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Vocapedia > Health > Body, Organs > Brain > Diseases

 

 

 

 

What is consciousness?        The Economist        Sept. 10, 2015

 

Understanding what consciousness is,

and why and how it evolved,

is perhaps the greatest mystery

known to science.

 

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ir8XITVmeY4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marking the Distance        StoryCorps        31 October 2013

 

 

 

 

Marking the Distance        StoryCorps        31 October 2013

 

When Gweneviere Mann lost her short-term memory,

following surgery to remove a brain tumor,

she was forced to navigate life in a new way.

 

But she wasn't alone.

 

With the support of her boyfriend, Yasir Salem,

Gweneviere found she could tackle the challenges

her condition threw her way—and a few more.

 

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yAC-z8F0Mdw

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rewiring the Brain        BBC        27 January 2015

 

 

 

 

Rewiring the Brain        BBC        27 January 2015

 

Do you worry that screen-based devices

– computers, video games and smartphones -

are rewiring your brain?

 

Perhaps you should; because they certainly are.

 

But will the changes mean

generations plagued with attention disorders

and poor social skills or will it boost creativity?

 

Narrated by Gillian Anderson. Scripted by Nigel Warburton.

From the BBC Radio 4 series about life's big questions - A History of Ideas.

This project is from the BBC in partnership with The Open University,

the animations were created by Cognitive.

 

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ARooFFot94

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leandro Castelao

 

Markers on the Road to Understanding the Brain        NYT        JULY 21, 2014

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/22/opinion/Markers-on-the-Road-to-Understanding-the-Brain.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

brain        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2018/feb/12/
its-not-just-in-the-genes-the-foods-that-can-help-and-harm-your-brain

 

 

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/video/2017/feb/14/
what-happens-in-your-brain-when-you-fall-in-love-video

https://www.theguardian.com/science/audio/2017/jan/22/
a-neuroscientist-explains-how-music-affects-the-brain-podcast

 

http://www.theguardian.com/education/2015/sep/16/
what-happens-in-your-brain-when-you-make-a-memory

https://www.youtube.com/watch?
v=ir8XITVmeY4 - The Economist, Sep. 10, 2015

 

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2014/oct/12/
how-to-keep-your-brain-healthy-nobel-prize-medicine

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2014/jan/11/
eat-yourself-smart-do-something

 

http://www.theguardian.com/science/2013/dec/07/
brain-science-ditch-male-female-cliche

http://www.theguardian.com/science/2013/dec/02/
men-women-brains-wired-differently

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/nov/16/
left-right-brain-distinction-myth

http://www.theguardian.com/science/2013/sep/21/
stephen-hawking-brain-outside-body

http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2013/jun/30/
brain-mind-behaviour-neuroscience-neuroimaging

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2012/jun/12/
barbara-arrowsmith-young-rebuilt-brain

http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2012/apr/29/
neuroscience-david-eagleman-raymond-tallis

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2010/sep/14/
oxford-scientist-brain-change

http://www.independent.co.uk/opinion/commentators/
colin-blakemore-an-organ-so-complex-we-may-never-fully-understand-it-775587.html

 

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2006/jul/18/
health.medicineandhealth 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2004/oct/25/
science.research

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

brain        USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/10/
opinion/future-artificial-intelligence-transhumanism.html

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2019/04/24/
716790281/decoded-brain-signals-could-give-voiceless-people-a-way-to-talk

 

 

 

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2018/11/08/
665615440/researchers-uncover-a-circuit-for-sadness-in-the-human-brain

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2018/10/25/
660504533/the-underestimated-cerebellum-gains-new-respect-from-brain-scientists

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2018/10/22/
658810909/can-t-hear-well-fixing-hearing-loss-can-keep-your-memory-sharper

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2018/10/08/
654903558/a-brain-scientist-who-studies-alzheimers-explains-how-she-stays-mentally-fit

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2018/10/01/
605213122/5-simple-ways-to-encourage-brain-development-in-your-little-one

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2018/03/07/
591512588/harvard-brain-collection-will-help-scientists-dive-inside-eating-disorders

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2018/03/07/
591305604/sorry-adults-no-new-neurons-for-your-aging-brains

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/02/
obituaries/charles-wilson-top-brain-surgeon-and-researcher-dies-at-88.html

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2018/02/06/
583633391/a-tiny-pulse-of-electricity-can-help-the-brain-form-lasting-memories

 

 

 

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/12/24/
571647519/could-brain-surgery-save-a-father-and-son

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/12/18/
571120472/older-adults-forgetfulness-tied-to-faulty-brain-rhythms-in-sleep

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/12/07/
569188070/why-your-brain-has-trouble-bailing-out-of-a-bad-plan

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/11/06/
562354635/sleepless-night-leaves-some-brain-cells-as-sluggish-as-you-feel

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/10/30/
560837881/brain-patterns-may-predict-people-at-risk-of-suicide

