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Arts > Music > Gospel, Soul, Doo Wop, 1950 R&B, Disco, Funk, Groove    1950s-2010s        USA

 

 

 

 

The Platters - The Great Pretender (Original Footage HD)

 

"The Great Pretender"

is a popular song recorded by The Platters,

with Tony Williams on lead vocals,

and released as a single on November 3, 1955.

 

The words and music were created by Buck Ram,

the Platters' manager and producer

who was a successful songwriter

before moving into producing and management.

 

The Great Pretender reached the number one position

on both the R&B and pop charts in 1956.

 

YouTube > Solrac Etnevic

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IEzfhclKO8Q

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Candi Staton        USA

 

https://www.npr.org/artists/15399577/candi-staton

 

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/08/16/
638646096/first-listen-candi-staton-unstoppable

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chaka Khan        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/2016/04/18/
474355356/songs-we-love-fomo-house-of-love-feat-chaka-khan-taka-boom-mark-stevens

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Herbie Hancock        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/11/
arts/music/review-chick-corea-and-herbie-hancock-
on-two-grand-pianos-at-carnegie-hall.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Betty Davis        USA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.npr.org/2016/07/06/
484808335/behind-the-black-power-goddess-betty-davis-early-demos-released

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gladys Knight        USA

 

 

 

 

 

B.B. King and Gladys Knight - The Thrill Is Gone (Midnight Special - Oct 1973)

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9DYHm1a9RNg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Smokey Robinson

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/06/
arts/music/smokey-robinson-gershwin-prize-popular-song.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/17/
arts/music/17smokey.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Supremes

 

https://www.nytimes.com/topic/organization/the-supremes 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Platters

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/06/
arts/music/herb-reed-an-original-platter-dies-at-83.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1992/08/16/
nyregion/tony-williams-64-platters-lead-singer.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Legend

 

https://www.theguardian.com/music/johnlegend 

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2010/oct/19/
john-legend-roots-interview-obama

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Janelle Monáe

 

https://www.theguardian.com/music/janelle-monae 

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2010/jul/04/
janelle-monae-live-hoxton-kitty-empire

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

R&B / R'n'B

 

The John and Ruby Lomax

1939 Southern States Recording Trip

 

http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/lohtml/lohome.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

T-Pain

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2008/mar/04/
urban.popandrock

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chris Brown

 

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2009/jul/21/
chris-brown-apologises-rihanna 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vagabond

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2009/feb/20/
new-band-vagabond

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zarif

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2009/feb/20/
zarif-soul-music-kindred-spirit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Estelle

 

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2008/mar/28/
news.race 

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2008/mar/28/
urban 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/audio/2008/mar/28/
mark.brown.thomas.sangster.tintin 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nile Rodgers        Chic        USA

 

http://www.theguardian.com/music/nile-rodgers

 

http://www.theguardian.com/culture/2014/feb/05/
nile-rogers-chic-disco-david-bowie-daft-punk-paul-lester

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Al Green        USA

 

 

 

 

Al Green - For The Good Times

 

Neste vídeo vou mostrar a música "For The Good Times"

do programa Soul Train 1971.

 

YouTube > Periecos Brechó

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-3c_Sz1A4qg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2008/oct/17/popandrock10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Staples

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/21/
books/ill-take-you-there-by-greg-kot.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Staples > Mavis Staples

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/21/
books/ill-take-you-there-by-greg-kot.html

 

http://www.theguardian.com/music/2008/apr/15/
popandrock.urban 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tina Turner

 

https://www.nytimes.com/topic/person/tina-turner  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diane Ernestine Earle Ross / Diana Ross        USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/topic/person/diana-ross 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2006/jun/30/popandrock.shopping5 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2004/mar/16/popandrock1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Martha Reeves and the Vandellas        USA

 

 

 

 

MARTHA and THE VANDELLAS - Dancing In The Street (1964)        WarnerMusicVideos

 

MARTHA and THE VANDELLAS - Dancing In The Street (1964)

 

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=68Uv959QuCg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/07/28/
632661834/american-anthem-dancing-in-the-street-martha-vandellas

 

https://www.theguardian.com/culture/2016/feb/09/
how-we-made-dancing-in-the-street-martha-reeves-and-the-vandellas

 

http://www.theguardian.com/music/2015/apr/16/
martha-reeves-the-only-thing-that-can-change-things-is-music

 

http://www.newmorning.com/20140507
-2948-Martha-Reeves-And-The-Vandellas.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/05/books/
ready-for-a-brand-new-beat-looks-at-a-martha-reeves-oldie.html

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2009/jun/25/
martha-reeves-motown

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/01/19/
national/19reeves.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Earth, Wind & Fire        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/05/
arts/music/maurice-white-founder-of-earth-wind-and-fire-dies-at-74.html

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/therecord/2016/02/05/
465703176/maurice-white-the-audacity-of-uplift

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/02/04/
465626236/maurice-white-of-earth-wind-fire-dies-at-74

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Parliament-Funkadelic sound        1970s - 2010s

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/music/georgeclinton

 

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/allsongs/2018/05/22/
613347394/george-clinton-doctor-of-the-mothership-prescribes-funk-in-medicaid-fraud-dogg

https://www.npr.org/event/music/
579982124/george-clinton-the-p-funk-allstars-tiny-desk-concert - Jan. 24, 2018

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/06/24/
482486305/bernie-worrell-wizard-of-woo-dies-at-72

http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2016/06/24/
482788572/on-parliament-funkadelic-and-a-less-squeaky-clean-picture-of-blackness

 

http://www.theguardian.com/music/musicblog/2015/mar/17/
george-clinton-listen-conversation-with-alexis-petridis

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/26/
arts/music/cordell-mosson-of-parliament-funkadelic-dies-at-60.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/06/21/
arts/music/21shider.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Funkadelic        USA

 

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2018/jun/04/
how-we-made-funkadelic-one-nation-under-a-groove

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Four Tops        Lawrence Payton

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1997/06/21/
arts/lawrence-payton-59-singer-with-the-four-tops-is-dead.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Four Tops > Obie Benson

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/07/02/
arts/music/02benson.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Raelettes

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Raelettes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Charles Edward Bradley        USA        1948-2018

 

 

 

 

Charles Bradley

 

The World (Is Going Up In Flames) - Feat. Menahan Street Band

 

Directed by Poull Brien.

Upcoming debut album "No Time For Dreaming"

out January 25th.

Daptone / Dunham Records.

http://www.thecharlesbradley.com

 

YouTube

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MTy7ugrSFz4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.npr.org/artists/175953068/charles-bradley

 

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/11/01/
661163992/first-listen-charles-bradley-black-velvet

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/24/
arts/music/charles-bradley-soul-singer-dies.html

http://www.npr.org/sections/therecord/2017/09/23/
553171466/screaming-eagle-of-soul-charles-bradley-dies-at-68

 

http://www.npr.org/2016/05/02/
474115975/on-changes-charles-bradley-keeps-going-forward

http://www.npr.org/event/music/469584112/
charles-bradley-live-in-concert-sxsw-2016 - March 29, 2016

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/music/2016/apr/03/
charles-bradley-changes-review

http://www.npr.org/2016/03/22/
471312866/first-listen-charles-bradley-changes

http://www.npr.org/event/music/
470807585/charles-bradley-aint-it-a-sin-live-at-sxsw-2016 - March 17, 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eugene Pitt        USA        1937-2018

 

(...) lead singer

of the Jive Five,

a doo-wop group

that reached the Top 10

in 1961 with “My True Story”

and endured long past

doo-wop’s heyday

by mingling their sound

with ascendant genres

like funk, disco and soul

 

(...)

 

Mr. Pitt

formed the Jive Five

in the late 1950s

with Jerome Hanna,

Thurmon Prophet,

Richard Harris

and Norman Johnson

— four friends

with whom he sang

on the streets of Brooklyn.

