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Vocapedia > USA > Law, Justice > Defendant, Defense, Defender, Lawyer

 

 

 

R.J. Matson

The New York Observer and Roll Call

NY

Cagle

15 September 2010

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

defendant

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2015/10/21/
450553208/what-to-do-with-californias-mentally-ill-defendants

 

http://www.dps.state.ia.us/commis/pib/Releases/2014/Rayhons_Complaint_&_Affidavit.pdf

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/05/us/
in-detroit-trial-voicing-regret-over-killing-at-his-door.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/04/22/us/
tsarnaev-court-appearance.html

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/03/20/
nyregion/20wrongful-ranta-statement.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/30/nyregion/
woman-is-held-in-death-of-man-pushed-onto-subway-tracks-in-queens.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/13/us/
george-zimmerman-to-appear-in-court.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/27/us/
supervising-priest-goes-on-trial-in-philadelphia.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/02/
nyregion/02cheshire.html

 

http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2006-12-01-
sword-trial_x.htm

 

 

 

 

indigent criminal defendants

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/25/
opinion/sunday/injustice-in-murder-cases.html

 

 

 

 

poor defendants

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/10/us/
10defenders.html

 

 

 

 

mentally ill defendants

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2015/10/21/
450553208/what-to-do-with-californias-mentally-ill-defendants

 

 

 

 

co-defendant

 

 

 

 

self-defense

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/15/us/
in-zimmerman-case-self-defense-was-hard-to-topple.html

 

 

 

 

take the stand to testify in his / her own defense

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/11/29/
503737818/former-south-carolina-police-officer-takes-the-stand-at-his-murder-trial

 

 

 

 

 

constitutional right to a lawyer

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/10/us/
10defenders.html

 

 

 

 

Brady violations

 

The law requires prosecutors

to share evidence with defense attorneys,

especially if it helps exonerate defendants.

 

The requirement is known

as the Brady disclosure.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/07/16/
us-usa-florida-shooting-omara-idUSBRE96F04R20130716

 

 

 

 

plead guilty to abuse, torture, imprisonment

https://www.npr.org/2019/02/22/
697103949/california-couple-parents-of-13-plead-guilty-to-abuse-torture-imprisonment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How Making a Movie Could Keep You Out of Jail        NYT        22 February 2019

 

 

 

 

How Making a Movie Could Keep You Out of Jail | Op-Docs        The New York Times        22 February 2019

 

“Our job is to make judges suffer.”

 

That’s the view of Doug Passon,

a defense lawyer and expert

in creating short, tear-jerker documentaries

to win lenient sentences for his clients.

 

Passon is also the subject of this week’s

Op-Doc “No Jail Time: The Movie,”

by Lance Oppenheim.

 

Oppenheim’s previous Op-Doc

was the eerily humorous “Long Term Parking,”

about airline workers living in an airport parking lot;

 

this time, he peers into a strange subculture of lawyers

immersing themselves in the art of documentary storytelling.

 

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=ZDGOtvmX_Zs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I defended a serial killer        G        2 July 2014

 

 

 

 

I defended a serial killer | Guardian Docs        2 July 2014

 

Why do lawyers defend serial killers and murderers?

Rory Carroll and Simon Hattenstone

talk to the lawyers who've taken on some of the toughest cases.

 

John Henry Browne, 67,

has been practising law for 43 years.

Based in Seattle, Washington,

he has defended high-profile mass murderers,

including serial killer Ted Bundy,

who sowed fear across the US in the 1970s,

and Robert Bales,

an army sergeant

who massacred 16 Afghan civilians in 2011.

 

Laurence Lee, 61,

runs his own firm in Liverpool

and specialises in criminal law.

 

In 1993, he represented 10-year-old Jon Venables,

who was charged with abducting two-year-old James Bulger

from a shopping centre in Bootle, and murdering him.

 

Venables and his co-defendant,

Robert Thompson,

were found guilty,

becoming Britain's

youngest convicted murderers.

