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Arts > Photographers > Timeline > 19th, 20th, 21st century > FR, UK, USA, SA (II)

 

 

 

Masked For Men'S Work

Photographer Dennis Stock

holding camera to his face so that the lens

looks like his right eye & viewfinder his left.

 

Location: US

Date taken: June 1951

 

Photographer: Andreas Feininger

Life Images

http://images.google.com/hosted/life/a2858d90ba3af2c0.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Santu Mofokeng        SA        1956-2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bill Ray        USA        1936-2020

 

Life magazine photographer

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2020/jan/20/
life-magazine-photographer-bill-ray-in-pictures

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2020/jan/20/
life-magazine-photographer-bill-ray-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stuart Heydinger        UK        1927-2019

 

Brilliant news photographer

who worked for the Times

and then became

chief photographer

of the Observer

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2019/nov/03/
stuart-heydinger-obituary

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2019/nov/03/
stuart-heydinger-obituary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sally Soames        UK        1937-2019

 

Sally Soames (...)

was one of a handful

of female photographers

who came to prominence

in the heyday of Fleet Street.

 

She shot only

in black and white,

believing that it possessed

“a greater visual impact

than colour”,

and preferred working

with natural light.

 

Like her direct contemporary

Don McCullin,

who shared those inclinations,

she got her first assignment

at the Observer

and then made her name

at the Sunday Times.

https://www.theguardian.com/media/2019/oct/23/
sally-soames-obituary

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/media/2019/oct/23/
sally-soames-obituary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jill Freedman        USA        1939-2019

 

 

 

“Gun Play, Street Cops,” 1979

 

Credit

Jill Freedman

 

Jill Freedman, Photographer Who Lingered in the Margins, Dies at 79

 

She immersed herself

in the rougher precincts of American life for months at a time,

portraying their denizens as noble but not necessarily heroic.

NYT

Oct. 9, 2019

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/09/
arts/jill-freedman-dead.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(...) adventurous

photographer

who immersed herself

for months at a time

in the lives

of street cops,

firefighters,

circus performers

and other tribes

she felt

were misunderstood

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/09/
arts/jill-freedman-dead.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/09/
arts/jill-freedman-dead.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Oliver Shearer        USA        1947-2019

 

 

 

John Shearer

outside the Attica Correctional Facility in western New York,

where he documented a bloody uprising by inmates in 1971.

 

Credit

Bill Ray/The LIFE Picture Collection, via Getty Images

 

John Shearer, Who Photographed Tumultuous 1960s, Dies at 72

 

Mr. Shearer joined the staff of Look magazine at the age of 20,

becoming one of the few black photographers

at a major national publication.

NYT

June 27, 2019

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/27/
arts/john-shearer-dead.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mr. Shearer

was more than

a photojournalist:

 

He made animated films,

worked in publishing,

taught at the Columbia

Graduate School of Journalism

and collaborated with his father

on a children’s book series

about a young black detective,

Billy Jo Jive.

 

It became the basis

of an animated feature

for “Sesame Street.”

 

He also wrote books

for young readers,

like “I Wish I Had an Afro”

(1970),

about a poor black

family living

in the midst of wealth.

 

But the public knew him

best through his pictures.

 

A few years

after his photo

of the Kennedy funeral

appeared,

Mr. Shearer joined

the staff of Look.

 

At 20

he was the magazine’s

second-youngest

staff photographer;

the youngest had been

the director

Stanley Kubrick,

who was 18

when he was hired

in the mid-1940s.

 

At the time,

Mr. Shearer was one

of the few black

photographers

at a major publication.

 

His race gave him

a different sensibility

in seeing his subjects

and, some said,

a greater sense

of responsibility

in how he portrayed them.

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/27/
arts/john-shearer-dead.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/27/
arts/john-shearer-dead.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David Goldblatt        SA        1930-2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arlene Harriet Gottfried        USA        1950-2017

 

Arlene Gottfried ('s)

arresting images

of ordinary people

in New York’s

humbler

neighborhoods

earned her

belated recognition

as one of the finest

street photographers

of her generation

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/10/
arts/design/arlene-gottfried-dead-new-york-city-photographer.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/10/
arts/design/arlene-gottfried-dead-new-york-city-photographer.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Godfrey Morris        USA        1916-2017

 

John Morris

may be

an avowed pacifist,

but his career

has been largely

defined by war.

 

He was born

during WWl,

was Robert Capa’s

photo editor

at Life magazine

during WWll

and was the first

to put graphic photos

of the Vietnam War

on the New York Times

front page.

 

He is widely

considered

to be one of the most

important editors

in the history

of photography.

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/12/06/
as-he-turns-100-john-morris-recalls-a-century-in-photojournalism/

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/video/obituaries/
100000002453870/the-last-word-john-g-morris-obituary.html
- 28 July 2017

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/28/
business/john-g-morris-renowned-photo-editor-dies-at-100.html

 

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/12/06/
as-he-turns-100-john-morris-recalls-a-century-in-photojournalism/

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/gallery/2011/apr/17/
photography-henricartierbresson - broken link

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David Newell-Smith    UK    1937-2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hikaru “Carl” Iwasaki        USA        1923-2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Louis Stettner        USA        1922-2016

 

(...) photographer

who explored

the streets

of the two cities

he called

his “spiritual mothers,”

New York and Paris,

recording the daily lives

of ordinary people

 

(...)

 

Mr. Stettner,

a New Yorker,

was a product

of the Photo League

and its emphasis

on socially conscious,

documentary work,

exemplified

by members

and supporters

like Weegee,

Berenice Abbott

and Robert Frank.

 

“I have never been

interested in photographs

based solely on aesthetics,

divorced from reality,”

he wrote

in his photo collection

“Wisdom Cries Out

in the Streets,”

published in 1999.

 

“I also doubt very much

whether this is possible.”

 

While living in Paris

after World War II,

he also found inspiration

in a new wave

of French photographers,

including

Robert Doisneau,

Brassaï

and Henri

Cartier-Bresson,

whose outlook

seemed to dovetail

with the league’s.

 

He was particularly

taken with Brassaï.

 

“Brassaï

showed me

that it was possible

to find something

significant

in photographing

subjects

in everyday life

doing ordinary things

by interpreting them

in your own way

and with your own

personal vision,”

Mr. Stettner told

The Financial Times

in June.

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/15/arts/design/louis-stettner-dead.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/15/
arts/design/louis-stettner-dead.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dave Heath    USA    1931-2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Robert De Witt Fitch        USA        1939-2016

 

 

 

Bob Fitch

photographed prominent black civil rights figures

as the official chronicler

of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

 

Here, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

captured the attention of a young boy

as he spoke before a crowd

in Eutaw, Ala., in 1966.

 

Bob Fitch,

via Department of Special Collections,

Stanford University Libraries

 

Bob Fitch, Photojournalist of Civil Rights Era, Dies at 76

NYT

By SAM ROBERTS        MAY 3, 2016

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/04/
arts/bob-fitch-photojournalist-of-civil-rights-era-dies-at-76.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

self-taught photojournalist

whose images chronicled

America’s

deep-seated ambivalence

over civil rights

and illustrated

the passion underscoring

other protest movements

since the 1960s

 

(...)

 

“Photojournalism

seduced me,”

Mr. Fitch wrote

on his website.

 

“It was my way

to support

the organizing

for social justice

that was transforming

history,

our lives and future.”

 

Mr. Fitch,

a preacher’s son

who became

an ordained

minister himself,

was transformed

from a Berkeley, Calif.,

teenager

who rejected

religious ritual

into an instrument

of social justice

by sundry catalysts:

his family’s

fundamental

Christian ethos,

the writing

of James Baldwin

and the music

of Pete Seeger.

 

He photographed

the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

and other prominent

black civil rights figures

as the official chronicler

of the organization they founded,

the Southern Christian

Leadership Conference;

 

Dorothy Day

of the Catholic Workers

Movement;

 

Cesar Chavez

of the United Farm Workers

(his photo was the prototype

for a 2002 postage stamp),

and the Jesuit priests

Daniel and Philip Berrigan

and their followers

who opposed the draft

and the war in Vietnam.

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/04/
arts/bob-fitch-photojournalist-of-civil-rights-era-dies-at-76.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/04/
arts/bob-fitch-photojournalist-of-civil-rights-era-dies-at-76.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Charles Robert Gatewood        USA        1942-2016

 

boundary-pushing

photographer

who mapped,

provocatively and disturbingly,

the subcultures of strippers,

sex-club devotees, bikers,

body piercers and fetishists

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/05/
arts/charles-gatewood-photographer-of-extremes-dies-at-73.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/05/
arts/charles-gatewood-photographer-of-extremes-dies-at-73.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Robert Melvin Adelman        USA        1930-2016

 

freelance

photographer

whose vivid images

of unspeakable

brutality and despair

brought segregation

and the civil rights movement

home to Americans

in the 1960s

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/22/arts/design/
bob-adelman-photographer-who-captured-the-emotion-of-the-civil-rights-movement-dies-at-85.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/22/
arts/design/bob-adelman-photographer-
who-captured-the-emotion-of-the-civil-rights-movement-dies-at-85.html

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/03/21/
bob-adelman-civil-rights-obit-photos/

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/03/20/
471195573/bob-adelman-who-photographed-iconic-civil-rights-moments-dies

 

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=18079739 -
Updated January 14, 2008 2:28 PM ET    Published January 14, 2008 9:00 AM ET

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2008/jan/03/
photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leo Antony Gleaton        USA        1948-2015

 

photographer

who turned his back

on a career

in New York fashion

and embarked

on an itinerant

artistic quest,

documenting

the lives

of black cowboys

and creating images

of the African diaspora

in Latin America

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/19/arts/design/
tony-gleaton-67-dies-leaving-legacy-in-pictures-of-africans-in-the-americas.html

 

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2015/08/23/
432629171/tony-gleaton-photographing-the-african-story-across-the-americas

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/19/
arts/design/tony-gleaton-67-dies-leaving-legacy-
in-pictures-of-africans-in-the-americas.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Charles Henry Harbutt        USA        1935-2015

 

 

 

Charles Harbutt's photo

"Bride in Church Basement, Granite City, Illinois , 1965.''

