank on Blank        14 April 2015

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2RJPc9DXnys

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.npr.org/artists/15750509/dolly-parton

https://www.theguardian.com/music/dolly-parton

 

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/12/09/
673738768/dream-it-on-through-dolly-parton-on-her-new-album-inspiring-young-people-and-mor

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2018/03/01/
589912466/dolly-parton-gives-the-gift-of-literacy-a-library-of-100-million-books

 

 

 

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/therecord/2015/08/03/
428791584/dolly-in-nashville-authenticity-that-makes-room-for-rhinestones

 

http://www.theguardian.com/music/2015/may/12/
dollywood-tennessee-dolly-parton

 

http://www.theguardian.com/music/2014/may/06/
vera-lynn-why-i-love-dolly-parton

http://www.npr.org/2014/05/09/
310464112/dolly-partons-long-journey-home

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2011/aug/21/
dolly-parton-country-music

 

http://www.npr.org/2010/09/06/
129611133/dolly-parton-singing-songs-from-the-heart-and-soul 

 

http://www.npr.org/2009/10/19/
113940261/dolly-parton-songs-we-love

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joni Mitchell        USA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.npr.org/artists/14857713/joni-mitchell

https://www.theguardian.com/music/jonimitchell

 

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/allsongs/2018/09/12/
646751133/they-fed-me-to-the-beast-joni-mitchell-at-the-isle-of-wight-festival

 

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/apr/04/
not-easy-to-be-joni-mitchell-fan-but-illness-devastates-me

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2015/04/01/
396774936/musician-joni-mitchell-is-awake-and-in-good-spirits-in-intensive-care

 

https://www.npr.org/2014/12/09/
369386571/the-music-midnight-makes-in-conversation-with-joni-mitchell

 

http://www.theguardian.com/music/musicblog/2013/nov/07/
joni-mitchell-70-birthday-blue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Charlie McCoy        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/2015/08/08/
429989179/the-real-charlie-mccoy-a-musical-quarterback-of-1960s-nashville

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fairport Convention        UK

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2013/may/13/
fairport-convention-review

 

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2007/aug/05/
folk.festivals

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Willie Nelson        USA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.npr.org/artists/15396875/willie-nelson

 

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/world-cafe/2019/06/21/
734737713/willie-nelson-on-cowboys-crazy-and-cbd-infused-coffee

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/07/24/
631508812/after-illness-willie-nelson-is-on-the-road-again-with-family-at-his-side

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/04/23/
602233513/first-listen-willie-nelson-last-man-standing

 

https://www.npr.org/event/music/
538388754/willie-nelson-and-jackie-king-on-piano-jazz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bonnie Guitar (born Bonnie Buckingham)        1923-2019

 

 

Bonnie Guitar (...)

had hit records

as a country singer

and guitarist,

but (her) biggest

achievement

may have been

her work

as a businesswoman

in the male-dominated

music industry

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/17/
obituaries/bonnie-guitar-dead.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/17/
obituaries/bonnie-guitar-dead.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Don Williams        USA        1939-2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Glen Travis Campbell        USA        1936-2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Glen Travis Campbell

was born

on April 22, 1936,

about 80 miles southwest

of Little Rock, Ark.,

between Billstown

and Delight,

where his father

sharecropped

120 acres of cotton.

 

He was the seventh son

in a family of eight boys

and four girls.

 

When he was 4,

his father ordered him

a three-quarter-size

guitar for $5

from Sears, Roebuck.

 

He was performing

on local radio stations

by the time he was 6.

 

Picking up music

from the radio

and his church’s

gospel hymns,

he “got tired

of looking a mule in the butt,”

as Mr. Campbell put it

in an interview

with The New York Times

in 1968.

 

He quit school

at 14 and went

to Albuquerque,

where his father’s

brother-in-law,

Dick Bills,

had a band

and was appearing

on both radio

and television.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/08/
arts/music/glen-campbell-dead.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2017/08/08/
obituaries/glen-campbell-artist-who-bridged-pop-and-country-has-died/s/08GLEN-slide-MZL0.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/08/
arts/music/glen-campbell-dead.html

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/08/08/
523951843/glen-campbell-country-music-legend-is-dead-at-81

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rosalie Sorrels (born Rosalie Ann Stringfellow)        USA        1933-2017

 

(...) singer

and storyteller

who drew on her own

tempestuous life

in songs

of struggle and heartache

that inspired a generation

of rising folk musicians

in the 1980s

 

(...)