 

William Kelley, 65,

retired two years ago

after practising law

in Orange County, California, for 33 years.

He defended Charles Ng,

who was convicted of murdering 11 people.

Ng and his accomplice, Leonard Lake,

abducted and tortured their victims

at a remote cabin in the Sierra Nevada foothills

in the mid-80s.

 

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?
v=5PQ7rWaKW9Q&list=PLa_1MA_DEorHVeZiy1Ky-yGdcEW9qCKet&index=35

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

True Believers in Justice: A Young Public Defender's Struggle - Op-Docs        NYT        24 January 2013

 

 

 

 

True Believers in Justice: A Young Public Defender's Struggle - Op-Docs        NYT        24 January 2013

 

The filmmaker Dawn Porter follows Travis Williams,

a young public defender in the Deep South,

who struggles against long hours, low pay

and staggering caseloads to bring justice to all.

 

YouTube

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rR7uYjbiS4c

Related

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/24/opinion/true-believers-in-justice.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

National Legal Aid and Defender Association

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/10/us/
10defenders.html

 

 

 

 

be accused of N

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/30/us/
politics/30jefferson.html

 

 

 

 

accuser

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/06/07/
531963388/cosby-lawyer-challenges-accusers-credibility-in-sexual-assault-trial

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/06/06/
531802774/bill-cosbys-accuser-takes-the-stand-in-sexual-assault-trial

 

 

 

 

improperly

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/30/us/
politics/30jefferson.html

 

 

 

 

be accused of arson in addition to murder

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/16/nyregion/16cheshire.html

 

 

 

 

face up to 10 years in prison

 

 

 

 

three strikes and you’re out        UK / USA

http://www.silicon-valley.com/3strikes.html

http://www.legal-explanations.com/definitions/three-strikes-youre-out.htm

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2004/mar/08/usa.danglaister 

 

 

 

 

face life in prison

 

 

 

 

face / get life in prison without parole

http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2006-05-30-md-sniper-trial_x.htm

 

 

 

 

face a sentence as long as life in prison if convicted

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

defense / the defense

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/12/05/
504414334/accused-charleston-church-shooter-rehires-his-defense-team

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/13/us/
zimmerman-trial.html

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/07/10/us-usa-florida-
shooting-idUSBRE9690LB20130710

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1995/08/01/us/
simpson-defense-changes-glove-tactics.html

http://www.nytimes.com/1995/07/11/us/
simpson-defense-portrays-a-man-in-shock.html

http://www.nytimes.com/1995/03/19/
weekinreview/the-nation-the-simpson-defense-one-hateful-word.html

http://www.nytimes.com/1995/03/16/us/
simpson-defense-details-glove-theory.html

http://www.nytimes.com/1995/03/06/us/
the-simpson-defense-source-of-black-pride.html

http://www.nytimes.com/1995/02/18/us/
defense-says-simpson-was-too-stunned-to-react-to-former-wife-s-killing.html

http://www.nytimes.com/1995/02/03/us/
simpson-defense-grills-dreams-witness.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1994/10/10/us/
in-simpson-subtext-the-defense-tries-to-put-the-los-angeles-police-on-trial.html

http://www.nytimes.com/1994/09/03/us/
simpson-defense-attacks-theory-of-single-assailant.html

 

 

 

 

defense team

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/12/05/
504414334/accused-charleston-church-shooter-rehires-his-defense-team

 

 

 

 

legal defense

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/20/us/in-louisiana-
the-poor-lack-legal-defense.html

 

 

 

 

insanity / insanity defense

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/08/05/
487909967/with-no-insanity-defense-seriously-ill-people-end-up-in-prison

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/08/03/
486669552/does-a-psychopath-who-kills-get-to-use-the-insanity-defense

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/08/02/
486632201/guilty-but-mentally-ill-doesnt-protect-against-harsh-sentences

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/07/28/
486607183/after-hinckley-states-tightened-use-of-the-insanity-plea

