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Vocapedia > USA > Politics > Republicans / G.O.P.

 

 

 

Daryl Cagle

 

30 August 2004

http://cagle.slate.msn.com/art/

 

Bush = U.S. President George W. Bush

Cheney = U.S. Vice-President Dick Cheney

Elephant = Republican / G.O.P. party

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Republicans

 

https://www.npr.org/2019/08/23/
693716112/david-koch-dies-conservative-billionaire-helped-reshape-u-s-politics

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/17/
opinion/a-party-to-the-russian-connection.html

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/01/02/
506446779/obamacare-is-first-item-on-congress-chopping-block

 

http://www.npr.org/2016/12/24/
506338057/white-house-sharpens-its-case-for-obamacare-as-republicans-sharpen-knives

http://www.gocomics.com/jen-sorensen/2016/12/20

http://www.npr.org/2016/11/10/
501505527/trump-is-another-republican-striking-a-blow-for-the-way-things-used-to-be

http://www.npr.org/2016/09/04/
492230045/has-donald-trump-permanently-altered-the-republican-partys-dna

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/11/
opinion/the-republican-contest.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/18/
opinion/18mon1.html

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/nov/03/
republicans-congress-us-midterm-elections

 

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-
elections-obama-idUSTRE69929420101103 - Nov. 3, 2010

 

http://www.usatoday.com/news/washington/2006-10-20-
republican-edge_x.htm

 

 

 

 

Republican

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/11/
opinion/the-republican-contest.html

 

 

 

 

Republican party / Grand Old Party        G.O.P. / GOP

https://gop.com/  

http://www.nytimes.com/topic/organization/republican-party

 

http://www.npr.org/2016/11/01/
500183772/evangelicals-face-a-gender-split-over-trump

http://www.npr.org/2016/09/04/
492230045/has-donald-trump-permanently-altered-the-republican-partys-dna

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/10/
opinion/campaign-stops/how-trump-can-save-the-gop.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/12/
opinion/sunday/the-gops-latino-crucible.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/22/
opinion/campaign-stops/if-trump-breaks-up-the-gop-it-wont-be-a-first.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/04/
opinion/its-donald-trumps-party-now.html

http://www.npr.org/2016/04/14/
474185104/what-does-trumpism-mean-for-the-future-of-the-republican-party

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/11/
opinion/the-gop-created-donald-trump.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/25/
opinion/david-brooks-the-american-idea-and-todays-gop.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/12/
opinion/in-gop-far-right-is-too-moderate.html

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/05/18/
the-republican-war-on-workers-rights/

 

http://douthat.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/10/16/
a-teachable-moment/

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/13/us/
politics/gop-aims-for-a-calmer-face-except-maybe-for-ted-nugent.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/29/
opinion/brooks-a-second-g-o-p.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/26/us/
politics/as-republicans-debate-future-direction-one-senator-steps-aside.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/23/us/
politics/obama-speech-leaves-gop-stark-choices.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/14/
opinion/krugman-the-gops-existential-crisis.html

http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2012/11/13/
what-next-for-the-republican-party

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/09/
opinion/brooks-the-party-of-work.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/08/us/
politics/obamas-victory-presents-gop-with-demographic-test.html

http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2012/01/04/
for-gop-one-party-but-three-platforms/

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/26/us/politics/26repubs.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/07/health/policy/07health.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/03/us/politics/03scene.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/03/us/politics/03elect.html

http://www.cagle.msnbc.com/news/GOPPledge/main.asp

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/08/us/politics/08lobby.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/10/12/us/
politics/12strategy.html

 

http://www.usatoday.com/news/politics/2007-05-02-
gop-landscape_N.htm

 

http://www.usatoday.com/news/washington/2006-10-19-
candidate-letter_x.htm

 

 

 

 

Republican National Committee    RNC

https://www.npr.org/2019/08/23/
693716112/david-koch-dies-conservative-billionaire-helped-reshape-u-s-politics

 

https://www.npr.org/2019/01/04/
681987077/rnc-members-want-to-block-a-primary-challenge-to-trump-but-the-rules-may-stop-th

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Republicans > Elephant / red