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/04/
well/move/for-your-brains-sake-keep-moving.html

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/10/03/
555353033/brains-link-to-immune-system-might-help-explain-alzheimers

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/16/
science/marian-c-diamond-90-student-of-the-brain-is-dead.html

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/07/28/
539761740/from-rats-to-humans-a-brain-knows-when-it-cant-remember

 

http://www.npr.org/2017/07/25/
539187733/john-mccain-set-to-make-a-dramatic-return-amid-political-storm

 

http://www.npr.org/2017/07/25/
539198429/study-cte-found-in-nearly-all-donated-nfl-player-brains

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/07/24/
538294331/female-athletes-are-closing-the-gender-gap-when-it-comes-to-concussions

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/06/13/
532792500/brain-cell-transplants-are-being-tested-once-again-for-parkinsons

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/06/01/
530925382/cracking-the-code-that-lets-the-brain-id-any-face-fast

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/05/26/
529828305/more-robust-information-networks-boost-self-control-as-brains-mature

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/19/
opinion/sunday/you-still-need-your-brain.html

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/05/21/
528966102/why-brain-scientists-are-still-obsessed-with-the-curious-case-of-phineas-gage

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2017/05/21/
523969459/why-a-surgeon-taught-a-non-doctor-to-do-brain-surgery

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/13.7/2017/05/19/
528736359/has-modern-experience-changed-the-human-brain

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/15/
science/brenda-milner-brain-cognitive-neuroscience.html

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/04/23/
525062440/chemo-scrambled-my-brain

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/04/10/
523262108/a-hot-zone-in-the-brain-may-reveal-when-and-even-what-we-dream

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/01/30/
512426568/doctor-considers-the-pitfalls-of-extending-life-and-prolonging-death

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/01/26/
511455876/art-exhibition-celebrates-drawings-by-the-founder-of-modern-neuroscience

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/01/16/
509353565/when-the-brain-scrambles-names-its-because-you-love-them

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/01/05/
508237061/brain-area-that-recognizes-faces-gets-bigger-and-better-in-young-adults

 

 

 

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/12/31/
507133144/from-psychedelics-to-alzheimers-2016-was-a-good-year-for-brain-science

http://www.npr.org/2016/12/31/
507590770/-some-of-our-favorite-visual-stories-of-2016

http://www.npr.org/sections/13.7/2016/12/28/
507109578/the-stories-npr-one-listeners-loved-the-most-in-2016

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/12/30/
506433671/the-wrong-eating-habits-can-hurt-your-brain-not-just-your-waistline

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/12/21/
506452313/as-sleep-improves-so-does-an-injured-brain

http://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2016/11/29/
503693391/researchers-study-what-makes-dyslexic-brains-different

http://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2016/11/29/
497943749/6-potential-brain-benefits-of-bilingual-education

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/11/08/
501035923/how-the-brain-powers-placebos-false-memories-and-healing

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/09/
opinion/return-to-the-teenage-brain.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/07/
magazine/the-brain-that-couldnt-remember.html

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/06/23/
483245084/a-protein-that-moves-from-muscle-to-brain-may-tie-exercise-to-memory

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/06/15/
how-exercise-may-help-the-brain-grow-stronger/

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/06/08/
480608042/an-army-buddys-call-for-help-sends-a-scientist-on-brain-injury-quest

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/06/01/
yoga-may-be-good-for-the-brain/

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/05/18/
478401034/complain-all-you-want-but-your-busy-schedule-may-help-your-brain

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/04/27/
475871745/scans-show-the-brain-groups-words-by-meaning

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/04/21/
475112703/electric-currents-and-an-emotional-awakening-for-one-man-with-autism

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/04/21/
474691141/half-your-brain-stands-guard-when-sleeping-in-a-new-place

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/03/15/
470368451/the-brain-likes-categories-where-should-it-put-mixed-race-people

http://www.npr.org/2016/03/15/
469822325/forget-about-it-your-middle-aged-brain-is-not-on-the-decline

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/13/
opinion/sunday/the-neuroscientist-who-lost-her-mind.html

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/02/25/
468110269/beam-me-up-scotty-turns-out-your-brain-is-ready-for-teleportation

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/02/18/
contemplation-therapy/

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/02/17/
which-type-of-exercise-is-best-for-the-brain/

http://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2016/01/03/
460254858/turns-out-monkey-bars-and-kickball-are-good-for-the-brain

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/11/18/
science/joel-elkes-who-cast-light-on-psychosis-dies-at-101.html

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2015/11/16/
456197216/a-genetic-map-hints-at-what-makes-a-brain-human

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2015/11/04/
454651329/the-brains-gps-may-also-help-us-map-our-memories

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2015/10/22/
450847067/30-000-brain-researchers-meld-minds-at-sciences-hottest-ticket

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/10/21/
lifting-weights-twice-a-week-may-aid-the-brain/

http://www.npr.org/sections/13.7/2015/09/16/
440762467/the-immortal-brain-would-you-go-for-it

