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Vocapedia > Earth > Climate change, Global warming

 

Rising sea levels > Disappearing lands, Sinking cities, Climate displacement, Climate refugees

 

 

 

 

Sinking Islands, Floating Nation: Can Artificial Islands Save This Country? | Op-Docs        NYT        9 November 2018

 

Matthieu Rytz’s “Sinking Islands, Floating Nation,”

which paints a visually stunning portrait of Kiribati,

an island nation in the central Pacific

that is facing an existential threat

from rising sea levels.

 

The Op-Doc is a companion piece

to Rytz’s feature documentary “Anote’s Ark,”

which follows the country’s

now-retired president Anote Tong

as he races to save a country

that is slowly being swallowed by the ocean.

 

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=xhLEzrzOPKY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Vanishing Island        NYT        4 June 2014

 

 

 

 

The Vanishing Island | Op-Docs | The New York Times        4 June 2014

 

YouTube

http://www.youtube.com/watch
?v=qbW6KBI3Z2g&list=PL4CGYNsoW2iCb4uQUNgWK6TJJgNVp-MpP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

High tide in Kiribati,

an island nation seen as especially vulnerable

to the effects of climate change,

like rising sea levels.

 

Kadir van Lohuizen for The New York Times

 

Climate Study Puts Diplomatic Pressure on Obama

MARCH 31, 2014        NYT        By CORAL DAVENPORT

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/01/
world/climate-study-puts-diplomatic-pressure-on-obama.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Climate map shows world after 4C rise        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/interactive/2009/oct/22/
climate-change-carbon-emissions

 

 

 

 

global warming > rising seas / waters

rising sea levels / sea-level rise / sea level rise / global sea-level rise > coastline

 

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/10/08/
climate/ghost-forests.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2019/jul/31/
honduras-community-coastal-towns-rising-sea-le

 

 

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=xhLEzrzOPKY - NYT - 9 November 2018

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/07/16/
627254166/rising-seas-could-cause-problems-for-internet-infrastructure

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/jun/26/
rising-seas-florida-climate-change-elizabeth-rush

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/06/02/
616151979/flooding-and-rising-seas-threaten-americas-oldest-farmland

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/05/21/
611919853/foreign-investors-shrug-off-miamis-rising-sea-levels

 

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/03/14/
climate/easter-island-erosion.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/02/24/
us/jean-lafitte-floodwaters.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/19/
opinion/sunday/climate-change-bangladesh.html

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/01/04/
572721503/louisiana-says-thousands-should-move-from-vulnerable-coast-but-cant-pay-them

 

 

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/12/21/
world/asia/jakarta-sinking-climate.html

 

https://www.npr.org/2017/12/05/
567264841/south-florida-real-estate-boom-not-dampened-by-sea-level-rise

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2017/11/25/
564098130/protecting-the-netherlands-vulnerable-coasts-with-a-sand-motor

 

https://www.npr.org/2017/11/24/
566280048/the-sea-level-threat-to-cities-depends-on-where-the-ice-melts-not-just-how-fast

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2017/08/13/
542645647/in-egypt-a-rising-sea-and-growing-worries-about-climate-changes-effects

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/08/02/
540650904/carbon-dioxide-may-rob-crops-of-nutrition-leaving-millions-at-risk

 

http://www.npr.org/2017/07/27/
539506529/mapping-coastal-flood-risk-lags-behind-sea-level-rise

 

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/06/15/
world/europe/climate-change-rotterdam.html

 

http://www.gocomics.com/joe-heller/2017/01/24

 

 

 

 

http://www.npr.org/2014/04/16/
303367684/as-la-coast-recedes-battle-rages-over-who-should-pay

 

http://www.gocomics.com/joe-heller/2017/01/24

 

http://www.npr.org/2017/01/10/
509176361/alaskan-village-citing-climate-change-seeks-disaster-relief-in-order-to-relocate

 

http://www.npr.org/2017/01/04/
505320391/louisiana-history-washes-away-as-sea-levels-rise-land-sinks

 

 

 

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/08/18/
490519540/threatened-by-rising-seas-an-alaskan-village-decides-to-relocate

