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Vocapedia > Health > Lifestyle

 

Food, Food safety, Fast food, Junk food,

Healthy food, Wise eating, Diet, Sleep

 

 

 

Steve Greenberg

The Ventura County Star

CA

Cagle

26 August 2005

http://cagle.msnbc.com/politicalcartoons/PCcartoons/greenberg.asp

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

health

 

 

 

 

healthy        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2015/10/02/
445034350/let-me-show-you-what-keeps-me-from-being-healthy

 

 

 

 

healthy food        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2015/09/11/
439381221/alice-waters-healthy-food-advocate-receives-humanities-medal

 

 

 

 

unhealthy        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/money/2013/jul/27/
blackpool-most-unhealthy-place-england

 

 

 

 

unhealthy > The 9 unhealthiest meals in America        WP        1 August 2014

http://www.youtube.com/watch?
v=m3pWdI38kpk&list=PL8QBkS_wk32X6NOCCnfn4TngycqHO3Kbr

 

 

 

 

healthily        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/shortcuts/2013/jun/02/
microlives-key-to-living-longer

 

 

 

 

fresh food > food access        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/11/01/
560476160/food-access-advocates-walk-the-long-walk-to-the-nearest-grocery-store

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

food        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/local-government-network/2013/jan/07/
localism-food-policy-the-way-we-eat

 

 

 

 

rising food bills        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2012/nov/18/
family-finance-squeeze-healthy-eating

 

 

 

 

food waste        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2011/nov/18/
waste-food-feeds-5000-trafalgar

 

 

 

 

Nearly half of the world's food ends up as waste, report finds        UK        2013

 

Figures from the Institution of Mechanical Engineers

show as much as 2bn tonnes of food

never makes it on to a plate

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2013/jan/10/
half-world-food-waste

 

 

 

 

out-of-date food        UK

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/6676345.stm

 

 

 

 

unhealthy foods        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2014/mar/23/
everything-you-know-about-unhealthy-foods-is-wrong

 

 

 

 

Lee Wolff Wattenberg        USA        1921-2014

 

medical researcher

who helped jump-start

the field of cancer prevention,

finding weapons in the food people eat

— including chemical compounds in broccoli,

cabbage, coffee and garlic —

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/19/
health/lee-w-wattenberg-who-saw-cancer-fighters-in-foods-dies-at-92.html

 

 

 

 

food watchdog / Food Standards Agency    FSA

https://www.food.gov.uk/

 

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2004/sep/13/
advertising.food  

 

 

 

 

U.S. Food and Drug Administration    FDA        USA

https://www.fda.gov/

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/09/27/
554026398/what-happens-when-fda-finds-serious-violations-in-food-facilities-not-enough

 

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/12/27/
bacteria-1-f-d-a-0/

 

 

 

 

food safety        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/world/food-safety

 

 

 

 

food safety        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/topic/subject/food-safety

 

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/09/27/
554026398/what-happens-when-fda-finds-serious-violations-in-food-facilities-not-enough

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/25/
business/a-program-to-combat-food-contamination.html

 

 

 

 

bisphenol A        BPA        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/10/06/
555900292/which-items-in-our-kitchens-contain-bpa

 

 

 

 

food scare

 

 

 

 

bacteria        USA

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/12/27/
bacteria-1-f-d-a-0/

 

 

 

 

salmonella outbreak        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/business/2006/jul/21/
food.foodanddrink 

 

 

 

 

E. coli bacteria        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/topic/subject/e-coli 

 

 

 

 

a virulent strain of E. coli bacteria        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/27/business/27bugs.html

 

 

 

 

outbreak of E. coli        USA

http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2006-09-22-
spinach-deaths_x.htm

 

 

 

 

cantaloupe contaminated with listeria

 

the deadliest outbreak of food-borne illness

in the United States in more than a decade        USA        2011

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/28/
business/deaths-from-cantaloupe-listeria-rises.html

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/sep/28/
listeria-outbreak-cantaloupes-colorado-deaths

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Is Junk Food Really Cheaper?        NYT        24 September 2011

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/25/opinion/sunday/is-junk-food-really-cheaper.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Speed Bump

by Dave Coverly

Gocomics

November 10, 2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

eating habits        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/25/
upshot/americans-are-finally-eating-less.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/02/
opinion/bad-eating-habits-start-in-the-womb.html

 

 

 

 

fat        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2013/jan/05/
childhood-obesity-fatty-sugary-foods

 

http://www.theguardian.com/business/2012/jun/11/
why-our-food-is-making-us-fat

 

 

 

 

trans fats / trans fatty acids        USA

https://www.nytimes.com/topic/subject/trans-fatty-acids 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/14/
opinion/eliminate-trans-fats.html

 

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/12/31/
what-you-think-you-know-but-dont-about-wise-eating/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

salt        UK / USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/09/03/
547827356/has-salt-gotten-an-unfair-shake-sodium-partisans-say-yes

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2017/aug/08/
a-danger-to-public-health-uproar-as-scientist-urges-us-to-eat-more-salt

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/29/
opinion/too-much-salt-or-not-enough.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/24/
opinion/sunday/the-debate-on-salty-foods-continued.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/26/
opinion/bring-the-salt-monster-under-control.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/21/
opinion/the-public-health-crisis-hiding-in-our-food.html

 

http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2013/05/sugar_and_salt.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/06/06/opinion/l06salt.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/30/health/30salt.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/17/opinion/l17salt.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/11/business/11salt.html

 

 

 

 

salt consumption        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2009/sep/13/
food-standards-cereals-salt-campaign

 

 

 

 

excessive salt consumption

 

 

 

 

salty foods        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/24/
opinion/sunday/the-debate-on-salty-foods-continued.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

sugar        UK / USA

https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/11/21/
565766988/what-the-industry-knew-about-sugars-health-effects-but-didnt-tell-us

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/30/
opinion/a-month-without-sugar.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/17/
opinion/the-shady-history-of-big-sugar.html

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2016/09/14/
493957290/not-just-sugar-food-industry-s-influence-on-health-research

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/09/13/
493739074/50-years-ago-sugar-industry-quietly-paid-scientists-to-point-blame-at-fat

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2016/09/01/
492257166/organic-gatorade-its-still-loaded-with-sugar-folks

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/aug/18/
childhood-obesity-retailers-urge-mandatory-cuts-to-food-sugar-levels

http://www.theguardian.com/news/audio/2016/apr/22/
the-sugar-conspiracy

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/03/30/
labeling-the-danger-in-soda/

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2016/01/07/
462160303/new-dietary-guidelines-crack-down-on-sugar-but-red-meat-gets-a-pass

 

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/08/14/
what-eating-40-teaspoons-of-sugar-a-day-can-do-to-you/

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/23/
opinion/sugar-season-its-everywhere-and-addictive.html