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/13/us/
cancer-immortality-cryogenics.html

http://www.nytimes.com/video/science/100000003897597/
kim-suozzis-last-wishes.html - September 12, 2015

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2015/09/10/
436342537/how-sound-shaped-the-evolution-of-your-brain

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2015/09/09/
438839277/brain-tissue-transplants-may-have-spread-alzheimers-protein

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2015/09/03/us/
13immortality-explainer.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/31/
science/oliver-sacks-dies-at-82-neurologist-and-author-explored-the-brains-quirks.html

http://www.nytimes.com/video/obituaries/100000003864214/
dr-oliver-sacks-explorer-of-the-brain.html?playlistId=1194811622182 - August 30, 3015

http://www.npr.org/2015/07/20/
424571440/scientists-say-they-can-read-your-mind-and-prove-it-with-pictures

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2015/07/01/
419165395/how-your-brain-remembers-where-you-parked-the-car

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/28/
opinion/sunday/face-it-your-brain-is-a-computer.html

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2015/06/17/
415165246/why-some-teen-brains-may-be-hardwired-to-make-risky-choices

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2015/05/26/
409719011/a-neurosurgeon-reflects-on-the-awe-and-mystery-of-the-brain

http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2015/04/14/
399599727/no-rest-for-your-sleeping-brain

http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2015/03/16/
392789753/a-man-s-incomplete-brain-reveals-cerebellum-s-role-
in-thought-and-emotion

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2015/01/28/
381622350/why-teens-are-impulsive-addiction-prone-and-should-protect-their-brains

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/02/
education/edlife/this-is-your-brain-on-drugs-marijuana-adults-teens.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/03/
opinion/sunday/three-myths-about-the-brain.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/22/
opinion/Markers-on-the-Road-to-Understanding-the-Brain.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/12/
opinion/the-trouble-with-brain-science.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/09/
health/probing-brains-depth-trying-to-aid-memory.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/15/
arts/phyllis-frelich-deaf-activist-and-actress-dies-at-70.html

http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2014/04/02/
297910425/run-when-youre-25-for-a-sharper-brain-when-youre-45

http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2014/04/02/
298332344/map-of-the-developing-human-brain-shows-where-problems-begin

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/03/05/
how-fat-may-harm-the-brain-and-how-exercise-may-help/

http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2014/02/26/
283081784/more-hints-that-dads-age-at-conception-helps-shape-a-childs-brain

http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2014/02/05/
272092118/seeing-less-helps-the-brain-hear-more

http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2014/02/04/
271527934/our-brains-rewrite-our-memories-putting-present-in-the-past

http://www.npr.org/2014/01/30/
268432705/researchers-watch-as-our-brains-turn-sounds-into-words

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/01/22/
how-inactivity-changes-the-brain/

http://www.nytimes.com/video/science/100000002635403/
mapping-the-highways-of-the-brain-.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/04/us/
a-brain-is-dead-a-heart-beats-on.html

 

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/12/18/
what-happens-in-the-brain-after-a-concussion/

http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2013/11/11/
244503589/sweat-your-way-to-a-healthier-brain

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/25/
science/david-hubel-nobel-winning-scientist-dies-at-87.html 

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/01/09/
to-keep-the-brain-benefits-of-exercise-keep-exercising/

 

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/12/26/
exercise-and-the-ever-smarter-human-brain/

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/03/24/
the-brain-on-love/

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/02/22/
how-exercise-fuels-the-brain/

 

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/10/12/
what-parkinsons-teaches-us-about-the-brain/

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/04/11/
us-brain-model-idUSTRE7392KU20110411

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/19/
health/19brai.html

http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2006-10-05-
chemo-fog_x.htm

http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2006-07-03-
brain-rewired_x.htm

 

 

 

 

brain > cerebellum        USA

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2018/10/25/
660504533/the-underestimated-cerebellum-gains-new-respect-from-brain-scientists

 

 

 

 

brain cells        USA

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/11/06/
562354635/sleepless-night-leaves-some-brain-cells-as-sluggish-as-you-feel

 

 

 

 

brain cancer        USA

http://www.npr.org/2017/07/25/
539187733/john-mccain-set-to-make-a-dramatic-return-amid-political-storm

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/13/
style/meechy-monroe-dead-natural-hair-movement.html

 

 

 

 

brain training        USA

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2018/10/08/
654903558/a-brain-scientist-who-studies-alzheimers-explains-how-she-stays-mentally-fit

 

 

 

 

Lewy body dementia        USA

https://www.npr.org/2018/10/01/
653108552/ted-turner-opens-up-about-having-lewy-body-dementia

 

 

 

 

brain > blood flow        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/01/30/
512426568/doctor-considers-the-pitfalls-of-extending-life-and-prolonging-death

 

 

 

 

brain > dream        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/04/10/
523262108/a-hot-zone-in-the-brain-may-reveal-when-and-even-what-we-dream