 

http://www.npr.org/2016/05/25/
477014085/rising-seas-push-too-much-salt-into-the-florida-everglades

 

http://www.npr.org/2016/05/17/
477014145/rising-seas-made-this-republican-mayor-a-climate-change-believer

 

http://www.npr.org/2016/04/16/
474395637/what-can-we-learn-from-early-floridians-on-sea-level-rise

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/05/10/
477511597/window-into-the-future-scientists-document-disappearing-islands

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/04/05/
science/nasa-is-facing-a-climate-change-countdown.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/23/
science/sea-level-rise-global-warming-climate-change.html

 

 

 

 

http://www.npr.org/2015/12/01/
455745765/facing-rising-waters-a-native-tribe-takes-its-plea-to-paris-climate-talks

 

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/11/12/
indias-rising-tides-and-temperatures/

 

 

 

 

http://www.npr.org/2014/06/24/
324891517/as-sea-levels-rise-norfolk-is-sinking-and-planning

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/29/world/asia/
facing-rising-seas-bangladesh-confronts-the-consequences-of-climate-change.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/03/27/
world/climate-rising-seas.html

 

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/mar/05/
sydney-opera-house-statue-liberty-sea-level-climate-change-unesco

 

 

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/global-development/2013/jan/29/
sea-change-bay-bengal-vanishing-islands

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/14/
science/earth/study-rising-sea-levels-a-risk-to-coastal-states.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

American cities

most threatened by sea-level rise        USA

https://www.npr.org/2018/03/01/
589634980/norfolk-requires-developers-to-do-more-against-flooding

 

 

 

 

sink        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2018/oct/03/
as-bangkok-sinks-could-this-anti-flood-park-be-the-answer

 

 

 

 

sinking cities        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/oct/05/
from-london-to-shanghai-worlds-sinking-cities-face-devastating-floods

 

 

 

 

 

rise        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/23/
science/sea-level-rise-global-warming-climate-change.html

 

 

 

 

disappear

 

 

 

 

vanish        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/may/14/
our-country-will-vanish-pacific-islanders-bring-desperate-message-to-australia

 

 

 

 

disappearing land > Bangladesh        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/29/world/asia/
facing-rising-seas-bangladesh-confronts-
the-consequences-of-climate-change.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

disappearing islands        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2016/05/23/
478393443/the-vanishing-islands-of-indias-sundarbans

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/05/10/
477511597/window-into-the-future-scientists-document-disappearing-islands

 

 

 

 

Kiribati

- an island nation in the central Pacific

that is facing an existential threat

from rising sea levels        USA

https://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=xhLEzrzOPKY - NYT - 9 November 2018

 

 

 

 

Marshall Islands        UK / USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2015/12/09/
459053208/for-the-marshall-islands-the-climate-goal-is-1-5-to-stay-alive

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2015/12/02/world/The-Marshall-Islands-
Are-Disappearing.html

 

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/jul/12/
why-next-climate-treaty-vital-for-country-to-survive

 

 

 

 

Boston Globe > Big Picture

Smith Island        USA        25 September 2013

 

In the middle of Maryland's

Chesapeake Bay,

a tiny island may soon become

an early victim of climate change.

 

Smith Island

is the last inhabited island

in Maryland,

a place where residents,

hearty watermen

who make their living

catching oysters and blue crabs,

still speak in the Cornish dialect

of their ancestors.

 

Many Smith Islanders

can trace their ancestry

back 12 generations

to the English colonists

who settled here

in the 17th century.

 

And yet their link to this land

may soon be broken:

Smith Island is eroding.

 

Though scientists differ on how long

it will be before the island is underwater,

anywhere between 30 and 100 years,

there is no dispute about the cause: rising seas.

 

The global trend of rising ocean levels

is especially acute in the Chesapeake Bay,

where water is rising at twice the world average.

 

To make matters worse,

the land around the Chesapeake

is sinking:

a trend scientists call

post-glacial subsidence.

 

According to

a state-commissioned task force,

Maryland is now losing 260 acres

of tidal shoreline annually.

