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Vocapedia > Time > Year, Decade

 

 

 

Peter Schrank on the year ahead – cartoon

G

Sunday 1 January 2017    20.23 GMT

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/picture/2017/jan/01/
peter-schrank-on-the-year-ahead-cartoon

 

Left: Vladimir Putin

Right: Donald J. Trump

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clay Jones

GoComics

December 30, 2016

http://www.gocomics.com/clayjones/2016/12/30

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Andy Davey

The Independent

30 December 2007

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lio

by Mark Tatulli

Gocomics

January 01, 2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dave Brown

The Independent

1 January 2009

http://www.independent.co.uk/opinion/the-daily-cartoon-760940.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Cole, Scranton

PA -- The Scranton Times

Cagle

29 December 2008

 

R: Uncle Sam

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

year

 

 

 

 

rough year        USA

http://www.npr.org/2016/12/30/
506734040/as-a-rough-year-ends-we-turn-to-the-cosmos-for-some-perspective

 

 

 

 

leap year > February 29th

http://www.npr.org/2016/02/28/
468446187/how-do-you-celebrate-a-leap-year-birthday

 

 

 

 

light-year        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/08/24/
490947403/this-planet-just-outside-our-solar-system-is-potentially-habitable

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/19/
science/space/2-new-planets-are-most-earth-like-yet-scientists-say.html

 

 

 

 

liturgical year

http://www.vatican.va/liturgical_year/liturgico_en/liturgico_en.html

 

 

 

 

yearlong        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/01/
world/americas/01mexico.html

 

 

 

 

new year        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/28/
opinion/blow-greeting-the-new-year.html

 

http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2010/12/
a_new_year_rolls_in.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/01/
opinion/l01floater.html

 

 

 

 

during the Jim Crow years        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2017/02/05/
513144736/did-i-get-james-baldwin-wrong

 

 

 

 

in the waning years of N        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2017/02/22/
516651689/after-slavery-searching-for-loved-ones-in-wanted-ads

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2017        UK

https://www.youtube.com/
watch?time_continue=1&v=027ikJwr6fQ - Guardian - 22 December 2017

 

 

 

 

2017        USA

https://www.npr.org/sections/monkeysee/2017/12/27/
570931638/50-wonderful-things-from-2017

http://www.gocomics.com/mattdavies/2017/01/02

 

http://www.gocomics.com/jeffstahler/2016/12/31

http://www.gocomics.com/clayjones/2016/12/31

http://www.gocomics.com/phil-hands/2016/12/31

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2016        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/membership/video/2016/dec/22/
2016-how-do-you-report-a-year-that-changed-the-world-video

https://membership.theguardian.com/membership-content?referringContent=membership/2016/dec/16/
the-bedside-guardian-condensing-a-years-news-into-70-articles&membershipAccess=MembersOnly

 

 

 

 

2016        USA

http://www.gocomics.com/mattdavies/2017/01/02

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/12/30/
507536360/number-of-police-officers-killed-by-firearms-rose-in-2016-study-finds

http://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2016/12/31/
507104140/millions-saw-these-8-youtube-videos-in-2016-did-you

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/12/31/
507133144/from-psychedelics-to-alzheimers-2016-was-a-good-year-for-brain-science

http://www.npr.org/sections/monkeysee/2016/12/31/
507551203/50-wonderful-things-from-2016

http://www.gocomics.com/clayjones/2016/12/30

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/28/
arts/television/the-memorable-tv-episodes-of-2016.html

http://www.npr.org/2016/12/28/
506718757/should-we-all-just-stop-calling-2016-the-worst

http://www.gocomics.com/darrin-bell/2016/12/28

 

 

 

 

The year in pictures        2016        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/12/22/
sunday-review/2016-year-in-pictures.html

 

 

 

 

2015        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/12/25/
opinion/moments-of-grace-in-a-grim-year.html

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2015/12/16/
magazine/the-lives-they-lived.html

 

 

 

 