 

 

 

 

brain patterns        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/10/30/
560837881/brain-patterns-may-predict-people-at-risk-of-suicide

 

 

 

 

immortal brain        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/13.7/2015/09/16/
440762467/the-immortal-brain-would-you-go-for-it

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/13/us/
cancer-immortality-cryogenics.html

http://www.nytimes.com/video/science/100000003897597/
kim-suozzis-last-wishes.html - September 12, 2015

 

 

 

 

brain area        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/01/05/
508237061/brain-area-that-recognizes-faces-gets-bigger-and-better-in-young-adults

 

 

 

 

teenage brain        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/09/
opinion/return-to-the-teenage-brain.html

 

 

 

 

brain > memory        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/science/audio/2017/feb/08/
a-neuroscientist-explains-listeners-emails-about-memory-podcast

 

http://www.theguardian.com/education/2015/sep/16/
what-happens-in-your-brain-when-you-make-a-memory

 

 

 

 

brain > metacognition > metamemory        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/07/28/
539761740/from-rats-to-humans-a-brain-knows-when-it-cant-remember

 

 

 

 

brain > remember        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/07
/magazine/the-brain-that-couldnt-remember.html

 

 

 

 

brain > scramble names        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/01/16/
509353565/when-the-brain-scrambles-names-its-because-you-love-them

 

 

 

 

brain > cerebellum        USA

http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2015/03/16/
393351760/clues-to-autism-schizophrenia-emerge-from-cerebellum-research

http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2015/03/16/
392789753/a-man-s-incomplete-brain-reveals-cerebellum-s-role-in-thought-and-emotion

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

malaria > brain        USA

http://www.npr.org/blogs/goatsandsoda/2015/03/18/
393367086/how-malaria-in-the-brain-kills-doctors-solve-a-medical-mystery

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

migraine        USA

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/12/04/
567804150/new-drugs-could-prevent-migraine-headaches-for-some-people

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

cerebral palsy        USA

 

- neurological disorder

that affects body movement

and muscle coordination.

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/08/14/
543362834/poet-imagines-life-inside-a-1910-institution-that-eugenics-built

 

 

 

 

progressive supranuclear palsy, known as PSP        USA

 

a rare brain disorder

whose cause is largely a mystery

and for which there is

no known effective treatment.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/15/
arts/phyllis-frelich-deaf-activist-and-actress-dies-at-70.html

 

 

 

 

 

rare brain disorder > adrenoleukodystrophy    ALD        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/10/04/
555091418/parents-lobby-states-to-expand-newborn-screening-test-for-rare-brain-disorder

 

 

 

 

narcolepsy        UK

 

rare condition

that causes uncontrollable sleepiness

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2017/oct/22/
dreaming-cure-battle-to-beat-narcolepsy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lou Gehrig's disease / Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis    ALS        UK / USA

 

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis,

or ALS,

is a disease of the nerve cells

in the brain and spinal cord

that control

voluntary muscle movement.

 

ALS is also known

as Lou Gehrig''s disease.

http://health.nytimes.com/health/guides/disease/amyotrophic-lateral-sclerosis/overview.html

 

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/12/12/
675696565/former-nfl-player-tim-green-has-a-new-opponent-als

 

http://www.npr.org/2016/05/06/
476872164/nearing-lifes-end-a-mother-reflects-on-the-most-important-thing-i-did

 

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/05/13/
the-ethics-for-doctors-in-helping-a-patient-die/

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/31/
business/hal-finney-cryptographer-and-bitcoin-pioneer-dies-at-58.html

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/video/2013/jul/01/
stephen-hawking-watch-the-trailer

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/12/
health/policy/in-ill-doctor-a-surprise-reflection-of-who-picks-assisted-suicide.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/03/us/
dr-richard-k-olney-als-researcher-dies-at-64.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/15/
technology/15speech.html

 

 

 

 

ALS > speech-impaired        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/15/
technology/15speech.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis        USA

 

- a rare autoimmune disease

that can attack the brain.

http://www.npr.org/2012/11/14/
165115921/a-young-reporter-chronicles-her-brain-on-fire

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

brains with autism        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/22/
health/brains-of-autistic-children-have-too-many-synapses-study-suggests.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

synapse        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/22/
health/brains-of-autistic-children-have-too-many-synapses-study-suggests.html

 

 

 

 

amygdala

- brain circuit for processing fear        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/29/
opinion/sunday/why-teenagers-act-crazy.html

 

 

 

 

brain power        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/science/2014/jan/04/
can-i-increase-my-brain-power

 

 

 

 

Googling my brain        UK        20 October 2004

https://www.theguardian.com/salon/story/0,14752,1331700,00.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

brain damage        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/03/15/
470513922/in-a-first-nfl-executive-admits-football-is-linked-to-brain-damage

 

 

 

 

brain-damaged        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2012/nov/13/
brain-damaged-man-aware

 

 

 

 

be declared brain-dead        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/17/nyregion/
new-york-state-lawyer-who-was-shot-is-brain-dead-family-says.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/04/us/
a-brain-is-dead-a-heart-beats-on.html

 

 

 

 

brain-dead        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/19/
opinion/sunday/bruni-the-cruelest-pregnancy.html

 

 

 

 

brain disease >  Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease    CJD        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/02/06/
508241181/prion-test-for-rare-fatal-brain-disease-helps-families-cope

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

baby with 3 genetic parents        USA

 

Last fall,

the New York-based reproductive

endocrinologist John Zhang

made headlines when he reported

the birth of the world's first "three-parent" baby

— a healthy boy carrying the blended DNA

of the birth mother, her husband

and an unrelated female donor.