 

Ms. Sorrels

(pronounced sore-ELS)

first came

to widespread attention

at the 1966

Newport Folk Festival,

where she performed

traditional songs from Idaho,

her native state, and Utah,

where she lived

with her family.

 

She soon began

writing her own material,

about life on the road,

her marital difficulties

and the challenges

of raising children.

 

She then

broadened her scope

to include social issues

like prison reform,

suicide prevention

and women’s rights.

 

As a singer,

Ms. Sorrels

was influenced

by Billie Holiday,

and her jazz-inflected

phrasings

often perplexed

her accompanists.

 

But she delivered

her songs

with a throbbing intensity

that came straight

from the folk tradition.

 

The critic

John Rockwell,

describing her voice

in The New York Times

in 1979,

wrote,

“It’s full and rich,

with a plaintive vibrato

that thins out

delicately on top,

unless she’s pushing

for volume,

in which case it becomes

— if such a thing is possible —

an evocative, stirring bray.”

 

Ms. Sorrels developed

a storytelling approach,

surrounding her songs

with tales of her childhood,

her parents and grandparents,

and the early settlers of the West.

 

The effect could be incantatory.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/13/
arts/music/rosalie-sorrels-dead-folk-singer-songwriter.html

 

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/therecord/2017/06/15/
533080629/the-difficult-adventurous-happy-life-of-rosalie-sorrels

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/13/
arts/music/rosalie-sorrels-dead-folk-singer-songwriter.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Claude Putman Jr.        USA        1930-2016

 

songwriter

whose teary ballad

with a twist ending,

“The Green, Green Grass of Home,”

became a worldwide hit

for Tom Jones in 1967,

and whose long string

of country classics

included “D-I-V-O-R-C-E”

for Tammy Wynette

and “He Stopped Loving Her Today”

for George Jones

 

(...)

 

Mr. Putman

turned out

hundreds of songs,

many of them

country chart-toppers,

after moving

to Nashville

and signing

with Tree Publishing

in the early 1960s.

 

He was renowned

as a song doctor

who could transform

a promising tune

into a sure thing,

and although

he often wrote solo,

many of his greatest hits

were collaborative efforts.

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/01/arts/music/curly-putnam-died.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/01/
arts/music/curly-putnam-died.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Glenn Robertson Yarbrough        USA        1930-2016

 

folk singer

who at midcentury

found fame and fortune

with the popular trio

the Limeliters

but who walked away

from it all

for a life at sea

 

(...)

 

Founded in 1959,

the Limeliters

— comprising Mr. Yarbrough

on vocals and guitar,

Alex Hassilev

on vocals and banjo

and Lou Gottlieb

on vocals and bass —

was a contemporary

folk group

in the tradition

of the Kingston Trio.

 

Known for their burnished

tight harmonies,

sophisticated if

nontraditional arrangements

and witty onstage banter,

the Limeliters

were wildly successful.

 

Amid the folk revival

of the 1960s,

they appeared often

on television

and in live performance,

sold records

by the hundreds

of thousands

and became millionaires

in the bargain.

 

By all critical accounts,

Mr. Yarbrough’s

silvery lyric tenor

— a voice whose lightness

belied his stocky appearance —

was the group’s

acoustic linchpin,

soaring memorably

in traditional tunes

including “John Henry”

and contemporary numbers

like “Charlie,

the Midnight Marauder,”

about a hapless suburbanite

who one night

mistakenly enters

the wrong house.

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/13/
arts/music/glenn-yarbrough-folk-singer-with-the-limeliters-dies-at-86.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/13/
arts/music/glenn-yarbrough-folk-singer-with-the-limeliters-dies-at-86.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ralph Edmond Stanley        USA        1927-2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

singer, banjo player and guardian

of unvarnished mountain music

who was also a pivotal figure

in the recent revival

of interest in bluegrass

 

(...)


Though widely regarded

as one of the founding

fathers of bluegrass,

Mr. Stanley said

on numerous occasions

that he did not believe

his music was

representative of the genre.

 

“Old-time mountain style,

that’s what I like to call it,”

he explained in a 2001 interview

with the online music magazine

SonicNet.

 

(...)