The year in pictures        2015        UK / USA

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2015/12/27/
sunday-review/2015-year-in-pictures.html

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2015/dec/26/
the-20-photographs-of-the-year

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2015/dec/25/
the-best-photographs-of-america-2015-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Boston Globe > Big Picture > 2014 Year in Pictures: Part I        USA

http://www.bostonglobe.com/news/bigpicture/2014/12/15/
the-best-photos-part/wDd9frTph2aBLaa4yFRXpJ/story.html

 

 

 

Boston Globe > Big Picture > 2014 Year in Pictures: Part II        USA

http://www.bostonglobe.com/news/bigpicture/2014/12/17/
year-pictures-part/cbCRCMotCaAFw97CQy2qwM/story.html

 

 

 

 

Boston Globe > Big Picture > 2014 Year in Pictures: Part III        USA

http://www.bostonglobe.com/news/bigpicture/2014/12/19/
year-pictures-part-iii/iyG4PgzuA8sy4utXrSfGxJ/story.html

 

 

 

 

The best photos of 2014:

stories behind the Globe’s most memorable pictures of the year        USA

http://www.bostonglobe.com/news/bigpicture/2014/12/10/
the-best-photos-stories-behind-globe-most-memorable-pictures-year/
0NcwF9IhOGPfvlYP14zaBK/story.htm
l

 

 

 

 

2013 - The year by the numbers        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/video/multimedia/100000002628101/2013-
by-the-numbers.html

 

 

 

 

2013 - The year in illustrations        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2012/12/31/
opinion/2013-year-in-illustrations.html

 

 

 

 

2013 - The year in pictures        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/projects/2013/year-in-pictures/

 

 

 

 

2012 - The year in pictures        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2012/12/30/
sunday-review/2012-year-in-pictures.html

 

 

 

 

2011 - The year in review        UK

 

The news in 2011 was being recognised

as exceptional long before the year began

to draw to a close.

 

Our interactive reviews 2011 as a whole

but also captures running stories

that defined the year from the Arab spring to the UK riots

and from phone hacking to eurozone debt.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/interactive/2011-
news-year-in-review

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/interactive/2012/dec/25/
best-photographs-2012-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

2012 in review:

an interactive guide to the year that was        UK        28 December 2012

 

From the golden summer of sport for Britain

to the havoc wreaked by Hurricane Sandy

- and Felix Baumgartner's

record-breaking jump from space,

2012 was a rich year for news.

 

Here's our interactive guide

to the most extraordinary moments.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/interactive/2012/dec/28/2012-
in-review-interactive-guide

 

 

 

 

Boston Globe > Big Picture > The Year in Pictures: Part I        USA        December 19, 2011

http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2011/12/
the_year_in_pictures_part.html

 

 

 

 

cartoons > Cagle > 2010 year in review        USA

http://www.cagle.com/news/2010best/main.asp

 

 

 

 

cartoons > Cagle > Happy New Year        USA        2010

http://www.cagle.com/news/NewYear2011/main.asp

 

 

 

 

New Year's Eve        USA

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2010/dec/31/
new-years-eve-survival-guide

 

 

 

 

welcome the new year        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/01/nyregion/
01celebrations.html

 

 

 

 

celebrate 2010        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/01/nyregion/
01celebrations.html

 

 

 

 

The Guardian > 2010 – the year in review        UK

 

It was a year of elections, iPads, ash clouds,

an oil spill, WikiLeaks, spending cuts and protest.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/interactive/2010/dec/22/2010-
year-review

 

 

 

 

The Guardian > 2008 in review        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/series/2008-
in-review

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2008/dec/15/1

 

 

 

 

2008 > Cagle cartoons        USA

http://www.cagle.msnbc.com/news/2008best/main.asp

 

 

 

 

2006 > Cagle cartoons        USA

http://www.cagle.com/news/2006best/main.asp

 

 

 

 