 

Charles Harbutt

 

Charles Harbutt,

Photojournalist With an Eye for Art as Well as News,

Dies at 79

By SAM ROBERTS        NYT        JULY 2, 2015

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/03/
arts/charles-harbutt-photojournalist-with-an-eye-for-art-as-well-as-news-dies-at-79.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

photojournalist

who infused his work

with evocative imagery

and an art photographer

who transformed

conventional scenes

into surreal metaphors

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/03/
arts/charles-harbutt-photojournalist-with-an-eye-for-art-as-well-as-news-dies-at-79.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/03/
arts/charles-harbutt-photojournalist-with-an-eye-for-art-
as-well-as-news-dies-at-79.html  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Harold Martin Feinstein        USA        1931-2015

 

Harold Feinstein ('s)

celebrated series

of black-and-white

photographs

of Coney Island

in the 1950s

established him

as one of the most

accomplished recorders

of the American experience

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/30/
arts/harold-feinstein-dies-at-84-froze-new-york-moments-in-black-and-white.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/30/
arts/harold-feinstein-dies-at-84-froze-new-york-moments-in-black-and-white.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dan Farrell        USA        1930-2015

 

photographer

for The Daily News

in New York

known for his image

of John F. Kennedy Jr.

saluting

his father’s coffin

 

(...)

 

In 50 years

at the newspaper,

Mr. Farrell

photographed

the Beatles’

first American visit,

Bing Crosby

on the subway

and President

Jimmy Carter

jumping a fence

at La Guardia Airport.

 

But his most

memorable image

was of the president’s son.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/18/nyregion/
dan-farrell-photographer-who-captured-kennedy-funeral-salute-dies-at-84.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/18/nyregion/
dan-farrell-photographer-who-captured-kennedy-funeral-salute-dies-at-84.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alfred Wertheimer        GER / USA        1929-2014

 

photographer

who for a few

fleeting days in 1956

captured

strikingly intimate images

of a 21-year-old Elvis Presley

just as he was becoming

a rock ’n’ roll sensation

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/25/
arts/music/alfred-wertheimer-early-photographer-of-elvis-presley-dies-at-84.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/25/
arts/music/alfred-wertheimer-early-photographer-of-elvis-presley-dies-at-84.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Michelangelo Everard du Cille    JAM / USA    1956-2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lewis Baltz        USA        1945-2014

 

 

 

Lewis Baltz’s black-and-white images of parking lots, office parks,

industrial garage doors and the backs of anonymous warehouses

helped forge a new tradition of American landscape photography

in an age of urban sprawl.

 

His stark, geometric photographs

conveyed a kind of creeping soullessness

in the man-made landscape of Southern California,

where he was raised.

 

Courtesy of Gallery Luisotti

 

Lewis Baltz, Photographer of American Landscapes, Dies at 69

By RANDY KENNEDY        NYT        NOV. 25, 2014

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/26/
arts/design/lewis-baltz-photographer-of-american-landscapes-dies-at-69.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lewis Baltz ('s) caustic

but formally beautiful

black-and-white images

of parking lots, office parks,

industrial garage doors

and the backs

of anonymous warehouses

helped forge a new tradition

of American landscape

photography

in an age of urban sprawl

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/26/
arts/design/lewis-baltz-photographer-of-american-landscapes-dies-at-69.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/26/
arts/design/lewis-baltz-photographer-of-american-landscapes-dies-at-69.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shirley Baker        UK        1932-2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David Reginald Redfern        UK        1936-2014

 

David Redfern ('s)

photographs

of Louis Armstrong,

John Lennon,

Frank Sinatra and others

captured a half-century

of popular music

and formed the core

of an extensive archive

of musical images

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/07/
arts/design/david-redfern-british-photographer-of-jazz-and-pop-dies-at-78.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/07/
arts/design/david-redfern-british-photographer-of-jazz-and-pop-dies-at-78.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jane Bown        UK        1925-2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lida Moser        USA        1920-2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Patricia Anne "Tish" Murtha        UK        1956-2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Frank Michael Dominis        USA        1921-2013

 

Life magazine

photographer

who was known

for capturing celebrities,

wild animals

and presidents

at their unguarded best,

and who was caught

off guard himself

while taking

his most famous picture

— of two American

medal winners

raising black-gloved fists

at the 1968 Olympics —

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/01/arts/design/john-dominis-a-star-life-magazine-photographer-dies.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/01/
arts/design/john-dominis-a-star-life-magazine-photographer-dies.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Saul Leiter        USA        1923-2013

 

 New York at midcentury

was a monochrome town,

or so its best-known

documentarians

would have us believe.

 

But where eminent

photographers

like Weegee,

Diane Arbus

and Richard Avedon

captured

the city most often

in clangorous,

sharp-edged

black and white,

Saul Leiter saw it

as a quiet polychrome

symphony

— the glow of neon,

the halos of stoplights,

the golden blur of taxis —

a visual music

that few of his contemporaries

seemed inclined to hear.

 

One of the first

professionals

to photograph

New York City

regularly in color,

Mr. Leiter (...)

was among the foremost

art photographers of his time,

despite the fact that his work

was practically unknown

to the general public.

 

Of the tens of thousands

of images he shot

— many now esteemed

as among the finest examples

of street photography

in the world —

most remain unprinted.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/28/
arts/saul-leiter-photographer-with-a-palette-for-new-york-dies-at-89.html

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2018/aug/15/
saul-leiter-nude-friends-and-lovers-in-pictures

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/28/
arts/saul-leiter-photographer-with-a-palette-for-new-york-dies-at-89.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jack Mitchell        USA        1925-2013

 

(his) bulging

photographic portfolio

of actors, writers,

painters, musicians

and especially dancers

describes

a pictorial history

of the arts

in the late 20th century

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/10/
arts/jack-mitchell-photographer-of-the-arts-dies-at-88.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/10/
arts/jack-mitchell-photographer-of-the-arts-dies-at-88.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2013/11/09/
obituaries/mitchell-obit.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deborah Lou Turbeville        USA        1932-2013

 

Deborah Turbeville (...)

almost single-handedly

turned fashion photography

from a clean, well-lighted thing

into something dark, brooding

and suffused

with sensual strangeness

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/26/fashion/deborah-turbeville-fashion-photographer-dies-at-81.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/26/
fashion/deborah-turbeville-fashion-photographer-dies-at-81.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Guillermo Alfredo Eduardo Eppridge        1938-2013

 

award-winning

photojournalist

who made

his most enduring mark

with a historic image

of a mortally wounded

Senator Robert F. Kennedy

lying on the floor

of a Los Angeles hotel

in June 1968

 

(...)

 

Mr. Eppridge

and his camera

had been eyewitnesses

elsewhere.

 

He photographed

 

Latin American revolutions,

the Woodstock music festival,

the civil rights movement.

 

After three

civil rights workers

were killed

by the Ku Klux Klan

in Mississippi in 1964,

he and a reporter

lived with the family

of one of the victims,

James Chaney,

for a day or two.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/05/
us/bill-eppridge-who-captured-powerful-60s-images-dies-at-75.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/05/us/
bill-eppridge-who-captured-powerful-60s-images-dies-at-75.html

 

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/10/03/
the-moment-a-photographer-became-a-historian/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lee Elliot Tanner        USA        1931-2013

 

jazz photographer

whose evocative

and sometimes

ethereal image

of Duke Ellington,

Dizzy Gillespie,

Thelonious Monk

and others

helped define

the genre visually

on scores of album covers

and in magazines,

exhibitions and books

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/16/arts/music/lee-tanner-jazz-performance-portraitist-is-dead-at-82.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/16/
arts/music/lee-tanner-jazz-performance-portraitist-is-dead-at-82.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lewis Morley        1925-2013

 

(Lewis Morley) chronicled

changing Britain of the 60s

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2013/sep/07/lewis-morley-donates-archive-photographs

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2013/sep/07/
lewis-morley-donates-archive-photographs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bert Stern        1929-2013

 

Photographer and film-maker

who took some of the last shots

of Marilyn Monroe

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2013/jun/30/bert-stern

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2013/jun/30/
bert-stern

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wayne Forest Miller        1918-2013

 

photographer

whose intimate images

from the front lines of war,

the streets of Chicago’s

South Side

and his own family life

captured

a world in transition

in the middle

of the 20th century

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/26/
arts/design/wayne-miller-photographer-of-war-and-peace-dies-at-94.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/26/
arts/design/wayne-miller-photographer-of-war-and-peace-dies-at-94.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2013/05/25/
arts/design/20130525miller-obit.html

 

http://www.magnumphotos.com/
C.aspx?VP3=CMS3&VF=MAGO31_9_VForm&ERID=24KL534NBZ

 

http://vimeo.com/14414088

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ozzie Sweet (born Oscar Cowan)        1918-2013

 

 At the end

of World War II,

Ozzie Sweet’s

picture of a friend

posed as

a German soldier

surrendering

appeared

on the cover

of Newsweek

— “the magazine

of news significance,”

as it billed itself then.