 

 

 

 

Who Qualifies for the Insanity Defense?

http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2011/01/20/
who-qualifies-for-the-insanity-defense

 

 

 

 

question

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/16/nyregion/
defense-takes-on-accuser-in-rape-trial-of-2-officers.html

 

 

 

 

questioning

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/16/nyregion/
defense-takes-on-accuser-in-rape-trial-of-2-officers.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

defender

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/18/nyregion/
james-m-larossa-defender-of-mob-bosses-in-court-dies-at-82.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/11/us/
11defender.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mikel Jaso

 

When the Public Defender Says, ‘I Can’t Help’

The Opinion Pages | Op-Ed Contributor

By DERWYN BUNTON        NYT        FEB. 19, 2016

https://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/19/
opinion/when-the-public-defender-says-i-cant-help.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

public defender    P. D.

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/20/us/
in-louisiana-the-poor-lack-legal-defense.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/19/
opinion/when-the-public-defender-says-i-cant-help.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/25/
opinion/sunday/injustice-in-murder-cases.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/10/us/
10defenders.html

 

http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2006-08-28-
karr_x.htm

 

 

 

 

be granted public defenders

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

at the defense table

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/02/26/nyregion/
26bell.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1995/02/04/us/
simpson-threw-wife-into-wall-her-sister-tells jury.html

 

 

 

 

defense motion

 

 

 

 

client

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

defense attorney / lawyer

 

https://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=ZDGOtvmX_Zs - NYT - 22 February 2019

 

https://www.npr.org/2019/01/01/
678408216/ballistic-fingerprint-database-expands-amid-questions-about-its-precision

 

 

 

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/06/07/
531963388/cosby-lawyer-challenges-accusers-credibility-in-sexual-assault-trial

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/31/us/
paul-sprenger-lawyer-who-fought-discrimination-dies-at-74.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/18/nyregion/
james-m-larossa-defender-of-mob-bosses-in-court-dies-at-82.html

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/13/us/
zimmerman-trial.html

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/13/us/
george-zimmerman-to-appear-in-court.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/11/us/
maxwell-s-keith-lawyer-in-manson-case-dies-at-87.html

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/16/nyregion/
defense-takes-on-accuser-in-rape-trial-of-2-officers.html

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1995/09/28/us/
simpson-s-lawyer-tells-jury-that-evidence-doesn-t-fit.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1995/03/17/us/
simpson-s-lawyer-fails-to-crack-crucial-witness.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1995/03/14/us/
simpson-team-begins-sketching-its-case-for-a-police-conspiracy.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1995/03/07/us/
simpson-lawyer-suggests-police-didn-t-pursue-all-leads.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1995/01/21/us/
simpson-judge-permits-evidence-on-racial-bias-of-detective.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1995/01/14/us/
issue-of-racism-erupts-in-simpson-trial.html

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1994/11/29/nyregion/
judge-in-a-bitter-clash-with-simpson-lawyer.html

http://www.nytimes.com/1994/11/17/us/
attorneys-for-simpson-to-question-judge-s-wife.html

http://www.nytimes.com/1994/10/13/us/
simpson-s-lawyers-are-questioning-the-first-prospective-jurors-about-hung-juries.html

http://www.nytimes.com/1994/10/06/us/
judge-rejects-barrage-of-objections-by-simpson-s-lawyers.html

http://www.nytimes.com/1994/10/05/us/
simpson-team-opens-a-new-attack-on-evidence-in-bronco.html

http://www.nytimes.com/1994/09/25/
opinion/editorial-notebook-a-gathering-of-lawyers.html

 

 

 

 

lawyers for N

 

 

 

 

tort lawyer

https://www.law.cornell.edu/wex/tort

 

 

 

 

chief defense lawyer

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/07/16/
us-usa-florida-shooting-omara-idUSBRE96F04R20130716

 

 

 

 

 the lawyer representing...