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2014/aug/24/
robert-lustig-sugar-poison

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2014/may/10/
sugar-is-the-enemy-film-challenges-obesity-myths-fed-up

 

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2013/aug/04/
demon-drink-war-on-sugar

http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2013/05/
sugar_and_salt.html

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2013/mar/20/
sugar-deadly-obesity-epidemic

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2013/jan/05/
childhood-obesity-fatty-sugary-foods

 

 

 

 

sugary drinks        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2016/08/23/
491104093/berkeleys-soda-tax-appears-to-cut-consumption-of-sugary-drinks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

sugar addict        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2013/jan/05/
childhood-obesity-fatty-sugary-foods

 

http://www.theguardian.com/business/2012/jun/11/
why-our-food-is-making-us-fat

 

 

 

 

addictive        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/23/
opinion/sugar-season-its-everywhere-and-addictive.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

diet        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2018/feb/12/
its-not-just-in-the-genes-the-foods-that-can-help-and-harm-your-brain

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/local-government-network/2013/jan/07/
localism-food-policy-the-way-we-eat

 

 

 

 

diet        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/04/22/
525113726/chew-on-this-for-earth-day-how-our-diets-impact-the-planet

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/03/11/
519443324/eating-more-or-less-of-10-foods-may-cut-risk-of-death-from-heart-disease

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2015/10/26/
451211964/bad-day-for-bacon-processed-red-meats-cause-cancer-says-who

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2012/03/12/1
48457233/death-by-bacon-study-finds-eating-meat-is-risky

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/12/
opinion/l12pollan.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/10/
opinion/10pollan.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/30/
weekinreview/30bruni.html

 

 

 

 

poor diet        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/03/11/
519443324/eating-more-or-less-of-10-foods-may-cut-risk-of-death-from-heart-disease

 

 

 

 

yo-yo dieting        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/05/01/
526048767/-yo-yo-dieting-poses-serious-risks-for-heart-patients

 

 

 

 

protein        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/news/2019/jan/04/
protein-mania-the-rich-worlds-new-diet-obsession

 

 

 

 

Carbohydrates

are one of the main dietary components.

 

This category of foods

includes sugars, starches, and fiber.        USA

- NYT, 2.9.2014

http://www.nytimes.com/health/guides/
nutrition/carbohydrates/overview.html - broken link

 

 

 

 

low-carb diet        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/02/
health/low-carb-vs-low-fat-diet.html

 

 

 

 

calories        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2015/02/17/
upshot/what-do-people-actually-order-at-chipotle.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/12/22/
upshot/what-2000-calories-looks-like.html

 

 

 

 

schools > unhealthy lunches        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/2013/jan/12/
academy-free-school-pupils-lunches

 

 

 

 

poor diet > Alzheimer        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2012/sep/10/
alzheimers-junk-food-catastrophic-effect

 

 

 

 

Eating badly kills 70,000 yearly, report says        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2008/jan/03/
health.foodanddrink

 

 

 

 

wise eating        USA

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/12/31/
what-you-think-you-know-but-dont-about-wise-eating/

 

 

 

 

nutritionists > fibre        UK

 

Whole grains and fresh vegetables

are the best sources of fibre.

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2014/may/04/
do-i-need-to-eat-more-fibre

 

 

 

 

healthy eaters        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/30/
sunday-review/why-healthy-eaters-fall-for-fries.html

 

 

 

 

fast food        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2013/dec/21/
ready-made-christmas-dinners

 

 

 

 

fast food        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/06/15/
527044693/-supersizing-urban-america-how-u-s-policies-encouraged-fast-food-to-spread

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2015/11/12/
455074815/are-junk-food-habits-driving-obesity-a-tale-of-two-studies

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2015/09/17/
440951329/about-a-third-of-u-s-kids-and-teens-ate-fast-food-today

 

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/12/22/
upshot/what-2000-calories-looks-like.html

http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2014/08/03/
can-fast-food-redeem-itself

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/26/nyregion/
26fastfood.html

 

 

 

 

fast-casual chain        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/09/26/
553533712/more-healthful-kids-meals-panera-ceo-dishes-out-a-challenge

 

 

 

 

McDonald’s        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/topic/company/mcdonalds-corporation

 

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/11/30/
503911060/creator-of-mcdonalds-big-mac-dies-at-98

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/09/
business/fred-l-turner-innovative-chief-of-mcdonalds-dies-at-80.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/06/
magazine/how-mcdonalds-came-back-bigger-than-ever.html

 

 

 

 

processed food

 

 

 

 

Chicken nuggets. French fries. Pizza        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/09/26/
553533712/more-healthful-kids-meals-panera-ceo-dishes-out-a-challenge

 

 

 

 

Bacon, sausages and ham

rank alongside smoking

as cancer causes, says WHO        2015

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2015/10/26/
451950828/processed-and-red-meat-could-cause-cancer-your-questions-answered

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2015/oct/26/
bacon-ham-sausages-processed-meats-cancer-risk-smoking-says-who

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

junk food        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2012/nov/18/family-finance-tax-credits-lost

http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/2012/may/20/jamie-oliver-banned-food-academy-mps

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2010/jul/11/doctors-junk-food-crackdown

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2008/dec/14/advertising-children-junk-food

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2006/apr/22/advertising.food

http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2006/mar/29/advertising.food

 

 

 

 

junk food        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/09/18/
551796954/one-of-americas-biggest-food-banks-just-cut-junk-food-by-84-percent-in-a-year

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/09/16/health/brazil-
obesity-nestle.html

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/09/07/
548715416/a-pioneer-of-food-activism-steps-down-looks-back

 

http://www.npr.org/blogs/codeswitch/2015/04/08/
398310036/the-navajo-nations-tax-on-junk-food-splits-reservation

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/29/
opinion/michelle-obama-on-attempts-to-roll-back-healthy-reforms.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/25/
opinion/sunday/is-junk-food-really-cheaper.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/08/dining/08junk.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/08/health/nutrition/08junk.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/06/20/opinion/l20junk.htm

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/06/16/nyregion/16bigcity.html

 

 

 

 

junk foods        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2013/apr/29/
junk-food-ad-ban-children

 

 

 

 

bad food        USA

https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/11/19/
564879018/the-bad-food-bible-says-your-eating-might-not-be-so-sinful-after-all

 

 

 

 

foodstuffs        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2013/jan/05/
childhood-obesity-fatty-sugary-foods

 

 

 

 

food activism        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/09/07/
548715416/a-pioneer-of-food-activism-steps-down-looks-back

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

chemicals / food additives        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/blog/2013/jun/28/
six-chemicals-food-drink-banned

 

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2007/may/08/
health.food

 

 

 

 

chemicals > phthalates        USA

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/12/
well/eat/the-chemicals-in-your-mac-and-cheese.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

meat        USA

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/01/10/
were-eating-less-meat-why/