 

Not a stratagem

that would pass muster

in contemporary journalism,

but Mr. Sweet,

who had apprenticed

to the Mount Rushmore

sculptor

Gutzon Borglum,

appeared

in a Cecil B. DeMille film

and helped create

promotional ads

for the United States Army,

found the art in photography

to be in creating an image,

not capturing one.

 

He considered himself

not a news photographer

but a photographic

illustrator,

and like the work

of the painter

Norman Rockwell,

whom he claimed

as an influence,

his signature images

from the 1940s

through the 1950s

and into the 1960s,

many in the fierce hues

of increasingly

popular color film

that emulated

the emergent Technicolor

palate of American movies,

helped define

— visually, anyway —

an era.

 

Mr. Sweet (...)

took photographs

that appeared

on an estimated

1,800 magazine covers.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/24/
sports/ozzie-sweet-who-helped-define-new-era-of-photography-dies-at-94.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/24/
sports/ozzie-sweet-who-helped-define-new-era-of-photography-dies-at-94.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David Farrell        UK        1919-2013

 

David Farrell (...)

was known primarily

for his photographic portraits

of the most prominent

artists, actors, authors

and, particularly,

musicians of his time.

 

These ranged

from classical performers

such as Yehudi Menuhin,

Ravi Shankar

and Jacqueline du Pré

to Louis Armstrong,

the Beatles

and the Rolling Stones.

 

He would take

his portable darkroom

with him to filming locations,

where he photographed

Albert Finney,

Julie Christie,

Laurence Olivier

and Ralph Richardson,

among others.

 

His main body of work

dates from the mid-1950s

to the 1980s,

by which time

he was working

primarily in cinema,

but he continued

with his photography

well into the digital age.

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2013/feb/11/david-farrell

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2014/sep/01/
david-farrell-photography-stars-rolling-stones-judi-dench-osborne-samuel

 

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2013/feb/11/
david-farrell

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balthazar Kora        1926-2013

 

one of the leading

architectural photographers

in the period after World War II

when Modernist design

remade the American landscape

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/27/
arts/design/balthazar-korab-architectural-photographer-dies-at-86.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/27/
arts/design/balthazar-korab-architectural-photographer-dies-at-86.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2013/01/25/
arts/artsspecial/20130125KORAB_OBIT.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Martin Jenkinson        UK        ?-2012

 

 

 

C&A department store viewed from the Hole in the Road,

Sheffield, February 1990

 

From picket lines to Palestine:

Who We Are: by Martin Jenkinson - in pictures

 

His famous protest images put his work

on front pages throughout the 80s,

but every photograph of Martin Jenkinson’s

was a glimpse of our shared humanity

and an insight into the communities

he lived and worked in

G

Tue 27 Nov 2018        07.00 GMT

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2018/nov/27/
who-we-are-by-martin-jenkinson--in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(...) former steelworker

whose love of photography

combined with his politics

and his belief

in social justice,

fairness and equality.

 

He was responsible

for some of the most

striking images

to have emerged

from political and industrial

struggle in Britain

over the last 30 years.

 

Martin

captured steelworkers

as they fought for survival,

and was the official photographer

on the People's March for Jobs,

in 1981.

 

He was commissioned

by the National Union

of Mineworkers'

newspapers the Miner

and the Yorkshire Miner,

and was at the heart

of the epic strike

against pit closures

of 1984-85.

 

His enduring images

include the arrest

of Arthur Scargill;

the launch of the Women

Against Pit Closures

movement;

and a smiling pit striker

named Geordie Brealey

wearing a toy

policeman's helmet

as he "inspects"

battalions of police officers

lined up against pickets

at Orgreave cokeworks.

 

He was also commissioned

by many other unions,

notably

the National Union of Teachers,

to cover their conferences,

galas and other events.

 

An active member

of the National Union

of Journalists,

he served

on its national executive

committee.

www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2012/jul/01/martin-jenkinson-obituary

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2018/dec/06/
photographers-scrum-winning-image-picture#img-1

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2018/nov/27/
who-we-are-by-martin-jenkinson--in-pictures

 

www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2012/jul/01/
martin-jenkinson-obituary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Roger Prigent (born in Hanoi, Vietnam)        1923-2012

 

Roger Prigent (...)

gave up a promising career

in fashion photography

when his eyesight began

to fail three decades ago

and (...)  became a prominent

Manhattan antiques dealer,

leading a popular new wave

in French Empire furnishings

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/17/nyregion/
roger-prigent-photographer-turned-antiques-dealer-dies-at-89.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/17/
nyregion/roger-prigent-photographer-turned-antiques-dealer-dies-at-89.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cornel Lucas        UK        1920-2012

 

British

portrait photographer

who created

defining images

of Brigitte Bardot,

Katharine Hepburn,

Gregory Peck

and a host

of other celebrities

during the 1950s and ’60s,

when publicity photos

were the lifeblood

of the star-making process

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/19/
arts/cornel-lucas-photographer-whose-portraits-defined-film-stars-dies-at-92.html

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2012/nov/19/
cornel-lucas

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/19/
arts/cornel-lucas-photographer-whose-portraits-defined-film-stars-dies-at-92.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bettye Lane (born Elizabeth Foti)        USA        1930-2012

 

photojournalist

who gained

wide recognition

for her rich trove

of pictures documenting

the feminist movement

in the 1970s and ’80s

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/22/
arts/bettye-lane-photographer-of-protest-dies-at-82.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/22/
arts/bettye-lane-photographer-of-protest-dies-at-82.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pedro Eduardo Guerrero        USA        1917-2012

 

former art

school dropout

who showed up

in the dusty Arizona driveway

of Frank Lloyd Wright in 1939,

boldly declared himself

a photographer

and then spent

the next half-century

working closely with him,

capturing

his modernist architecture

on film

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/14/arts/design/pedro-guerrero-95-dies-captured-another-dimension-of-art.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/14/
arts/design/pedro-guerrero-95-dies-captured-another-dimension-of-art.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cris Alexander (born Allen Smith)        USA        1920-2012

 

(...) Mr. Alexander

made it in New York

as a photographer,

taking portraits

of the likes

of Martha Graham

and Vivien Leigh;

 

having gallery shows;

 

working

for Andy Warhol’s

Interview magazine

and the New York City Ballet;

 

and providing

droll pictures

for the best-selling 1961 satire

of a movie star’s memoir,

“Little Me,”

written by Patrick Dennis

and later adapted

for the Broadway stage

by Neil Simon.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/25/arts/cris-alexander-actor-and-photographer-dies-at-92.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/25/
arts/cris-alexander-actor-and-photographer-dies-at-92.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stanley Frank Stearns        USA        1935-2012

 

His iconic photograph

of John F. Kennedy Jr.

saluting his father’s casket

on Nov. 25, 1963,

helped encapsulate

a nation’s grief

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/05/us/
stan-stearns-who-caught-jfk-jrs-salute-on-film-dies-at-76.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/05/us/
stan-stearns-who-caught-jfk-jrs-salute-on-film-dies-at-76.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lillian Violet Bassman        USA        1917-2012

 

magazine art director

and fashion photographer

who achieved renown

in the 1940s and ’50s

with high-contrast,

dreamy portraits

of sylphlike models,

then re-emerged

in the ’90s

as a fine-art photographer

after a cache

of lost negatives

resurfaced

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/14/
arts/design/lillian-bassman-fashion-and-fine-art-photographer-dies-at-94.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/14/
arts/design/lillian-bassman-fashion-and-fine-art-photographer-dies-at-94.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2012/02/14/
arts/design/20120214bassmanSS.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eve Arnold        USA        1912-2012

 

The longevity

of Eve Arnold's career

as a photographer

matched

the heterogeneity

of her work.

 

Despite the success

of her portraits

of the rich and famous,

Arnold (...)

was equally well known

for photographing

"the poor, the old

and the underdog".

 

She said:

"It's the hardest thing

in the world

to take the mundane

and try to show

how special it is."

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2012/jan/05/eve-arnold

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/eve-arnold

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2014/dec/13/
eve-arnold-photojournalist-interview-1971

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2012/mar/04/all-about-eve-arnold-review

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2012/jan/08/big-picture-eve-arnold

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/gallery/2012/jan/05/eve-arnold-memorable-photographs

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2012/jan/05/eve-arnold

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2012/jan/05/photographer-eve-arnold-dies

 

https://www.theguardian.com/theobserver/2002/jul/07/film 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Martine Franck        BEL        1938-2012

 

A highly versatile artist,

Franck mixed

shots of celebrities

with work in the great

humanitarian tradition

of the Magnum agency.