 

The technique,

called mitochondrial replacement therapy,

allowed the 36-year-old mother

to bypass a defect in her own genome

that had led, twice before,

to children born with Leigh syndrome,

a devastating neurological disorder

that typically culminates in death

before age 3.

 

While heralded in many circles

as a breakthrough,

the news triggered numerous

ethical and scientific questions,

many of which remained unanswered

at the time.

 

Last week,

Zhang and his colleagues

at the New Hope Fertility Center

provided some answers

— and raised yet more concerns.

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/04/08/
523020895/a-baby-with-3-genetic-parents-seems-healthy-but-questions-remain

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

neurone        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/01/26/
511455876/art-exhibition-celebrates-drawings-by-the-founder-of-modern-neuroscience

 

 

 

 

communicate        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/01/26/
511455876/art-exhibition-celebrates-drawings-by-the-founder-of-modern-neuroscience

 

 

 

 

neuroscience        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/science/neuroscience

 

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2014/oct/12/
how-to-keep-your-brain-healthy-nobel-prize-medicine

 

 

 

 

neuroscience        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/13.7/2017/04/05/
522738015/is-neuroscience-rediscovering-the-soul

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/01/26/
511455876/art-exhibition-celebrates-drawings-by-the-founder-of-modern-neuroscience

 

 

 

 

neuroscientist        USA

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/16/
science/marian-c-diamond-90-student-of-the-brain-is-dead.html

 

 

 

 

neurosurgeon        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/03/
magazine/karl-ove-knausgaard-on-the-terrible-beauty-of-brain-surgery.html

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2015/05/26/
409719011/a-neurosurgeon-reflects-on-the-awe-and-mystery-of-the-brain

 

 

 

 

brain surgeon        USA

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/02/
obituaries/charles-wilson-top-brain-surgeon-and-researcher-dies-at-88.html

 

 

 

 

neurologist        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/06/13/
532792500/brain-cell-transplants-are-being-tested-once-again-for-parkinsons

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/23/
science/lewis-rowland-dead-columbia-university-neurologist.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/31/
science/oliver-sacks-dies-at-82-neurologist-and-author-
explored-the-brains-quirks.html

 

 

 

 

neuroplasticity        USA

 

- the brain’s ability

to form new neural connections

and be influenced by the environment

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/09/
opinion/return-to-the-teenage-brain.html

 

 

 

 

motor neurone disease        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/jan/06/
terminally-ill-uk-man-launches-legal-challenge-for-right-to-die

 

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2006/aug/09/
health.medicineandhealth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

brain surgery        USA

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/12/24/
571647519/could-brain-surgery-save-a-father-and-son

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/08/25/
545710598/this-music-teacher-played-his-saxophone-while-in-brain-surgery

http://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2017/05/21/
523969459/why-a-surgeon-taught-a-non-doctor-to-do-brain-surgery

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/03/
magazine/karl-ove-knausgaard-on-the-terrible-beauty-of-brain-surgery.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

mind        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/13/
opinion/sunday/the-neuroscientist-who-lost-her-mind.html

 

http://www.npr.org/2015/07/20/
424571440/scientists-say-they-can-read-your-mind-and-prove-it-with-pictures

 

 

 

 

meditation        USA

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/02/18/
contemplation-therapy/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Digital Devices Deprive Brain

of Needed Downtime

 

August 24, 2010

The New York Times

By MATT RICHTEL

 

SAN FRANCISCO — It’s 1 p.m. on a Thursday and Dianne Bates, 40, juggles three screens. She listens to a few songs on her iPod, then taps out a quick e-mail on her iPhone and turns her attention to the high-definition television.

Just another day at the gym.

As Ms. Bates multitasks, she is also churning her legs in fast loops on an elliptical machine in a downtown fitness center. She is in good company. In gyms and elsewhere, people use phones and other electronic devices to get work done — and as a reliable antidote to boredom.

Cellphones, which in the last few years have become full-fledged computers with high-speed Internet connections, let people relieve the tedium of exercising, the grocery store line, stoplights or lulls in the dinner conversation.

The technology makes the tiniest windows of time entertaining, and potentially productive. But scientists point to an unanticipated side effect: when people keep their brains busy with digital input, they are forfeiting downtime that could allow them to better learn and remember information, or come up with new ideas.