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/16/nyregion/
defense-takes-on-accuser-in-rape-trial-of-2-officers.html

 

 

 

 

 cross-examination of the central witness

 

opportunity for defense lawyers

to smear the witness’s credibility

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/16/nyregion/
defense-takes-on-accuser-in-rape-trial-of-2-officers.html

 

 

 

 

private court-appointed lawyer

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/25/
opinion/sunday/injustice-in-murder-cases.html

 

 

 

 

civil rights lawyer

http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2006-10-16-
terror-lawyer-sentenced_x.htm

 

 

 

 

defense lawyer

https://www.npr.org/2018/04/24/
605444941/in-closing-cosbys-lawyers-call-his-accuser-a-pathological-liar

 

http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2007-02-10-
serial-molester_x.htm

 

 

 

 

 table of defense lawyers

https://www.npr.org/2018/04/24/
605444941/in-closing-cosbys-lawyers-call-his-accuser-a-pathological-liar

 

 

 

 

be cross-examined by a defense lawyer

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/16/nyregion/16cheshire.html

 

 

 

 

argue to the jury

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/30/us/
politics/30jefferson.html

 

 

 

 

ask for leniency

http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2007-02-10-
serial-molester_x.htm

 

 

 

 

criminal defense lawyer

Shepard Kopp of Geragos & Geragos,

the L.A.-based firm that has represented

Michael Jackson, Winona Ryder

and Scott Peterson in court

http://www.usatoday.com/life/people/2006-08-02-
gibson-charged_x.htm

 

 

 

 

In his defense,

Blake's lawyer Gerald Schwartzbach attacked

the credibility of key prosecution witnesses...

 

 

 

 

defense attorney

http://www.usatoday.com/sports/college/lacrosse/2006-12-22-
duke-rape-charges_x.htm

 

 

 

 

the defense rests its case

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/07/10/us-usa-florida-
shooting-idUSBRE9690LB20130710

 

http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2006-07-10-
yates_x.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

confess

 

 

 

 

confess to killing...

http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2008-01-12-
autistic-girl-killed_N.htm

 

 

 

 

confession

 

 

 

 

make a full confession

 

 

 

 

videotaped confession

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

testify for the defense

http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2006-07-10-
yates_x.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

accuser

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/16/nyregion/
defense-takes-on-accuser-in-rape-trial-of-2-officers.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maxwell S. Keith

Dies at 87;

Replacement Lawyer

in Manson Case

 

March 10, 2012

The New York Times

By BRUCE WEBER

 

Maxwell S. Keith, who defended two members of the so-called Manson family in their notorious cult murder trials, stepping in after the lawyer for one of them disappeared under mysterious circumstances, died on Tuesday in Templeton, Calif. He was 87.

His daughter Hilary Keith confirmed the death.

In December 1970, a Superior Court judge in Los Angeles appointed Mr. Keith to represent Leslie Van Houten, one of three young women on trial with Charles Manson for the gruesome killings of seven people over two August nights in 1969.

The first night’s victims were the actress Sharon Tate, who was married to the director Roman Polanski and was eight and a half months pregnant; Abigail Folger, an heiress to the Folger coffee fortune; Jay Sebring, a celebrity hairstylist; Voytek Frykowski; and Steven Parent. They were killed by intruders at Ms. Tate’s home near Beverly Hills.

The next night, a supermarket executive and his wife, Leno and Rosemary LaBianca, were murdered in their Los Angeles home after returning from a vacation.

The trial had begun almost six months before Mr. Keith was appointed to the case. Ms. Van Houten, who was accused in only the LaBianca murders, had been represented by Ronald Hughes, but during a recess as the trial approached its conclusion, Mr. Hughes vanished after a hard rainstorm while he was on a camping trip. (His body was found several months later, and though no charges have ever been brought, it has long been speculated that members of the Manson cult killed him.)