Time > Person of the Year        USA        2006

http://www.usatoday.com/life/people/2006-12-17-
person-of-the-year_x.htm

 

 

 

 

gap year        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/travel/2011/aug/19/
end-of-the-gap-year

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2008/apr/15/
ecuador.travelnews

 

 

 

 

vintage year        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2013/dec/27/
weather-year-for-wildlife-britain-ireland

 

 

 

 

last year

 

 

 

 

late last year        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/08/01/business/01econ.html

 

 

 

 

over last year        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/21/
business/21toys.html

 

 

 

 

in one year

 

 

 

 

bumper year        USA

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2013/aug/16/
english-cherry-growers-bigger-harvest-2013

 

 

 

 

annus horribilis        UK        2008

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/this-britain/
2008-packed-off-without-regret-ndash-and-hope-for-what-is-to-come-1220031.html

 

 

 

 

anniversary        USA

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2015/04/15/
399782699/on-one-boston-day-city-marks-marathon-bombings-anniversary

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/12/nyregion/
on-9-11-anniversary-moments-of-silence-and-reflection.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/21/us/
21spill.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/12/nyregion/
12sept11.html

 

 

 

 

2008 > leap second        UK

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/
why-2008-really-will-be-the-longest-of-years-1218227.html

 

 

 

 

in the new year

 

 

 

 

later in the year

 

 

 

 

two years into the Iraq war

 

 

 

 

all year round

 

 

 

 

for the second year running

 

 

 

 

for more than 30 years

 

 

 

 

at year's end        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/01/
business/01bank.html

 

 

 

 

before the year is out

 

 

 

 

by 2008

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2006/oct/31/
greenpolitics.environment 

 

 

 

 

by the end of 2007 (two thousand and seven)

 

 

 

 

by early next year

 

 

 

 

early in 1927

 

 

 

 

2011        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2010/dec/31/
david-cameron-new-year-message

 

 

 

 

2010

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2011/01/02/
opinion/20110102_Op_Postcards.html

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/gallery/2010/dec/30/
tom-jenkins-best-shots-2010

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/gallery/2010/dec/29/
conservation-stories-2010

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/world/battalion.html?hp#/NYT/Features/28

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/video/2010/dec/29/
2010-year-in-music

http://www.nytimes.com/packages/html/photo/2010-year-in-pictures/

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/dec/26/
20-things-we-learned-in-2010

 

 

 

 

in the late 80s and early 90s

 

 

 

 

1978 > Key events        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2008/dec/29/
nationalarchives-past

 

 

 

 

1610

http://www.theguardian.com/science/2015/mar/11/
was-1610-the-beginning-of-a-new-human-epoch-anthropocene

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

decade        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2012/oct/27/
1980s-britain-thatcherism-final-reckoning

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/interactive/2011/sep/05/
9-11-terror-attacks-interactive

 

 

 

 

decade        USA

http://www.npr.org/2016/03/19/
470828257/after-decades-in-solitary-last-of-the-angola-3-carry-on-their-struggle

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/22/
opinion/four-decades-of-solitary-in-louisiana.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/11/
opinion/sunday/sept-11-a-decade-later-a-day-of-reflection.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/03/
opinion/03bono.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/03/
opinion/03sun1.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/01/
arts/01lookaheadweb.html

 

 

 

 

over a decade

 

 

 

 

The Guardian > The 9/11 decade

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/series/9-11-the-10th-anniversary

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/interactive/2011/sep/08/
9-11-attacks-photographs-interactive

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/sep/09/
9-11-changed-world-forever

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/sep/08/
al-quaida-future-islamic-militants

http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/neurophilosophy/2011/sep/09/
pregnant-911-survivors-transmitted-trauma

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/interactive/2011/sep/08/
september-11-anniversary-your-memories

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/interactive/2011/sep/05/
9-11-terror-attacks-interactive

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2011/sep/09/
new-york-fashion-week-september-11

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2011/sep/09/
9-11-stories-rob-magnuson-smith