 

 

 

 

abattoir meat        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/jan/19/
abattoir-meat-checks-food-scandal

 

 

 

 

meat-eaters        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/video/2015/sep/02/
meat-eaters-you-secretly-hate-yourselves-vegetarian-video

 

 

 

 

horsemeat > burgers        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2013/jan/16/
horse-meat-burgers-urgent-inquiry 

 

 

 

 

burger        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/16/
opinion/the-true-cost-of-a-burger.html

 

 

 

 

Anatomy of a Burger        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2009/10/04/us/
20090917-meat.html

 

 

 

 

veggie burger        USA

http://tmagazine.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/07/15/
del-posto-pastry-chef-brooks-headley-veggie-burger-superiority/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

fries        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/30/
sunday-review/why-healthy-eaters-fall-for-fries.html

 

 

 

 

crisps

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

soft drinks / cans of fizz        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2013/aug/04/
demon-drink-war-on-sugar

 

 

 

 

fizzy drinks

 

 

 

 

fizz        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/fashion/2013/jan/12/
diet-coke-fashion-favourite-fizz

 

 

 

 

soda        USA

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/13/
well/eat/food-stamp-snap-soda.html

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2016/10/20/
498589273/trick-or-treat-critics-blast-big-sodas-efforts-to-fend-off-taxes

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2016/06/07/
481123646/this-is-how-much-celebrities-get-paid-to-endorse-soda-and-unhealthy-food

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/03/30/
labeling-the-danger-in-soda/

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/04/
upshot/soda-industry-struggles-as-consumer-tastes-change.html

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/08/14/
what-eating-40-teaspoons-of-sugar-a-day-can-do-to-you/

 

 

 

 

soda tax        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2016/10/20/
498589273/trick-or-treat-critics-blast-big-sodas-efforts-to-fend-off-taxes

 

 

 

 

soda ban        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/24/nyregion/
fight-over-bloombergs-soda-ban-reaches-courtroom.html

 

 

 

 

Big Soda        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/04/05/
522626223/judges-take-up-big-sodas-suit-to-abolish-philadelphias-sugar-tax

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2016/10/20/
498589273/trick-or-treat-critics-blast-big-sodas-efforts-to-fend-off-taxes

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2016/08/23/
491104093/berkeleys-soda-tax-appears-to-cut-consumption-of-sugary-drinks

 

 

 

 

Coke        USA

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/09/28/
coke-spends-lavishly-on-pediatricians-and-dietitians/

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/29/
opinion/when-jim-crow-drank-coke.html

 

 

 

 

Coca-Cola        USA

http://www.npr.org/2015/11/19/
456628798/from-grocery-shelves-to-pop-culture-a-century-of-coca-cola-bottles

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

eating disorders > anorexia        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2007/feb/26/
lifeandhealth.genderissues

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

vegan        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2012/may/21/
polenta-mushrooms-hazelnuts-figs-recipe

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/mar/30/
vegan-baby-death-france

 

 

 

 

Ten Mediterranean recipes to help you live longer        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/wordofmouth/2013/feb/27/
ten-great-mediterranean-recipes

 

 

 

 

lifestyle

 

 

 

 

lifestyle choices        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2014/jun/20/
liver-cancer-skin-melanoma-sharp-increase

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

fit        USA

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2012/jun/10/
can-get-fit-five-minutes

 

 

 

 

get fit        USA

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/02/26/
how-to-get-fit-in-a-few-minutes-a-week/

 

 

 

 

stay fit        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/global/2017/jan/29/
25-fitness-tips-and-tricks-joe-wicks-louise-hazel

 

 

 

 

stay in shape        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/science/2014/jan/13/
no-pain-no-gain-exercise-heart-health-dementia-cancer

 

 

 

 

fitness        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/fitness

 

 

 

 

fitness        USA

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/12/25/
for-fitness-intensity-matters/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

exercise        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2017/aug/24/
around-6-million-middle-aged-english-people-take-no-exercise

 

http://www.theguardian.com/science/2014/jan/13/
no-pain-no-gain-exercise-heart-health-dementia-cancer

 

 

 

 

exercise        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/06/12/
532597956/art-collector-sells-lichtenstein-for-165-million-to-fund-criminal-justice-reform

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/21/
upshot/why-you-should-exercise-no-not-to-lose-weight.html

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/06/15/
how-exercise-may-help-the-brain-grow-stronger/

 

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/12/17/
how-exercise-changes-our-dna/

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/03/12/
what-running-can-do-for-the-heart/

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/03/07/
why-high-impact-exercise-is-good-for-your-bones/

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/03/05/
how-fat-may-harm-the-brain-and-how-exercise-may-help/

http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2014/01/22/
264872783/failing-to-get-off-the-couch-may-contribute-to-heart-failure

 

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/11/27/
the-power-of-a-daily-bout-of-exercise/

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/07/31/
how-exercise-changes-fat-and-muscle-cells/

 

 

 

 

exercise        USA

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/01/29/
exercise-to-age-well-regardless-of-age/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

workouts        USA

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/01/16/
personal-best-workouts-have-their-limits-recognized-or-not/

 

 

 

 

sit        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/09/04/
547580952/get-off-the-couch-baby-boomers-or-you-may-not-be-able-to-later

 

 

 

 

sitting        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/09/04/
547580952/get-off-the-couch-baby-boomers-or-you-may-not-be-able-to-later

 

 

 

 

sitting down        UK        2014

 

studies show it increases our risk of dying

from practically any disease you can think of.

 

But there is something we can do about it

– we can simply stand up

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2014/sep/15/
is-sitting-down-bad-for-my-health

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

drugs

 

 

 

 

drugs and alcohol

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Britain's addiction to unhealthy food        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2010/jul/11/
doctors-junk-food-crackdown

 

 

 

 

cheap ready meals        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2012/nov/18/
family-finance-squeeze-healthy-eating

 

 

 

 

fast food

 

 

 

 

fast-food chain > Nathan’s Famous        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/16/nyregion/
murray-handwerker-who-made-nathans-more-famous-dies-at-89.html

 

 

 

 

fast-food outlets        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2010/jul/11/
doctors-junk-food-crackdown

 

 

 

 

quality food

 

 

 

 

real food

 

 

 

 

food safety        USA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

sleep / nap        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/emma-brockes-blog/2014/jan/22/
napping-is-a-good-thing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fred L. Turner,

Innovative Chief of McDonald’s,

Dies at 80

 

January 8, 2013

The New York Times

By KATIE THOMAS

 

Fred L. Turner, who as chief executive helped transform McDonald’s into a global giant and introduced the world to the Chicken McNugget, the Egg McMuffin and the Happy Meal, died on Monday in Glenview, Ill. He was 80.

The cause was complications of pneumonia, his daughter Paula Turner, said.