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2012/aug/20/
martine-franck-magnum-photography-pictures

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2012/aug/19/
martine-franck

 

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2012/aug/20/
martine-franck-magnum-photography-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Horst Faas        GER        1933-2012

 

 

 

Women and children crouched in a muddy canal,

taking cover from intense Vietcong fire. 1966.

 

Horst Faas/Associated Press

 


Parting Glance: Horst Faas

By The Associated Press

May. 10, 2012        NYT        May. 10, 2012

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/05/10/a-parting-glance-horst-faas/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photojournalist's work

in uncovering

the horrors of Vietnam war

helped turn

mainstream opinion

against US offensive

http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2012/may/11/vietnam-war-photographer-horst-faas

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/news/2015/apr/21/
40-years-on-from-fall-of-saigon-witnessing-end-of-vietnam-war#img-4

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2012/may/11/
vietnam-war-photographer-horst-faas

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/gallery/2012/may/11/
photographer-horst-faas-in-pictures

http://blogs.sacbee.com/photos/2012/05/
legendary-photojournalist-hors.html

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/05/10/
a-parting-glance-horst-faas/

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/13/
world/asia/horst-faas-vietnam-war-photographer-dies-at-79.html

 

 

Horst Faas > war photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leo Friedman        USA        1919-2011

 

his photograph

of an ebullient

Carol Lawrence

and Larry Kert

as lovebirds

chasing down

a Manhattan street

became

the enduring emblem

of the musical

“West Side Story”

and the signature image

of a career spent

taking pictures

of actors in action

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/07/theater/leo-friedman-photographer-of-broadway-dies-at-92.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/07/
theater/leo-friedman-photographer-of-broadway-dies-at-92.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Barry Feinstein        USA        1931-2011

 

photographer who chronicled

the lives of seminal rock ’n’ roll

stars of the 1960s,

and who was perhaps best known

for the stark portrait of Bob Dylan

on the cover of the 1964 album

“The Times They Are A-Changin’”

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/21/
arts/music/barry-feinstein-photographer-of-defining-rock-portraits-dies-at-80.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/21/
arts/music/barry-feinstein-photographer-of-defining-rock-portraits-dies-at-80.html

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2011/oct/
24/barry-feinstein

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Theodore Lux Feininger        GER / USA        1910-2011

 

painter and photographer

who, as a young student

at the Bauhaus,

used his camera to compile

an invaluable and visually

distinctive record

of the artistic avant-garde

in Germany between the wars

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/14/
arts/t-lux-feininger-photographer-and-painter-dies-at-101.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/14/
arts/t-lux-feininger-photographer-and-painter-dies-at-101.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Albert Edward West        1933-2011

 

Photographer

with the Guardian for 26 years,

whose career spanned

glass plate and digital

http://www.guardian.co.uk/theguardian/2011/jun/01/e-hamilton-west-obituary

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/theguardian/2011/jun/01/
e-hamilton-west-obituary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brian Lanker        USA        1947-2011

 

photojournalist

who showed

that small-city newspapers

could have large-scale impact

through the empathetic

and intimate visual portrayal

of American lives

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/19/
arts/design/brian-lanker-pulitzer-winning-photojournalist-dies-at-63.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/19/
arts/design/brian-lanker-pulitzer-winning-photojournalist-dies-at-63.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jerome Liebling        USA        1924-2011

 

(his) subtly

powerful pictures

and the lessons

he drew from them

influenced a generation

of socially minded

photographers

and documentary

filmmakers

 

(...)

 

Mr. Liebling

was among a wave

of pioneering

photographers

— including

Walker Evans,

Berenice Abbott,

Helen Levitt

and Gordon Parks —

who took

to the streets of New York

in the 1930s and ’40s

to make art

by turning their cameras

onto corners of urban life

that had mostly

been ignored

by the photographers

before them.

 

His experience

as a child

of the Depression

growing up in Brooklyn,

Mr. Liebling said,

formed an impulse

throughout his career

to “figure out

where the pain was,

to show things

that people wouldn’t see

unless I was showing them.”

 

Over a half-century

much of his work

depicted painful subjects

far too directly

for magazines

or newspapers

to show them:

mental patients

in state hospitals,

cadavers used

by New York

medical students,

blood-drenched workers

at a Minnesota

slaughterhouse.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/29/
arts/design/jerome-liebling-photographer-and-mentor-is-dead-at-87.html

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2011/sep/07/
jerome-liebling-obituary

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/gallery/2011/sep/07/
jerome-liebling-photography

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/29/
arts/design/jerome-liebling-photographer-and-mentor-is-dead-at-87.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Corinne Day        UK        1962-2010

 

Photographer

whose unadorned,

plaintive images

exposed

a darker side of fashion

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/02/world/europe/02day.html

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2010/aug/31/corinne-day-obituary

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2010/aug/31/corinne-day-kate-moss

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lee Jonathan Lockwood        USA        1932-2010

 

American photojournalist

who had rare opportunities

to capture political, military

and civilian life

in Communist countries,

documenting the treatment

of an American prisoner of war

in North Vietnam

and persuading Fidel Castro

to sit for a long, discursive,

smoke-filled

and highly personal interview

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/08/us/08lockwood.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/08/us/
08lockwood.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brian Duffy        UK        1933-2010

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2010/jun/05/
photographer-brian-duffy-dies

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2010/jan/12/
brian-duffy

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/gallery/2009/sep/28/
brian-duffy-photography-exhibition

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2009/sep/27/
sixties-photographer-brian-duffy-show

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peter Andrew Gibson Gowland        USA        1916-2010

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/05/
arts/design/05gowland.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jim Marshall        USA        1936-2010

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/gallery/2012/nov/22/
rolling-stones-jim-marshall-pictures

 

http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2010/03/24/
arts/20100325-MARSHALL_index.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Charles Lee Moore        USA        1931-2010

 

photographer

who braved

physical peril

to capture

searing images

— including lawmen

using dogs

and fire hoses

against defenseless

demonstrators —

that many credit

with helping

to propel landmark

civil rights legislation

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/16/arts/16moore.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/16/
arts/16moore.html

 

http://www.npr.org/blogs/pictureshow/2010/03/
charles_moore.html

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/greenslade/2010/mar/16/
charles-moore-civil-rights

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Louis Fabian Bachrach Jr.        USA        1917-2010

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/02/
arts/design/02bachrach.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dennis Stock        USA        1928-2010

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2010/jan/21/
dennis-stock-obituary

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/15/
arts/design/15stock.html

 

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/01/13/
parting-4/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dennis Hopper        USA         1936-2010

 

 

 

Dennis and Brooke, 1962

 

In 1961 Hopper married fellow actor Brooke Hayward

–she bought him a $351 Nikon for his 25th birthday.

 

On the road: Dennis Hopper's 60s photography – in pictures

The Easy Rider actor-director picked up a camera in 1961

and began a parallel career as a photographer,

taking shots on film sets,

in diners and out in the landscape,

before putting all his pictures in a vault in the early 70s.

 

A new book, Dennis Hopper:

In Dreams publishes more than 100 of them

– most of them for the first time –

revealing Hopper’s restless energy and curiosity.

G

Thu 24 Oct 2019        07.01 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/film/gallery/2019/oct/24/
on-the-road-dennis-hoppers-60s-photography-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dennis Hopper's

revealing 1960s photographs

– in pictures

 

Before Easy Rider

brought him stardom,

Dennis Hopper

spent much of the 1960s

on the LA art scene

obsessively photographing

its leading figures

and documenting

the counterculture

of the time.

https://www.theguardian.com/film/gallery/2014/jun/15/
dennis-hopper-revealing-1960s-photographs-in-pictures 

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/dennis-hopper

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/gallery/2019/oct/24/
on-the-road-dennis-hoppers-60s-photography-in-pictures

 

https://www.theguardian.com/culture/gallery/2017/jul/06/
dennis-hopper-lost-photographs-1960s

 

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/04/27/
dennis-hoppers-drug-store-camera-photos/

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/gallery/2014/jun/15/
dennis-hopper-revealing-1960s-photographs-in-pictures

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2014/jun/15/
dennis-hopper-the-lost-album-photographs

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/pictureshow/2010/06/02/
127375345/hopper

https://www.npr.org/templates/story/
story.php?storyId=127307586 - June 1, 2010

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/30/
movies/30hopper.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Roy Rudolph DeCarava        USA        1919-2009

 

 

 

"Graduation"        1949

Roy DeCarava        1919-2009

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/10/28/parting-2/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/11/18/
books/review/roy-de-carava-light-break-the-sound-i-saw-sherry-turner-decarava.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/10/
arts/design/roy-decarava-photography-david-zwirner.html

 

 

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/23/
lens/illuminating-black-joy-black-love-and-resistance-in-harlem.html

 

 

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/22/
magazine/a-true-picture-of-black-skin.html

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/29/
arts/29decarava.html

 

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/10/28/
parting-2/

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2009/nov/11/
roy-decarava-obituary-letter

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2009/nov/01/
roy-decarava-obituary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nathan Louis "Nat" Finkelstein        USA        1933-2009

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/culture/2019/apr/16/
factory-photographer-and-lou-reeds-worst-person-the-legacy-of-nat-finkelstein

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Larry Sultan        USA        1946-2009

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/14/
arts/14sultan.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2001/10/05/
arts/art-in-review-larry-sultan-the-valley.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Douglas Hannaford Jeffery        1917-2009

 

theatre photographer

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2009/feb/14/
douglas-h-jeffery-obituary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Irving Penn        USA        1917-2009

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hugh (Hubert) van Es        1941-2009

 

The Dutch photographer

Hugh van Es (...)

became famous

for his iconic picture

of Americans

leaving Saigon,

on one of the last

helicopters out,

on 29 April 1975,

the day before the city

was captured

by the North Vietnamese army

at the end of the Vietnam war.