Mr. Keith was given a short time to absorb about 18,000 pages of court documents, and though he said he was familiar enough with the evidence to proceed when the trial resumed just before Christmas, he asked the court to declare a mistrial on the basis of his not having been present to hear witnesses testify. The judge, Charles H. Older, denied the request, and Mr. Keith went on to present a defense that separated Ms. Van Houten’s interests from Mr. Manson’s.

Mr. Keith contended that Ms. Van Houten and the other young women, Susan Atkins and Pamela Krenwinkel (along with another member of the cult, Charles Watson, who would be tried later), had been brainwashed by Mr. Manson and were incapable of thinking or acting on their own. In his closing argument, he latched on to how the prosecutor, Vincent Bugliosi, had referred to them as robots.

“If you believe the prosecution theory that these female defendants and Mr. Watson were extensions of Mr. Manson — his additional arms and legs, as it were — if you believe that they were mindless robots, they cannot be guilty of premeditated murder,” Mr. Keith said.

In his book about the case, “Helter Skelter,” Mr. Bugliosi said Mr. Keith had “delivered the best of the four defense arguments,” though it was to no avail. The three women and Mr. Manson were convicted of murder, and in a subsequent trial Mr. Watson, defended by Mr. Keith, was found guilty in all seven murders. All were given the death penalty, but when California temporarily abolished capital punishment in 1972, their sentences were reduced to life in prison.

Maxwell Stanley Keith was born in Pasadena, Calif., on July 16, 1924. World War II interrupted his education at Princeton, and he served in the Pacific as a bombardier in the Army Air Forces. He graduated from Princeton after the war and from Loyola Law School in Los Angeles.

Before becoming a defense lawyer in private practice, he worked in the district attorney’s office in Los Angeles. In 1960, he and a partner defended Dr. R. Bernard Finch, a wealthy physician from West Covina, Calif., who, in a scandalous case that seized national headlines, was convicted of killing his wife.

In addition to his daughter Hilary, Mr. Keith is survived by his wife, the former Alison Cronkhite, whom he married in 1953; three other daughters, Elizabeth Keith, Alison Stirling and Adelaide Muro; two sons, Gordon and Alexander; eight grandchildren; and a great-granddaughter.

In 1976, Ms. Van Houten’s conviction was overturned when an appeals court ruled that Judge Older should have ordered a retrial when Mr. Hughes disappeared. Her second trial ended without a verdict, but in 1978 she was convicted again. Mr. Keith represented her throughout. Both she and Mr. Watson remain in prison.

Maxwell S. Keith Dies at 87; Replacement Lawyer in Manson Case,
NYT,
10.3.2012,
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/11/us/
maxwell-s-keith-lawyer-in-manson-case-dies-at-87.html

 

 

 

 

 

Defense, Treading Carefully,

Questions Accuser

in Trial of 2 Officers

 

April 15, 2011

The New York Times

By JOHN ELIGON

 

She had been on the witness stand for some eight hours spanning two days, recounting gruesome, emotional details of an evening in which she said a police officer raped her, when a moment of levity interrupted.

The defense lawyer questioning her, Joseph Tacopina, was asking her on Friday if she had “falsely” accused his client, Officer Kenneth Moreno, of contacting her mother and brother.

The prosecution objected, and the judge suggested that “mistakenly” might be a better characterization. The woman, staring pointedly at Mr. Tacopina, told him with the aplomb of a seasoned jurist, “Sorry, rephrase.”

Laughter broke out through the courtroom, and the woman cracked her first discernible smile from the witness box.

Friday was the first full day of the much anticipated cross-examination of the prosecution’s star witness — the 29-year-old accuser — in the rape trial of Officer Moreno and his partner, Officer Franklin Mata.

Typically, the cross-examination of the central witness in a prosecution is an opportunity for defense lawyers to smear the witness’s credibility, ruffle the witness and be combative. It is often a time for courtroom theatrics.

But not on Friday. The woman remained calm and confident, flexed her intellect and even went on the attack in a few instances.