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/sep/09/
september-11-john-nicholson-bbc

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/cifamerica/2011/sep/09/
muslim-post-9-11-america

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/booksblog/2011/sep/05/
introducing-9-11-stories

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/sep/08/
9-11-ten-years-on-shifting-opinions-muslims

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/filmblog/2011/sep/08/
9-11-films-hollywood-handle

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/interactive/2011/sep/08/
september-11-anniversary-your-memories

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/from-the-archive-blog/2011/sep/06/
9-11-attacks-guardian-archive

 

 

 

 

decade > 2000-2009        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/03/
business/economy/03view.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/world/2009-
decade.html

 

 

 

 

lost decade        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/14/us/
14census.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/02/your-money/
stocks-and-bonds/02money.html

 

 

 

 

1990s        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/news/series/
g2-on-the-90s

 

 

 

 

1990s        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/08/opinion/sunday/
the-best-decade-ever-the-1990s-obviously.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

the sixties

http://www.pdngallery.com/legends/legends9/

 

 

 

 

free press > The Sixties

http://www.guardian.co.uk/theobserver/2006/oct/08/2

 

 

 

 

in the Sixties

 

 

 

 

1960s        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/guardianwitness-blog/ng-interactive/2015/aug/13/
60-photos-of-the-1960s-readers-pictures

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2015/mar/12
/terence-stamp-i-was-in-my-prime-but-when-the-60s-ended-i-ended-with-it

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/video/2010/mar/15/
david-bailey-60s-photographs

 

 

 

 

in the late 1960s

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/03/arts/television/
alan-sues-a-laugh-in-cast-mainstay-dies-at-85.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

time > year > 1968

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1967        UK / USA

https://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2017/07/25/
1967s-other-summer-of-love/

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2017/jun/08/
1967-the-year-that-pop-came-out-beatles-rolling-stones-kinks

 

 

 

 

1967 > USA > summer of love        UK / USA

https://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2017/07/25/
1967s-other-summer-of-love/

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/13/
opinion/the-greatest-music-festival-in-history.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/culture/gallery/2017/may/20/
on-the-road-to-the-summer-of-love-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

1962: a year packed with drama – in pictures            UK

 

A look back at a year

that included the death of Marilyn Monroe,

the release of the first Bond film

and the Cuban missile crisis

http://www.guardian.co.uk/culture/gallery/2012/sep/29/
1962-year-pictures

 

 

 

 

1960s / 60s        UK / USA

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/guardianwitness-blog/ng-interactive/2015/aug/13/
60-photos-of-the-1960s-readers-pictures

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2015/04/03/
arts/television/mad-men-season-7-timeline.html

 

 

 

 

in '66

 

 

 

 

1960's        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2004/jul/20/penal.crime

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2004/jun/09/popandrock1 

 

 

 

 

one evening in the summer of 1969

 

 

 

 

summer of love

 

 

 

 

historic albums of 1969        USA

https://www.npr.org/2019/10/25/
773104499/first-reviled-now-revered-the-historic-albums-of-1969

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1950s > the best of times        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/theguardian/2007/oct/10/features11.g2

 

 

 

 

1940s        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2013/aug/13/
austerity-1940s-war-vintage-fashion

 

 

 

 

1945 / '45        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2013/mar/02/
spirit-45-ken-loach-nhs-history 

 

 

 

 

The Twenties: Fads, Dress, and Trends

Selected Images from the Collections of the Library of Congress        USA

http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/list/072_fads.html

 

 

 

 

1950s hipster        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/culture/2009/nov/14/
guide-guidelines-50s-hipster-slang 

 

 

 

 

in the mid-70's

 

 

 

 

great mid-20th-century artists

 

 

 

 

in the Eighties

 

 

 

 

in the early Eighties

 

 

 

 

the 1980s        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2013/apr/17/solemn-grandeur-thatcher-funeral

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2012/oct/27/1980s-britain-thatcherism-final-reckoning

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2010/oct/26/walkman-hollywood-nostalgia-80s