 

He grew up

listening to the music

of the Carter Family

and singing in the ardent,

unaccompanied style

of the Primitive Baptist Church.

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/24/
arts/music/ralph-stanley-whose-mountain-music-gave-rise-to-bluegrass-dies-at-89.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/24/
arts/music/ralph-stanley-whose-mountain-music-gave-rise-to-bluegrass-
dies-at-89.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Guy Charles Clark        USA        1941-2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Merle Ronald Haggard        USA    1937-2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bonnie Lou (born Mary Joan Kath)        1924-2015

 

singer

who achieved

national stardom

in the 1950s

by recording hit country

and rockabilly records

and performing on television

and radio

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/12/11/
arts/music/bonnie-lou-country-and-rockabilly-star-of-the-1950s-dies-at-91.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/12/11/
arts/music/bonnie-lou-country-and-rockabilly-star-of-the-1950s-dies-at-91.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lynn Rene Anderson        USA        1947-2015

 

Lynn Anderson (...)

skyrocketed

to country music stardom

in 1970

singing her signature song,

“(I Never Promised You a)

Rose Garden”

 

(...)

 

“Rose Garden,”

written by Joe South,

became a crossover hit,

soaring to the top

of both the country

and pop charts

and earning Ms. Anderson

a Grammy in 1971.

 

An album of the same title

was the top-selling one

by a female country artist

from 1971 to 1997.

 

Ms. Anderson attributed

the song’s popularity

to its emotional tug

as the nation was trying

to recover from the war

in Vietnam.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/01/
arts/music/lynn-anderson-singer-of-rose-garden-dies-at-67.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/01/
arts/music/lynn-anderson-singer-of-rose-garden-dies-at-67.html
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

James Edward Brown        USA        1934-2015

 

Grand Ole Opry star

whose smooth,

sweet baritone

made him a chart-topper

as a solo act,

in duets

with Helen Cornelius

and as one third

of the close-harmony

group the Browns,

whose 1959 hit

“The Three Bells”

sold more than

a million records

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/13/
arts/music/jim-ed-brown-smooth-voice-on-the-three-bells-and-other-hits-dies-at-81.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/13/
arts/music/jim-ed-brown-smooth-voice-on-the-three-bells-and-other-hits-dies-at-81.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jean Ruth Ritchie        USA        1922-2015

 

 

Jean Ritchie (...)

brought hundreds

of traditional songs

from her native

Appalachia

to a wide audience

— singing of faith

and unfaithfulness,

murder and revenge,

love unrequited

and love lost —

and in the process helped

ignite the folk song revival

of the mid-20th century

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/03/
arts/music/jean-ritchie-who-revived-appalachian-folk-songs-dies-at-92.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/03/
arts/music/jean-ritchie-who-revived-appalachian-folk-songs-dies-at-92.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Paul Gimble        USA        1926-2015

 

virtuoso Texas fiddler

who played with a roster

of country superstars

including Bob Wills,

Marty Robbins,

Merle Haggard,

Willie Nelson

and George Strait

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/14/
arts/music/johnny-gimble-who-fiddled-his-way-from-a-flatbed-truck-to-fame-dies-at-88.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/14/
arts/music/johnny-gimble-who-fiddled-his-way-from-a-flatbed-truck-to-fame-dies-at-88.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Guy Hughes Carawan Jr.        USA        1927-2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Benjamin Franklin Logan Jr.        USA        1927-2015

 

On weekdays,

Benjamin F. Logan

worked

as a mathematician

and electrical engineer

at AT&T Bell Laboratories

in New Jersey.

 

On nights and weekends,

he donned a 10-gallon hat

and took to the stage

as a pre-eminent

bluegrass fiddler.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/06/
arts/music/benjamin-f-logan-engineer-by-day-and-bluegrass-fiddler-by-night-dies-at-87.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/06/
arts/music/benjamin-f-logan-engineer-by-day-
and-bluegrass-fiddler-by-night-dies-at-87.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

James Cecil Dickens        USA        1920-2014

 

Little Jimmy Dickens,

the diminutive

but big-voiced

country singer

best known

for his novelty recordings

and his self-deprecating

sense of humor

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/03/nyregion/
jimmy-dickens-94-an-outsize-country-singer.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/03/nyregion/
jimmy-dickens-94-an-outsize-country-singer.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