 

The US Army Corps of Engineers

estimates that Smith Island

has lost 3,300 acres of wetlands

in the last 150 years.

 

Many residents

have relocated to the mainland;

the island's population

is down from a peak of 700 in 1960

to 267 full-time residents today.

-- European Pressphoto Agency --

photographs by Jim Lo Scalzo

http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2013/09/smith_island.html

 

 

 

 

USA > 80 miles from New Orleans > Isle de Jean Charles        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/03/
opinion/vanishing-island.html

 

 

 

 

the Bay of Bengal's vanishing islands        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/global-development/2013/jan/29/
sea-change-bay-bengal-vanishing-islands

 

 

 

 

 flood-prone island        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2016/05/23/
478393443/the-vanishing-islands-of-indias-sundarbans

 

 

 

 

Louisiana > disappearing coastline        USA

https://www.npr.org/2018/01/04/
572721503/louisiana-says-thousands-should-move-from-vulnerable-coast-but-cant-pay-them

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/04/20/
524896256/louisianas-governor-declares-state-of-emergency-over-disappearing-coastline

 

http://www.npr.org/2014/04/16/
303367684/as-la-coast-recedes-battle-rages-over-who-should-pay

 

 

 

 

recede        USA

http://www.npr.org/2014/04/16/
303367684/as-la-coast-recedes-battle-rages-over-who-should-pay

 

 

 

 

dike        USA

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/11/12/
indias-rising-tides-and-temperatures/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Climate Refugees Trailer         13 December 2013

 

 

 

 

Climate Refugees Trailer         13 December 2013        SnagFilms

 

CLIMATE REFUGEES

uncovers the unbelievable plight of people around the world

displaced by climatically induced environmental disasters.

 

The documentary illuminates for the first time

the human face of climate change

as civilization now finds itself

facing the confluence of overpopulation,

lack of resources and a changing climate.

 

Traveling the world and interviewing several

of the 25 million climate refugees now on the run,

along with scholars, politicians and the like,

CLIMATE REFUGEES brings to light the heart-wrenching truth

of what is quickly becoming mankind's greatest challenge.

 

YouTube

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eYYIAaNySpE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

climate refugees        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/blog/2013/may/13/
join-debate-america-first-climate-refugees

 

 

 

 

climate refugees        USA

https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2018/06/20/
621782275/the-refugees-that-the-world-barely-pays-attention-to

 

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/12/28/
photographing-climate-change-refugees-drone-foot-josh-haner/

 

http://www.npr.org/2015/12/01/
455745765/facing-rising-waters-a-native-tribe-takes-its-plea-to-paris-climate-talks

 

http://www.npr.org/2013/05/18/
185068648/impossible-choice-faces-americas-first-climate-refugees

 

http://green.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/08/12/
film-on-climate-refugees-strikes-a-chord/

 

 

 

 

climate displacement        USA

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/19/
magazine/how-a-warming-planet-drives-human-migration.html

 

 

 

 

relocate        USA

http://www.npr.org/2017/01/10/
509176361/alaskan-village-citing-climate-change-seeks-disaster-relief-
in-order-to-relocate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Climate Study

Puts Diplomatic Pressure

on Obama

 

MARCH 31, 2014

The New York Times

By CORAL DAVENPORT

 

WASHINGTON — A sweeping new study on the effects of climate change — which the report says is already disrupting the lives and livelihoods of the poorest people across the planet — creates a diplomatic challenge for President Obama, who hopes to make action on both climate change and economic inequality hallmarks of his legacy.

The report, published this week by the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, concludes that the world’s poorest people will suffer the most as temperatures rise, with many of them already contending with food and water shortages, higher rates of disease and premature death, and the violent conflicts that result from those problems.

Rajendra K. Pachauri, the chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and Christopher Field, the co-chairman of the group that wrote the report, discuss its warning.

Those countries and nongovernmental organizations point to a 2009 pledge by Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton to create a $100 billion annual climate fund for poor countries by 2020. The World Bank justified such an expenditure in a 2010 report concluding that it would take up to $100 billion a year to offset the ravages of climate change on poor countries.