Ms. Bates, for example, might be clearer-headed if she went for a run outside, away from her devices, research suggests.

At the University of California, San Francisco, scientists have found that when rats have a new experience, like exploring an unfamiliar area, their brains show new patterns of activity. But only when the rats take a break from their exploration do they process those patterns in a way that seems to create a persistent memory of the experience.

The researchers suspect that the findings also apply to how humans learn.

“Almost certainly, downtime lets the brain go over experiences it’s had, solidify them and turn them into permanent long-term memories,” said Loren Frank, assistant professor in the department of physiology at the university, where he specializes in learning and memory. He said he believed that when the brain was constantly stimulated, “you prevent this learning process.”

At the University of Michigan, a study found that people learned significantly better after a walk in nature than after a walk in a dense urban environment, suggesting that processing a barrage of information leaves people fatigued.

Even though people feel entertained, even relaxed, when they multitask while exercising, or pass a moment at the bus stop by catching a quick video clip, they might be taxing their brains, scientists say.

“People think they’re refreshing themselves, but they’re fatiguing themselves,” said Marc Berman, a University of Michigan neuroscientist.

Regardless, there is now a whole industry of mobile software developers competing to help people scratch the entertainment itch. Flurry, a company that tracks the use of apps, has found that mobile games are typically played for 6.3 minutes, but that many are played for much shorter intervals. One popular game that involves stacking blocks gets played for 2.2 minutes on average.

Today’s game makers are trying to fill small bits of free time, said Sebastien de Halleux, a co-founder of PlayFish, a game company owned by the industry giant Electronic Arts.

“Instead of having long relaxing breaks, like taking two hours for lunch, we have a lot of these micro-moments,” he said. Game makers like Electronic Arts, he added, “have reinvented the game experience to fit into micro-moments.”

Many business people, of course, have good reason to be constantly checking their phones. But this can take a mental toll. Henry Chen, 26, a self-employed auto mechanic in San Francisco, has mixed feelings about his BlackBerry habits.

“I check it a lot, whenever there is downtime,” Mr. Chen said. Moments earlier, he was texting with a friend while he stood in line at a bagel shop; he stopped only when the woman behind the counter interrupted him to ask for his order.

Mr. Chen, who recently started his business, doesn’t want to miss a potential customer. Yet he says that since he upgraded his phone a year ago to a feature-rich BlackBerry, he can feel stressed out by what he described as internal pressure to constantly stay in contact.

“It’s become a demand. Not necessarily a demand of the customer, but a demand of my head,” he said. “I told my girlfriend that I’m more tired since I got this thing.”

In the parking lot outside the bagel shop, others were filling up moments with their phones. While Eddie Umadhay, 59, a construction inspector, sat in his car waiting for his wife to grocery shop, he deleted old e-mail while listening to news on the radio. On a bench outside a coffee house, Ossie Gabriel, 44, a nurse practitioner, waited for a friend and checked e-mail “to kill time.”

Crossing the street from the grocery store to his car, David Alvarado pushed his 2-year-old daughter in a cart filled with shopping bags, his phone pressed to his ear.

He was talking to a colleague about work scheduling, noting that he wanted to steal a moment to make the call between paying for the groceries and driving.

“I wanted to take advantage of the little gap,” said Mr. Alvarado, 30, a facilities manager at a community center.

For many such people, the little digital asides come on top of heavy use of computers during the day. Take Ms. Bates, the exercising multitasker at the expansive Bakar Fitness and Recreation Center. She wakes up and peeks at her iPhone before she gets out of bed. At her job in advertising, she spends all day in front of her laptop.

But, far from wanting a break from screens when she exercises, she says she couldn’t possibly spend 55 minutes on the elliptical machine without “lots of things to do.” This includes relentless channel surfing.

“I switch constantly,” she said. “I can’t stand commercials. I have to flip around unless I’m watching ‘Project Runway’ or something I’m really into.”

Some researchers say that whatever downside there is to not resting the brain, it pales in comparison to the benefits technology can bring in motivating people to sweat.

“Exercise needs to be part of our lives in the sedentary world we’re immersed in. Anything that helps us move is beneficial,” said John J. Ratey, associate clinical professor of psychiatry at the Harvard Medical School and author of “Spark: The Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain.”

But all things being equal, Mr. Ratey said, he would prefer to see people do their workouts away from their devices: “There is more bang for your buck doing it outside, for your mood and working memory.”

Of the 70 cardio machines on the main floor at Bakar Fitness, 67 have televisions attached. Most of them also have iPod docks and displays showing workout performance, and a few have games, like a rope-climbing machine that shows an animated character climbing the rope while the live human does so too.

A few months ago, the cable TV went out and some patrons were apoplectic. “It was an uproar. People said: ‘That’s what we’re paying for,’ ” said Leeane Jensen, 28, the fitness manager.