 

At the time he was working

as a staff photographer

for United Press International

(UPI).

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2009/may/20/hugh-van-es-obituary-vietnam-war-photography

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2009/may/20/
hugh-van-es-obituary-vietnam-war-photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Philip Jones Griffiths        1936-2008

 

Images captured

by the photojournalist

Philip Jones Griffiths

in Vietnam

helped turn the tide

of public opinion

against the war.

 

His remarkably

composed pictures

- taken in the trouble spots

of Central Africa, Algeria,

South-East Asia

and Northern Ireland -

focused attention

on the human cost

of warfare.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2008/mar/21/pressandpublishing2

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2008/mar/21/
pressandpublishing2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

William James Claxton        1927-2008

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2008/oct/13/
william-claxton-photographer-chet-baker

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2008/oct/17/
jazz-photography

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2008/oct/15/
jazz

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/gallery/2008/oct/15/
photography-art?picture=338596323

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/10/14/
arts/design/14claxton.html

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/
story.php?storyId=95827792

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cornell Capa        USA        1918-2008

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fred McDarrah        USA        1926-2007

 

The cameras

that Fred W. McDarrah

carried

— a boxy old Rolleicord,

and later a battered

35-millimeter Nikon S2 —

weren’t special.

 

Nor was he,

not in his own mind.

 

He was

a bit of a square,

he admitted,

and an unlikely chronicler

of the bohemian world

he saw coming into view

in Greenwich Village

in the mid-1950s.

 

What McDarrah

(1926-2007)

had was a drive

to document,

in galleries and lofts

and cafes and bars,

the painters,

musicians, critics,

bookstore owners

and Beat-era poets

and writers he sensed

were making a new world,

one that would spark

the counterculture

of the 1960s.

 

“I was a groupie

at heart,”

he wrote later.

 

“I wanted to be

part of the action.

 

My camera

was my diary,

my ticket of admission,

my way of remembering,

preserving, proving

that I had been there

when it all happened.”

 

McDarrah

was the first

staff photographer

at The Village Voice,

America’s

Ur-alternative weekly,

founded in 1955.

 

He’d been roommates

with Dan Wolf,

one of the paper’s

founders.

 

Wolf had seen

the kinetic photographs

McDarrah was taking

when he wasn’t

at his day job

in advertising

on Madison Avenue.

 

McDarrah

would go on to work

for The Voice for 50 years.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/06/
arts/design/fred-mcdarrah-photographs-village-voice.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/06/
arts/design/fred-mcdarrah-photographs-village-voice.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Don McPhee        UK        1945-2007

 

 

 

Boys playing football on a hill above Oldham, 1982

 

Own a limited edition print from photographer Don McPhee

G

Thursday 26 October 2017        07.58 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2017/jun/19/
don-mcphee

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Guardian photographer

based in Manchester

http://www.theguardian.com/media/2007/mar/27/
pressandpublishing.guardianobituaries

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2017/jun/19/
don-mcphee

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2018/dec/06/
photographers-scrum-winning-image-picture#img-1

 

 

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2009/feb/24/
miners-strike-photo-don-mcphee

 

 

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/culture/gallery/2008/apr/17/
photography?picture=333600793

 

 

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/media/2007/mar/27/
pressandpublishing.guardianobituaries

https://www.theguardian.com/gall/0,8542,1384820,00.html 

https://www.theguardian.com/arts/pictures/0,8542,1385621,00.html

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/gall/0,,803674,00.html 

https://www.theguardian.com/media/2007/mar/30/pressandpublishing.guardianobituaries

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ernest C. Withers        USA        1922-2007

 

 

 

Ernest Withers’s photograph of a march in Memphis in 1968

after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr.

 

Credit Dr. Ernest C. Withers, Sr./Withers Family Trust

 

The Civil Rights Movement Photographer

Who Was Also an F.B.I. Informant

NYT

Jan. 18, 2019

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/18/
books/review/preston-lauterbach-bluff-city.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

one of the most

celebrated photographers

of the civil rights era

- and a paid F.B.I. informer

check source

 

 

 

Starting

in the early 1960s,

Withers had spent

nearly two decades

as a paid informant

of the F.B.I.,

feeding its agents

information

about the activists

he photographed.

 

He not only informed;

he took requests.

 

At one anti-Vietnam

War march,

he was asked

to photograph

all of the 30-odd

protesters,

taking special care

to catch

all their faces,

and he turned

80 8-by-10 prints

over to his F.B.I.

contact.

 

On occasion,

he sold his work

to a local paper,

then gave copies

to the bureau.

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/18/
books/review/preston-lauterbach-bluff-city.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/18/
books/review/preston-lauterbach-bluff-city.html

 

https://www.npr.org/templates/
story/story.php?storyId=129884068 - Sept. 15, 2010

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/14/us/14photographer.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joseph John Rosenthal        USA        1911-2006

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leonard Freed        USA        1929-2006

 

prominent photojournalist

and member of the Magnum

Photography Collective

who was known primarily

for his in-depth coverage

of African-Americans

in the era

of the civil rights movement

 

(...)

 

Mr. Freed joined

Magnum in 1972

and distinguished himself

with classic photo essays

on assignments for Life,

Look, Paris-Match,

Die Zeit, Der Spiegel,

Stern, The Sunday Times

Magazine of London,

Libération and Fortune.

 

While his coverage

of African-Americans

first made his reputation,

his photo-reportage

on the Arab-Israeli wars

of 1967 and 1973,

and his behind-the-scenes

coverage

of the New York City police

department in the late 1970s

were typical of the penetrating,

cleareyed photo essays

of Magnum photographers.

 

In 1968,

he published

“Black in White America,”

a book about

African-Americans

from Harlem

through the South.

 

His 1980 book

“Police Work”

used words and images

to document

the New York police.

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/04/arts/design/04freed.html

 

 

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/03/27/
leonard-freed-photos-jewish-life-amsterdam/

 

http://www.theguardian.com/media/2006/dec/06/
pressandpublishing.obituaries

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/04/
arts/design/04freed.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Humphrey Spender        UK        1910-2005

 

photographer,

photojournalist and painter

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/gallery/2008/mar/28/
bolton.worktown?picture=333235760

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/2005/mar/15/guardianobituaries.artsobituaries1

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/obituaries/humphrey-spender-528311.html 

https://www.tate.org.uk/art/artists/john-humphrey-spender-1978 

http://www.jameslomax.com/words/1045/mass-observation-and-humphrey-spender

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anne Noggle        USA        1922-2005

 

http://www.theguardian.com/culture/2005/sep/14/
obituaries.mainsection

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carl Mydans        USA        1907-2004

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2004/08/18/
arts/carl-mydans-life-photographer-who-chronicled-wars-and-the-depression-
dies-at-97.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Richard Avedon    USA    1923-2004

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

George Silk        NZ        1916-2004

 

longtime

Life magazine photographer

known for images that captured

both the intimate drama of war

and the raw dynamism of sport

 

(...)

 

George Silk

was born Nov. 17, 1916,

in Levin, New Zealand.

 

An amateur photographer,

he went to work

in a camera shop at 16.

 

When the war began,

in 1939,

he was hired

as a combat photographer

for the Australian

Ministry of Information,

assigned

to follow Australian troops

through North Africa, Greece

and New Guinea.

 

In Libya

with the Desert Rats

of Tobruk,

Mr. Silk was captured

by Field Marshal

Erwin Rommel's

forces.

 

He escaped 10 days later.

 

In New Guinea,

he took what is probably

his most famous photograph,

in December 1942.

 

The photo shows

a blinded Australian soldier,

barefoot, eyes bandaged,

being led through

the remote countryside

by a traditionally clad

tribesman.

 

The image got Mr. Silk

hired at Life the next year.

 

For Life,

Mr. Silk photographed

Allied forces in Europe

and, at the end of the war,

he commandeered a B-29

to take aerial photos

of a devastated Japan.

 

In 1946, he shot

a photo essay on famine

in China's Hunan Province.

 

For the rest of his career,

Mr. Silk worked primarily

as a sports photographer,

drawing on the passion

for the outdoors acquired

as a boy in New Zealand.

 

Mr. Silk

was fascinated by motion,

and sought innovative ways

to snare its rush

in a still photograph.