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2009/nov/03/absolute-80s

 

 

 

 

in the Thatcherite 1980s

 

 

 

 

1984        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/culture/2014/mar/25/
breakfast-club-everything-good-happened-1984

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2007/jun/02/
uk.hay2007authors

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2000 / Y2K

 

 

 

 

millennium        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2008/apr/28/jazz

 

 

 

 

the noughties        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/organgrinder/2009/jul/23/
channel-4-2000s-greatest-tv-show-noughties

 

 

 

 

'03

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1930s        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/society/series/the-1930s-revisited

 

 

 

 

1929

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1890s        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/12/
fashion/12CODES.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

circa 1850

 

 

 

 

in the 70's

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Madoff gets 150 years        2009

http://www.cagle.msnbc.com/news/MadoffSentence/main.asp

 

 

 

 

sesquicentennial        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2009/10/16/us/
AP-US-John-Browns-March.html - broken link

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

yesteryear        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/packages/html/magazine/20100207-
winters-slideshow/index.html

 

 

 

 

a year-on-year increase

 

 

 

 

in his two years as mayor, he...

 

 

 

 

an 11% increase on last year

 

 

 

 

a 2-year-old boy

 

 

 

 

on an average of five years

 

 

 

 

seven years in the same job

 

 

 

 

five young boys ages 6 to 12

 

 

 

 

I'm ten

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peter Till

 

Burned out long ago

It's not Princess Diana we miss,

on the eighth anniversary of her death,

but the no-worry 90s she typified

 

The Guardian        p. 17        31.8.2005

http://www.theguardian.com/uk/2005/aug/31/monarchy.politics

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Guardian        Weekend        p. 29        7 October 2006

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Decade of Progress on AIDS

 

November 30, 2011

The New York Times

By BONO

 

I’LL tell you the worst part about it, for me.

It was the look in their eyes when the nurses gave them the diagnosis — H.I.V.-positive — then said there was no treatment. I saw no anger in their expression. No protest. If anything, just a sort of acquiescence.

The anger came from the nurses, who knew there really was a treatment — just not for poor people in poor countries. They saw the absurdity in the fact that an accident of geography would deny their patients the two little pills a day that could save their lives.

This was less than a decade ago. And all of us who witnessed these dedicated African workers issuing death sentence after death sentence still feel fury and shame. AIDS set off an almost existential crisis in the West. It forced us to ask ourselves the big, uncomfortable questions, like whether capitalism, which invented the global village and kept it well stocked with stuff, could also create global solutions. Whether we were interested in charity... or justice.

The wanton loss of so many lives in Africa offended the very idea of America: the idea that everyone is created equal and that your destiny is your own to make. By the late 1990s, AIDS campaigners in the United States and around the world teamed up with scientists and doctors to insist that someone — anyone — put the fire out. The odds against this were as extreme as the numbers: in 2002, two million people were dying of AIDS and more than three million were newly infected with H.I.V. Around 50,000 people in the sub-Saharan region had access to treatment.

Yet today, here we are, talking seriously about the “end” of this global epidemic. There are now 6.6 million people on life-saving AIDS medicine. But still too many are being infected. New research proves that early antiretroviral treatment, especially for pregnant women, in combination with male circumcision, will slash the rate of new H.I.V. cases by up to 60 percent. This is the tipping point we have been campaigning for. We’re nearly there.

How did we get here? America led. I mean really led.

The United States performed the greatest act of heroism since it jumped into World War II. When the history books are written, they will show that millions of people owe their lives to the Yankee tax dollar, to just a fraction of an aid budget that is itself less than 1 percent of the federal budget.