Mr. Tacopina, for his part, appeared to make a strategic decision to be gentle — the notion being that hostility toward a sympathetic figure might not play well with the jury. When he began his questioning on Thursday, Mr. Tacopina even told the woman to let him know if she needed a break at any time.

Edward Mandery, the lawyer representing Officer Mata, said the same thing when he began his cross-examination late Friday afternoon. Mr. Mandery will resume his questioning on Monday.

Despite their approach, the defense lawyers were still aggressive in trying to portray the woman, who has testified to having been very drunk the night she said she was raped, as someone who could not remember details of what happened and who had an ulterior motive. She has a $57 million lawsuit pending against the city and the officers.

Mr. Tacopina read from e-mail and Facebook messages the woman exchanged with friends in the days after the officers escorted her up to her fifth-floor apartment in December 2008 and she says she was raped, pointing out minor inconsistencies between what she said then and what she was saying now.

Of an e-mail to her roommate, who was in London, the woman testified that she wrote that she was “O.K.” and that the episode was not “violent or aggressive.”

She also testified that she had told a nurse at the hospital she went to that she was not physically hurt. But, she explained, she thought the nurse meant from an act like being punched. And she said she had tried to play down the episode to her roommate so as not to worry her.

“When something like this happens to you, the shock is so surreal,” she said, her lips quivering in her most visibly emotional moment of the day.

“When you are just trying to figure out what you need to do afterwards,” she added, “you tell people you’re O.K., even though you’re not, because you’re trying to get through it.”

Mr. Tacopina got the woman to concede that she had told hospital staff members that she believed the assault was between midnight and 1 a.m., even though she testified during the trial that she had no recollection of time.

Officer Moreno and Officer Mata had been sent to the woman’s East Village address after a cabdriver reported she was too drunk to get out of the taxi.

The woman acknowledged on Friday that in a surveillance video of her walking into her apartment building with the officers, it appeared that she was moving her lips, perhaps bolstering the defense argument that she was coherent enough to have a conversation with them. (Mr. Tacopina has said Officer Moreno was counseling the woman that night about her drinking.)

Mr. Tacopina tried to show that the woman was less certain about what happened that night than she had let on in court. He introduced several statements she supposedly made to friends, memorialized in e-mails or investigators’ notes.

In one of the statements, the woman supposedly told a friend that “I think I was just raped” and that she was “pretty sure it was by a cop.”

But the woman insisted she had never expressed uncertainty about what had happened that night.

“I never said I believe I was raped,” she testified. “I knew I was raped.”

She added that several of those statements were notes written by an investigator, not her.

“Honestly,” she said, “everybody was so shocked that it was the cops, it seemed unbelievable.”


Colin Moynihan contributed reporting.

Defense, Treading Carefully, Questions Accuser in Trial of 2 Officers,
NYT,
15.4.2011,
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/16/nyregion/
defense-takes-on-accuser-in-rape-trial-of-2-officers.html

 

 

 

 

 

A Defender Who’s No Stranger

to High-Profile Cases

 

January 10, 2011

The New York Times

By WILLIAM GLABERSON

 

The capital-defense lawyer who will represent Jared L. Loughner in the shootings in Tucson, Judy Clarke, is a well-known public defender who gets life sentences in cases that often begin with emotional calls for the death penalty.

Ms. Clarke has helped a number of infamous defendants avoid death sentences, including Theodore J. Kaczynski, the Unabomber; Eric Robert Rudolph, the Atlanta Olympics bomber; and Susan Smith, the South Carolina woman who drowned her toddlers.

Over a legal career of more than 30 years, Ms. Clarke has become perhaps the best-known federal public defender in the country, with a reputation for taking on cases that seem impossible.

“She has stood up to the plate in the kinds of cases that bring the greatest disdain from the public,” said Gerald H. Goldstein, a San Antonio lawyer who has known her for years.

Ms. Clarke has an aversion to the news media and an unassuming courtroom style that masks an encyclopedic knowledge of criminal law. Her low-key style and pageboy haircut can make her seem at first to be a junior member of the legal team.