Mr. Turner went to work at the McDonald’s Corporation in 1956 as one of its first employees. He had been flipping hamburgers at a local franchise — learning the ropes as part of a plan to open his own restaurant with business partners — when the chain’s pioneer, Ray A. Kroc, offered a job opening new franchises.

He was named vice president for operations in 1958, became president and chief administrative officer in 1968, and was named chief executive in 1974, a position he held until 1987.

Mr. Turner was seen as the driving force behind many of the ideas and products that made McDonald’s one of the world’s most recognizable and successful brands.

“Ray Kroc founded it, but Fred Turner built it into what it is today,” said Dick Starmann, a former McDonald’s executive and longtime spokesman, who worked with Mr. Turner for nearly 30 years.

He is seen as the architect of the company’s “quality, service and cleanliness” model, which helped establish its reputation in the United States and abroad as a welcoming, family-friendly destination.

In 1961 he created Hamburger University, the training program for managers, franchisees and employees. During his time as chief executive — when the number of restaurants more than tripled — he expanded McDonald’s well beyond the early model of the walk-up hamburger stand. Under his watch, the company increased indoor seating and introduced the drive-through; the Happy Meal for children, complete with a toy; and the Chicken McNugget.

One of Mr. Turner’s biggest successes was the introduction of a McDonald’s breakfast companywide. Although some local franchises were already offering a breakfast menu, there was debate internally about how aggressively the company should promote it, Mr. Starmann recalled: “He made a big, bold decision — we’re going on national TV. He said, ‘The breakfast train is leaving the station — lead, follow or get out of the way.’ ”

In 1975 the company placed the Egg McMuffin on the national menu, and breakfast sales soon took off.

The Chicken McNugget was a similar breakthrough. The company had been experimenting with fried chicken for years, “but for whatever reason it just didn’t seem like we got it right,” Mr. Starmann said. Under Mr. Turner’s direction, the company developed the idea of “a boneless piece of chicken, to sell them almost like French fries.” The Chicken McNugget was introduced in all domestic restaurants in 1983.

Frederick Leo Turner was born on Jan. 6, 1933, in Des Moines, where he spent much of his childhood. He met his future wife, Patty Shurtleff, while they were students at Drake University. She died in 2000.

In addition to his daughter Paula, survivors include two other daughters, Patty Rhea and Teri Turner, and eight grandchildren.

Fred L. Turner, Innovative Chief of McDonald’s, Dies at 80,
NYT,
8.1.2013,
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/09/
business/fred-l-turner-innovative-chief-of-mcdonalds-dies-at-80.html

 

 

 

 

 

Is Junk Food Really Cheaper?

 

September 24, 2011

The New York Times

By MARK BITTMAN

 

THE “fact” that junk food is cheaper than real food has become a reflexive part of how we explain why so many Americans are overweight, particularly those with lower incomes. I frequently read confident statements like, “when a bag of chips is cheaper than a head of broccoli ...” or “it’s more affordable to feed a family of four at McDonald’s than to cook a healthy meal for them at home.”

This is just plain wrong. In fact it isn’t cheaper to eat highly processed food: a typical order for a family of four — for example, two Big Macs, a cheeseburger, six chicken McNuggets, two medium and two small fries, and two medium and two small sodas — costs, at the McDonald’s a hundred steps from where I write, about $28. (Judicious ordering of “Happy Meals” can reduce that to about $23 — and you get a few apple slices in addition to the fries!)

In general, despite extensive government subsidies, hyperprocessed food remains more expensive than food cooked at home. You can serve a roasted chicken with vegetables along with a simple salad and milk for about $14, and feed four or even six people. If that’s too much money, substitute a meal of rice and canned beans with bacon, green peppers and onions; it’s easily enough for four people and costs about $9. (Omitting the bacon, using dried beans, which are also lower in sodium, or substituting carrots for the peppers reduces the price further, of course.)

Another argument runs that junk food is cheaper when measured by the calorie, and that this makes fast food essential for the poor because they need cheap calories. But given that half of the people in this country (and a higher percentage of poor people) consume too many calories rather than too few, measuring food’s value by the calorie makes as much sense as measuring a drink’s value by its alcohol content. (Why not drink 95 percent neutral grain spirit, the cheapest way to get drunk?)

Besides, that argument, even if we all needed to gain weight, is not always true. A meal of real food cooked at home can easily contain more calories, most of them of the “healthy” variety. (Olive oil accounts for many of the calories in the roast chicken meal, for example.)In comparing prices of real food and junk food, I used supermarket ingredients, not the pricier organic or local food that many people would consider ideal. But food choices are not black and white; the alternative to fast food is not necessarily organic food, any more than the alternative to soda is Bordeaux.

The alternative to soda is water, and the alternative to junk food is not grass-fed beef and greens from a trendy farmers’ market, but anything other than junk food: rice, grains, pasta, beans, fresh vegetables, canned vegetables, frozen vegetables, meat, fish, poultry, dairy products, bread, peanut butter, a thousand other things cooked at home — in almost every case a far superior alternative.

“Anything that you do that’s not fast food is terrific; cooking once a week is far better than not cooking at all,” says Marion Nestle, professor of food studies at New York University and author of “What to Eat.” “It’s the same argument as exercise: more is better than less and some is a lot better than none.”

THE fact is that most people can afford real food. Even the nearly 50 million Americans who are enrolled in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (formerly known as food stamps) receive about $5 per person per day, which is far from ideal but enough to survive. So we have to assume that money alone doesn’t guide decisions about what to eat. There are, of course, the so-called food deserts, places where it’s hard to find food: the Department of Agriculture says that more than two million Americans in low-income rural areas live 10 miles or more from a supermarket, and more than five million households without access to cars live more than a half mile from a supermarket.

Still, 93 percent of those with limited access to supermarkets do have access to vehicles, though it takes them 20 more minutes to travel to the store than the national average. And after a long day of work at one or even two jobs, 20 extra minutes — plus cooking time — must seem like an eternity.

Taking the long route to putting food on the table may not be easy, but for almost all Americans it remains a choice, and if you can drive to McDonald’s you can drive to Safeway. It’s cooking that’s the real challenge. (The real challenge is not “I’m too busy to cook.” In 2010 the average American, regardless of weekly earnings, watched no less than an hour and a half of television per day. The time is there.)

The core problem is that cooking is defined as work, and fast food is both a pleasure and a crutch. “People really are stressed out with all that they have to do, and they don’t want to cook,” says Julie Guthman, associate professor of community studies at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and author of the forthcoming “Weighing In: Obesity, Food Justice and the Limits of Capitalism.” “Their reaction is, ‘Let me enjoy what I want to eat, and stop telling me what to do.’ And it’s one of the few things that less well-off people have: they don’t have to cook.”