 

Like many young

vocalists of the era,

they sang doo-wop,

the romantic, harmonic

brand of pop music

that became popular

alongside early rock ’n’ roll

and contributed

to the sound of soul.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/05/
obituaries/eugene-pitt-doo-wop-singer-with-staying-power-dies-at-80.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/05/
obituaries/eugene-pitt-doo-wop-singer-with-staying-power-dies-at-80.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sharon Lafaye Jones        USA        1956-2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

soul singer

and powerful voice

of the band the Dap-Kings

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/19/
arts/music/sharon-jones-dap-kings-dies.html

 

 

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/11/23/
miss-sharon-jones-a-queen-among-dap-kings/

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/19/
arts/music/sharon-jones-dap-kings-dies.html

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/11/18/
502654590/soul-singer-sharon-jones-60-dies

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/30/
arts/music/sharon-jones-documentary-interview.html

 

http://www.npr.org/2016/07/28/
487707877/soul-singer-sharon-jones-the-cancer-is-here-but-i-want-to-perform

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/29/
movies/miss-sharon-jones-review.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wayne Lamar Jackson        USA        1941-2016

 

Wayne Lamar Jackson

was born (...) in Memphis

and grew up across

the Mississippi River

in West Memphis, Ark.

 

He got his first trumpet

when he was 11.

 

“I opened up the case,

and it smelled like oil and brass,”

he wrote on his website.

 

“I loved that,

so I put it together, blew,

and out came a pretty noise.”

 

(...)

 

Mr. Jackson

had his first gold record

when he was still in high school,

performing on the instrumental

“Last Night” with the Mar-Keys.

 

Released in 1961,

it rose to No. 3

on the pop charts

and was included

on the first album

issued by Stax,

a label that helped create

the Memphis sound

in soul music.

 

As part of the house band at Stax,

with Booker T. and the M.G.’s,

the Mar-Keys played on records

by Otis Redding, Eddie Floyd,

Sam and Dave, Albert King,

and Carla and Rufus Thomas.

 

At American Sound Studio

in Memphis

and FAME Studios

in Muscle Shoals, Ala.,

Mr. Jackson and Mr. Love

performed with artists

including Wilson Pickett,

Aretha Franklin

and Percy Sledge.

 

After incorporating themselves

in 1969 as the Memphis Horns,

Mr. Jackson and Mr. Love

became roving ambassadors

of the Memphis sound,

in constant demand by artists

as varied as Elvis Presley,

Al Green, Rod Stewart,

Steve Winwood,

Bonnie Raitt, U2

and Willie Nelson.

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/23/
arts/music/wayne-jackson-memphis-horns-trumpeter-dies-at-74.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/23/
arts/music/wayne-jackson-memphis-horns-trumpeter-dies-at-74.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prince Roger Nelson    USA    1958-2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Natalie Cole        USA        1950-2015

 

buoyantly jazzy singer

who became a million-selling,

Grammy Award-winning

pop hitmaker

with her 1975 debut album

and went on

to even greater popularity

when she followed the example

of her father, Nat King Cole,

in interpreting pre-rock

pop standards

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/02/
arts/music/natalie-cole-grammy-award-winning-singer-dies-at-65.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/02/
arts/music/natalie-cole-grammy-award-winning-singer-dies-at-65.html

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/therecord/2016/01/01/
461701599/natalie-cole-underappreciated-but-never-forgotten

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ben E. King (born Benjamin Earl Nelson)        USA        1938-2015

 

smooth, soulful baritone

who led the Drifters

on “There Goes My Baby,”

“Save the Last Dance for Me”

and other hits

in the late 1950s and early 1960s,

and as a solo artist

recorded the classic singles

“Spanish Harlem”

and “Stand by Me”

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/02/
arts/music/ben-e-king-soulful-singer-with-the-drifters-dies-at-76.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/02/
arts/music/ben-e-king-soulful-singer-with-the-drifters-dies-at-76.html

 

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2015/05/01/
403530520/singer-ben-e-king-best-known-for-stand-by-me-dies-at-76

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Errol Brown        JAM        1943-2015

 

lead singer

for the British band

Hot Chocolate

and the writer of the band’s

indelible disco hit

“You Sexy Thing,”

which returned

to the pop charts

when it was featured

in the comedy

“The Full Monty”

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/07/arts/music/errol-brown-you-sexy-thing-singer-dies-at-71.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/07/
arts/music/errol-brown-you-sexy-thing-singer-dies-at-71.html

 

http://www.theguardian.com/music/2015/may/07/
errol-brown

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Percy Sledge        USA        1941-2015

 

 

 

A print advertisement

for one of Sledge’s 1968 hit Take Time to Know Her

 

Photograph:

Granamour Weems Collection /Alamy

 

Percy Sledge: a life in pictures

From his early hit When A Man Loves A Woman,

to his induction in the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame,

we take a look at the musical life of Percy Sledge,

who has died aged 73

 

G        Tuesday 14 April 2015        18.13 BST

http://www.theguardian.com/music/gallery/2015/apr/14/percy-sledge-a-life-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Percy Sledge (...)

soared from part-time singer

and hospital orderly

to lasting fame

with his aching,

forlorn performance

on the classic

"When a Man Loves a Woman"

 

(...)

 

A No. 1 hit in 1966,

"When a Man Loves a Woman"

was Sledge's debut single,

an almost unbearably

heartfelt ballad

with a resonance

he never approached again.

 

Few singers could have.

 

Its mood set

by a mournful organ

and dirge-like tempo,

"When a Man Loves a Woman"

was for many

the definitive soul ballad,

a testament of blinding,

all-consuming love

haunted by fear and graced

by overwhelming emotion.

 

"When a Man Loves a Woman"

was a personal triumph for Sledge,

who seemed on the verge of sobbing

throughout the production,

and a breakthrough for Southern soul.

 

It was the first No. 1 hit

from Alabama's

burgeoning Muscle Shoals

music scene,

where Aretha Franklin

and the Rolling Stones

among others would record,

and the first gold record

for Atlantic Records.

http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2015/04/14/us/ap-us-obit-percy-sledge.html

 

 

http://www.npr.org/artists/15406033/percy-sledge

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2015/04/14/us/
ap-us-obit-percy-sledge.html

http://www.theguardian.com/music/2015/apr/14/
soul-singer-percy-sledge-dies-aged-73

http://www.npr.org/sections/therecord/2015/04/14/
399596752/percy-sledge-had-a-voice-the-whole-world-heard

http://www.theguardian.com/music/gallery/2015/apr/14/
percy-sledge-a-life-in-pictures

 

http://www.npr.org/2011/03/16/
134172710/when-a-rock-historian-loves-soul-singer-percy-sledge

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tbWDkg4T3G4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Don Covay (born James Donald Randolph)        USA        1936-2015

 

singer and songwriter

whose rhythm-and-blues

compositions

— among them “Pony Time,”

“Chain of Fools”

and “Mercy, Mercy” —

became hits

for a variety of performers

and standards of rock ’n’ roll

and soul music

 

(...)