But lawyers who have worked with her say she is a master strategist in death-penalty cases.

“She is known for being the criminal defense lawyers’ criminal defense lawyer,” said Norman L. Reimer, the executive director of the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers.

In recent years, Ms. Clarke has been in private practice in San Diego with her husband, Thomas H. Speedy Rice, a law professor, but has continued to take public-defender assignments.

Ms. Clarke did not respond to requests for comment, but friends said she would be drawn to the Tucson case. She is an opponent of the death penalty, they said, not only as a political position but also because of her experiences delving into the tangled stories of her clients.

“Judy would probably say if the public saw everything she sees, it would look at the client or the case differently,” said David I. Bruck, a veteran death-penalty lawyer and a professor at Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Va., who has known Ms. Clarke since law school.

Mr. Bruck brought her in to work with him in defending Ms. Smith in the drowning case in the mid-1990s. Ms. Clarke’s approach often turns death-penalty defendants into confidants who must trust her with their lives. But it does not necessarily win friends outside of the courthouse.

After Ms. Clarke arrived from the West Coast to take on the Smith case, the South Carolina Legislature passed a law banning the future appointment of public defenders from out of state in capital cases.

After Ms. Clarke completed Ms. Smith’s case, she returned to the state the $82,944 fee that the trial judge had approved for her work, saying it was needed for the defense of other indigent people facing charges.

Ms. Clarke grew up in Asheville, N.C., in a conservative Republican family. She has said her parents tried to foster independent thinking. That came to the fore in the 1990s, when her mother, Patsy Clarke, helped lead a campaign to unseat Jesse Helms, the longtime Republican senator.

Mr. Helms had infuriated the family by telling the Clarkes in a letter that a brother of Judy’s, Mark Clarke, who had died of AIDS at 31, had “played Russian roulette in his sexual activity.”

Quin Denvir, a public defender who handled the Unabomber case with Ms. Clarke, said she had worked carefully to avoid a capital sentence, though Mr. Kaczynski ultimately turned against his lawyers. “She has a great sense,” Mr. Denvir said, “of how to put a case together to go for life instead of death.”

 

Toby Lyles contributed research.

A Defender Who’s No Stranger to High-Profile Cases,
NYT,
10.1.2011,
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/11/us/11defender.html

 

 

 

 

 

Defendant Ignited Fire,

Cheshire Prosecutor Tells Jury
 

 

October 1, 2010

The New York Times

By WILLIAM GLABERSON

 

NEW HAVEN — A prosecutor at the trial of one of the two men accused of invading a home and murdering a woman and her two daughters contended on Friday for the first time that it was the defendant, Steven J. Hayes, who ignited the fire that killed the girls.

In his closing argument, the prosecutor, Michael Dearington, reminded jurors of testimony that Mr. Hayes ran from the house following the other suspect, Joshua Komisarjevsky.

“The last one out is the one who lights the fire,” Mr. Dearington said.

In a courtroom darkened so jurors could see slides of the victims and their home in Cheshire, Conn., which was ruined by an arson fire after a home invasion, rape and murder in 2007, Mr. Dearington repeatedly emphasized that no matter how much of a role Mr. Komisarjevsky had in the crime, Mr. Hayes played a crucial role and personally committed many of the acts involved.

Mr. Komisarjevsky has been a central focus of Mr. Hayes’s trial, though he has not been in the courtroom.

The two men face the possibility of the death penalty. Mr. Komisarjevsky is to be tried later.

Mr. Dearington, speaking unemotionally but somberly, reminded jurors that soon after his arrest Mr. Hayes told an officer that “things got out of control.”

“It wasn’t ‘things,’ ” he continued. “It was two people acting together.”

Mr. Dearington also reminded the jurors that Mr. Hayes admitted to having had sex with and then killing the mother of the family, Jennifer Hawke-Petit.