Climate policy experts say that the United States, as the world’s largest economy, would be expected to provide $20 billion to $30 billion of that annual fund.

That puts Mr. Obama and Secretary of State John Kerry, who has been working aggressively behind the scenes to forge a United Nations climate change treaty in 2015, in a tough position.

But both men know there is no chance that a Congress focused on cutting domestic spending and jump-starting the economy will enact legislation agreeing to a huge increase in so-called climate aid. Since 2010, the Obama administration has spent about $2.5 billion a year to help foreign countries adapt to climate change and adopt low-carbon energy technology.

It will be a stretch even to continue that level of spending. Many Republicans, who control the House and have a chance to gain the Senate this fall, question whether climate change is real.

“If the White House actually wants something like this, it should begin by building support among congressional Democrats, but — at this point — I don’t see any real signs of support from House or Senate Democratic leaders at all,” said Michael Steel, a spokesman for Speaker John A. Boehner of Ohio.

Vulnerable nations, emboldened by the new United Nations report, are demanding more, not less, from the United States.

Ronald Jean Jumeau, the United Nations ambassador from the island nation of Seychelles, and a spokesman for the Alliance of Small Island States, compared the proposed fund with the amount of money Congress approved after Hurricane Sandy.

“We know that $100 billion is not going to be enough,” Mr. Jumeau said. “After Sandy, Congress voted for $60 billion in recovery for New York, New Jersey and Connecticut — for one storm. It shows you how much $100 billion is going to cover.”

The window is starting to close on Mr. Obama’s ability to broker a treaty that could significantly reduce greenhouse gas pollution in time to avoid the most disastrous effects of climate change. This fall, at the United Nations General Assembly, world leaders will meet to put offers on the table for a climate change pact, a mix of commitments to cut fossil fuel pollution at home and provide money to poor countries to adapt. A few months later, at a two-week summit meeting in Lima, Peru, they will negotiate a draft of a final treaty that is set to be signed next year in Paris and take effect in 2020.

Diplomats say the new report has increased pressure on governments to reach a climate deal.

“By underscoring impacts and vulnerabilities, the report makes clear the urgency for strong action to reduce emissions and build greater resilience,” said Todd D. Stern, the State Department’s chief climate change negotiator.

In a speech in London last fall, Mr. Stern made clear that there was no chance that the United States would finance most of any climate adaptation fund with taxpayer dollars. “The fiscal reality of the United States and other developed countries is not going to allow it,” he said. Mr. Stern and others say the bulk of that money will have to come from private investors and corporations.

Nongovernmental organizations say that relying chiefly on the private sector will not be enough, especially as food supplies grow short. “The scientists could not have been more clear, particularly in the area of food security,” said Timothy Gore, an analyst for Oxfam, the antipoverty group. “There is no government that’s going to be able to stick around very long if the price of bread keeps going up, if they can’t feed their people.”

“I challenge anyone in the U.S. government to explain how the private sector is going to invest in what’s needed on the ground, like funding farmers in the Sahel region facing crop loss from changing rainfall patterns,” Mr. Gore said, referring to the area of Africa just south of the Sahara.

Hanging over the coming negotiations will be the specter of the failed 1997 Kyoto Protocol. Vice President Al Gore promised in those talks that the United States would act on climate change, only to have the Senate refuse to ratify that treaty. At a 2009 climate summit meeting in Copenhagen, Mr. Obama promised that Congress would soon pass a sweeping climate change bill. Just months later, the bill died in the Senate.

Mr. Obama is now trying to bolster his credibility on the issue by flexing his executive authority and acting without Congress. His administration is moving ahead with aggressive new Environmental Protection Agency regulations to reduce carbon pollution from coal-fired power plants. At talks around the world, Mr. Kerry and Mr. Stern have sought to persuade other nations that, this time, the United States will be able to keep its commitments, since they do not require action from Congress.

The United States’ inability to offer more substantial aid to countries that did little to cause global warming will probably remain a major sticking point with developing nations, including India and China.