 

Mr. Covay was among

a handful of writers

and performers,

including Wilson Pickett

and Otis Redding,

who helped define

the soul sound (male division)

of the 1960s.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/07/
arts/music/don-covay-performer-and-writer-of-rb-hits-dies-at-78.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/07/
arts/music/don-covay-performer-and-writer-of-rb-hits-dies-at-78.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jimmy Lee Ruffin        USA        1936-2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mabon Lewis Hodges        USA        1945-2014

 

guitarist and songwriter

whose lithe touch on songs

by Al Green and others

helped shape the sound

of Memphis soul in the 1970s

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/26/
arts/music/teenie-hodges-soul-guitarist-and-songwriter-dies-at-68.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/26/
arts/music/teenie-hodges-soul-guitarist-and-songwriter-dies-at-68.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Robert Steel Smith        USA        1936-2013

 

Bobbie Smith ('s)

mellifluous vocals

helped make the Spinners

one of the leading soul acts

of the 1970s

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/21/arts/music/bobbie-smith-voice-of-the-spinners-dies-at-76.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/21/
arts/music/bobbie-smith-voice-of-the-spinners-dies-at-76.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Robert Edward Rogers        1940-2013

 

Bobby Rogers (...)

was born on the same day

in the same Detroit hospital

as the Motown crooner

Smokey Robinson,

with whom

he harmonized

in high school

and eventually

in the Hall of Fame

singing group

the Miracles

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/05/arts/music/bobby-rogers-dies-at-73-sang-in-smokey-robinsons-miracles.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/05/
arts/music/bobby-rogers-dies-at-73-sang-in-smokey-robinsons-miracles.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leroy Bonner        1943-2013

 

frontman of the Ohio Players,

a funk band whose influence lasted

well beyond the string of hits it had

in the mid-1970s

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/29/arts/music/leroy-bonner-of-the-ohio-players-dies-at-69.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/29/
arts/music/leroy-bonner-of-the-ohio-players-dies-at-69.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marva Ann Manning        1944-2012

 

 James Brown

was Soul Brother No. 1

and, for a while,

Marva Whitney

was Soul Sister No. 1.

 

That was the nickname

Mr. Brown gave her

when she was a singer

in the James Brown Revue

and a solo artist

on his King Records,

turning out brassy,

rowdy empowerment anthems

that would come

to be prized by funk savants,

sample-chasing hip-hop producers

and record collectors.

 

As part

of the James Brown Revue,

Ms. Whitney (...)

had her own featured segment

during its shows

and sang duets with Mr. Brown,

her vocals effortlessly intense.

 

After joining the revue in 1967,

she was with Mr. Brown

in some of his most

momentous shows

during a tumultuous 1968,

including performances

in Vietnam for American soldiers

and in Boston on the night

after the assassination

of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/01/
arts/music/marva-whitney-singer-in-the-james-brown-revue-dies-at-68.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/01/
arts/music/marva-whitney-singer-in-the-james-brown-revue-dies-at-68.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fontella Bass        1940-2012

 

(her) 1965 hit “Rescue Me”

was an indelible example

of the decade’s finest pop-soul

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/28/
arts/music/fontella-bass-72-singer-of-rescue-me-is-dead.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/28/
arts/music/fontella-bass-72-singer-of-rescue-me-is-dead.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jimmy McCracklin (born James David Walker)        1921-2012

 

blues singer and pianist

who by his count composed

nearly a thousand songs

and recorded hundreds,

including the 1950s hit “The Walk”

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/23/
arts/music/jimmy-mccracklin-rb-singer-and-songwriter-dies-at-91.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/23/
arts/music/jimmy-mccracklin-rb-singer-and-songwriter-dies-at-91.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inez McConico        1929-2012

 

Inez Andrews ('s)

soaring, wide-ranging voice

— from contralto croon

to soul-wrenching wail —

made her a pillar of gospel music

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/22/arts/music/inez-andrews-gospel-singer-dies-at-83.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/22/
arts/music/inez-andrews-gospel-singer-dies-at-83.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Earl Carroll        1937-2012

 

lead singer

of the 1950s doo-wop

group the Cadillacs,

who later found contentment,

plus a measure

of abiding renown,

as a New York City

school custodian

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/27/arts/music/earl-carroll-lead-singer-of-the-cadillacs-dies-at-75.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/27/
arts/music/earl-carroll-lead-singer-of-the-cadillacs-dies-at-75.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jessy Dixon        1938-2011

 

singer and songwriter

who helped popularize

gospel music

with his energetic style

and who found

a wider audience

touring and recording

with Paul Simon

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/27/arts/music/jessy-dixon-gospel-singer-and-songwriter-dies-at-73.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/27/
arts/music/jessy-dixon-gospel-singer-and-songwriter-dies-at-73.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bee Gees        Barry Gibb        UK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/music/bee-gees

 

 

http://www.npr.org/2016/10/22/
498827990/im-in-defiance-of-time-barry-gibb-on-music-family-and-loss

 

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2016/aug/14/
barbara-gibb-mother-of-the-bee-gees-dies-aged-95

 

 

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2013/jul/18/
barry-gibb-bee-gees-music-alive

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bee Gees        Robin Hugh Gibb        UK        1949-2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

one of the three singing brothers

of the Bee Gees,

the long-running

Anglo-Australian pop group

whose chirping falsettos

and hook-laden disco hits

like “Jive Talkin’ ”

and “You Should Be Dancing”

shot them to worldwide fame

in the 1970s

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/21/arts/music/robin-gibb-62-member-of-the-bee-gees-dies-at-62.html

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/music/robin-gibb

https://www.theguardian.com/music/bee-gees

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2016/aug/14/
barbara-gibb-mother-of-the-bee-gees-dies-aged-95

 

http://www.npr.org/2012/05/21/
151126992/bee-gee-robin-gibb-dies-of-cancer-at-62

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/musicblog/2012/may/21/robin-gibb-twitter-bee-gees

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2012/may/21/robin-gibb-music-industry-tribute

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/video/2012/may/21/bee-gees-robin-gibb-video

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/21/arts/music/robin-gibb-62-member-of-the-bee-gees-dies-at-62.html

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/musicblog/2012/may/21/robin-gibb-tribute-music

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/gallery/2012/may/21/robin-gibb-bee-gees-life-in-pictures

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2012/may/21/robin-gibb-pioneer-disco-dies

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2012/may/20/robin-gibb

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Donald Dunn        USA        1941-2012

 

Bassist

in Booker T. and the MG’s

 

(his) simple but inventive

bass playing

anchored numerous hit records

and helped define the sound

of Memphis soul music

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/14/
arts/music/duck-dunn-bassist-in-booker-t-and-the-mgs-dies-at-70.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/14/
arts/music/duck-dunn-bassist-in-booker-t-and-the-mgs-dies-at-70.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

James Thomas Ellis, singer        1937-2012

 

The career

of the vocalist Jimmy Ellis (...)

was ultimately defined

by one song.

 

The band he fronted,

the Trammps,

had other US and UK hits

in the era

when the lushly orchestrated

soul music released

on the Philadelphia International label

was gradually mutating into disco,

but they were all overshadowed

by Disco Inferno.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2012/mar/09/jimmy-ellis

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2012/mar/09/
jimmy-ellis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Etta James Etta James (born Jamesetta Hawkins)        1938-2012

 

Etta James's powerful,

versatile and emotionally direct voice

could enliven the raunchiest blues

as well as the subtlest love songs,

most indelibly in her signature hit,

“At Last”

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/21/arts/music/etta-james-singer-dies-at-73.html

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/music/etta-james 

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/musicblog/2012/jan/20/
etta-james-10-classic-performances

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/21/arts/music/
etta-james-singer-dies-at-73.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Johnny Otis (John Alexander Veliotes)        1921-2012

 

The bandleader Johnny Otis (...)

was one of the first white American

musicians to cross the racial divide,

aligning himself

with the black community

as a teenager

and from then on

regarding himself

– and being treated as –

a black man.

