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Arts > Photographers

 

Photographers born late 18th century - early / mid 19th century    DEN, FR, UK, USA

 

 

 

 

The Weird World of Eadweard Muybridge

YouTube > Cinephilia and Beyond

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Awo-P3t4Ho

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

William Henry Jackson        USA        1843-1942

 

American painter,

Civil War veteran,

geological survey

photographer

and an explorer

famous for his images

of the American West.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Henry_Jackson

 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Henry_Jackson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Northcote Whitridge Thomas        UK        1868-1936

 

 

 

Yainkain, Head wife of Chief Sehi Bureh of Tormah,

Tormabum, Southern Province, Sierra Leone, 1915

 

Some of the responses included:

‘She looks very motherly.’

‘She looks like she’s got a lot of responsibilities.’

 

‘Her face in and of itself doesn’t look sad,

but her eyes look very sad.

 

Not because of what she’s doing

or where she is,

but something ages ago,

like there is a long, long deep sadness’

 

Confronting the colonial archive – in pictures

British colonial anthropologist Northcote Thomas

took thousands of photographs and sound recordings

of men, women and children

in west Africa between 1909 and 1915.

Some of these works,

which reflect the reprehensible colonial mindset,

feature in short Faces|Voices – winner of this year’s

Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC)

Best Research Film of the Year Award –

in which Londoners respond to the faces of these people.

Here’s a selection of the original images

G

Tue 19 Nov 2019    07.00 GMT

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2019/nov/19/
the-anthropologists-africa-in-pictures-faces-voices

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A chief, Kokori, Delta State, Nigeria, 1910

One woman in the film says:

‘Any recording of our people – African people –

from my perspective as an African woman

is important because much of our history

has been subjugated, maligned, buried, distorted.

So even though one could say that the general context

within which these pictures were taken was one of violence,

I still think the fact that we have these images is important.

We know these people existed.

They leave traces, memories,

contributions to knowledge that we can learn from.’

(Quotes above and below

from the responses in Faces|Voices)

 

Confronting the colonial archive – in pictures

British colonial anthropologist Northcote Thomas

took thousands of photographs and sound recordings

of men, women and children

in west Africa between 1909 and 1915.

Some of these works,

which reflect the reprehensible colonial mindset,

feature in short Faces|Voices – winner of this year’s

Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC)

Best Research Film of the Year Award –

in which Londoners respond to the faces of these people.

Here’s a selection of the original images

G

Tue 19 Nov 2019    07.00 GMT

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2019/nov/19/
the-anthropologists-africa-in-pictures-faces-voices

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

British colonial

anthropologist

Northcote Thomas

took thousands

of photographs

and sound recordings

of men, women

and children

in west Africa

between

1909 and 1915.

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2019/nov/19/
the-anthropologists-africa-in-pictures-faces-voices

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2019/nov/19/
the-anthropologists-africa-in-pictures-faces-voices

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Frederick Hollyer        UK        1838-1933

 

Frederick Hollyer

adapted

new technical

developments

in photography

to create

a unique visual

record of London life

at the dawn

of the 20th century.

 

His portrait

 

photographs

offer us a glimpse

into late-Victorian

and Edwardian

celebrity culture.

 

The Victoria

and Albert Museum

holds

a remarkable

collection

of Hollyer portraits

- nearly 200

platinum prints

contained

in three

chintz-covered

albums -

and also some

of his reproductions.

http://www.vam.ac.uk/page/f/frederick-hollyer/

 

 

https://www.vam.ac.uk/collections/
frederick-hollyer
 

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2014/oct/19/
anarchy-beauty-william-morris-legacy-review-virtue-of-simplicity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

William Hope        UK        1863-1933

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/gallery/2010/oct/29/
haunted-photographs-william-hope-halloween

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Richard J. Arnold        USA        1856-1929

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Thomson        1837-1921

 

 Edinburgh-born

John Thomson

was one

of the great names

of early photography.

 

His photographic legacy

is one of astonishing

quality and depth.

 

Thomson's images

of China

and South-East Asia

brought the land,

culture,

and people

of the Far East

alive for

the 'armchair travellers'

of Victorian Britain.