George Hamilton IV        USA        1937-2014

 

clean-cut

country singer

whose string

of wholesome hits

in the 1960s,

including “Abilene”

and “Before This Day Ends,”

helped him become

an enduring draw

at the Grand Ole Opry

and on concert stages

around the world

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/19/
arts/music/george-hamilton-iv-77-country-singer-is-dead.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/19/
arts/music/george-hamilton-iv-77-country-singer-is-dead.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jean Redpath        UK        1937-2014

 

esteemed

Scottish folk singer

whose arresting

repertoire

of ancient ballads,

Robert Burns poems

and contemporary tunes

helped energize

a genre she described

as a “brew of pure flavor

and pure emotion”

 

(...)

 

Ms. Redpath,

who recorded

some 40 albums,

combined voluminous

historical knowledge,

a winning stage presence

and a voice that could be

both bright and melancholy

to become perhaps

the most prominent

Scottish folk singer

of the postwar era.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/24/
arts/music/jean-redpath-prolific-scottish-folk-singer-dies-at-77.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/24/
arts/music/jean-redpath-prolific-scottish-folk-singer-dies-at-77.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pete Seeger        USA        1919-2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Noble Ray Price        1926-2013

 

Ray Price (...)

was at the forefront

of two revolutions

in country music

as one of its finest

ballad singers

and biggest hit makers

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/17/arts/music/ray-price-country-singer-dies-at-87.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/17/
arts/music/ray-price-country-singer-dies-at-87.html

 

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=251788866

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

the Highwaymen        early 1960s / David Louis Fisher        1940-2010

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/13/
arts/music/13fisher.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Emmylou Harris

 

https://www.nytimes.com/topic/person/emmylou-harris

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

George Glenn Jones        1931-2013

 

definitive country singer

of the last half-century,

whose songs about heartbreak

and hard drinking

echoed his own turbulent life

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/27/
arts/music/george-jones-country-singer-dies-at-81.html

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2013/may/03/
keith-richards-george-jones-feel

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/27/
arts/music/george-jones-country-singer-dies-at-81.html

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2013/apr/26/
george-jones

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Richard Pierce Havens        1941-2013

 

Mr. Havens embodied

the spirit of the ’60s

— espousing peace and love,

hanging out

in Greenwich Village

and playing gigs

from the Isle of Wight

to the Fillmore

(both East and West)

to Carnegie Hall.

 

He surfaced

only in the mid-1960s,

but before

the end of the decade

many rock musicians

were citing him

as an influence.

 

His rendition

of “Handsome Johnny”

became an anti-Vietnam War

anthem.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/23/arts/music/richie-havens-guitarist-and-singer-dies-at-72.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/23/
arts/music/richie-havens-guitarist-and-singer-dies-at-72.html

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2013/apr/23/
richie-havens-remembered-groove-armada

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jason Andrew Molina        1973-2013

 

Before bearded

banjo bands

like Mumford & Sons

and the Avett Brothers

rode a folk-rock revival

to mainstream success,

Mr. Molina

was constructing

spare songs

about 19th-century

heartbreak

and the despair

of blue-collar workers,

about loneliness

and bad weather

and scarred landscapes

in a fading Midwest.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/27/arts/music/jason-molina-leader-of-magnolia-electric-band-dies-at-39.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/27/
arts/music/jason-molina-leader-of-magnolia-electric-band-dies-at-39.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Douglas Dillard        1937-2012

 

banjo virtuoso

who began the 1960s

by helping to introduce

a generation of listeners

to bluegrass

and ended the decade

as an early advocate

of country-rock

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/28/arts/music/doug-dillard-banjo-virtuoso-dies-at-75.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/28/
arts/music/doug-dillard-banjo-virtuoso-dies-at-75.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Charles Everett Lilly        1924-2012

 

Everett Lilly (...)

was largely credited,

along with his brother Burt

and their band mates

Don Stover and Tex Logan,

with introducing bluegrass music

to New England

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/14/arts/music/everett-lilly-bluegrass-musician-dies-at-87.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/14/arts/music/
everett-lilly-bluegrass-musician-dies-at-87.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joseph Aquilla Thompson        1918-2012

 