 

He attracted

many nicknames

– among them

the Duke Ellington of Watts,

the Reverend Hand Jive

and the Godfather

of Rhythm and Blues –

and distinguished himself

as a television host,

political activist, preacher,

cartoonist, painter,

chef, record producer,

talent scout, DJ,

sculptor, writer

and organic farmer.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2012/jan/19/johnny-otis

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2012/jan/19/
johnny-otis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

James Walter Castor        1940-2012

 

singer,

instrumentalist and songwriter

whose mastery of genres

from doo-wop to Latin soul to funk,

and instruments including

saxophone and bongos

earned him the title Everything Man

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/18/
arts/music/jimmy-castor-musician-who-mastered-many-genres-dies-at-71.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/18/
arts/music/jimmy-castor-musician-who-mastered-many-genres-dies-at-71.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dobie Gray        1940, 1942 or 1943-2011

 

a versatile singer and songwriter

who had a handful of hits

in various pop genres

but who was probably best known

for his enduring 1973 soul anthem,

“Drift Away,” a wistful paean

to all songwriters and their songs

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/08/arts/music/dobie-gray-singer-known-for-drift-away-dies.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/08/arts/music/
dobie-gray-singer-known-for-drift-away-dies.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

James Norman Scott        1937-2011

 

rhythm-and-blues

singer and songwriter

who worked with Bob Marley

and Jimi Hendrix early

in their careers

and was involved

in a longstanding dispute

over songwriting credit for the song

“Time Is on My Side”

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/26/arts/music/
jimmy-norman-singer-who-worked-with-marley-and-hendrix-dies-at-74.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/26/
arts/music/jimmy-norman-singer-who-worked-with-marley-and-hendrix-dies-at-74.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nickolas Ashford        1941-2011

 

with Valerie Simpson,

his songwriting partner and later wife,

he wrote some of Motown’s biggest hits,

like “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough“

and “Ain’t Nothing Like the Real Thing,”

and later recorded their own hits

and toured as a duo

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/23/
arts/music/nick-ashford-of-motown-writing-duo-dies-at-70.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/23/
arts/music/nick-ashford-of-motown-writing-duo-dies-at-70.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wardell Joseph Quezergue        1930-2011

 

prime mover

in New Orleans rhythm and blues

since the early 1950s

as a producer,

arranger and bandleader

for a long list of artists

including the Dixie Cups,

Professor Longhair,

the Neville Brothers and Dr. John

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/08/arts/music/wardell-quezergue-hitmaker-of-new-orleans-rb-dies-at-81.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/08/
arts/music/wardell-quezergue-hitmaker-of-new-orleans-rb-dies-at-81.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

General Norman Johnson        1941-2010

 

General Johnson (...)

provided the distinctive lead vocal

for the Chairmen of the Board’s

1970 Top 10 hit,

“Give Me Just a Little More Time,”

and went on to become

a successful rhythm-and-blues

songwriter

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/16/arts/music/16johnson.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/16/
arts/music/16johnson.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Theodore DeReese "Teddy" Pendergrass, Sr.        1950-2010

 

Smooth Philadelphia

soul and R&B star

who first found fame

with the Blue Notes

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2010/jan/14/teddy-pendergrass-obituary

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2010/jan/14/
teddy-pendergrass-obituary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Garry Shider        1953-2010

 

funk-rock guitarist and singer

whose spacey but soulful

and rhythmically powerful playing

provided one of the pillars of the influential

Parliament-Funkadelic sound of the 1970s

and propelled him

into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/06/21/arts/music/21shider.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/06/21/
arts/music/21shider.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marvin Isley        1953-2010

 

bass player

with R&B family band

the Isley Brothers

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2010/jun/08/isley-brothers-star-dies

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2010/jun/08/
isley-brothers-star-dies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Walter Lee Hawkins        USA        1949-2010

 

Grammy-winning

gospel composer and singer

whose songs brought

a sense of contemporary rhythm

to the howling, pleading,

God-praising tradition

of churchly ecstasy

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/14/arts/music/14hawkins.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/14/
arts/music/14hawkins.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Viola Wills (Viola Mae Wilkerson)        USA        1940-2009

 

While Viola Wills's best-known hit,

Gonna Get Along Without You Now

in 1979,

was the one that made her name,

it was also the track that cast her

as a stereotype.

 

Thenceforth she became

the "disco diva",

with an enthusiastic gay following,

but the term belied her musical range,

which encompassed soul,

jazz and gospel.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2009/may/20/viola-wills-obituary

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2009/may/20/
viola-wills-obituary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Four Tops

 

Levi Stubbs        USA        1936-2008

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2008/oct/17/
levi-stubbs-singer-motown

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2008/oct/18/
usa

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/10/18/
arts/music/18stubbs.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Isaac Hayes        USA        1942-2008

 

 

 

 

ISAAC HAYES - SHAFT @ WATTSTAX 1973 [feat. Richard Pryor]

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Gghsy_YKk8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

singer and songwriter

whose luxurious,

strutting funk arrangements in songs

like “Theme From ‘Shaft’ ”

defined the glories and excesses

of soul music in the early 1970s

 

(...)

 

With his lascivious bass-baritone

and flamboyant wardrobe,

Mr. Hayes developed

a musical persona

that was an embodiment

of the hyper-masculine,

street-savvy characters

of the so-called

blaxploitation films of the era.

 

In his theme song

to Gordon Parks’s “Shaft” from 1971,

the title character is summed up in a line

that has become a classic of kitsch:

“Who’s a black private dick/

Who’s a sex machine to all the chicks?”

(Furthermore: “He’s a complicated man/

But no one understands him

but his woman.”)

 

The “Shaft” theme won

an Academy Award

and has become one

of his best-known songs.

 

But Mr. Hayes’s career

stretched far beyond soundtracks.

 

For much of the 1960s and into the ’70s

he was one of the principal songwriters

and performers for Stax Records,

the trailblazing Memphis R&B label,

and in the 1990s he revived his career

by providing the voice

for the amorous and wise Chef

on the cable television show

“South Park.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/08/11/arts/music/11hayes.html

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/music/isaachayes

http://www.nytimes.com/topic/person/isaac-hayes 

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2008/aug/12/popandrock.jazz

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2008/aug/11/usa

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/08/11/arts/music/11hayes.html

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2008/aug/11/isaac.hayes.youtube.gallery

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Izear "Ike" Luster Turner        USA        1931-2007

 

singer, songwriter and rock entrepreneur

 

http://www.theguardian.com/news/2007/dec/14/guardianobituaries.adamsweeting

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2007/dec/13/usa.musicnews  

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/13/arts/music/13turner.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

James Brown        USA        1933-2006

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wilson Pickett        USA        1941-2006

 

 

 

Wilson Pickett

Nothing You Can Do (ATLANTIC 2381)

http://redkelly.blogspot.com/2006/01/wilson-pickett-nothing-you-can-do.html

added 20.5.2007

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

soul music pioneer

whose insistent wail turned songs

like "In the Midnight Hour" into hits

 

(...)

 

Born in Prattville, Ala.,

Mr. Pickett was one of 11 children;

he told interviewers

that he had suffered

an abusive childhood.

 

As a teenager

he moved to Detroit,

where he formed

a gospel band,

the Violinaires,

that performed

in local churches.

 

But his chance

at pop fame emerged in 1961,

when he was invited

to join the Falcons,

an R & B act that had already

scored a Top 20 hit,

"You're So Fine."

 

While the Falcons

enjoyed modest success,

Mr. Pickett struck out on his own,

recording the song

"If You Need Me."

 

His performance hit the market

at roughly the same time

the soul singer Solomon Burke

released his own version.

 

Still, both treatments sold well,

and Mr. Pickett soon had a contract

with Atlantic Records.