 

He was one

of the pioneers

of photojournalism,

using his camera

to record life

on London's streets

in the 1870s.

 

As a society

photographer

he also captured

the rich and famous

in the years before

the First World War.

http://digital.nls.uk/thomson/

 

 

https://digital.nls.uk/thomson/

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2013/nov/04/
photography-london-street-life-in-london

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Erskine Beveridge        UK        1851-1920

 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erskine_Beveridge

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

C.A. Mathew        ? - 1916

 

Mathew lived

in Brightlingsea

in Essex,

having only begun

taking photographs

a year before

these images

were made,

he passed away

4 short years later

in 1916

leaving

this series of images

that in the words

of the Gentle Author

of Spitalfields Life

are ‘the most

vivid evocation

we have

of Spitalfields

at this time.’

http://www.elevenspitalfields.com/shows/photographs-of-spitalfields-a-century-ago/

 

 

 

On a spring morning

in 1912,

a man with a tripod

and a heavy camera

walked out

of Liverpool Street station

and into the heart

of London's East End,

capturing

the children playing

with hoops

and skipping ropes,

the busy shoppers,

the pubs,

the horse-drawn

delivery carts

competing with lorries,

the tailors promising

individual garments

at wholesale prices

in an area famous

for centuries

for textile workers,

a now vanished world.

 

He then went home

to his new

photographic studio

at Brightlingse

in Essex,

and vanished

from history.

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2014/mar/02/
photographs-ca-mathews-london-east-end-exhibition

 

 

http://www.elevenspitalfields.com/shows/
photographs-of-spitalfields-a-century-ago/

 

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2014/mar/02/
photographs-ca-mathews-london-east-end-exhibition

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jacob August Riis        DEN        1849-1914

 

 

 

“ ‘I Scrubs’

— Little Katie from the West 52nd Street Industrial School.”

1891-92.

 

Jacob A. Riis,

Museum of the City of New York

 

Revealing Riis’s Other Half of New York

NYT

Oct. 22, 2015

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/10/22/revealing-riiss-other-half-of-new-york/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Danish American

social reformer,

"muckraking" journalist

and social documentary

photographer

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacob_Riis

 

 

 

A Danish-born

police reporter

with a knack

of publicity

and an abiding

Christian faith,

Jacob Riis won

international

recognition

for his 1890 bestseller,

“How the Other Half Lives,”

which exposed

the desperate

and squalid conditions

of New York City’s

tenement slums

and gave momentum

to a sanitary

reform movement

that started

in the 1840s

and culminated

in New York State’s

landmark

Tenement House Act

of 1901.

 

Born

in the rural town

of Ribe

in northern Denmark,

Riis immigrated

to New York in 1870

and spent five years

as an itinerant worker.

 

He turned

to journalism in 1873

and was hired in 1877

as a police reporter

at The New York Tribune,

where he worked

until 1890.

 

He began

taking photographs

in 1888,

after the invention

of magnesium

flash powder

in Germany

allowed

photographic images

to be captured

in little light.

 

He first began

presenting

his photographs

as lantern slides

as part

illustrated lectures

that were presented

as entertainment.

 

Although

he viewed

his photography

as ancillary

to his writing,

today

he is recognized

as a important

predecessor

to social

documentarians

like Lewis Hine

and Dorothea Lange.

http://www.nytimes.com/topic/person/jacob-a-riis 

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/topic/person/jacob-a-riis  

 

 

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/10/22/
revealing-riiss-other-half-of-new-york/

 

http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2008/02/27/
nyregion/20080227_RIIS_SLIDESHOW_index.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Camille Silvy        FR        1834-1910

 

 

https://www.npg.org.uk/index.php?id=5754

 

 

http://www.lemonde.fr/culture/article/2010/07/28/
camille-silvy-pionnier-oublie-de-la-photo-de-mode_1393028_3246.html

 

http://www.lemonde.fr/culture/portfolio/2010/07/23/
londres-accueille-les-photographies-de-la-vie-moderne-de-camille-silvy_1390259_3246.html

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/photography/7868414/
Camille-Silvy-Photographer-of-Modern-Life-1834-1910.html