 

It was this desire

that caused

him sometimes

to separate himself

from his camera,

for example,

hooking it up

to a cable

and placing it

in a normally

inaccessible spot,

like the center

of a football field

just before kickoff.

 

For other images,

Mr. Silk adapted

a racetrack's

photo-finish camera

to catch the fluid blur

of an athlete in motion.

 

One notable picture,

taken at the 1960

Olympic trials

in Palo Alto, Calif.,

shows an athlete

who appears

to be stretched

widthwise,

attenuated

to unnatural

dimensions.

 

Motion,

Mr. Silk found,

lay in the distortion.

http://www.nytimes.com/2004/10/28/arts/28silk.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2004/10/28/
arts/28silk.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Humphrey Spender        UK        1910-2005

 

Pioneering

photographer

who chronicled

the state of Britain

in the 1930s

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/news/2005/mar/15/
guardianobituaries.artsobituaries1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eddie Adams        USA        1933-2004

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

James "Spider" Martin        USA        1939-2003

 

James Martin,

nicknamed Spider

for his wiry

5-foot-2 frame,

grew up

in Hueytown, Ala.,

a Southern white boy

who got shivers

when “Dixie”

played at football games,

he later wrote.

 

He began working

for The Birmingham News

in 1964.

 

In February 1965,

he was sent

to Marion, Ala.,

to cover the shooting

of the civil rights activist

Jimmie Lee Jackson

by state troopers,

a dangerous assignment

no senior colleague wanted,

he later recalled.

 

The plan

for a march to Montgomery

began to take shape,

and he found himself

in Selma on March 7.

 

Mr. Martin’s

images of Bloody Sunday

helped stir public outrage

(and landed him a bonus,

according to documents

in the archive,

despite what Mr. Martin

later described

as the reluctance

of The News to put them

on the front page).

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/16/
arts/design/spider-martins-photographs-of-the-selma-march-get-a-broader-view.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/16/
arts/design/spider-martins-photographs-of-the-selma-march-get-a-broader-view.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ingeborg Hermine "Inge" Morath        AUS / USA        1923-2002

 

 In Paris after the war,

Morath

got a job at Magnum,

the elite photo agency

founded

by the great pioneers

of photojournalism,

Robert Capa

and Henri Cartier-Bresson.

 

There, she did everything

from secretarial work,

to working with contact sheets,

to cleaning the office (...)

all the while honing

her skills in photography.

 

In 1955,

she became Magnum's

first full female member.

https://www.npr.org/2018/12/10/
674579667/biography-captures-the-charisma-and-confidence-of-photographer-inge-morath

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/12/10/
674579667/biography-captures-the-charisma-and-confidence-of-photographer-inge-morath

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yousuf Karsh        ARM / CAN        1908-2002

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2016/sep/27/
heres-looking-at-you-yousuf-karshs-celebrity-portraits-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

James Karales        USA        1930-2002

 

photojournalist

whose 1965 picture

of determined marchers

outlined against

a lowering sky

became a pictorial anthem

of the civil rights movement

http://www.nytimes.com/2002/04/05/
arts/james-karales-photographer-of-social-upheaval-dies-at-71.html

 

 

http://www.sc.edu/uscpress/books/2013/7158.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2002/04/05/
arts/james-karales-photographer-of-social-upheaval-dies-at-71.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Helen Muspratt        UK        1905-2001

 

Pioneering photographer

who made her mark

in naturalistic portraiture

and social documentary

http://www.theguardian.com/news/2001/aug/11/guardianobituaries

 

 

https://www.npg.org.uk/collections/search/person/mp08150/helen-muspratt 

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2016/mar/11/
helen-muspratt-british-photography-communist-radical-in-pictures

 

http://www.independent.co.uk/
news/obituaries/helen-muspratt-9270464.html -
2 August 2001

http://www.theguardian.com/news/2001/aug/11/
guardianobituaries

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eudora Alice Welty        USA        1909-2001

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/topic/person/eudora-welty

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/09/
lens/eudora-welty-photos-mississippi.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/news/2001/jul/24/
guardianobituaries.books

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lucien Aigner        HUN / USA        1901-1999

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/gallery/2016/mar/29/
ucien-aigner-archive-photography-yale-university-archive-gallery
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Harry Callahan        USA        1912-1999

 

photographer

whose pictures

married

the elegant precision

of American modernists

like Ansel Adams

with the restless

experimental spirit

of European modernists

like Laszlo Moholy-Nagy

http://www.nytimes.com/1999/03/18/
arts/harry-callahan-cool-master-of-the-commonplace-dies-at-86.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1999/03/18/
arts/harry-callahan-cool-master-of-the-commonplace-dies-at-86.html

http://www.mocp.org/collections/permanent/callahan_harry.php

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Horst Paul Albert Bohrmann / Horst P Horst        GER/USA        1906-1999

 

 In a career

that spanned

six decades,

Horst photographed

the exquisite creations

of couturiers such as

Chanel, Schiaparelli

and Vionnet

in 1930s Paris,

and helped to launch

the careers

of many models.

 

In New York

a decade later,

he experimented

with early colour techniques

and his meticulously

composed,

artfully lit images

leapt from the magazine page.

http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/exhibitions/exhibition-horst-photographer-of-style/

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2014/may/02/
horst-p-horst-the-king-of-fashion-photography-in-pictures

 

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2014/may/02/
v-and-a-horst-exhibition-photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wright Marion Morris        USA        1910-1998

 

 

 

Eroded Soil, Faulkner Country, Mississippi, 1940

 

For a photographer who endeavoured

to capture ‘what it is to be an American’,

there are remarkably few people to be found

in the work of American photographer and writer Wright Morris,

who died in 1998.

 

Photograph:

Estate of Wright Morris/courtesy of the Center for Creative Photography

 

 

The dust bowl wanderer – in pictures

 

Wright Morris was known for his novels,

yet the pictures he took while travelling through the midwest

capture a vanishing way of life in Depression-era America

G

Wed 29 Jan 2020    07.00 GMT

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2020/jan/29/
dust-bowl-wanderer-in-pictures-wright-morris

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wright Morris ('s)

taut American Gothic novels,

stories, essays and photographs

plumbed the mysteries

of the stark Nebraska landscape

and who was often called one

of the nation's most unrecognized

recognized writers

 

(...)

 


Drawing on

a picaresque childhood

and comic overseas

misadventures,

Mr. Morris wrote 33 books,

including 19 novels,

three memoirs,

four books of essays,

two collections of short stories

and five books

of annotated photographs.

 

His work was widely praised

and honored with literary awards,

but many admirers felt

that in the end,

Mr. Morris took literature

more seriously than it took him.

 

'No book of mine

can be read under a hair dryer,

while bolting a hamburger

or half-watching TV,''

he said in 1963,

acknowledging his reputation

as a sophisticated writer

on unsophisticated subjects.

https://www.nytimes.com/1998/04/29/
arts/wright-morris-a-novelist-of-the-nebraska-prairie-dies-at-88.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1998/04/29/
arts/wright-morris-a-novelist-of-the-nebraska-prairie-dies-at-88.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Irwin Allen Ginsberg        USA        1926-1997

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/13/
arts/design/13beat.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alfred Eisenstaedt        USA        1898-1995

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bert Hardy        UK        1913-1995

 

 

 

Pool of London (1949)

 

‘The ideal picture tells something of the essence of life,’

Hardy wrote.

 

‘It shows some aspect of humanity

the way the person who looks at the picture

will at once recognise as startlingly true’

 

Never had it so good:

Bert Hardy's archive of mid-century life – in pictures

G

Thursday 9 June 2016    07.00 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2016/jun/09/
never-had-it-so-good-bert-hardys-archive-of-mid-century-life-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Picture Post

photographer

from the 1940s onwards,

Hardy documented everything

from the horrors of Belsen

to monks in Tibet

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2016/jun/09/
never-had-it-so-good-bert-hardys-archive-of-mid-century-life-in-pictures

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2016/jun/09/
never-had-it-so-good-bert-hardys-archive-of-mid-century-life-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Howard Sochurek        US        1924-1994

 

photographer

for Life magazine

on assignment

throughout the world

and later a pioneer

in computer-assisted imaging

http://www.nytimes.com/1994/04/29/
obituaries/howard-sochurek-a-photographer-69.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1994/04/29/
obituaries/howard-sochurek-a-photographer-69.html

http://life.time.com/howard-sochurek/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kevin Carter        SA        1960-1994

 

 

 

A vulture watches a starving Sudanese child in 1993.

 

Photograph:

Kevin Carter/Megan Patricia Carter Trust/Sygma/Corbis

 

Photojournalism in a world of words – in pictures

G

Saturday 5 December 2015        08.15 GMT

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2015/dec/05/
photojournalism-in-a-world-of-words-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kevin Carter,

a South African,

was a photojournalist,

winning the Pulizer prize

for a harrowing photograph

of a starving child

in the Sudan.

 

His work

in the South African townships

helped end end apartheid

in South Africa.