It’s not just about choice, however, and rational arguments go only so far, because money and access and time and skill are not the only considerations. The ubiquity, convenience and habit-forming appeal of hyperprocessed foods have largely drowned out the alternatives: there are five fast-food restaurants for every supermarket in the United States; in recent decades the adjusted for inflation price of fresh produce has increased by 40 percent while the price of soda and processed food has decreased by as much as 30 percent; and nearly inconceivable resources go into encouraging consumption in restaurants: fast-food companies spent $4.2 billion on marketing in 2009.

Furthermore, the engineering behind hyperprocessed food makes it virtually addictive. A 2009 study by the Scripps Research Institute indicates that overconsumption of fast food “triggers addiction-like neuroaddictive responses” in the brain, making it harder to trigger the release of dopamine. In other words the more fast food we eat, the more we need to give us pleasure; thus the report suggests that the same mechanisms underlie drug addiction and obesity.

This addiction to processed food is the result of decades of vision and hard work by the industry. For 50 years, says David A. Kessler, former commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration and author of “The End of Overeating,” companies strove to create food that was “energy-dense, highly stimulating, and went down easy. They put it on every street corner and made it mobile, and they made it socially acceptable to eat anytime and anyplace. They created a food carnival, and that’s where we live. And if you’re used to self-stimulation every 15 minutes, well, you can’t run into the kitchen to satisfy that urge.”

Real cultural changes are needed to turn this around. Somehow, no-nonsense cooking and eating — roasting a chicken, making a grilled cheese sandwich, scrambling an egg, tossing a salad — must become popular again, and valued not just by hipsters in Brooklyn or locavores in Berkeley. The smart campaign is not to get McDonald’s to serve better food but to get people to see cooking as a joy rather than a burden, or at least as part of a normal life.

As with any addictive behavior, this one is most easily countered by educating children about the better way. Children, after all, are born without bad habits. And yet it’s adults who must begin to tear down the food carnival.

The question is how? Efforts are everywhere. The People’s Grocery in Oakland secures affordable groceries for low-income people. Zoning laws in Los Angeles restrict the number of fast-food restaurants in high-obesity neighborhoods. There’s the Healthy Food Financing Initiative, a successful Pennsylvania program to build fresh food outlets in underserved areas, now being expanded nationally. FoodCorps and Cooking Matters teach young people how to farm and cook.

As Malik Yakini, executive director of the Detroit Black Community Food Security Network, says, “We’ve seen minor successes, but the food movement is still at the infant stage, and we need a massive social shift to convince people to consider healthier options.”

HOW do you change a culture? The answers, not surprisingly, are complex. “Once I look at what I’m eating,” says Dr. Kessler, “and realize it’s not food, and I ask ‘what am I doing here?’ that’s the start. It’s not about whether I think it’s good for me, it’s about changing how I feel. And we change how people feel by changing the environment.”

Obviously, in an atmosphere where any regulation is immediately labeled “nanny statism,” changing “the environment” is difficult. But we’ve done this before, with tobacco. The 1998 tobacco settlement limited cigarette marketing and forced manufacturers to finance anti-smoking campaigns — a negotiated change that led to an environmental one that in turn led to a cultural one, after which kids said to their parents, “I wish you didn’t smoke.” Smoking had to be converted from a cool habit into one practiced by pariahs.

A similar victory in the food world is symbolized by the stories parents tell me of their kids booing as they drive by McDonald’s.

To make changes like this more widespread we need action both cultural and political. The cultural lies in celebrating real food; raising our children in homes that don’t program them for fast-produced, eaten-on-the-run, high-calorie, low-nutrition junk; giving them the gift of appreciating the pleasures of nourishing one another and enjoying that nourishment together.

Political action would mean agitating to limit the marketing of junk; forcing its makers to pay the true costs of production; recognizing that advertising for fast food is not the exercise of free speech but behavior manipulation of addictive substances; and making certain that real food is affordable and available to everyone. The political challenge is the more difficult one, but it cannot be ignored.

What’s easier is to cook at every opportunity, to demonstrate to family and neighbors that the real way is the better way. And even the more fun way: kind of like a carnival.

Is Junk Food Really Cheaper?,
NYT,
24.9.2011,
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/25/
opinion/sunday/is-junk-food-really-cheaper.html

 

 

 

 

 

In E. Coli Fight,

Some Strains

Are Largely Ignored

 

May 26, 2010

The New York Times

By WILLIAM NEUMAN

 

For nearly two decades, Public Enemy No. 1 for the food industry and its government regulators has been a virulent strain of E. coli bacteria that has killed hundreds of people, sickened thousands and prompted the recall of millions of pounds of hamburger, spinach and other foods.

But as everyone focused on controlling that particular bacterium, known as E. coli O157:H7, the six rarer strains of toxic E. coli were largely ignored.

Collectively, those other strains are now emerging as a serious threat to food safety. In April, romaine lettuce tainted with one of them sickened at least 26 people in five states, including three teenagers who suffered kidney failure.

Although the federal government and the beef and produce industries have known about the risk posed by these other dangerous bacteria for years, regulators have taken few concrete steps to directly address it or even measure the scope of the problem.

For three years, the United States Department of Agriculture has been considering whether to make it illegal to sell ground beef tainted with the six lesser-known E. coli strains, which would give them the same outlaw status as their more famous cousin. The meat industry has resisted the idea, arguing that it takes other steps to keep E. coli out of the beef supply and that no outbreak involving the rarer strains has been definitively tied to beef.

The severity of the April outbreak is spurring a reassessment.

“This is something that we really have to look at,” said Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, Democrat of New York, who plans to introduce a bill that would pre-empt the Agriculture Department by declaring a broad range of disease-causing E. coli to be illegal in ground beef and requiring the meat industry to begin testing for the microbes. “How many people do we have to see die or become seriously ill because of food poisoning?”

The issue will be one of the first faced by President Obama’s nominee to head the department’s food safety division, Dr. Elisabeth Hagen, who is scheduled to testify Thursday in her Senate confirmation hearing.

Part of the problem is that so little is known about the rarer E. coli strains, which have been called the “big six” by public health experts. (The term refers to the fact that, after the O157 strain, these six strains are the most virulent of a group of related E. coli.) Few food companies test their products for the six strains, many doctors do not look for them and only about 5 percent of medical labs are equipped to diagnose them in sick patients.

A physiological quirk of E. coli O157 makes it easy to test for in the lab, and many types of food are screened for it. The other E. coli strains are much harder to identify and testing can be time-consuming. The Agriculture Department has been working to develop tests that could be used in meat plants to rapidly detect the pathogens.

The lettuce linked to the April outbreak tested negative for the more famous form of E. coli, but no one checked it for the other strains, according to the Ohio company that processed it, Freshway Foods. It turned out that the romaine was infected with E. coli O145, one of the more potent of the six strains.