 

https://www.npr.org/2017/12/13/
570241652/in-reaction-to-trump-democratic-candidates-surge-in-deep-red-texas

http://www.gocomics.com/michaelramirez/2017/01/07

http://www.gocomics.com/robert-ariail/2017/01/08

 

http://www.gocomics.com/clayjones/2016/11/13

http://www.gocomics.com/bobgorrell/2016/11/09

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/11/04/us/
politics/growing-divide-between-red-and-blue-america.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/10/
opinion/campaign-stops/how-trump-can-save-the-gop.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/17/us/
its-pretty-lonely-a-democratic-incumbent-in-a-sea-of-texas-red.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/22/
opinion/campaign-stops/if-trump-breaks-up-the-gop-it-wont-be-a-first.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/17/
opinion/texas-red-but-not-relevant.html

 

http://www.theverge.com/2012/11/6/
3609534/republicans-red-democrats-blue-why-election

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/11/22/
opinion/sunday/who-turned-my-blue-state-red.html

http://www.nytimes.com/video/us/politics/100000003265183/
louisiana-runoff-a-blue-state-turns-red.html

 

 

 

 

red states        UK / USA

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/21/
opinion/sunday/trump-racism-black-children.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/17/
opinion/sunday/how-does-my-red-state-see-me.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/07/
opinion/sunday/talking-red-state-blues.html

 

 

 

 

maverick Republican

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/08/
opinion/israels-true-friends.html

 

 

 

 

Republican convention        UK / USA

http://www.usatoday.com/news/politics/election2008/2008-09-07-
poll_N.htm

 

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2004/aug/31/
uselections2004.usa2 

 

 

 

 

Republicanism

http://www.npr.org/2016/03/13/
469651866/how-2-powerful-streams-of-republicanism-are-headed-for-cleveland

 

 

 

 

neo-classical Republicanism

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/14/
opinion/how-the-gop-can-win-black-voters.html

 

 

 

 

neoconservative / neocon        UK / USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/14/us/
walter-berns-a-catalyst-of-the-neoconservative-movement-dies-at-95.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/16/us/
jean-bethke-elshtain-a-guiding-light-for-policy-makers-after-9-11-dies-at-72.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/02/
opinion/brooks-the-neocon-revival.html

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2013/feb/27/
bush-administration-sold-iraq-war

 

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2006/nov/04/iraq.
midterms2006 

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2006/jun/25/usa.
paulharris

 

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2005/dec/28/usa.iraq

 

 

 

 

conservatism

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/04/
opinion/campaign-stops/the-defeat-of-true-conservatism.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/02/
opinion/brooks-the-neocon-revival.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2012/10/01/
the-souths-enduring-conservativism/

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/19/us/
politics/19rusher.html

 

 

 

 

conservative

https://www.npr.org/2019/08/23/
693716112/david-koch-dies-conservative-billionaire-helped-reshape-u-s-politics

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/04/us/
m-stanton-evans-pioneer-of-conservative-movement-dies-at-80.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/02/
opinion/brooks-the-neocon-revival.html

 

 

 

 

conservative middle America        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2004/oct/22/
uselections2004.usa1

 

 

 

 

Conservatives

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/09/24/
how-did-conservatives-get-this-radical/

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/09/
opinion/blow-suicide-conservatives.html

 

 

 

 

conservative movement in American politics

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/04/us/
m-stanton-evans-pioneer-of-conservative-movement-dies-at-80.html

 

 

 

 

George W. Bush > Bushim

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/16/
opinion/campaign-stops/goodbye-bushism.html

 

 

 

 

hawk

 

 

 

 

hawkish

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/23/us/
politics/romney-seeks-out-center-avoiding-hawkish-tone.html

 

 

 

 

G.O.P. stalwart

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/06/20/us/
20barbour.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

the right

https://www.npr.org/2018/04/27/
606230683/despite-so-much-winning-the-right-feels-like-its-losing

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/20/
opinion/texans-gone-wild.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/11/08/us/
elections/how-trump-pushed-the-election-map-to-the-right.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/18/
technology/facebook-moves-to-repair-its-fractured-relationship-with-the-right.html

 

 

 

 

right-wingers

 

 

 

 

the Alt-RIght

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GOP identity

 

Joe Heller

has been the editorial cartoonist

for the Green Bay Press-Gazette since 1985,

before that he was the cartoonist

for the West Bend News.