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/01/20/arts/music/20pickett.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/01/20/arts/music/20pickett.html

https://www.theguardian.com/culture/2006/jan/20/usa.world 

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/entertainment/4630184.stm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Barry White        (born Barry Eugene Carter)        USA        1944-2003

 

Barry White ('s) deep voice

and lushly orchestrated songs

added up to soundtracks

for seduction

http://www.nytimes.com/2003/07/05/obituaries/05WHIT.html/

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2003/07/05/
obituaries/05WHIT.html/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rufus Thomas        USA        1917-2001

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2002/jul/20/
artsfeatures.features1

 

https://www.theguardian.com/news/2001/dec/21/
guardianobituaries1 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marvin Gaye        USA        1939-1984

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sly and the Family Stone        USA        1967-1983

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/therecord/2015/11/24/
457256347/remembering-cynthia-robinson-co-founder-of-sly-the-family-stone

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chairmen of the Board        USA        1960s-1970s

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/16/
arts/music/16johnson.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Otis Ray Redding, Jr.        USA        1941-1967

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/13/
opinion/the-greatest-music-festival-in-history.html

 

http://www.npr.org/2015/05/30/
410264042/like-an-avalanche-otis-reddings-unstoppable-crossover

 

http://www.npr.org/2014/10/28/
359613658/the-mysterious-case-of-arthur-conley-otis-reddings-protege

 

http://www.npr.org/2000/09/17/
1082281/-sittin-on-the-dock-of-the-bay - March 6, 2012

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2008/feb/15/
vinylword.joequeenan

 

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?
storyId=17075938 - December 10, 2007

 

http://www.npr.org/2000/09/17/1082281/
-sittin-on-the-dock-of-the-bay - September 17, 2000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sam Cooke        USA        1931-1964

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The biggest music event

of the Black Power era: Wattstax        August 1972

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2002/jul/20/
artsfeatures.features1

 

http://www.pbs.org/pov/pov2004/wattstax/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Crystals        1960s

 

Ms. Alston

was a choir-trained teenager

in Brooklyn

when she formed the Crystals

with her high school friends

Mary Thomas,

Dolores Kenniebrew

(who is known as Dee Dee),

Myrna Giraud and Patsy Wright.

 

Their harmonious songs,

often about young romance,

were like those of many other popular

all-female R&B vocal groups

in the early 1960s,

like the Shirelles

and the Ronettes.

 

The producer Phil Spector

signed the Crystals in 1961,

and they became an early example

of his dense, layered “wall of sound”

production style.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/06/
obituaries/barbara-alston-founding-member-of-the-crystals-dies-at-74.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/06/
obituaries/barbara-alston-founding-member-of-the-crystals-dies-at-74.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Phil Spector

 

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?
storyId=103066928 - April 13, 2009

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2007/apr/21/
philspector.music

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?
storyId=8993130 - March 19, 2007

 

 

 

 

Phil Spector > wall of sound

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/06/
obituaries/barbara-alston-founding-member-of-the-crystals-dies-at-74.html

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2007/apr/21/
philspector.music

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?
storyId=8993130 - March 19, 2007

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

psychedelic

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2008/sep/19/
popandrock.normanwhitfield

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soul Train

http://soultrain.com/videos/

 

http://www.arte.tv/fr/palace-of-soul-les-annees-soul-train-18/7489310,CmC=7489530.html

 

 

 

 

label > Invictus

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/16/
arts/music/16johnson.html

 

 

 

 

label > Motown records

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/motown

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/17/
arts/music/maxine-powell-motowns-maven-of-style-dies-at-98.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/05/
arts/music/bobby-rogers-dies-at-73-sang-in-smokey-robinsons-miracles.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/04/
arts/music/frank-wilson-motown-songwriter-and-producer-dies-at-71.html

 

 

 

 

label > Motown > Michael Jackson        1958-2009

http://blogs.reuters.com/fanfare/2009/06/26/
michael-jackson-becomes-motowns-latest-fallen-hero/

 

 

 

 

Motown > Norman Jesse Whitfield, songwriter and record producer        1941-2008

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2008/sep/19/
popandrock.normanwhitfield

 

 

 

 

Motown > The Temptations

https://www.nytimes.com/topic/organization/the-temptations 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/02/
obituaries/dennis-edwards-former-temptations-lead-singer-dies-at-74.html

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2008/oct/31/
temptations-whitfield

 

 

 

 

Dennis Edwards        1943-2018

 

Dennis Edwards (...)

became a lead singer

of the Motown hitmakers the Temptations in 1968

as they embraced psychedelic funk

and won Grammy Awards

for the songs “Papa Was a Rollin’ Stone”

and “Cloud Nine”

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/02/
obituaries/dennis-edwards-former-temptations-lead-singer-dies-at-74.html

 

 

 

 

Motown > The Temptations > Ali-Ollie Woodson

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/06/01/arts/music/01woodson.html

 

 

 

Motown > Jheryl Busby

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/08/business/media/08busby.html

 

 

 

 

Motown > Mable John

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2008/may/09/jazz.folk 

 

 

 

 

Motown > Martha Reeves

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2009/jun/25/martha-reeves-motown

 

 

 

 

Mustang records

http://www.nytimes.com/2003/07/05/obituaries/05WHIT.html/

 

 

 

 

Dot Records > Randolph Clay Wood        1917-2011

 

Randy Wood started out stocking records

in a nook of his electrical appliance store

before going on to found Dot Records,

a label that found success in the 1950s

recording white artists like Pat Boone

singing black artists’ rhythm-and-blues songs

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/15/business/media/15wood.html

 

 

 

 

Solar Records - acronym for Sound of Los Angeles Records

 

Richard Gilbert Griffey        USA        1938-2010

bringing a funky, laid back, California sound

to soul, R&B and disco in the ’70s and ’80s

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/04/arts/music/04griffey.html

 

 

 

 

Solar Records

Shalamar, the Whispers, Lakeside, Dynasty, Klymaxx, Midnight Star, the Deele

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/04/arts/music/04griffey.html

 

 

 

 

Stax > Estelle Axton        1918-2004

http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/2004/feb/28/guardianobituaries.artsobituaries

 

 

 

 

Ahmet Ertegun, co-founder of Atlantic Records        1923-2006

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2006/dec/15/5 

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2006/dec/15/4 

http://www.pbs.org/previews/am-atlanticrecords/

 

 

 

 

 the era’s major traditional gospel groups, the Ward Singers        1940s

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/28/
arts/music/fontella-bass-72-singer-of-rescue-me-is-dead.html

 

 

 

 

Pat Boone (born Charles Eugene Boone)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pat_Boone

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Teena Marie,

‘Ivory Queen of Soul,’

Dies at 54

 

Filed at 1:14 a.m. EST
on December 27, 2010
The New York Times
By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

 

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Teena Marie, the "Ivory Queen of Soul" who developed a lasting legacy with her silky soul pipes and with hits like "Lovergirl," ''Square Biz," and "Fire and Desire" with mentor Rick James, died on Sunday. She was 54.

A statement from Pasadena police said the death appeared to be from natural causes. The police and fire department were called to her home after family members found her unresponsive.

In an interview with The Associated Press last year, Teena Marie said she had successfully battled an addiction to prescription drugs; she went on tour last year to support her last album, "Congo Square."

Marie certainly wasn't the first white act to sing soul music, but she was arguably among the most gifted and respected, and was thoroughly embraced by the black audience.

Even before she started her musical career, she had a strong bond with the black community, which she credited to her godmother. She gravitated to soul music and in her youth decided to make it her career.

Marie made her debut on the legendary Motown label back in 1979, becoming one of the very few white acts to break the race barrier of the groundbreaking black-owned record label that had been a haven for black artists like Stevie Wonder, the Jackson Five, the Supremes and Marvin Gaye.

Marie was the protege of the masterful funk wizard James, with whom she would have long, turbulent but musically magical relationship.

The cover of her debut album, "Wild and Peaceful," did not feature her image, with Motown apparently fearing black audiences might not buy it if they found out the songstress with the dynamic, gospel-inflected voice was white.

But Marie notched her first hit, "I'm A Sucker for Your Love," and was on her way to becoming one of R&B's most revered queens. During her tenure with Motown, the singer-songwriter and musician produced passionate love songs and funk jam songs like "Need Your Lovin'," ''Behind the Groove."

Marie's voice was the main draw of her music: Pitch-perfect, piercing in its clarity and wrought with emotion, whether it was drawing from the highs of romance or the mournful moments of a love lost. But her songs, most of which she had a hand in writing, were the other major component of her success.