Emily Grabowski, 18, a student from Irondequoit, N.Y., ate some of the lettuce at her college dining hall and ended up in the hospital with kidney failure. Recuperating at home, she wonders now if she could have been spared her ordeal. “If they had tested it and they had caught it,” she said, “I wouldn’t have had the E. coli.”

Earthbound Farm, the nation’s largest producer of organic salad greens, is one of the few companies that does screen for the full range of toxic E. coli, and it has found a worrisome incidence of the rarer strains. Out of 120,000 microbial tests last year, about one in 1,000 showed the presence of unwanted microbes, mostly the six strains.

“No one is looking for non-O157 to the level we are,” said Will Daniels, Earthbound Farm’s senior vice president for food safety. “I believe it is really going to emerge as one of the areas of concern.”

Earthbound Farm was not involved in the April outbreak.

The O157 strain of E. coli is a frightening bug, causing bloody diarrhea and sometimes kidney failure, which can be fatal. Some of the six strains cause less severe illness, but others appear to be just as devastating as the O157.

The toxic E. coli bacteria originate in the guts of cattle, putting the beef industry on the front line. The O157 strain achieved notoriety in 1993 when four children died and hundreds of people were sickened by tainted hamburger sold at Jack in the Box restaurants. The next year, the Agriculture Department made it illegal to sell ground beef containing the O157 bacteria.

The beef industry now routinely tests for the O157 strain, but there is no regular testing for the other six strains.

It is unclear how prevalent the six strains are in ground beef. Preliminary data from a department study found the pathogens in only 0.2 percent of samples. By comparison, the O157 strain already banned shows up in about 0.3 percent of samples, according to other government data.

But tests commissioned by William Marler, a Seattle lawyer who represents victims of food poisoning and has pushed the department to ban more E. coli strains, found the six strains in 0.7 percent of ground beef samples bought at supermarkets.

The E. coli bacteria can be killed by thorough cooking to 160 degrees.

Tracking the impact of the rarer E. coli strains on human health is difficult because few medical labs test for them, and health officials say illnesses caused by them are vastly underreported.

Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention showed at least 10 food-borne outbreaks from 1990 to 2008 involving the six strains, carried in foods like salad or strawberries. Investigators suspected ground beef as the cause of a 2007 outbreak in North Dakota, but the link was not confirmed.

The April outbreak is a signal of a broader problem, said Michael R. Taylor, deputy commissioner for foods at the Food and Drug Administration.

“We need to be developing our tools and abilities to assess” the full range of toxic E. coli, he said. The agency, which regulates produce, is waiting for Congress to pass a law that would greatly expand its food safety authority.

It is not clear how E. coli travels from cattle to produce, but scientists think it may occur through contact with manure, perhaps tracked through fields by wild animals, or through tainted irrigation water.

For its part, the Agriculture Department has said it is reluctant to ban the broader range of E. coli in beef until it has developed tests that can rapidly detect the pathogens. It expects to complete those by the end of 2011 and then study how often the six strains show up in the beef supply.

But an official said the timetable was not rigid. “I don’t want to give the impression that we’re going to wait months and months for these tests, and months and months to see what’s in the beef supply,” said Dr. David Goldman, an assistant administrator for the Office of Public Health Science of the department. “In terms of policy options, it’s not like we have to do one and then the other.”

James H. Hodges, executive vice president of the American Meat Institute, an industry group, said that the industry had put in place many procedures to keep E. coli O157:H7 out of ground beef, like washing carcasses in hot water and lactic acid.

Those steps also work against the other E. coli, Mr. Hodges said, pointing to the lack of outbreaks of illness connected to them. “It certainly tells me that both the government and the industry is targeting the correct organism,” he said.

Dr. Richard Raymond, who was the department’s head of food safety from 2005 to 2008, said he stopped short of banning the rarer E. coli from hamburger because he thought that he would not have been able to defend the decision against industry criticism until rapid tests were developed.

But he said the April outbreak could push regulators to act. “I don’t think the U.S.D.A. wants to see another Jack in the Box,” Dr. Raymond said.

In E. Coli Fight, Some Strains Are Largely Ignored,
NYT,
26.5.2010,
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/27/business/27bugs.html

 

 

 

 

 

Letters

Putting America on a Healthier Diet

 

September 12, 2009

The New York Times

 

To the Editor:

Re “Big Food vs. Big Insurance,” by Michael Pollan (Op-Ed, Sept. 10):

Mr. Pollan rightly contends that health care reform will be ineffective unless the country’s increasing obesity problem is addressed. But because the food industry is only part of the problem, reforming it is only part of the solution.

The other part of the problem is the American consumer. While food producers provide an array of unhealthy fare, how, what and when we eat are personal choices.

Mr. Pollan praises attempts to tax sugary sodas because these products add empty calories to our diets, particularly for our youth. Yet sugar-free sodas have been available and widely consumed for 40 years. The choice is the consumer’s.

If we are to make headway on this issue, we must have comprehensive physical education and health education in our schools and incentives supporting healthy, active lifestyles and nutritional food choices for all citizens.

Like all industries, the food producers are driven by their bottom line. Only when consumers begin to demand healthier food will the industry change.

Anne-Marie Hislop
Davenport, Iowa, Sept. 10, 2009



To the Editor:

I applaud Michael Pollan’s recognition that obesity is the “elephant in the room” in the health care debate, but dissent on his solutions.

Taxing specific products such as soft drinks or creating yet another educational program will not get the job done. Multiple studies have demonstrated that “fat” taxes will not appreciably lower obesity rates, while attempts to change consumer eating behavior have historically come up short.

The real enemy is the number of excess calories available for consumption, regardless of the source. The only way to slim down this beast is to engage the food industry.

Rather than alienate or overregulate the industry, my recommendation is to put into effect tax incentives that would entice food companies to sell fewer calories. If they cut their calories, they would be rewarded. If they continued to spew excess calories on the public, they would risk losing favorable tax treatments.

This approach is well worth discussing. Our nation’s health depends on it.

Henry J. Cardello
Chapel Hill, N.C., Sept. 10, 2009

The writer is a former food industry executive and author of “Stuffed: An Insider’s Look at Who’s (Really) Making America Fat.”



To the Editor:

Eating well and exercising are important, but not necessarily a panacea against disease.

I am a 55-year-old woman who is slim, eats a healthy organic diet, takes ballet classes and practices yoga on a weekly basis.

I had breast cancer in 2003 and learned I had Stage 4 tonsil cancer in 2008. My out-of-the-pocket costs for my recent treatment for tonsil cancer totaled $15,000.

As part of my follow-up care, I need thousands of dollars of dental work, plus expensive magnetic resonance imaging every six months for the next three years. My monthly health insurance premium, for me alone, has gone up to $662.