Cagle

29 January 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

‘Suicide Conservatives’

 

February 8, 2013

The New York Times

By CHARLES M. BLOW

 

There used to be a political truism: Democrats fall in love, while Republicans fall in line.

That’s no longer true. Not in this moment. Democrats have learned to fall in love and fall in line. Republicans are just falling apart.

Last week, the opening salvos were launched in a very public and very nasty civil war between establishment Republicans and Tea Party supporters when it was reported that Karl Rove was backing a new group, the Conservative Victory Project, to counter the Tea Party’s selection of loopy congressional candidates who lose in general elections.

The Tea Party was having none of it. It sees Rove’s group as a brazen attack on the Tea Party movement, which it is. Rove sees winning as a practical matter. The Tea Party counts victory in layers of philosophical purity.

Politico reported this week that an unnamed “senior Republican operative” said that one of the party’s biggest problems was “ ‘suicide conservatives, who would rather lose elections than win seats with moderates.’ ”

Democrats could be the ultimate beneficiaries of this tiff. Of the 33 Senate seats up for election in 2014, 20 are held by Democrats. Seven of those 20 are in states that President Obama lost in the last presidential election. Republicans would have to pick up only a handful of seats to take control of the chamber.

But some in the Tea Party are threatening that if their candidate is defeated in the primaries by a candidate backed by Rove’s group, they might still run the Tea Party candidate in the general election. That would virtually guarantee a Democratic victory.

Sal Russo, a Tea Party strategist, told Politico: “We discourage our people from supporting third-party candidates by saying ‘that’s a big mistake. We shouldn’t do that.’ ” He added: “But if the position [Rove’s allies] take is rule or ruin — well, two can play that game. And if we get pushed, we’re not going to be able to keep the lid on that.”

The skirmish speaks to a broader problem: a party that has lost its way and can’t rally around a unified, coherent vision of what it wants to be when it grows up.

The traditional Republican message doesn’t work. Rhetorically, the G.O.P. is the party of calamity. The sky is always falling. Everything is broken. Freedoms are eroding. Tomorrow is dimmer than today.

In Republicans’ world, we must tighten our belts until we crush our spines. We must take a road to prosperity that runs through the desert of austerity. We must cut to grow. Republicans are the last guardians against bad governance.

But how can they sell this message to a public that has rejected it in the last two presidential elections?

Some say keep the terms but soften the tone.

A raft of Republicans, many of them possible contenders in 2016, have been trying this approach.

Louisiana’s governor, Bobby Jindal, speaking at a Republican National Committee meeting last month, chastised his party for being “the stupid party” that’s “in love with zeros,” even as he insisted, “I am not one of those who believe we should moderate, equivocate, or otherwise abandon our principles.”

Jindal’s plan, like that of many other Republicans, boils down to two words: talk differently.

Other Republicans, like Marco Rubio, seem to want to go further. They understand that the party must behave differently. He is among a group of senators who recently put forward a comprehensive immigration proposal that would offer a pathway to citizenship for the millions of undocumented immigrants in this country.

This is a position Democrats have advocated, and it’s a position that Republicans have to accept if they want Hispanic support — and a chance of winning a presidential election.

The Tea Party crowd did not seem pleased with that plan. Glenn Beck, the self-described “rodeo clown” of the right, said:

“You’ve got John McCain, Lindsey Graham, and now Marco Rubio joining them because Marco Rubio just has to win elections. I’m done. I’m done. Learn the Constitution. Somebody has to keep a remnant of the Constitution alive.”

For Beck’s wing of the party, moderation is surrender, and surrender is death. It seems to want to go further out on a limb that’s getting ever more narrow. For that crowd, being a Tea Party supporter is more a religion than a political philosophy. They believe so deeply and fervently in it that they see no need for either message massage or actual compromise.

While most Democrats and Independents want politicians to compromise, Republicans don’t, according to a January report by the Pew Research Center. The zealots have a chokehold on that party, and they’re sucking the life — and common sense — out of it.

For this brand of Republican, there is victory in self-righteous defeat.