Tunes like "Cassanova Brown" ''Portuguese Love" and "Deja Vu (I've Been Here Before)" featured more than typical platitudes on love and life, but complex thoughts with rich lyricism.

And "Fire and Desire," a duet with Rick James that featured the former couple musing about their past love, was considered a musical masterpiece and a staple of the romance block on radio stations across the country.

Marie left Motown in 1982 and her split became historic: She sued the label and the legal battle led to a law preventing record labels from holding an artist without releasing any of their music.

She went to Epic in the 1980s and had hits like "Lovergirl" and "Ooo La La La" but her lasting musical legacy would be her Motown years.

Still, she continued to record music and perform. In 2004 and 2006 she put out two well-received albums on the traditional rap label Cash Money Records, "La Dona" and "Sapphire."

In 2008, she talked about her excitement of being honored by the R&B Foundation.

"All in all, it's been a wonderful, wonderful ride," she told The Associated Press at the time. "I don't plan on stopping anytime soon."

 

(This version CORRECTS

Updates with police report, removes attribution to publicist.

Corrects that 'Ooo La La La' was during Epic

instead of Motown years.)

    Teena Marie, ‘Ivory Queen of Soul,’ Dies at 54, NYT, 26.12.2010,
    http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2010/12/26/arts/AP-US-Obit-Teena-Marie.html

 

 

 

 

 

Garry Shider,

a Pillar of Funk-Rock,

Is Dead at 56

 

June 20, 2010
The New York Times
By LARRY ROHTER

 

Garry Shider, the funk-rock guitarist and singer whose spacey but soulful and rhythmically powerful playing provided one of the pillars of the influential Parliament-Funkadelic sound of the 1970s and propelled him into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, died on Wednesday at his home in Upper Marlboro, Md. He was 56.

The cause was brain and lung cancer, said his son Garrett.

Onstage, Mr. Shider, known as Starchild or Diaperman (because of his fondness for performing dressed only in a loincloth), cut an outlandish figure, emphasized by his tie-dyed dreadlocks. But he delivered incendiary solos and impressively funky rhythm work on his guitar, most notably on the jam showpiece “Cosmic Slop.” With George Clinton, the founder of Parliament and Funkadelic, he wrote some of the groups’ signature songs, including “One Nation Under a Groove” and “Atomic Dog.”

Born in Plainfield, N.J., on July 24, 1953, Mr. Shider began performing as a child, singing and playing in a local family-based gospel group, the Shiderettes, and providing support for nationally known acts like Shirley Caesar and the Mighty Clouds of Joy. It was at this time that he met Mr. Clinton, who owned a barbershop near the church Mr. Shider’s family attended and led a doo-wop-inspired vocal group called the Parliaments, which would later evolve into the intertwined groups Parliament and Funkadelic, also known collectively as P-Funk.

As a teenager, Mr. Shider played in a band called U.S., short for United Soul, some of whose recordings were produced by Mr. Clinton and the keyboardist Bernie Worrell, later to be another important member of the P-Funk family. That led to his being asked to play on Parliament and Funkadelic recordings in the early 1970s and an invitation shortly afterward to join the bands.

Along with his fellow guitarists Eddie Hazel and Michael Hampton, Mr. Shider, his playing by now also incorporating the influences of Jimi Hendrix and Sly Stone, gave both punch and funk to hit P-Funk albums including “Standing on the Verge of Getting It On” and “Hardcore Jollies” and live performances throughout the remainder of the decade. He also played with the offshoot bands of other P-Funk members, especially those of Mr. Hazel and the bassist Bootsy Collins.

After Parliament-Funkadelic dissolved in the early 1980s, Mr. Shider continued his association with Mr. Clinton and served at times as musical director of the P-Funk All-Stars, a successor band. He also performed with other P-Funk members in the movies “PCU” and “The Night Before,” playing songs he helped write; appeared on records like the Black Crowes’ “Three Snakes and One Charm”; and had his earlier work sampled on hit CDs by rap performers like Dr. Dre, OutKast and Digital Underground. In 1997, he and the other members of Parliament-Funkadelic were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

Benefit concerts to help pay Mr. Shider’s medical bills have been scheduled for July 10 in Plainfield and July 11 in Manhattan.

In addition to his sons, Garrett and Marshall, Mr. Shider is survived by his wife, the singer and songwriter Linda Shider.

    Garry Shider, a Pillar of Funk-Rock, Is Dead at 56, NYT, 20.6.2010,
    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/06/21/arts/music/21shider.html

 

 

 

 

 

Obituary

Isaac Hayes

Soul legend, composer and actor

who won an Oscar

for the soundtrack of Shaft

 

Tuesday 12 August 2008
The Guardian
Adam Sweeting
This article was first published
on guardian.co.uk at 00.01 BST
on Tuesday 12 August 2008.
It appeared in the Guardian
on Tuesday 12 August 2008
on p30 of the Obituaries section.
It was last updated at 10.11 BST
on Tuesday 12 August 2008.
 

 

Isaac Hayes, who has died aged 65, earned massive international acclaim and a niche in the record books from writing the Oscar-winning theme for the movie Shaft in 1971. But that was only the tip of the iceberg of Hayes's talents, which comprised skills as a multi-instrumentalist, producer, arranger and vocalist, as well as composer, songwriter and actor. The musical innovations he pioneered throughout his career made him an influential figure in the development of soul and disco, and he was later dubbed the "Original Rapper". He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2002.

Born in Covington, Tennessee, Hayes was raised by his sharecropper grandparents in their shack after his mother had died and his father walked out. When he moved with his grandparents to Memphis, he took jobs as a bus boy and dishwasher to help boost the household's dire finances, but it was a sign of things to come when he won a talent show singing the Nat King Cole hit Looking Back. "Career change!" recalled Hayes, whose only previous musical experience was singing in church as a boy. "I started pursuing music big time."

He began finding work as a musician in local clubs and formed several shortlived groups, including Sir Isaac and the Doo-Dads and Calvin Valentine and the Swing Cats. Then he signed on as pianist with saxophonist Floyd Newman, who was also a staff musician for the new Memphis label, Stax. This brought Hayes an invitation to stand in on keyboards for a temporarily absent Booker T Jones, from the Stax house band Booker T & the MGs, and he played his first paid sessions with Otis Redding in early 1964.

Hayes had become a familiar face around Stax when the writer and producer David Porter suggested they collaborate as songwriters. It was an inspired move, and soon the Porter/Hayes duo (alias the Soul Children) were banging out such classics as Soul Man, When Something Is Wrong With My Baby and Hold On, I'm Coming for Sam & Dave, and the sublime B-A-B-Y for Carla Thomas. Hayes's work at Stax helped to create the Memphis Sound, which influenced the Beatles, the Rolling Stones and almost everybody who mattered in pop.

The assassination of Martin Luther King in Memphis on April 4 1968 was especially shattering for Hayes, who had joined King's civil rights marches and was due to meet him on the day of his death. "I thought 'I can't do a thing about it, so let me become successful and powerful enough where I can have a voice to make a difference.' " His first solo album, Presenting Isaac Hayes, was released that year. It sold insignificantly, but his 1969 follow-up, Hot Buttered Soul, sold 1m copies and represented a bold artistic advance. It contained only four tracks, and its complex symphonic arrangements and verbal monologues pointed the way ahead to 1970s concept albums by Marvin Gaye, Barry White and Stevie Wonder. His expanded versions of Burt Bacharach's Walk on By and Jimmy Webb's By the Time I Get to Phoenix still sound revolutionary.