Michael Pollan is correct in targeting agribusiness for contributing to obesity, but he does a grave disservice to me, and Americans in general, when he links the dire consequences of not having strong and meaningful health care reform with the honorable, but separate, issue of food industry reform.

Francesca Pastine
San Francisco, Sept. 10, 2009



To the Editor:

As a big fan of Michael Pollan, I was delighted to read “Big Food vs. Big Insurance.”

I am 65, look 50, and weigh 10 pounds more than when I graduated from high school, where I lettered in two sports. I work out three or four times a week, recently added two weekly yoga classes, take stairs whenever possible and have no major health issues.

My “diet” is to eat as much as I need, and no more. If my weight is up a little any morning, I just eat less that day.

My wife and I usually split the massive entrees at restaurants, we eat very little meat, and our snacks are fruits and nuts. And yes, I indulge — with a little delicious dark chocolate and low-fat ice cream every day.

I don’t eat junk food or buy the soft drinks and other reconstituted muck that American agribusiness currently substitutes for real food.

When Americans demand that restaurants and agribusiness put our health first, I will no longer be unusual.

James G. Goodale
Houston, Sept. 10, 2009



To the Editor:

Michael Pollan’s essay on the role of the food industry in contributing to obesity and associated chronic diseases may have some merit, but only because too many consumers make poor dietary choices, meal after meal, day after day.

Are we really going to blame the food industry for providing foods we enjoy but overindulge in? When did personal responsibility go out the window?

Most of us like a good hamburger with all the “fixings,” maybe even fries and a shake with it. But is the provider to blame when we consume them day after day, and couple this with other food choices that are high in calories and fat, with little or no exercise to offset these poor dietary choices?

The old saying that there are no good foods or bad foods, only good or bad diets, is still relevant.

Rather than play the blame game, we should direct our efforts at better educating consumers on the importance of balancing caloric intake with energy output.

Taxing or blaming the food industry may add more money to the government coffers, and make some feel better, but it has no public benefit.

James Stanley
Jasper, Ga., Sept. 10, 2009

Putting America on a Healthier Diet,
NYT,
12.9.2009,
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/12/opinion/l12pollan.html

 

 

 

 

 

Op-Ed Contributor

Big Food vs. Big Insurance

 

September 10, 2009

The New York Times

By MICHAEL POLLAN

 

Berkeley, Calif.

TO listen to President Obama’s speech on Wednesday night, or to just about anyone else in the health care debate, you would think that the biggest problem with health care in America is the system itself — perverse incentives, inefficiencies, unnecessary tests and procedures, lack of competition, and greed.

No one disputes that the $2.3 trillion we devote to the health care industry is often spent unwisely, but the fact that the United States spends twice as much per person as most European countries on health care can be substantially explained, as a study released last month says, by our being fatter. Even the most efficient health care system that the administration could hope to devise would still confront a rising tide of chronic disease linked to diet.

That’s why our success in bringing health care costs under control ultimately depends on whether Washington can summon the political will to take on and reform a second, even more powerful industry: the food industry.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, three-quarters of health care spending now goes to treat “preventable chronic diseases.” Not all of these diseases are linked to diet — there’s smoking, for instance — but many, if not most, of them are.

We’re spending $147 billion to treat obesity, $116 billion to treat diabetes, and hundreds of billions more to treat cardiovascular disease and the many types of cancer that have been linked to the so-called Western diet. One recent study estimated that 30 percent of the increase in health care spending over the past 20 years could be attributed to the soaring rate of obesity, a condition that now accounts for nearly a tenth of all spending on health care.

The American way of eating has become the elephant in the room in the debate over health care. The president has made a few notable allusions to it, and, by planting her vegetable garden on the South Lawn, Michelle Obama has tried to focus our attention on it. Just last month, Mr. Obama talked about putting a farmers’ market in front of the White House, and building new distribution networks to connect local farmers to public schools so that student lunches might offer more fresh produce and fewer Tater Tots. He’s even floated the idea of taxing soda.

But so far, food system reform has not figured in the national conversation about health care reform. And so the government is poised to go on encouraging America’s fast-food diet with its farm policies even as it takes on added responsibilities for covering the medical costs of that diet. To put it more bluntly, the government is putting itself in the uncomfortable position of subsidizing both the costs of treating Type 2 diabetes and the consumption of high-fructose corn syrup.

Why the disconnect? Probably because reforming the food system is politically even more difficult than reforming the health care system. At least in the health care battle, the administration can count some powerful corporate interests on its side — like the large segment of the Fortune 500 that has concluded the current system is unsustainable.

That is hardly the case when it comes to challenging agribusiness. Cheap food is going to be popular as long as the social and environmental costs of that food are charged to the future. There’s lots of money to be made selling fast food and then treating the diseases that fast food causes. One of the leading products of the American food industry has become patients for the American health care industry.

The market for prescription drugs and medical devices to manage Type 2 diabetes, which the Centers for Disease Control estimates will afflict one in three Americans born after 2000, is one of the brighter spots in the American economy. As things stand, the health care industry finds it more profitable to treat chronic diseases than to prevent them. There’s more money in amputating the limbs of diabetics than in counseling them on diet and exercise.

As for the insurers, you would think preventing chronic diseases would be good business, but, at least under the current rules, it’s much better business simply to keep patients at risk for chronic disease out of your pool of customers, whether through lifetime caps on coverage or rules against pre-existing conditions or by figuring out ways to toss patients overboard when they become ill.

But these rules may well be about to change — and, when it comes to reforming the American diet and food system, that step alone could be a game changer. Even under the weaker versions of health care reform now on offer, health insurers would be required to take everyone at the same rates, provide a standard level of coverage and keep people on their rolls regardless of their health. Terms like “pre-existing conditions” and “underwriting” would vanish from the health insurance rulebook — and, when they do, the relationship between the health insurance industry and the food industry will undergo a sea change.

The moment these new rules take effect, health insurance companies will promptly discover they have a powerful interest in reducing rates of obesity and chronic diseases linked to diet. A patient with Type 2 diabetes incurs additional health care costs of more than $6,600 a year; over a lifetime, that can come to more than $400,000. Insurers will quickly figure out that every case of Type 2 diabetes they can prevent adds $400,000 to their bottom line. Suddenly, every can of soda or Happy Meal or chicken nugget on a school lunch menu will look like a threat to future profits.

When health insurers can no longer evade much of the cost of treating the collateral damage of the American diet, the movement to reform the food system — everything from farm policy to food marketing and school lunches — will acquire a powerful and wealthy ally, something it hasn’t really ever had before.

AGRIBUSINESS dominates the agriculture committees of Congress, and has swatted away most efforts at reform. But what happens when the health insurance industry realizes that our system of farm subsidies makes junk food cheap, and fresh produce dear, and thus contributes to obesity and Type 2 diabetes? It will promptly get involved in the fight over the farm bill — which is to say, the industry will begin buying seats on those agriculture committees and demanding that the next bill be written with the interests of the public health more firmly in mind.