 

Carter committed suicide

only 14 months

after winning the Pulizer.

http://www.thebangbangclub.com/kevin-carter.html

 

 

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/people/obituary-kevin-carter-1373625.html

http://content.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,165071,00.html

http://edition.cnn.com/2011/US/04/21/conflict.journalists.bang.bang.club/

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1994/07/29/world/
kevin-carter-a-pulitzer-winner-for-sudan-photo-is-dead-at-33.html


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ken Oosterbroek        SA        1963-1994

 

Ken Oosterbroek

documented

South Africa's

transitional years

to the first

democratic election

until he was killed

when National Peace-Keeping

Force members

panicked under fire

in Tokoza in 1994.

http://www.thebangbangclub.com/ken-oosterbroek.html

 

 

http://www.thebangbangclub.com/ken-oosterbroek.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Helen Levitt        USA        1913-2009

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Berenice Abbott        USA        1898-1991

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ernest Cole        SA        1940-1990

 

the beauty and the ugliness

of segregated South Africa

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2010/nov/25/
ernest-cole-david-goldblatt-apartheid-photography

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2019/dec/06/
david-goldblatt-ernest-cole-aparteid-era-south-africa-photography

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2010/nov/25/
ernest-cole-david-goldblatt-apartheid-photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Norman Parkinson        UK        1913-1990

 

https://www.theguardian.com/music/gallery/2018/dec/19/
norman-parkinson-portraits-the-beatles-abbey-road

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peter Hujar        USA        1934-1987

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2016/oct/14/
peter-hujar-photography-new-york

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

André Kertész        HUN        1894-1985

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2009/jul/23/
andre-kertesz-photography-reading

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gjon Mili (born Korça, Albania)        1904-1984

 

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gjon_Mili

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ansel Easton Adams        USA        1902-1984

 

Ansel Adams ('s)

majestic black- and-white

landscapes

of the American West

and (his) devotion

to clarity and precision

made him probably

the best- known

photographer

in the United States

 

(...)

 

In a career

that spanned

more

than 50 years,

Mr. Adams

combined

a passion

for natural

landscape,

meticulous

craftsmanship

as a printmaker

and a missionary's

zeal for his medium

to become

the most widely

exhibited

and recognized

photographer

of his generation.

http://www.nytimes.com/learning/general/onthisday/bday/0220.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/topic/person/ansel-adams

http://www.nytimes.com/learning/general/onthisday/bday/0220.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/25/
magazine/dispatches-from-a-ruined-paradise.html

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2016/02/17/
466453528/photos-three-very-different-views-of-japanese-internment

 

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/10/14/
ansel-adams/

 

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2008/04/27/
travel/20080427_YOSEMITE_FEATURE.html

http://www.nytimes.com/learning/general/onthisday/bday/0220.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bill Brandt        (born in Germany)    UK        1904-1983

 

 

 

Sepulchral beauty …

Northumbrian Miner at his Evening Meal (Bill Brandt, 1937).

 

Photograph: © Bill Brandt/Bill Brandt Archive Ltd.

 

Photo: Yale Center for British Art

 

 

Bill Brandt/Henry Moore review – a coruscating chronicle of British life

 

From blitz victims to dust-coated miners and the rocks of Stonehenge,

the affinities between German photographer and British sculptor

are shown in works of sepulchral beauty

G

Thu 6 Feb 2020    15.34 GMT

Last modified on Thu 6 Feb 2020    19.44 GMT

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2020/feb/06/
bill-brandt-henry-moore-review-hepworth-wakefield

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bill Brandt

is a founding figure

in photography’s

modernist traditions

 

(...)

 

Brandt’s

distinctive vision

—his ability

to present

the mundane world

as fresh and strange—

emerged in London

in the 1930s,

and drew

from his time

in the Paris studio

of Man Ray.

http://www.moma.org/visit/calendar/exhibitions/1343  

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2020/feb/06/
bill-brandt-henry-moore-review-hepworth-wakefield

 

http://www.lemonde.fr/culture/article/2005/10/13/
photographie-quand-bill-brandt-revait-la-noire-realite-de-la-grande-bretagne
_698940_3246.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photographer Alan Villiers (1903-1982)

chronicles the last days

of merchant sailing

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/gallery/2009/mar/18/
alan-villiers-sailing-ships-photography?picture=344763272

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Francesca Woodman        USA        1958-1981

 

Francesca Woodman

committed suicide

at the age of 22,

jumping

from a window.

 

She had only

about five years

of photography

behind her,

much of it done

as a student.

 

Working

in black and white,

she frequently

took self-portraits

or depicted

other young women,

sometimes nude.

 

Often the figures

are only partly

visible or blurry,

as if trying

to escape the frame.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/04/arts/design/francesca-woodman-retrospective.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/04/
arts/design/francesca-woodman-retrospective.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cecil Walter Hardy Beaton        UK        1904-1980

 

 

 

Self portrait, 1930s

All photographs from The Cecil Beaton Studio Archive at Sotheby’s

 

Cecil Beaton:

Icons of the 20th century - in pictures

G

11 June 2018

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2018/jun/11/
cecil-beaton-icons-of-the-20th-century-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Though he's known

for celebrity portraits,

Beaton was one of the most

prolific photographers of life

during the second world war,

taking over 7,000 pictures

between 1940-45 in Britain

as well as China and Africa.

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2012/aug/31/
cecil-beaton-war-photography-pictures 

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2018/jun/11/
cecil-beaton-icons-of-the-20th-century-in-pictures

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2017/may/10/
early-work-cecil-beaton-photography-beetles-and-huxley-in-pictures

 

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2012/sep/05/
cecil-beaton-war-photography-exhibition

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2012/aug/31/
cecil-beaton-war-photography-pictures

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/gallery/2012/jan/06/
new-york-photography-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tōyō Miyatake / 宮武東洋1        JAP / USA        1896-1979

 

 

 


Photos: 3 Very Different Views Of Japanese Internment

Updated February 17, 2016    7:57 PM ET

Published February 17, 2016    11:41 AM ET

http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2016/02/17/
466453528/photos-three-very-different-views-of-japanese-internment
 

 

 

 

 

Before World War II,

Miyatake

had a photo studio

in Los Angeles'

Little Tokyo.

 

When he learned

he would be interned

at Manzanar,

he asked a carpenter

to build him

a wooden box

with a hole

carved out at one end

to accommodate a lens.

 

He turned this box

into a makeshift camera

that he snuck

around the camp,

as his grandson

Alan Miyatake

explains

in the video below,

which is featured

in the exhibit.

 

Fearful

of being discovered,

Miyatake

at first only

took pictures

at dusk or dawn,

usually without people

in them.

 

Camp director

Merritt

eventually caught

Miyatake,

but instead

of punishing him,

allowed him

to take pictures

openly.

 

Miyatake later

became the camp's

official photographer.

http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2016/02/17/
466453528/photos-three-very-different-views-of-japanese-internment

 

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2016/02/17/
466453528/photos-three-very-different-views-of-japanese-internment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Philippe Halsman (Latvian: Filips Halsmans)        USSR / USA        1906-1979

 

 

 

Andy Warhol, 1968.

 

The man who made Marilyn fly:

Philippe Halsman's stunt shots – in pictures

G

Friday 23 October 2015        07.00 BST

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2015/oct/23/
philippe-halsman-astonish-me-in-pictures#img-1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2015/oct/23/
philippe-halsman-astonish-me-in-pictures#img-1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

W. Eugene Smith        USA        1918-1978

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marion Palfi        GER / USA        1907-1978

 

Ms. Palfi

set out

to document

racism

and segregation

in Irwinton, Ga.,

the small town

where Caleb Hill,

in the first reported

lynching of 1949,

was murdered.

 

Later that year,

Ms. Palfi spent

two weeks

in Irwinton

documenting

its residents,

both black and white.

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/09/17/a-meditation-on-race-in-shades-of-white/

 

 

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/09/17/
a-meditation-on-race-in-shades-of-white/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Elizabeth 'Lee' Miller        USA        1907-1977

 

 

http://arts.guardian.co.uk/video/2007/sep/15/lee.miller

https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2007/apr/23/usa.artnews

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2005/jan/22/photography 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2002/oct/26/art.photography 

https://www.theguardian.com/arts/pictures/0,,820967,00.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Paul Strand        USA        1890-1976

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2016/mar/16/
parmesan-and-politics-paul-strands-photographic-genius-in-pictures

 

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2016/mar/16/
i-posed-for-paul-strand-the-day-the-great-photographer-walked-into-my-village-in-italy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edward J. Steichen        LUX / USA        1879-1973

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/topic/person/edward-steichen 

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2014/oct/29/
fashion-edward-steichens-trailblazing-vogue-photographs-vanity-fair-in-pictures

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2013/jul/05/
family-of-man-photography-edward-steichen

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/07/
arts/design/07steichen.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Emil Otto Hoppé        GER / UK        1878-1972

 

Hoppé was one

of the most famous

photographers

in the world

in the 1920s,

courted by

the rich and famous

when not going

on street photography

safaris

with his friend

George Bernard Shaw,

yet almost forgotten

when he died in 1972

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2010/oct/07/national-portrait-gallery-eo-hoppe

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2011/feb/13/
eo-hoppe-exhibition-laura-cumming

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/gallery/2011/feb/13/
photography-hoppe-portraits-in-pictures

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2010/oct/07/
national-portrait-gallery-eo-hoppe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tony Ray-Jones        UK        1941-1972

 

 

 

Ballroom, Morecambe, 1968

 

Ray-Jones was inspired by a generation of street photographers

he encountered while living in New York in the mid-1960s

 

 

Not so swinging: how the 60s really looked – in pictures

 

Before his death at the age of 30,

Tony Ray-Jones travelled through England

photographing what he saw as a disappearing way of life,

as the 1960s drew to an end.