Still, Connie Hedegaard, the European Union commissioner for climate action, said she hoped that could eventually be overcome: “I think the $100 billion mark can be reached. It was understood in Copenhagen that it had to be a mix of public and private money. I think vulnerable groups — families in Bangladesh or the Philippines — don’t care whether a dollar coming their way is public or private.”

 

A version of this news analysis appears in print

on April 1, 2014, on page A3 of the New York edition

with the headline: Climate Study Puts Diplomatic Pressure

on Obama.

Climate Study Puts Diplomatic Pressure on Obama,
NYT,
31.3.2014,
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/01/world/
climate-study-puts-diplomatic-pressure-on-obama.html

 

 

 

 

 

Study Halves

Prediction of Rising Seas

 

May 15, 2009

The New York Times

By ANDREW C. REVKIN

 

A new analysis halves longstanding projections of how much sea levels could rise if Antarctica’s massive western ice sheets fully disintegrated as a result of global warming.

The flow of ice into the sea would probably raise sea levels about 10 feet rather than 20 feet, according to the analysis, published in the May 15 issue of the journal Science.

The scientists also predicted that seas would rise unevenly, with an additional 1.5-foot increase in levels along the east and west coasts of North America and the east coast of southern Africa. That is because the shift in a huge mass of water away from the South Pole would subtly change the shape and rotation of the Earth, the authors said.

Several Antarctic specialists familiar with the new study had mixed reactions to the projections.

But they and the study’s lead author, Jonathan L. Bamber of the British Glaciology Center, agreed that the odds of a disruptive rise in seas from warming over the next century or so remain serious enough to warrant the world’s attention.

They also uniformly called for renewed investment in ice-probing satellites and field missions that could within a few years substantially clarify the risk.

There is strong consensus that warming waters around Antarctica, and Greenland in the Arctic, would result in centuries of rising seas. But glaciologists and oceanographers still say uncertainty prevails on the vital question of how fast coasts will retreat in a warming world in the next century or two.

The new study combined computer modeling with measurements of the ice and underlying bedrock, both direct and by satellite.

It did not assess the pace or likelihood of a rise in seas. The goal was to examine as precisely as possible how much ice could flow into the sea if warming seawater penetrated between the West Antarctic ice sheet and the bedrock beneath. For decades West Antarctic ice has been identified as particularly vulnerable to melting because, although piled more than one mile above sea level in many places, it also rests on bedrock a half mile to a mile beneath sea level in others.

That topography means that warm water could progressively melt spots where ice is stuck to the rock, allowing it to flow more freely.

Erik I. Ivins, at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, described the new paper as “good solid science,” but added that the sea-level estimates cannot be verified without renewed investment in satellite missions and other initiatives that are currently lagging.

A particularly valuable satellite program called Grace, which measures subtle variations in gravity related to the mass of ice and rock, “has perhaps a couple of years remaining before its orbit deteriorates,” Dr. Ivins said.

“The sad truth is that we in NASA are watching our earth-observing systems fall by the wayside as they age – without the sufficient resources to see them adequately replaced.”

Robert Bindschadler, a longtime specialist in polar ice at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, said the study only provided a low estimate of Antarctica’s possible long-term contribution to rising seas because it did not deal with other mechanisms that could add water to the ocean.

The prime question, he said, remains what will happen in the next 100 years or so, and other recent work implies that a lot of ice can be shed within thattime.

“Even in Bamber’s world,” he said, referring to the study’s author, “there is more than enough ice to cause serious harm to the world’s coastlines.”

Study Halves Prediction of Rising Seas,
NYT,
15.5.2009,
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/05/15/
science/earth/15antarctica.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Related > Anglonautes > Vocapedia

 

weather > heat

 

 

climate change > fossil fuels, greenhouse effect / gases

 

 

climate change, global warming

 

 

climate change > glaciers, polar regions

 

 

climate change > denial, scepticism

 

 

geography

 

 

Earth > water > resources

 

 

Earth > water > drought

 

 

energy > nuclear energy

 

 

energy > natural / shale gas > fracking

 

 

energy > renewables > ethanol, wind power

 

 

energy > renewables > solar power

 

 

transports > car