For me, a fan and a pest of America, it’s a tale of strange bedfellows: the gay community, evangelicals and scruffy student activists in a weird sort of harmony; military men calling AIDS in Africa a national security issue; the likes of Nancy Pelosi, Barbara Lee and John Kerry in lock step with Bill Frist and Rick Santorum; Jesse Helms, teary-eyed, arriving by walker to pledge support from the right; the big man, Patrick Leahy, offering to punch out a cranky Congressional appropriator; Jeffrey Sachs, George Soros and Bill Gates, backing the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria; Rupert Murdoch (yes, him) offering the covers of the News Corporation.

Also: a conservative president, George W. Bush, leading the largest ever response to the pandemic; the same Mr. Bush banging his desk when I complained that the drugs weren’t getting there fast enough, me apologizing to Mr. Bush when they did; Bill Clinton, arm-twisting drug companies to drop their prices; Hillary Rodham Clinton, making it policy to eradicate the transmission of H.I.V. from mother to child; President Obama, who is expected to make a game changing announcement this World AIDS Day to finish what his predecessors started — the beginning of the end of AIDS.

And then there were the everyday, every-stripe Americans. Like a tattooed trucker I met off I-80 in Iowa who, when he heard how many African truck drivers were infected with H.I.V., told me he’d go and drive the pills there himself.

Thanks to them, America led. Really led.

This was smart power. Genius, really. In 2007, 8 out of the 10 countries in the world that viewed the United States most fondly were African. And it can’t be a bad thing for America to have friends on a continent that is close to half Muslim and that, by 2025, will surpass China in population.

Activists are a funny lot. When the world suddenly starts marching in step with us, we just point out with (self-)righteous indignation all that remains to be done. But on this World AIDS Day I would like you to stop and consider what America has achieved in this war to defend lives lived far away and sacred principles held closer to home.

The moonshot, I know, is a tired metaphor; I’ve exhausted it myself. But America’s boldest leap of faith is worth recalling. And the thing is, as I see it, the Eagle hasn’t landed yet. Budget cuts ... partisan divisions ... these put the outcome in jeopardy just as the science falls into place. To get this far and not plant your flag would be one of the greatest accidental evils of this recession.

 

Bono is the lead singer of the band U2

and a founder of the advocacy group ONE

and the (Product)RED campaign.

A Decade of Progress on AIDS,
NYT,
30.11.2011,
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/01/
opinion/a-decade-of-progress-on-aids.html

 

 

 

 

 

Soaring Poverty Casts Spotlight

on ‘Lost Decade’

 

September 13, 2011

The New York Times

By SABRINA TAVERNISE

 

WASHINGTON — Another 2.6 million people slipped into poverty in the United States last year, the Census Bureau reported Tuesday, and the number of Americans living below the official poverty line, 46.2 million people, was the highest number in the 52 years the bureau has been publishing figures on it.

And in new signs of distress among the middle class, median household incomes fell last year to levels last seen in 1997.

Economists pointed to a telling statistic: It was the first time since the Great Depression that median household income, adjusted for inflation, had not risen over such a long period, said Lawrence Katz, an economics professor at Harvard.

“This is truly a lost decade,” Mr. Katz said. “We think of America as a place where every generation is doing better, but we’re looking at a period when the median family is in worse shape than it was in the late 1990s.”

The bureau’s findings were worse than many economists expected, and brought into sharp relief the toll the past decade — including the painful declines of the financial crisis and recession —had taken on Americans at the middle and lower parts of the income ladder. It is also fresh evidence that the disappointing economic recovery has done nothing for the country’s poorest citizens.

The report said the percentage of Americans living below the poverty line last year, 15.1 percent, was the highest level since 1993. (The poverty line in 2010 for a family of four was $22,314.)

The report comes as President Obama gears up to try to pass a jobs bill, and analysts said the bleak numbers could help him make his case for urgency. But they could also be used against him by Republican opponents seeking to highlight economic shortcomings on his watch.

“This is one more piece of bad news on the economy,” said Ron Haskins, a director of the Center on Children and Families at the Brookings Institution. “This will be another cross to bear by the administration.”