Hayes's Shaft moment duly arrived in 1971, and his double-album soundtrack made him the first African-American to win an Academy award. The Theme from Shaft, with its tense beat, edgy wah-wah guitars and effortlessly hip monologue, became a Grammy-winning chart-topper, made No 4 in the UK and made Hayes a global star. He was the godfather of bling in his gold chains and interplanetary costumes, as well as one of the most imitated musicians on the planet. He was showered with film and television work, scoring the TV show The Men and the movies Tough Guys and Truck Turner (both of which also starred Hayes, who played a bartender in Shaft). His Truck Turner score would be used by Quentin Tarantino in his Kill Bill movies. In 1974 he debuted in the recurring role of Jim Rockford's fellow ex-con in The Rockford Files.

Hayes released a second successful double-album in 1971, Black Moses, and his US chart-topping Live at the Sahara Tahoe made it three. His 1973 album Joy included the hit I Love You That's All, later sampled by numerous artists, including Massive Attack and Eric B & Rakim.

In 1975, following a struggle with Stax over royalties, Hayes set up his own Hot Buttered Soul (HBS) label, under the wing of ABC. He scored a big hit with the disco-orientated Chocolate Chip, though follow-ups Disco Connection and Groove-A-Thon proved less commercial. By 1976 he somehow found himself $6m in debt, and was mortified to see his solid gold Cadillac Eldorado go to the tax authorities.

However, he lost no time in staging a comeback, teaming up with Dionne Warwick for the 1977 double-LP A Man and a Woman, and co-writing Warwick's US Top 20 hit, Déjà Vu. Hayes signed a solo deal with Polydor and notched hit singles with Zeke the Freak, Don't Let Go and Do You Wanna Make Love. The last of these was from his final 70s album, a duet with Millie Jackson called Royal Rappin's (1979).

The 1980s proved unrewarding musically, but Hayes compensated by stepping up his acting work. He played the villain in John Carpenter's Escape from New York, appeared in action romps Counterforce and Dead Aim, and adorned the small screen in The A-Team, Hunter and Miami Vice. In 1988, he appeared in the Keenen Ivory Wayans comedy I'm Gonna Git You, Sucka, a satire of Shaft-style blaxploitation films.

Numerous film parts followed through the 1990s. Hayes now signed a record deal with Columbia. His album U-Turn contained Ike's Rap, featuring a powerful anti-crack message ("Don't be a resident of crack city"). He also agreed to lecture in colleges in prisons about the perils of drug addiction.

In 1992, Hayes explored his humanitarian bent further when he and Warwick accepted an invitation to visit the Cape coast and the Elmina slave castles of Ghana. Much moved, Hayes committed himself to raising funds to improve social and educational standards in Ghana. He was rewarded by being made a Ghanaian king. He subsequently founded the Isaac Hayes Foundation, to promote literacy, musical and nutritional education around the world. He was an enthusiastic chef who owned restaurants in Memphis and Chicago, and often performed at both.

In 1997, his culinary leanings led to his being cast as the voice of Chef in the animated TV show South Park. Hayes described the character as "a person that speaks his mind; he's sensitive enough to care for children ... And he loves the ladies". Chocolate Salty Balls (PS I Love You), a song performed by Chef, was his first UK chart-topper. However, he left the series acrimoniously, apparently offended by an episode that satirised Scientology, which he espoused and promoted. South Park's creators, Trey Parker and Matt Stone, argued that Hayes had not objected to other religions being lampooned, but wanted to apply different standards to Scientology.

Hayes suffered a stroke in 2006, and appeared confused and disorientated on a TV talk show earlier this year. Last Sunday, he was found unconscious by his wife Adjowa at his home near Memphis, apparently having collapsed while using a treadmill. He was pronounced dead at Memphis's Baptist Memorial hospital, and was thought to have suffered a simultaneous stroke and heart attack. Adjowa was his fourth wife. He fathered 12 children.

 

· Isaac Hayes, musician,

born August 20 1942; died August 10 2008

   Soul legend,
    composer and actor who won an Oscar for the soundtrack of Shaft,
    G, 12.8.2008,
    http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2008/aug/12/popandrock.jazz

 

 

 

 

 

Ike Turner,

Musician and Songwriter

in Duo With Tina Turner,

Dies at 76

 

December 13, 2007
The New York Times
By JON PARELES

 

Ike Turner, the R&B musician, songwriter, bandleader, producer, talent scout and ex-husband of Tina Turner, died on Wednesday at his home in San Marcos, Calif., a San Diego suburb. He was 76.

His death was announced by Jeanette Bazzell Turner, who married Mr. Turner in 1995. She gave no cause of death, but said he had had emphysema.

Mr. Turner was best known for discovering Anna Mae Bullock, a teenage singer from Nutbush, Tenn., whom he renamed Tina Turner. The Ike and Tina Turner Revue made a string of hits in the 1960s before the Turners broke up in 1975.

Tina Turner described the relationship as abusive in her autobiography, “I, Tina,” which was adapted for the 1993 film “What’s Love Got to Do With It?” and made Mr. Turner’s name synonymous with domestic abuse.

“I got a temper,” he admitted in 1999 in his autobiography, “Takin’ Back My Name: The Confessions of Ike Turner.” But he maintained that the film had “overstated” it.

Mr. Turner’s career extended back to the 1950s, when he played with pioneering Mississippi Delta bluesmen and helped shape early rock ’n’ roll as well as soul and rhythm-and-blues. “Rocket 88,” a song his band released in 1951 under the name Jackie Brenston and his Delta Cats, is regularly cited as a contender for the first rock-’n’-roll record for its beat, its distorted guitar and its honking saxophone.

Ike and Tina Turner were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1991.

Ike Turner, whose full name is variously given as Izear Luster Turner Jr. and Ike Wister Turner, was born in Clarksdale, Miss., and was brought up there by his mother after his father, a minister, was beaten to death by a white mob.

As a child Ike spent time at the local radio station, WROX, a hub for Delta blues performances. According to Mr. Turner’s autobiography, the D.J.s taught him how to cue up and segue records, sometimes leaving him alone on the air when he was 8 years old.

He grew up around Delta musicians like the bluesman Robert Nighthawk Jr. and the pianist Pinetop Perkins, who gave him boogie-woogie lessons, and he learned to play guitar.

In high school he formed a group called the Kings of Rhythm. B. B. King helped that band get a steady weekend gig and recommended it to Sam Phillips at Sun Studios in Memphis. The band had been performing jukebox hits, but on the drive from Mississippi to Memphis, its members decided to write something of their own.

Their saxophonist, Jackie Brenston, suggested a song about the new Rocket 88 Oldsmobile. The piano-pounding intro and the first verse were by Mr. Turner, and the band collaborated on the rest; Mr. Brenston sang.

Sun was not yet its own record label, so Mr. Phillips sent the song to Chess Records. It went on to sell a half-million copies. “I was playing rhythm and blues,” Mr. Turner wrote. “That’s all I was playing.” His book says he was paid $20 for the record.

Mr. Turner became a session guitarist, known for his flamboyant, note-bending use of his guitar’s whammy bar. He was also a producer, songwriter and talent scout for Sun and for RPM/Modern Records. He worked with Mr. King, Bobby (Blue) Bland, Howlin’ Wolf, Johnny Ace, Otis Rush, Elmore James and many other blues and R&B musicians.

In 1954 he moved up the Mississippi River to East St. Louis, Ill., where his disciplined and dynamic band became a major draw at local clubs. There, in 1958, he heard Anna Mae Bullock, who joined the group and quickly became its focal point as Tina Turner. The band was soon renamed the Ike and Tina Turner Revue. Her lead vocal on “A Fool in Love” started a streak of Top 10 R&B hits for the revue and also reached the pop Top 40. It was followed by “It’s Gonna Work Out Fine” in 1961. The duo became stars on the grueling so-called chitlin’ circuit of African-American clubs.

Ike and Tina Turner had a wedding ceremony in Tijuana, Mexico, in 1962; Mr. Turner’s book said they were never actually married. They had a son, Ronald, who survives him, along with Jeanette Bazzell Turner and four other children: Mia, Twanna, Michael and Ike Jr.