 

A new exhibition marks the pivotal contribution

he made to British documentary photography

G

Tue 15 Oct 2019    07.00 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2019/oct/15/
tony-ray-jones-england-60s-swinging-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From heavy petting

in Piccadilly Circus

to horses out

grabbing a bite

in Windsor,

here's an exclusive

series of 1960s images

by Tony Ray-Jones

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2013/sep/20/
tony-ray-jones-england-in-pictures

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2019/oct/15/
tony-ray-jones-england-60s-swinging-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2013/sep/20/
tony-ray-jones-england-in-pictures

 

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2013/sep/20/
tony-ray-jones-martin-parr-exhibition

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Larry Burrows        UK        1926-1971

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Henri Huet        FR        1927-1971

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kent Potter        ?-10 February 1971

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2011/mar/15/
vietnam-photography-huet-guillot-review

 

http://digitaljournalist.org/issue0805/
four-photojournalists-killed-over-laos-come-home.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Keisaburo Shimamoto        ?-10 February 1971

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2011/mar/15/
vietnam-photography-huet-guillot-review

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diane Arbus        USA        1923-1971

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Robert W. Kelley        USA        1920-1971

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Michael Peto    1908-1970

 

Michael Peto's

candid images

from the 1950s and 60s

captured the celebrities

and power brokers

of the day

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2013/sep/08/
michael-peto-photographer-archive
 

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2013/sep/08/
michael-peto-photographer-archive

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2013/sep/08/
michael-peto-archive-in-pictures

http://www.npg.org.uk/whatson/display/2013/
michael-peto-photographs-mandela-to-mccartney.php

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weegee        USA        1899-1968

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mary Bayard Morgan Wootten        USA        1875-1959

 

Though known

as a pictorialist

(more of an art

photographer

than a straightforward

documentarian),

Ms. Wootten

strayed

from the unspoken rules

set by Alfred Stieglitz,

the father of pictorialism,

in the early 20th century.

 

Unlike

Mr. Stieglitz,

who was way

up north

in New York,

Ms. Wootten

did not oppose

commercial

photography.

 

In fact,

financial gain,

believe it or not,

was the chief reason

she entered

the industry,

where she nonetheless

notched several firsts

in her career.

https://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2018/01/29/
single-mother-pioneering-photographer-the-remarkable-life-of-bayard-wootten/

 

 

https://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2018/01/29/
single-mother-pioneering-photographer-the-remarkable-life-of-bayard-wootten/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edward Henry Weston        USA        1886-1958

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/topic/person/edward-weston  

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/24/
arts/design/24wilson.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alexander Stewart ('Sasha')        UK        1892-1953

 

Alexander Stewart

('Sasha')

was a British

portrait photographer

and inventor

who opened

his first studio

in 1924

and continued

in business

until the end of 1940.

 

His society

and theatrical

portraits

were published

in British society

magazines

such as The Tattler

and The Illustrated

London News.

http://www.npg.org.uk/collections/search/person/mp87592/alexander-stewart-sasha

 

 

http://www.npg.org.uk/collections/search/person/mp87592/
alexander-stewart-sasha

 

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/picture/2013/sep/28/
albertina-rasch-girls

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pierre P. Pullis        USA        1869-1942

 

Work

on New York’s

first subway

began in 1900,

running

from City Hall

up to

Grand Central,

across to

Times Square,

and then up

the West Side

on Broadway.

 

The contractor,

the Rapid Transit Subway

Construction Company,

embarked on not only

a construction project

of unprecedented scope,

but also a program

of photographic

documentation

without precursor.

 

(...)

 

Pierre P. Pullis

and other

photographers,

using cameras

with 8-by-10-inch

glass negatives,

were assigned

to record

the progress

of construction

as well as every

dislodged flagstone,

every cracked brick,

every odd building

and anything

that smelled

like a possible lawsuit.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/13/
realestate/architectural-photos-captured-new-york-city-life.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/13/
realestate/architectural-photos-captured-new-york-city-life.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cherry Kearton        UK        1871-1940

 

Richard

and Cherry Kearton,

working in the 1890s,

were possibly

the world's

first professional

wildlife

photographers.

 

Starting at home

in the village of Thwaite

in north Yorkshire

with a cheap box camera,

they managed to capture

some of the finest

early pictures

of birds in their nests,

insects,

and mammals.

 

But having no telephoto

lenses or fast film,

they had to lug around

massive plate glass cameras

and devise ever more bizarre

ways to get close

to their shy quarries.

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2013/oct/06/
wildlife-photography-pioneers-attenborough-camera

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2013/oct/06/
wildlife-photography-pioneers-attenborough-camera

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alfred Stieglitz        USA        1864-1946

 

 

 

A Danish girl, from issue 26

 

Revisiting the Images of Alfred Stieglitz’s Camera Work Magazine

 

Two photographers have spent years

compiling a complete set of Camera Work,

Alfred Stieglitz’s groundbreaking publication

that helped shepherd photography into the art world.

NYT

June 12, 2018

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/12/
lens/revisiting-the-images-of-alfred-stieglitz-camera-work-magazine.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters/database/stieglitz_a.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/12/
lens/revisiting-the-images-of-alfred-stieglitz-camera-work-magazine.html

 

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/08/18/
of-america-work-and-fine-art/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lewis Wickes Hine    USA    1874-1940

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Christina Broom        UK        1862-1939

 

UK's first female press photographer

http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2014/mar/30/
museum-london-photo-collection-son-kipling-war-christina-broom

 

 

Christina Broom is regarded as the UK’s first female press photographer. With creativity and a bold pioneering spirit she took her camera to the streets and captured thousands of images of people and events in London, revealing unique observations of the city at the start of the 20th century. - See more at: http://www.museumoflondon.org.uk/docklands/whats-on/exhibitions-displays/christina-broom/#sthash.Rvja112Q.dpuf

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2015/jun/19/
christina-broom-portraits-suffragettes-in-pictures

 

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2015/jun/19/
christina-broom-portraits-suffragettes-photography

 

http://www.museumoflondon.org.uk/docklands/
whats-on/exhibitions-displays/christina-broom/

 

 

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2014/mar/30/
museum-london-photo-collection-son-kipling-war-christina-broom

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Michael Francis Blake Photographs (1912-1934)

 

 

http://library.duke.edu/digitalcollections/blake/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

William Hope        1863-1933

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/gallery/2010/oct/29/
haunted-photographs-william-hope-halloween

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Richard J. Arnold        USA        1856-1929

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Richard Kearton        UK        1862-1928

 

Richard and Cherry Kearton,

working in the 1890s,

were possibly the world's

first professional

wildlife photographers.

 

Starting at home

in the village of Thwaite

in north Yorkshire

with a cheap box camera,

they managed to capture

some of the finest

early pictures

of birds in their nests,

insects, and mammals.

 

But having no telephoto

lenses or fast film,

they had to lug around

massive plate glass cameras

and devise ever more

bizarre ways to get close

to their shy quarries.

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2013/oct/06/
wildlife-photography-pioneers-attenborough-camera

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2013/oct/06/
wildlife-photography-pioneers-attenborough-camera

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

George Edward Anderson        USA        1860-1928

 

George Edward Anderson

differed from

many of the world's

great documentary

photographers

in that he served

for four years

as a bishop

of the Church

of Jesus Christ

of Latter-day Saints

and spent a stretch

as a missionary

in England.

 

But overall

he shared

the hallmark

characteristics:

toiling in obscurity,

strained family life,

unwavering vision

and a poverty-inducing

obsession

for his subject

and the act

of photographing.

 

Photography

came of age

at the same time

as Mormonism

— and they moved

west together.

 

Anderson's mentor,

Charles Roscoe Savage,

settled in Utah

a little ahead

of the arrival

of William Henry Jackson

and the other Western

survey photographers.

http://www.npr.org/sections/pictureshow/2011/04/01/
135023986/frontier-utah-as-seen-by-mormon-bishop-documentary-photographer

 

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/pictureshow/2011/04/01/
135023986/frontier-utah-as-seen-by-mormon-bishop-documentary-photographer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Griffith "Jack" London        USA        1876-1916

 

(born John Griffith Chaney)

 

 

(...) Jack London (...)

was famous for novels,

like the

“The Call of the Wild,”

which were based

on his adventures,

trekking through

the Klondike

or sailing

the South Pacific.

 

He was the archetype

of the macho writer

— before

Ernest Hemingway —

having been,

among other things,

a Socialist,

a hobo, a sailor,

a war correspondent

and an oyster pirate.

 

(...)

 

Although he went on

to become

a prolific writer,

he was also

an avid photographer.

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/11/22/
rarely-seen-photos-by-jack-london/

 

 

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/11/22/
rarely-seen-photos-by-jack-london/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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