‘Suicide Conservatives’,
NYT,
8.2.2013,
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/09/
opinion/blow-suicide-conservatives.html

 

 

 

 

 

The Party of Work

 

November 8, 2012

The New York Times

By DAVID BROOKS

 

The American colonies were first settled by Protestant dissenters. These were people who refused to submit to the established religious authorities. They sought personal relationships with God. They moved to the frontier when life got too confining. They created an American creed, built, as the sociologist Seymour Martin Lipset put it, around liberty, individualism, equal opportunity, populism and laissez-faire.

This creed shaped America and evolved with the decades. Starting in the mid-20th century, there was a Southern and Western version of it, formed by ranching Republicans like Barry Goldwater, Ronald Reagan and George W. Bush. Their version drew on the traditional tenets: ordinary people are capable of greatness; individuals have the power to shape their destinies; they should be given maximum freedom to do so.

This is not an Ayn Randian, radically individualistic belief system. Republicans in this mold place tremendous importance on churches, charities and families — on the sort of pastoral work Mitt Romney does and the sort of community groups Representative Paul Ryan celebrated in a speech at Cleveland State University last month.

But this worldview is innately suspicious of government. Its adherents generally believe in the equation that more government equals less individual and civic vitality. Growing beyond proper limits, government saps initiative, sucks resources, breeds a sense of entitlement and imposes a stifling uniformity on the diverse webs of local activity.

During the 2012 campaign, Republicans kept circling back to the spot where government expansion threatens personal initiative: you didn’t build that; makers versus takers; the supposed dependency of the 47 percent. Again and again, Republicans argued that the vital essence of the country is threatened by overweening government.

These economic values played well in places with a lot of Protestant dissenters and their cultural heirs. They struck chords with people whose imaginations are inspired by the frontier experience.

But, each year, there are more Americans whose cultural roots lie elsewhere. Each year, there are more people from different cultures, with different attitudes toward authority, different attitudes about individualism, different ideas about what makes people enterprising.

More important, people in these groups are facing problems not captured by the fundamental Republican equation: more government = less vitality.

The Pew Research Center does excellent research on Asian-American and Hispanic values. Two findings jump out. First, people in these groups have an awesome commitment to work. By most measures, members of these groups value industriousness more than whites.

Second, they are also tremendously appreciative of government. In survey after survey, they embrace the idea that some government programs can incite hard work, not undermine it; enhance opportunity, not crush it.

Moreover, when they look at the things that undermine the work ethic and threaten their chances to succeed, it’s often not government. It’s a modern economy in which you can work more productively, but your wages still don’t rise. It’s a bloated financial sector that just sent the world into turmoil. It’s a university system that is indispensable but unaffordable. It’s chaotic neighborhoods that can’t be cured by withdrawing government programs.

For these people, the Republican equation is irrelevant. When they hear Romney talk abstractly about Big Government vs. Small Government, they think: He doesn’t get me or people like me.

Let’s just look at one segment, Asian-Americans. Many of these people are leading the lives Republicans celebrate. They are, disproportionately, entrepreneurial, industrious and family-oriented. Yet, on Tuesday, Asian-Americans rejected the Republican Party by 3 to 1. They don’t relate to the Republican equation that more government = less work.

Over all, Republicans have lost the popular vote in five out of the six post-cold-war elections because large parts of the country have moved on. The basic Republican framing no longer resonates.

Some Republicans argue that they can win over these rising groups with a better immigration policy. That’s necessary but insufficient. The real problem is economic values.

If I were given a few minutes with the Republican billionaires, I’d say: spend less money on marketing and more on product development. Spend less on “super PACs” and more on research. Find people who can shift the debate away from the abstract frameworks — like Big Government vs. Small Government. Find people who can go out with notebooks and study specific, grounded everyday problems: what exactly does it take these days to rise? What exactly happens to the ambitious kid in Akron at each stage of life in this new economy? What are the best ways to rouse ambition and open fields of opportunity?

Don’t get hung up on whether the federal government is 20 percent or 22 percent of G.D.P. Let Democrats be the party of security, defending the 20th-century welfare state. Be the party that celebrates work and inflames enterprise. Use any tool, public or private, to help people transform their lives.

The Party of Work,
NYT,
8.11.2012,
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/09/
opinion/brooks-the-party-of-work.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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