 

http://www.jeudepaume.org/index.php?page=article&idArt=1304

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Forbes White        UK        1831-1904

 

 

https://www.nationalgalleries.org/art-and-artists/artists/
john-forbes-white

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eadweard Muybridge        UK        1830-1904

 

http://www.victorian-cinema.net/muybridge  

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/eadweard-muybridge

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2019/dec/12/
scoundrel-harry-larkyns-rebecca-gowers-review

 

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2015/oct/09/
indecent-exposures-eadweard-muybridge-early-nudes-in-pictures

 

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/picture/2013/jun/15/
horse-eadweard-muybridge

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Awo-P3t4Ho - 7 April 2013

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2010/aug/29/
eadweard-muybridge-tate-review

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/interactive/2010/apr/27/
eadweard-muybridge-studies-motion-tate

 

https://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-britain/exhibition/
eadweard-muybridge - 8 SEPTEMBER 2010 – 16 JANUARY 2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Linnaeus Tripe        UK        1822-1902

 

British photographer

Captain Linnaeus Tripe

documented

the stunning

cultural artefacts

of Burma

and South India

in the mid-19th century

with an unprecedented

series of photos.

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2015/feb/23/
burmese-days-glimpses-of-a-lost-kingdom-in-pictures

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2015/feb/23/
burmese-days-glimpses-of-a-lost-kingdom-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mathew B. Brady        USA        ca. 1822-1896

 

America's

most sought-after

portrait photographer,

who numbered

eighteen Presidents

among his sitters,

Matthew Brady's

historical legacy

rests not only

on the "Gallery

of Illustrious Americans"

he recorded,

but also on his work

as a pioneer

of photo journalism

in America.

 

His classic

black and white

images of the Civil War

remain one of the most

powerful studies ever

of the horrors

of armed conflict.

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/ihas/icon/brady.html

 

 

 

Mathew Brady

did not actually take

many of the Civil War

photographs

attributed to him.

 

More of a project manager,

he spent most of his time

supervising his corps

of traveling photographers,

preserving their negatives

and buying others

from private photographers

fresh from the battlefield,

so that his collection

would be

as comprehensive

as possible.

 

When photographs

from his collection

were published,

whether printed

by Brady or adapted

as engravings

in publications,

they were credited

with Brady's name

(e.g., "Photograph by Brady"

or "Negative by M. B. Brady,

New York"),

although they were actually

the work of many

different people.

 

In 1862

Brady

shocked America

by displaying

Alexander Gardner's

and James Gibson's

photographs

of battlefield corpses

from Antietam.

 

This exhibition

marked the first time

most people witnessed

the carnage of war.

 

The New York Times

said that Brady

had brought

"home to us

the terrible reality

and earnestness of war."

http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/cwp/bradynote.html

 

 

http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/cwp/

http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/cwp/bradynote.html

 

 

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/09/24/
the-dead-of-antietam/

 

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/07/25/
the-all-seeing-eye/

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1862/10/20/
news/brady-s-photographs-pictures-of-the-dead-at-antietam.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thomas Annan        UK        1829-1887

 

https://www.theguardian.com/cities/gallery/2017/jun/02/
urchins-alleyways-glimpse-19th-century-glasgow-industry-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Timothy H. O'Sullivan        USA        1840-1882

 

 

 

Timothy H O’Sullivan,

Cañon de Chelle, 1870-1874

 

Preceding all of them though

was Timothy H O’Sullivan,

who photographed the American civil war

before becoming one of the first

to document the west of the country

– which was at this point almost entirely undeveloped

 

The jewels of the new SFMOMA photography collection – in pictures

G

Monday 9 May 2016       

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Timothy O’Sullivan

was a pioneer

in many senses

of the word.

 

He was one

of the very early

practitioners

of wet plate

photography

– believed

to have worked

with Civil War

photographer

Matthew Brady.

 

He was also

an explorer.

 

After

photographing

the Civil War,

he headed out

to document

the great American West

which, at the time,

was a vast

and unknown

frontier.

 

O’Sullivan was

the photographer

on two key

Western surveys:

the King survey

of the Fortieth Parallel,

and the Wheeler

survey.

 

Through

these two projects,

photography

became a new

and integral part

of science

documentary.