Joseph Thompson

is credited

with helping to keep alive

an African-American

musical tradition

— the black string band —

that predates the blues

and influenced country music

and bluegrass.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/02/
arts/music/joe-thompson-dies-at-93-fiddler-of-string-band-legacy.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/02/
arts/music/joe-thompson-dies-at-93-fiddler-of-string-band-legacy.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Richard Lawrence Kniss        1937-2012

 

self-taught musician

who for more than 40 years

played stand-up bass

behind Peter, Paul and Mary,

becoming a veritable fourth member

of the folk-singing trio

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/28/
arts/music/dick-kniss-bassist-for-peter-paul-and-mary-is-dead-at-74.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/28/
arts/music/dick-kniss-bassist-for-peter-paul-and-mary-is-dead-at-74.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Elizabeth Jane Haaby / Liz Anderson        1930-2011

 

Liz Anderson

wrote breakthrough hits

for Merle Haggard

and other country singers

and recorded songs of her own

about faithless men

and beleaguered women

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/03/
arts/music/liz-anderson-who-wrote-hit-country-songs-dies-at-81.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/03/
arts/music/liz-anderson-who-wrote-hit-country-songs-dies-at-81.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Johnnie Robert Wright        1914-2011

 

singer and bandleader

who was among

the first country musicians

to use Latin rhythms

and who managed

the singing career

of his wife, Kitty Wells

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/28/
arts/music/johnnie-wright-country-singer-and-bandleader-dies-at-97.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/28/
arts/music/johnnie-wright-country-singer-and-bandleader-dies-at-97.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wilma Leigh Leary        1921-2011

 

perennial favorite

with the Grand Ole Opry

and a member,

with her husband, Stoney,

of a popular tradition-steeped

country singing duo

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/19/
arts/music/wilma-lee-cooper-grand-ole-opry-singer-dies-at-90.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/19/
arts/music/wilma-lee-cooper-grand-ole-opry-singer-dies-at-90.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Michael Waterson        1941-2011

 

founding member of the Watersons,

the self-taught singing group

that was long considered

the royal family of British folk music

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/26/arts/music/mike-waterson-british-folk-singer-dies-at-70.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/26/
arts/music/mike-waterson-british-folk-singer-dies-at-70.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hazel Jane Dickens        USA        1935-2011

 

clarion-voiced

advocate

for coal miners

and working people

and a pioneer

among women

in bluegrass music

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/23/arts/music/hazel-dickens-bluegrass-singer-dies-at-75.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/23/
arts/music/hazel-dickens-bluegrass-singer-dies-at-75.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gilbert Lee Robbins        USA        1931-2011

 

singer, guitarist and songwriter

with the folk group the Highwaymen

and a fixture on the folk-music scene

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/10/arts/music/10robbins.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/10/
arts/music/10robbins.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ralph Eugene Mooney        1928-2011

 

Ralph Mooney

played pedal steel guitar

on hit recordings

by Merle Haggard

and Waylon Jennings

and was a writer

of “Crazy Arms,”

one of the most enduring

shuffles

in country music

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/27/
arts/music/ralph-mooney-master-of-the-steel-guitar-dies-at-82.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/27/
arts/music/ralph-mooney-master-of-the-steel-guitar-dies-at-82.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ferlin Husky        1925-2011

 

smooth-voiced singer

whose 1956 hit “Gone”

became the first country single

of the Nashville Sound era

to cross over to the pop Top 10

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/18/arts/music/ferlin-husky-country-singer-dies-at-85.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/18/
arts/music/ferlin-husky-country-singer-dies-at-85.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Charlie Elzer Loudermilk        1927-2011

 

member

of one of the pre-eminent

brother acts in country music

and an inspiration

to several generations

of rock musicians

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/27/arts/music/27louvin.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/27/
arts/music/27louvin.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jimmy Ray Dean        USA        1928-2010

 

country singer

and television-show host

whose good looks,

folksy integrity

and aw-shucks Texas charm

served him especially well

when he went into

the sausage business

and became his own pitchman

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/06/15/arts/15dean.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/06/15/
arts/15dean.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peter, Paul and Mary > Mary Travers        1936-2009

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/17/
arts/music/17travers.html

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/musicblog/2009/sep/17/
mary-travers-peter-paul

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Davey (Davy) Graham, guitarist        UK        1940-2008

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2008/dec/17/folk-blues-music 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2008/dec/16/folk-legend-davey-graham-dies