At least one exerciser has a different take. Two stories up from the main floor, Peter Colley, 23, churns away on one of the several dozen elliptical machines without a TV. Instead, they are bathed in sunlight, looking out onto the pool and palm trees.

“I look at the wind on the trees. I watch the swimmers go back and forth,” Mr. Colley said. “I usually come here to clear my head.”

Digital Devices Deprive Brain of Needed Downtime,
NYT,
24.8.2010,
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/25/
technology/25brain.html

 

 

 

 

 

Is surfing the Internet

altering your brain?

 

Mon Oct 27, 2008

7:17am EDT

Reuters

By Belinda Goldsmith

 

CANBERRA (Reuters) - The Internet is not just changing the way people live but altering the way our brains work with a neuroscientist arguing this is an evolutionary change which will put the tech-savvy at the top of the new social order.

Gary Small, a neuroscientist at UCLA in California who specializes in brain function, has found through studies that Internet searching and text messaging has made brains more adept at filtering information and making snap decisions.

But while technology can accelerate learning and boost creativity it can have drawbacks as it can create Internet addicts whose only friends are virtual and has sparked a dramatic rise in Attention Deficit Disorder diagnoses.

Small, however, argues that the people who will come out on top in the next generation will be those with a mixture of technological and social skills.

"We're seeing an evolutionary change. The people in the next generation who are really going to have the edge are the ones who master the technological skills and also face-to-face skills," Small told Reuters in a telephone interview.

"They will know when the best response to an email or Instant Message is to talk rather than sit and continue to email."

In his newly released fourth book "iBrain: Surviving the Technological Alteration of the Modern Mind," Small looks at how technology has altered the way young minds develop, function and interpret information.

Small, the director of the Memory & Aging Research Center at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience & Human Behavior and the Center on Aging at UCLA, said the brain was very sensitive to the changes in the environment such as those brought by technology.

He said a study of 24 adults as they used the Web found that experienced Internet users showed double the activity in areas of the brain that control decision-making and complex reasoning as Internet beginners.

"The brain is very specialized in its circuitry and if you repeat mental tasks over and over it will strengthen certain neural circuits and ignore others," said Small.

"We are changing the environment. The average young person now spends nine hours a day exposing their brain to technology. Evolution is an advancement from moment to moment and what we are seeing is technology affecting our evolution."

Small said this multi-tasking could cause problems.

He said the tech-savvy generation, whom he calls "digital natives," are always scanning for the next bit of new information which can create stress and even damage neural networks.

"There is also the big problem of neglecting human contact skills and losing the ability to read emotional expressions and body language," he said.

"But you can take steps to address this. It means taking time to cut back on technology, like having a family dinner, to find a balance. It is important to understand how technology is affecting our lives and our brains and take control of it."

 

(Editing by Paul Casciato)

Is surfing the Internet altering your brain?,
R,
27.10.2008,
http://www.reuters.com/article/technologyNews/
idUSTRE49Q2YW20081027

 

 

 

 

 

Brain Found

in Bag Near Richmond, Va.

 

October 9, 2007

Filed at 1:09 p.m. ET

The New York Times

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

 

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) -- A brain was found in a bag near an apartment complex Tuesday morning, but it wasn't clear if it was human or animal, police said.

It was discovered in an area next to a suburban Richmond apartment complex under construction and near a mall, Richmond police spokeswoman Karla Peters said.

The state medical examiner was examining the brain, she said. It wasn't clear how long it had been there.

''We're waiting for the medical examiner to determine how we should proceed,'' Peters said.

Brain Found in Bag Near Richmond, Va.,
NYT,
9.10.2007,
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/us/AP-Brain-in-Bag.html

 

 

 

 

 

Out-of-Body Experience?

Your Brain Is to Blame

 

October 3, 2006

The New York Times

By SANDRA BLAKESLEE

 

They are eerie sensations, more common than one might think: A man describes feeling a shadowy figure standing behind him, then turning around to find no one there. A woman feels herself leaving her body and floating in space, looking down on her corporeal self.

Such experiences are often attributed by those who have them to paranormal forces.

But according to recent work by neuroscientists, they can be induced by delivering mild electric current to specific spots in the brain. In one woman, for example, a zap to a brain region called the angular gyrus resulted in a sensation that she was hanging from the ceiling, looking down at her body. In another woman, electrical current delivered to the angular gyrus produced an uncanny feeling that someone was behind her, intent on interfering with her actions.

The two women were being evaluated for epilepsy surgery at University Hospital in Geneva, where doctors implanted dozens of electrodes into their brains to pinpoint the abnormal tissue causing the seizures and to identify adjacent areas involved in language, hearing or other essential functions that should be avoided in the surgery. As each electrode was activated, stimulating a different patch of brain tissue, the patient was asked to say what she was experiencing.

Dr. Olaf Blanke, a neurologist at the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in Switzerland who carried out the procedures, said that the women had normal psychiatric histories and that they were stunned by the bizarre nature of their experiences.