 

Although

he accumulated

an enormous library

of glass plates,

O’Sullivan

remained

almost forgotten

until around the 1970s,

when there was

a growing interest

in landscape

photography.

http://www.npr.org/sections/pictureshow/2010/04/16/
126052575/osullivan

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2016/may/09/
pritzker-collection-sfmoma-photography

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/pictureshow/2010/04/16/
126052575/osullivan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Julia Margaret Cameron    UK    1815-1879

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

William Henry Fox Talbot        BR        1800-1877

 

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/talbot_william_henry_fox.shtml

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Roger Fenton        BR        1819-1869

 

Roger Fenton

is a towering figure

in the history

of photography,

the most celebrated

and influential

photographer

in England

during the medium's

"golden age"

of the 1850s.

 

Before

taking up

the camera,

he studied law

in London

and painting

in Paris.

 

He traveled

to Russia

in 1852

and photographed

the landmarks

of Kiev

and Moscow;

 

founded

the Photographic Society

(later designated

the Royal Photographic Society)

in 1853;

 

was appointed

the first official

photographer

of the British Museum

in 1854;

 

achieved

widespread recognition

for his photographs

of the Crimean War

in 1855;

 

and excelled

throughout

the decade

as a photographer

in all the medium's

genres

—architecture,

landscape,

portraiture,

still life,

reportage,

and tableau-vivant.

http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/rfen/hd_rfen.htm

 

 

https://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/
rfen/hd_rfen.htm  

 

 

https://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2018/01/18/
roger-fenton-the-first-great-war-photographer/

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2017/aug/03/
pioneer-photographer-crimean-war-roger-fenton#img-5

 

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2015/feb/25/
salt-silver-tate-the-dawn-of-photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Beasley Greene        1832-1856

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It all started here:

the dawn of photography

– in pictures

 

 

Nelson’s Column

being built,

the pyramids of Giza,

soldiers

in the Crimean War

and fishwives

in Edinburgh ...

 

here’s

what the pioneers

of a newly invented medium,

from Roger Fenton

to William Henry Fox Talbot,

picked as their subjects

in the 1840s and 50s

 

Salt and Silver:

Early Photography 1840-1860

is at Tate Britain, London SW1,

until 7 June, 2015

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2015/feb/25/
salt-silver-tate-the-dawn-of-photography

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2015/feb/25/
salt-silver-tate-the-dawn-of-photography

 

https://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-britain/
exhibition/salt-and-silver-early-photography-1840-1860

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Louis-Jacques-Mandé Daguerre (1787-1851)

and the invention of photography

 

 

 

 

The Daguerreotype - Photographic Processes Series - Chapter 2 of 12        12 December 2014

YouTube > George Eastman Museum

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d932Q6jYRg8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On January 7, 1839,

members

of the French Académie

des Sciences

were shown

products of an invention

that would forever change

the nature

of visual representation:

photography.

 

The astonishingly

precise pictures

they saw were the work

of Louis-Jacques-Mandé

Daguerre (1787–1851),

a Romantic painter

and printmaker

most famous until then

as the proprietor

of the Diorama,

a popular

Parisian spectacle

featuring

theatrical painting

and lighting effects.

 

Each daguerreotype

(as Daguerre

dubbed his invention)

was a one-of-a-kind

image

on a highly polished,

silver-plated

sheet of copper.

 

Daguerre's invention

did not spring to life

fully grown,

although in 1839

it may have seemed

that way.

 

In fact, Daguerre

had been searching

since the mid-1820s

for a means to capture

the fleeting images

he saw

in his camera obscura,

a draftsman's aid

consisting

of a wood box

with a lens at one end

that threw an image

onto a frosted

sheet of glass

at the other.

 

In 1829,

he had formed

a partnership

with Nicéphore Niépce,

who had been working

on the same problem

—how to make

a permanent image

using light

and chemistry—

and who had achieved

primitive but real results

as early as 1826.

 

By the time Niépce

died in 1833,

the partners

had yet to come up

with a practical,

reliable process.

http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/dagu/hd_dagu.htm

 

 

https://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/dagu/hd_dagu.htm 

 

https://photo-museum.org/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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