 

https://www.theguardian.com/music/musicblog/2008/dec/16/davy-graham-video-tribute 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Martyn

born as Iain David McGeachy        UK        1948-2009

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/musicblog/2009/jan/30/john-martyn-music

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2009/jan/30/john-martyn-obituary

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2009/jan/29/john-martyn-dies

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/musicblog/2009/jan/29/john-martyn-remembered

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Odetta Holmes Felious, singer and actor        USA        1930-2008

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/12/03/arts/music/03odetta.html?ref=obituaries

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2008/dec/04/odetta-film-folk-music-obituary

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2008/dec/05/odetta-singer-civil-rights-activist

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2008/dec/04/folk-jazz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arthur Roy 'Artie' Traum        USA        1943-2008

 

guitarist, singer-songwriter

and musical educationist

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2008/jul/25/folk.jazz 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Jackson Carey Frank        USA        1943-1999

 

He was one of the great

singer-songwriters

of the 60s folk scene,

more highly regarded

by some than Paul Simon.

 

But he only recorded

one album –

and died in obscurity,

penniless and homeless

http://www.theguardian.com/music/2014/jan/09/jackson-c-frank-tragic-tale-forgotten-60s-legend

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/music/2014/jan/09/
jackson-c-frank-tragic-tale-forgotten-60s-legend

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jeffrey Scott "Jeff" Buckley,

raised as Scott "Scottie" Moorhead        USA        1966-1997

 

https://www.nytimes.com/topic/person/jeff-buckley 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tim Buckley        USA        1947-1975

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1998/01/04/
magazine/the-lives-they-lived-jeff-buckley-his-father-s-son.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Buffalo Springfield        USA / CAN        1966 to 1968

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.npr.org/2019/02/20/
693790065/buffalo-springfield-for-what-its-worth-american-anthem

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Mamas and the Papas        USA

 

Denny Doherty        CAN        1960s

 

 

http://www.usatoday.com/life/people/2007-01-19-
doherty-mamapapa_x.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Woody Guthrie        USA        1912-1967

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Weavers        USA    1940s-1960s

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Music Review

Country Music Awards

Attain New Levels of Inclusion

 

November 12, 2009

The New York Times

By JON CARAMANICA

 

It’s safe to say that this is the first year in which the most important people at the Country Music Association Awards were an African-American man and a teenage girl, but so it went Wednesday night at the 43rd edition of the awards, celebrating a year of increasingly porous borders in Nashville.

Engagement is the only option, it was clear at this show, broadcast from the Sommet Center in Nashville on ABC, and hosted by the country stars Brad Paisley and Carrie Underwood for the second year. New faces abounded, dynasties ended, and cross-pollination was the new normal.

The phenom Taylor Swift swept the four categories in which she was nominated, including Entertainer of the Year, making her the first female artist to win that award since 2000.

The show got questions of inclusion out of the way early: the first two performances were by Ms. Swift — at 19, the youngest ever nominee for Entertainer of the Year — and Darius Rucker. Mr. Rucker won New Artist of the Year, the first African-American so honored, was nominated for Male Vocalist of the year, a category no African-American had won (or been nominated in) since Charley Pride in 1972.

In what was presumably a ploy to make him appear part of the country crowd, Mr. Rucker spent half of his performance in the audience — almost without fail, his was the only black face visible.

But Mr. Rucker fit in in every other way: he performed “Alright,” about the humble pleasures of the simple, stable life. “Don’t need no concert in the city/I got a stereo and ‘The Best of Patsy Cline’ ” — never mind that Mr. Rucker was in fact singing at a concert in a city.

Ms. Swift’s relationship to the genre is more complicated and is likely to become more vexing in the coming years. She’s a commodity bigger than country itself, and it was happy to exploit her while she remains willing. She performed twice on the show, singing “Forever & Always” and “Fifteen,” and she was mentioned just before every commercial break: “Taylor Swift takes on the big boys for Entertainer of the Year!”

She won that, as well as Album of the Year for “Fearless” (Big Machine), her second album, Music Video of the Year (“Love Story”) and Female Vocalist of the Year.

Ms. Swift’s antagonist Kanye West, who stormed her acceptance speech at the MTV Video Music Awards in September, provided the butt of some jokes, but managed, for this night, to stay away from Nashville, or at least this stage.