The Sept. 21 issue of Nature magazine includes an account by Dr. Blanke and his colleagues of the woman who sensed a shadow person behind her. They described the out-of-body experiences in the February 2004 issue of the journal Brain.

There is nothing mystical about these ghostly experiences, said Peter Brugger, a neuroscientist at University Hospital in Zurich, who was not involved in the experiments but is an expert on phantom limbs, the sensation of still feeling a limb that has been amputated, and other mind-bending phenomena.

“The research shows that the self can be detached from the body and can live a phantom existence on its own, as in an out-of-body experience, or it can be felt outside of personal space, as in a sense of a presence,” Dr. Brugger said.

Scientists have gained new understanding of these odd bodily sensations as they have learned more about how the brain works, Dr. Blanke said. For example, researchers have discovered that some areas of the brain combine information from several senses. Vision, hearing and touch are initially processed in the primary sensory regions. But then they flow together, like tributaries into a river, to create the wholeness of a person’s perceptions. A dog is visually recognized far more quickly if it is simultaneously accompanied by the sound of its bark.

These multisensory processing regions also build up perceptions of the body as it moves through the world, Dr. Blanke said. Sensors in the skin provide information about pressure, pain, heat, cold and similar sensations. Sensors in the joints, tendons and bones tell the brain where the body is positioned in space. Sensors in the ears track the sense of balance. And sensors in the internal organs, including the heart, liver and intestines, provide a readout of a person’s emotional state.

Real-time information from the body, the space around the body and the subjective feelings from the body are also represented in multisensory regions, Dr. Blanke said. And if these regions are directly simulated by an electric current, as in the cases of the two women he studied, the integrity of the sense of body can be altered.

As an example, Dr. Blanke described the case of a 22-year-old student who had electrodes implanted into the left side of her brain in 2004.

“We were checking language areas,” Dr. Blanke said, when the woman turned her head to the right. That made no sense, he said, because the electrode was nowhere near areas involved in the control of movement. Instead, the current was stimulating a multisensory area called the angular gyrus.

Dr. Blanke applied the current again. Again, the woman turned her head to the right. “Why are you doing this?” he asked.

The woman replied that she had a weird sensation that another person was lying beneath her on the bed. The figure, she said, felt like a “shadow” that did not speak or move; it was young, more like a man than a woman, and it wanted to interfere with her.

When Dr. Blanke turned off the current, the woman stopped looking to the right, and said the strange presence had gone away. Each time he reapplied the current, she once again turned her head to try to see the shadow figure.

When the woman sat up, leaned forward and hugged her knees, she said that she felt as if the shadow man was also sitting and that he was clasping her in his arms. She said it felt unpleasant. When she held a card in her right hand, she reported that the shadow figure tried to take it from her. “He doesn’t want me to read,” she said.

Because the presence closely mimicked the patient’s body posture and position, Dr. Blanke concluded that the patient was experiencing an unusual perception of her own body, as a double. But for reasons that scientists have not been able to explain, he said, she did not recognize that it was her own body she was sensing.

The feeling of a shadowy presence can occur without electrical stimulation to the brain, Dr. Brugger said. It has been described by people who undergo sensory deprivation, as in mountaineers trekking at high altitude or sailors crossing the ocean alone, and by people who have suffered minor strokes or other disruptions in blood flow to the brain.

Six years ago, another of Dr. Blanke’s patients underwent brain stimulation to a different multisensory area, the angular gyrus, which blends vision with the body sense. The patient experienced a complete out-of-body experience.

When the current flowed, she said: “I am at the ceiling. I am looking down at my legs.”

When the current ceased, she said: “I’m back on the table now. What happened?”

Further applications of the current returned the woman to the ceiling, causing her to feel as if she were outside of her body, floating, her legs dangling below her. When she closed her eyes, she had the sensation of doing sit-ups, with her upper body approaching her legs.

Because the woman’s felt position in space and her actual position in space did not match, her mind cast about for the best way to turn her confusion into a coherent experience, Dr. Blanke said. She concluded that she must be floating up and away while looking downward.

Some schizophrenics, Dr. Blanke said, experience paranoid delusions and the sense that someone is following them. They also sometimes confuse their own actions with the actions of other people. While the cause of these symptoms is not known, he said, multisensory processing areas may be involved.

When otherwise normal people experience bodily delusions, Dr. Blanke said, they are often flummoxed. The felt sensation of the body is so seamless, so familiar, that people do not realize it is a creation of the brain, even when something goes wrong and the brain is perturbed.

Yet the sense of body integrity is rather easily duped, Dr. Blanke said.

And while it may be tempting to invoke the supernatural when this body sense goes awry, he said the true explanation is a very natural one, the brain’s attempt to make sense of conflicting information.

Out-of-Body Experience? Your Brain Is to Blame,
NYT,
3.10.2006,
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/10/03/
health/psychology/03shad.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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