The Rolling Stones chose the Ike and Tina Turner Revue as its opening act on a 1969 tour, introducing it to many rock fans. In 1971 the revue reached the pop Top 10 with its version of Creedence Clearwater Revival’s “Proud Mary,” with Ike’s deep vocal counterpoint and Tina’s memorable spoken-word interlude. “We never do anything nice and easy,” Ms. Turner says in the song. “We always do it nice and rough.” That song won a Grammy Award for best R&B performance by a group.

Ms. Turner’s account of the couple’s years together describes domestic violence, infidelity and drug use; his version does not deny that, although he wrote in his book, “Tina and me, we had our fights, but we ain’t had no more fights than anybody else.”

Tina walked out on him in 1975. Mr. Turner, already abusing cocaine and alcohol, spiraled further downward during the 1980s while Ms. Turner became a multimillion-selling star on her own. A recording studio he had built in Los Angeles burned down in 1982, and he was arrested repeatedly on drug charges. In 1989 he went to prison for various cocaine-possession offenses and was in jail when he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

But he had a windfall when the hip-hop duo Salt ’N’ Pepa used a sample of his song “I’m Blue” for their 1993 hit “Shoop,” which reached No. 4 on the Billboard pop chart.

Mr. Turner set out to reclaim his place in rock history. He wrote his autobiography with a British writer, Nigel Cawthorne. At the 2001 Chicago Blues Festival he performed with Pinetop Perkins in a set filmed for the Martin Scorsese PBS series “The Blues.” He renamed his band the Kings of Rhythm and re-recorded “Rocket 88” for the 2001 album “Here and Now.” He toured internationally, recording a live album and DVD, “The Resurrection,” at the Montreux Jazz Festival in 2002. He visited high schools during Black History Month with an antidrug message. He recorded a song with the British band Gorillaz in 2005.

In the end, the music business embraced him: Mr. Turner’s 2006 album, “Risin’ With the Blues,” won the Grammy this year as best traditional blues album.

 

Ben Sisario contributed reporting.

    Ike Turner, Musician and Songwriter in Duo With Tina Turner, Dies at 76,
    NYT, 13.12.2007,
    http://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/13/arts/music/13turner.html

 

 

 

 

 

Obituary

Ray Charles

 

Musical giant

who drew together

blues, gospel, soul and jazz

 

Saturday 12 June 2004

02.45 BST

Guardian.co.uk

Tony Russell

 

During the 1960s, a generation of teenagers discovered America's hidden music of black blues, gospel and soul, and many of them promptly fissured into followings of one genre or another. If anyone could reunite those factions it was Ray Charles, who has died aged 73. His work had elements of every idiom: it was pan-American music. Sometimes, it seemed to be even more than that.

In 1960, Charles recorded Hoagy Carmichael's "old sweet song", Georgia On My Mind. It was a beautiful thing in itself, but, appearing as it did in the early years of the civil rights struggle, Charles's bittersweet reading seemed like an elegy to an Old South that was - or ought to have been - on its way out. To hear a man singing with such exquisite tenderness about a place where he could not eat lunch or use a public lavatory on his own terms made the terrible ambivalences of black southern life unbearably vivid.

The tools that Charles brought to this, and the many other extraordinary performances he recorded in the 1950s and 60s, were a hugely expressive voice, and fingers that knotted the emotional ambiguities of the blues with the incessant beat of gospel music.

But what elevated him above gifted contemporaries like Fats Domino or Charles Brown was his skill as an arranger, giving shape and character to a piece, plotting its contours and adding telling detail. This was the talent that inspired him to take a routine blues, preface it with a few bars of electric piano and texture it with a dialogue between himself and his backing singers that began in church and ended up in the bedroom.

"What'd I Say didn't feel like a big deal at the time," remembered Tom Dowd, Atlantic Records' engineer. "Ray, the gals and the band live in the small studio, no overdubs. Next!" But during the summer of 1959, the record became, as Charles's biographer Michael Lydon has written, "the life of a million parties, the spark of as many romances." And more: "In faraway Liverpool, Paul McCartney heard it and chills went up and down his spine: 'I knew right then and there I wanted to be involved in that kind of music'."

Charles's own involvement in music began when he was a three-year-old in Greenville, Florida, where he and his mother had moved from his birthplace in Albany, Georgia. Sitting on the lap of a local pianist, Wiley Pitman, he learned where to put his fingers in order to reproduce his teacher's rolling boogie-woogie figures. A year or two later he lost his sight, perhaps from congenital glaucoma, and, at the Florida School for the Deaf and Blind, he learned to read music in Braille.

Before he was out of his teens, talent and determination had led him to Seattle and then Los Angeles, where he worked for the blues singer Lowell Fulson and before leading his own groups. Already, he was a man fit to be respected by younger musicians: Quincy Jones, three years his junior, listened to the ideas Charles was deploying in his arrangements and found that "the whole world opened up".

Charles's first records were blues and pop songs in the husky vocal manner of contemporary stars like Nat "King" Cole and Charles Brown, but by the time he signed with Atlantic in 1952, he was searching for his own music - and within a couple of years he had found it. In songs like I've Got A Woman, This Little Girl Of Mine and Hallelujah I Love Her So, he pulled down the wall between blues and gospel and used the bricks to build hit records.

Discovering in Atlantic's owners, Ahmet and Nesuhi Ertegun, and their in-house producer Jerry Wexler, a team that understood and encouraged his vision, he diversified into jazz, recording with the vibraharpist Milt Jackson, and sang standards with a big band on the 1959 album The Genius Of Ray Charles, which stayed in the charts for 82 weeks.

His most momentous experiment, however, came after he had left Atlantic for ABC-Paramount, a larger label with the resources to lift him out of the ghetto of the rhythm 'n' blues chart and give him the keys to the city of mainstream pop. Modern Sounds In Country And Western Music (1962) applied big-band jazz and pop orchestrations to classics of the hillbilly song folio like Born To Lose, territory that was supposed to be a no-go area for black musicians. The album's vast success, spearheaded by the chart-topping I Can't Stop Loving You, reverberated through Nashville for years afterwards.

Charles was, by that time, a headliner in the day-to-day world of package tours and one-nighters, and with the pressures of that life came the usual problems: drugs, paternity suits, fallings-out with musicians. He had always had the ability to sink himself in his music and ignore most of what went on around him, and he spent much of the 1970s absorbed in his own production company, Ray Charles Enterprises, his record label Tangerine and his studios, where he could put his knowledge of music and electronics into the service of ever more ambitious projects.

Inevitably, having demonstrated that he lived outside the law of categories, he began to disappoint admirers who still followed it. For his old constituency of jazz and blues enthusiasts, his expansion into show tunes and singalong country songs seemed like a series of wrong turnings, and his recording of the Beatles' Eleanor Rigby, though arresting, was hardly likely to change their opinion. Perhaps they were cheered by his cameo in Jon Landis's movie The Blues Brothers (1980), where he plays the benevolent music-store owner who equips John Belushi and Dan Aykroyd so that they can fulfil their "mission from God" and put their band back together.

By the 1990s Charles's best work was behind him, but, having already received a Grammy lifetime achievement award and similar honours from from the Rock 'n' Roll Hall of Fame and the Songwriters Hall of Fame, he extended his list of Grammys to a dozen with I'll Be Good To You, a duet with Chaka Khan, and A Song For You.

His last public appearance was in April, when the RPM International Building, his old studio in downtown Los Angeles, was designated a historic landmark. His final recording, due to be released in August, is Genius Loves Company, a collection of duets with such admirers as Willie Nelson, Elton John and Norah Jones.

Charles was twice divorced and is survived by 12 children.



· Ray Charles (Robinson), musician,

born September 23 1930; died June 10 2004

Musical giant who drew together blues, gospel, soul and jazz,
G,
12.6.2004,
http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/2004/jun/12/
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