“Mamas, don’t let your babies grow up to be Kanye,” Mr. Paisley, who won Male Vocalist of the Year, sang during the opening monologue, then was joined by Ms. Underwood: “Let ’em pick guitars and drive them ol’ trucks/ Cause cowboys have manners/ They don’t interrupt.”

If Mr. West had shown up, he would have fit in, though. This year’s performances boiled down to who could bring the most impressive plus-one: Vince Gill sang with Daughtry on “Tennessee Line,” Kenny Chesney was joined by Dave Matthews on “I’m Alive,” and for what was billed as their final C.M.A. performance, the soon-to-be-split Brooks & Dunn were joined by Billy Gibbons of ZZ Top on “Honky Tonk Stomp.”

Jamey Johnson, whose “In Color” won Song of the Year, crept his way through “Between Jennings and Jones,” a traditional ramble about outlaw country on which he was joined by Kid Rock, the onetime white rapper who’s remade himself as a Nashville bad boy.

This crammed-tight show featured nine awards (three others were presented off-camera) and more than twice as many performances, including standout turns by Mr. Paisley, Sugarland and Zac Brown Band and shaky moments by Ms. Swift, Tim McGraw and Lady Antebellum.

The coming sea change in country could be seen in several categories, especially ones that have long been associated with a single artist: each one has five nominees, though often that has seemed like too many, with minor figures routinely nominated to fill the extra slots, like decoys in a police lineup.

But not this year. Lady Antebellum won Vocal Group of the Year, breaking a six-year stranglehold by Rascal Flatts. (It also won Single of the Year, for “I Run to You.”) Sugarland won Vocal Duo of the Year for the third year in a row; before that, Brooks & Dunn won 14 of the prior 15 years. Even though Sugarland is the category’s new bully, frontwoman Jennifer Nettles was gracious in victory, offering Brooks & Dunn the stage — they declined — and telling them, “It’s an honor to be in your category.”

Or at least, what was their category. Turnover was this night’s theme, as exemplified by Ms. Swift’s acceptance speech for Entertainer of the Year. “Every single person in that category let me open up for them this year,” she said, of the far older, far more established men she vanquished. “Thank you so much to y’all. I love you.”

Country Music Awards Attain New Levels of Inclusion,
NYT,
12.11.2009,
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/12/arts/music/12country.html

 

 

 

 

 

Music

Protest From the Right Side of Country

 

March 31, 2009

The New York Times

By JON CARAMANICA

 

There’s no screaming on the first great song of the bailout era. No audible rage. No tears. Instead, on “Shuttin’ Detroit Down,” the country star John Rich, singing evenly, sounds perfectly levelheaded, as if he’d thought through his position thoroughly and acquired the peace of the righteous:

I see all these big shots whining on my evening news

About how they’re losing billions and it’s up to me and you

To come running to

The rescue

“The song is not depressing,” Mr. Rich said last week, in an interview in the rooftop bar of a hotel in Gramercy Park. “The song is defiant.”

And for contemporary Nashville, shockingly topical. Mr. Rich, 35, conceived and wrote “Shuttin’ Detroit Down” in late January, in a fit of pique after watching news accounts of the $1.2 million office remodeling by John Thain, the Merrill Lynch chief executive. Within two weeks it had been recorded, mastered and released to country radio stations, as well as added to his new album “Son of a Preacher Man” (Warner Brothers Nashville), which had already been submitted to the label.

It reflects not only Mr. Rich’s songwriting gifts — he collaborated on the verses with the longtime country singer John Anderson — but also his acumen in gauging and channeling the mood of the country, aggressively striking a note of conservative populism rarely seen in any genre of pop since country music’s response to Sept. 11. (The video, which features Mickey Rourke and Kris Kristofferson, will be released shortly.)

But even though Mr. Rich’s subject matter is au courant, his tropes are familiar country tugs of war: urban versus rural, modern versus traditional, white collar versus blue. The most bracing moment on “Shuttin’ Detroit Down” comes not when Mr. Rich points a finger at those “living it up on Wall Street in that New York City town,” but when he reflects on the little guy: “Well that old man’s been working in that plant most all his life/ Now his pension plan’s been cut in half and he can’t afford to die,” his voice dropping a half-step on the last word to indicate where the real locus of tragedy resides.

Mr. Rich sees the song as being in the us-versus-them tradition of “Okie From Muskogee,” the 1969 semisatire of country life by Merle Haggard, with whom Mr. Rich recently crossed paths.