The past decade was also marked by a growing gap between the very top and very bottom of the income ladder. Median household income for the bottom tenth of the income spectrum fell by 12 percent from a peak in 1999, while the top 90th percentile dropped by just 1.5 percent. Overall, median household income adjusted for inflation declined by 2.3 percent in 2010 from the previous year, to $49,445. That was 7 percent less than the peak of $53,252 in 1999. Part of the income decline over time is because of the smaller size of the American family.

This year is not likely to be any better, economists said. Stimulus money has largely ended, and state and local governments have made deep cuts to staff and to budgets for social programs, both likely to move economically fragile families closer to poverty.

Minorities were hit hardest. Blacks experienced the highest poverty rate, at 27 percent, up from 25 percent in 2009, and Hispanics rose to 26 percent from 25 percent. For whites, 9.9 percent lived in poverty, up from 9.4 percent in 2009. Asians were unchanged at 12.1 percent.

An analysis by the Brookings Institution estimated that at the current rate, the recession will have added nearly 10 million people to the ranks of the poor by the middle of the decade.

Joblessness was the main culprit pushing more Americans into poverty, economists said.

Last year, about 48 million people ages 18 to 64 did not work even one week out of the year, up from 45 million in 2009, said Trudi Renwick, a Census official.

“Once you’ve been out of work for a long time, it’s a very difficult road to get back,” Mr. Katz said.

Median income fell across all working-age categories, but was sharpest drop was among the young working Americans, ages 15 to 24, who experienced a decline of 9 percent.

According to the Census figures, the median annual income for a male full-time, year-round worker in 2010 — $47,715 — was virtually unchanged, in 2010 dollars, from its level in 1973, when it was $49,065, said Sheldon Danziger, professor of public policy at the University of Michigan.

Those who do not have college degrees were particularly hard hit, he said. “The median, full-time male worker has made no progress on average,” Mr. Danziger said.

The recession has continued pushing 25-to-34-year-olds to move in with family and friends to save money. Of that group, nearly half were living below the poverty line, when their parents’ incomes were excluded. The poverty level for a single person under the age of 65 was $11,344.

“We’re risking a new underclass,” said Timothy Smeeding, director of the Institute for Research and Poverty at the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

“Young, less-educated adults, mainly men, can’t support their children and form stable families because they are jobless,” he added.

But even the period of economic growth that came before the recession did little for the middle and bottom wage earners.

Arloc Sherman, a senior researcher at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, said that the period from 2001 to 2007 was the first recovery on record where the level of poverty was deeper, and median income of working-age people was lower, at the end than at the beginning.

“Even before the recession hit, a lot of people were falling behind,” he said. “This may be adding to people’s sense of urgency about the economy.”

The suburban poverty rate, at 11.8 percent, appears to be the highest since 1967, Mr. Sherman added. Last year more Americans fell into deep poverty, defined as less than half the official poverty line, or about $11,000, with the ranks of that group increasing to 20.5 million, or about 6.7 percent of the population.

Poverty has also swallowed more children, with about 16.4 million in its ranks last year, the highest numbers since 1962, according to William Frey, senior demographer at Brookings. That means 22 percent of children are in poverty, the highest percentage since 1993.

The census figures do not count noncash assistance, like food stamps and the earned-income tax credit, and economists say that as a result they tend to overstate poverty numbers for certain groups, like children. But rises in the cost of housing, medical care and energy are not taken into account, either.

The report also said the number of uninsured Americans increased by 900,000 to 49.9 million.

Those covered by employer-based insurance continued to decline in 2010, to about 55 percent, while those with government-provided coverage continued to increase, up slightly to 31 percent. Employer-based coverage was down from 65 percent in 2000, the report said.

 

 

This article has been revised

to reflect the following correction:

Correction: September 13, 2011

An earlier version of this article gave an incorrect figure

for the number of people the Census Bureau

found to be in poverty in the Unites States.

The number is 46.2 million people, not 56.2 million.