In the same way much of the health insurance industry threw its weight behind the campaign against smoking, we can expect it to support, and perhaps even help pay for, public education efforts like New York City’s bold new ad campaign against drinking soda. At the moment, a federal campaign to discourage the consumption of sweetened soft drinks is a political nonstarter, but few things could do more to slow the rise of Type 2 diabetes among adolescents than to reduce their soda consumption, which represents 15 percent of their caloric intake.

That’s why it’s easy to imagine the industry throwing its weight behind a soda tax. School lunch reform would become its cause, too, and in time the industry would come to see that the development of regional food systems, which make fresh produce more available and reduce dependence on heavily processed food from far away, could help prevent chronic disease and reduce their costs.

Recently a team of designers from M.I.T. and Columbia was asked by the foundation of the insurer UnitedHealthcare to develop an innovative systems approach to tackling childhood obesity in America. Their conclusion surprised the designers as much as their sponsor: they determined that promoting the concept of a “foodshed” — a diversified, regional food economy — could be the key to improving the American diet.

All of which suggests that passing a health care reform bill, no matter how ambitious, is only the first step in solving our health care crisis. To keep from bankrupting ourselves, we will then have to get to work on improving our health — which means going to work on the American way of eating.

But even if we get a health care bill that does little more than require insurers to cover everyone on the same basis, it could put us on that course.

For it will force the industry, and the government, to take a good hard look at the elephant in the room and galvanize a movement to slim it down.

 

Michael Pollan,

a contributing writer for The Times Magazine

and a professor of journalism

at the University of California, Berkeley,

is the author of “In Defense of Food: An Eater’s Manifesto.”

Big Food vs. Big Insurance,
NYT,
10.9.2009,
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/10/opinion/10pollan.html

 

 

 

 

 

Big City

Mother’s Fight

Against Junk Food

Puts a School on Edge

 

June 16, 2009

The New York Times

By SUSAN DOMINUS

 

MeMe Roth, a publicist and an Upper West Side mother of two, is getting really, really mad — “and I do not mean angry,” she clarified. “I mean mad, like crazy.” Ms. Roth is being driven mad by Public School 9, where her children are in second and fourth grades, and it seems that P.S. 9, in turn, is being driven mad by Ms. Roth.

Ms. Roth, who runs a group called National Action Against Obesity, has no problem with the school lunches provided at the highly regarded elementary school on Columbus Avenue and 84th Street. What sets her off is the junk food served on special occasions: the cupcakes that come out for every birthday, the doughnuts her children were once given in gym, the sugary “Fun-Dip” packets that some parent provided the whole class on Valentine’s Day.

“I thought I was sending my kid to P.S. 9, not Chuck E. Cheese,” Ms. Roth, a trim, impassioned 40-year-old from Atlanta, said in an interview. “Is there or is there not an obesity and diabetes epidemic in this country?”

When offered any food at school other than the school lunch, Ms. Roth’s children — who shall go nameless since it seems they have enough on, or off, their plates — are instructed to deposit the item into a piece of Tupperware their mother calls a “junk food collector.”

This solution seemed to be working pretty well until Ms. Roth’s daughter dutifully tried to stick a juice pop — a special class treat from her teacher on a hot day — into her plastic container. The teacher told Ms. Roth’s daughter to eat it or lose it, and according to the child pointed out that she had seen the young girl eating the corn chips served with school lunch — did that not count as junk food?

This prompted one of Ms. Roth’s infamous heated e-mail messages to the school. Which, in turn, prompted administrators to pull her daughter out of class to discuss the juice pop incident, which only further infuriated Ms. Roth, who said her daughter felt as if she’d been ambushed.

What followed was the kind of meeting in which bureaucracy masquerades as farce, or maybe it’s the other way around. Ms. Roth and her husband, Ben, say they were told by Helene Moffatt, a school safety official, that if they considered the regular dissemination of junk food a threat to their children’s health and safety — and indeed, they do — they should request a health and safety transfer, something that generally follows threats of violence. That transfer request, they were told, would also require filing a complaint with the police.

“What would that conversation even sound like?” asked Mr. Roth, who works in marketing. “ ‘We know you guys are dealing with stabbings and shootings, but stop everything: We have a cupcake situation’ ?”

Both parents left feeling they were being pushed out of P.S. 9, which they perceive as exhausted by Ms. Roth’s intense lobbying for, among other things, permission slips for any food not on the official lunch menu. It would not be the first time: The Roths previously lived in Millburn, N.J., where, after Ms. Roth waged war on the bagels and Pringles meal served to kids at lunch, received e-mail from one member of the P.T.A. that said, “Please, consider moving.” That was in 2006, and P.S. 9 has been hearing about its transgressions against healthy eating pretty much ever since.

“The community is very concerned,” the principal, Diane Brady, wrote in an e-mail message. At the meeting with Ms. Moffatt, Ms. Brady said that Ms. Roth “was hostile” and “threw candy onto the table and cursed.” It was not the first time, she added, that Ms. Roth had “displayed this hostile behavior.”

Ms. Roth’s message is hardly outlandish: There is an obesity epidemic, and there are probably better ways to celebrate a child’s birth than sending a passel of kids into sugar shock in the middle of math class.

Her extreme methods have earned her attention before: The police were called to a Y.M.C.A. in 2007 when she absconded with the sprinkles and syrups on a table where members were being served ice cream. That was Ms. Roth who called Santa Claus fat on television that Christmas, and she has a continuing campaign against the humble Girl Scout cookies, on the premise that no community activity should promote unhealthy eating.

“She has some valid points, but the way she delivers them is abrasive,” said Jim Stanek, a fellow P.S. 9 parent, who responded angrily to an e-mail message Ms. Roth sent to around 75 parents saying that the physical education teacher who served her children doughnuts probably “couldn’t pass a standardized phys ed. test.”

It is too bad that Ms. Roth’s suggestions come in e-mail messages strung with too many capital letters and undiplomatic, if accurate, scare tactics (on the threat of diabetes—“we’re talking amputations, blindness, endless finger pricking, endless disabilities”). It would probably benefit New York’s students, and no doubt Ms. Roth’s family, if she tried to catch a few flies with honey. Make that agave nectar.

Mother’s Fight Against Junk Food Puts a School on Edge,
NYT,
16.6.2009,
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/06/16/nyregion/16bigcity.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Related > Anglonautes > Vocapedia

 

poverty > the poor > hunger, food

 

 

walking, pedestrians

 

 

lifestyle / health

exercise, smoking, drinking / alcohol,

food, diet, obesity

 

 

organic food

 

 

drugs

 

 

 

 

 

Related

 

The Guardian > Nutrition

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/nutrition