“He put his hand on my shoulder, and he looked me dead in the eye,” Mr. Rich recalled. “He said, ‘That new song you have out now, that reminds me a whole lot of “Okie.” As a songwriter, that is officially the highest compliment I’ve ever been paid.”

But in many ways “Detroit” has less to do with “Okie” and more to do with the left-wing protest music of that era. That it comes from the other side of the aisle seems a minor detail. “Shuttin’ Detroit Down” is skeptical of big business as well as big government — “D.C.’s bailing out them bankers as the farmers auction ground” — keeping a song that’s postpartisan, at least on the surface, consistent with right-wing thinking.

This isn’t Mr. Rich’s first dalliance with Republican talking points. Last year he stumped for Fred Thompson before throwing his support behind Senator John McCain and recording a rally song, “Raising McCain,” a far less imaginative slice of propaganda. (“He got shot down/in a Vietnam town/fighting for the red, white and blue.” )

Now that Republicans are underdogs, it’s a particularly good time to be a conservative agitator, and Mr. Rich is seizing the moment. His next single will be “The Good Lord and the Man,” about his grandfather, whom he said had been awarded six Purple Hearts in World War II:

When I see people on my TV taking shots at Uncle Sam,

I hope they always remember why they can

’Cause we’d all be speaking German, living under the flag of Japan,

If it wasn’t for the good Lord and the man.

“I mean it completely literally,” Mr. Rich said.

Still, these songs — “A couple of sledgehammers,” he called the two singles, with evident glee — capture only one side of Mr. Rich’s personality. “Son of a Preacher Man" is an eclectic, if often sober album, spanning vintage big-band country comedy (“Drive Myself to Drink”), dramatic self-confrontation (“Another You”) and shameless romance (“I Thought You’d Never Ask,” which Mr. Rich wrote to propose to his future wife, Joan).

Mr. Rich has a lovely, crisp high tenor, though it’s deployed to better effect anchoring his partner Big Kenny in Big & Rich, the duo that emerged in 2004 and helped bring a dash of outlaw sensibility back to Nashville. (Mr. Rich had earlier played in the successful country band Lonestar but was kicked out as the group moved toward a more adult-contemporary sound.) Since then, Mr. Rich has positioned himself as a reliable disruptor, culturally and politically.

And he makes for a charming sermonizer. Speaking of his disbelief at government enabling of corporate arrogance on the Fox News’s “Glenn Beck Program” last week, he quipped, "Why don’t you just come to my house and slap me while you’re at it?"

That appearance was part of an album-release media offensive that included turns on “Glenn Beck” and “Hannity,” where he answered one question with a recitation of the first verse of “Detroit,” and gave Sean Hannity a T-shirt that read, “If you don’t love America ... why don’t you get the hell out?”

But he also took part in an unlikely comic skit on “Late Night With Jimmy Fallon” in which he gamely poked fun at rural pieties.

That last bit was the most telling, in that it implicitly asked which is the real cliché: the redneck, or the big-city comedy writers who think rednecks are all the same? Mr. Rich didn’t seem to mind toying with both sides.

Politics aside, Mr. Rich can be refreshingly undogmatic. As the host and avuncular mentor on the CMT series “Gone Country,” he shepherds once-weres from other music genres or entertainment careers in their quests to become country singers. And on the most recent season of “Nashville Star,” a country-music competition similar to “American Idol,” he was vocal about the need for Nashville to embrace Hispanic singers who can connect with the growing Hispanic population in the United States.

Mr. Rich, once the outsider scratching at the door, has now become something of a gatekeeper, and his idea of border policing suggests dashes of progressivism sprinkled throughout his conservative landscape.

“Everybody Wants to Be Me” is the most attitude-thick song on Mr. Rich’s new album, all about the long climb to the top. “Everybody wants to be me,” he charges, “but they don’t want to bruise, and they don’t want to bleed.” The camera’s expectations can overwhelm, he warns: “They take my country-boy views, make them big-city news and I just take it on the chin.”

Where “Shuttin’ Detroit Down” is calm and considered, this song is un-self-consciously exuberant. As martyrs go, Mr. Rich is the happiest, most complicit one around.

Protest From the Right Side of Country,
NYT,
31.3.2009,
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/03/31/
arts/music/31rich.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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