“Hayes had sex — having sex is not the right term — brutally raped” her, the prosecutor said.

In his summation, Mr. Hayes’s lawyer, Thomas J. Ullmann, offered a defense that seemed geared toward saving his client from the death penalty, but not establishing his innocence, while putting the blame on Mr. Komisarjevsky.

Mr. Ullmann conceded many of the charges against his client, including those that he raped and killed Ms. Hawke-Petit.

Speaking softly and occasionally shaking his head at the acts his client committed, he also said Mr. Hayes had committed arson, burglary and larceny.

And Mr. Ullmann conceded that Mr. Hayes took part in the kidnapping of all four members of the family, including the two girls, Michaela, 11, and Hayley, 17, who died from smoke inhalation, and their father, Dr. William A. Petit Jr., who was beaten but survived.

But Mr. Ullmann said that Mr. Komisarjevsky was the one controlling events; he portrayed Mr. Hayes as someone who never could have committed the crimes.

He said Mr. Hayes had not known that Mr. Komisarjevsky would change what he said had been their plan: break in, tie up the family, take money and get out.

Instead, Mr. Ullmann argued, Mr. Komisarjevsky changed the plan first by beating Dr. Petit and then by raping Michaela.

“The psychopath in this case is Joshua Komisarjevsky, not Steven Hayes,” Mr. Ullmann said.

“He should pay the price for what he did,” Mr. Ullmann argued about his client, “but not for what he did not do.”

Connecticut law generally requires what lawyers call “death plus” for a crime to warrant capital punishment.

As a result, Mr. Hayes could be sentenced to life in prison for killing Ms. Hawke-Petit, but committing a murder during the course of the rape would be a capital offense.

Mr. Ullmann argued that the rape of Ms. Hawke-Petit that Mr. Hayes confessed to might have been separate from his later strangulation of her.

Killing Michaela would make Mr. Hayes eligible for the death penalty because it is a capital offense under Connecticut law to kill a person who is younger than 16.

Mr. Ullmann devoted a good deal of his remarks to arguing that Mr. Komisarjevsky had a motive to kill the child: to cover up his sexual assault.

The 12 jurors and 2 remaining alternates were attentive to both arguments. In keeping with the reserved tone of the lawyers, they appeared unemotional.

A few of them nodded as lawyers for both sides pieced together narratives from what has often been disjointed, emotional testimony during the three-week trial.

Deliberations are to begin on Monday after the judge, Jon C. Blue of State Superior Court, gives the jurors legal instructions.

If Mr. Hayes is convicted of capital offenses, the same jury will hear a separate penalty phase of the trial.

The lawyers for both sides acknowledged the wrenching nature of the case.

Mr. Dearington displayed a family photograph of Ms. Hawke-Petit and her daughters for the jury on a large screen. But he referred to other photographs in evidence, like those of burned bodies.

He thanked the jurors for enduring “what has been indescribable evidence.”

Mr. Ullmann said the “the tragedy of this incident has affected us deeply — all of us.”

When he claimed that Mr. Hayes had killed Ms. Hawke-Petit “at the behest of” Mr. Komisarjevsky, Mr. Hayes, who was slumping at the defense table, did not stir.

In the end, Mr. Dearington argued, it did not really matter precisely which intruder took which action. Both were responsible, he said.

And, he said, both men had a problem because of the series of crimes they had committed.

“The solution was to destroy the house,” the prosecutor said to the jurors, “and, you may find, the people in it.”

Defendant Ignited Fire, Cheshire Prosecutor Tells Jury,
NYT,
1.10.2010,
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/02/nyregion/02cheshire.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Related > Anglonautes > Vocapedia

 

U.S. Constitution,

U.S. Supreme Court, State Supreme Courts

 

 

justice, law > USA

 

 

justice, law > death penalty > USA

 

 

prison, jail > USA

 

 

justice > courtroom artists / miscarriage of justice > UK / USA

 

 

 

 

 

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historical documents > USA