Soaring Poverty Casts Spotlight on ‘Lost Decade’,
NYT, 13.9.2011,
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/14/us/
14census.html

 

 

 

 

 

Sept. 11:

A Decade Later,

a Day of Reflection

 

September 10, 2011

The New York Times


For the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks, we invited readers to offer their thoughts.

To the Editor:

For one brief moment on Sept. 11, 2001, time seemed to stand still. People sought family members and recognized the importance of family. Acts of charity were plentiful. There was an assessment of life and what is really important. Places of worship were full. People unashamedly prayed.

There was a strong feeling of patriotism, and a desire to show the flag. Crime, and even the thought of it, was absent. We were all in support of our president. Congress and all our elected leaders worked together for the good of our country. Nations across the world expressed concern, sadness and unity with the United States.

For one brief moment ...

AL DiLASCIA
Chicopee, Mass., Sept. 7, 2011

Sept. 11, 2001, marks the last day of my life that I did not own a cellphone. I was a college junior in Sarasota, Fla., and heard about the planes hitting the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. My father was supposed to be giving a briefing at the Pentagon that morning, and I had no way to get in touch with him.

Hours passed before a message made its way through family channels that my dad’s briefing had been canceled and that he was several miles away when the plane struck the Pentagon.

The heroic images and stories of the day, the ignorance and blind hate of the days that followed and the military and political quagmires of the subsequent years, though they are with me every day, will never overwhelm the biggest part of 9/11 for me: for several hours, I didn’t know if my dad was alive or dead.

The next day I went and bought a cellphone and called my dad.

ROBERT HUTCHISON
South Bend, Ind., Sept. 7, 2011

After 10 years, and this week’s necessary memorials, I am hopeful that America will finally move beyond 9/11. Not to forget it — no, we shall never forget. But can we finally become more than a nation of victims and vengeance?

Can we return again to a pre-9/11 era, when Americans listened more to reason than to rage? Can we, like every nation in Europe that has been targeted by terrorists, acquire the confidence to walk beside our fears and not let fear consume any more of our defense dollars, our civil liberties, our ability to listen to one another and to world opinion?

Ten long and difficult years have passed. It’s time to move on.

BRUCE WATSON
Leverett, Mass., Sept. 7, 2011

In a letter published in The Times on Sept. 12, 2001, I wrote that “we can only hope” that the response to the 9/11 outrage will be “prudent, measured, rational, and within the parameters of the law,” and that “the inevitable temptation to change fundamentally the nature of our society, by attacking the civil rights and civil liberties of any individual or group, must be resisted.”

Unfortunately, this admonition was not heeded, and in the 10 years since the attacks we have betrayed our core values and undermined our credibility, both domestically and internationally.

On the home front, we have compromised our basic commitment to civil rights and civil liberties through devices such as the Patriot Act, the 2008 amendments to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, and “national security letters” — in the process creating an enormous surveillance apparatus worthy of a police state.

Internationally, our response remains one of unbridled militarism and imperialism, as we continue to wage two wars, occupying Muslim nations with tens of thousands of troops and seeking to impose our will on those lands by force — and now even working to undo our pledge to leave Iraq by the end of 2011. We have employed torture as an instrument of policy, in flagrant violation of the rule of law, and declined to punish or prosecute the policymakers who authorized it. And Guantánamo is still open, despite President Obama’s promise to close it by Jan. 21, 2010.

In the long run, this unprincipled reaction does not make us safer, but simply invites more terrorism and repression. But most important, it is a national disgrace.

JOHN S. KOPPEL
Bethesda, Md., Sept. 7, 2011

I experienced 9/11 first as an American mother, then as a “Muslim other.” For the first three hours, I didn’t know whether my son, who worked for one of the banks at the World Trade Center, was in New York or in London on that fateful Tuesday; when he finally called me with a terse “Mom, I’m all right,” I thought of all the mothers who didn’t get that reassuring phone call.

My second thought was to pray that the perpetrators of the horror would have no connection to the Middle East. When that prayer was not answered, I understood that, after 20 years of believing myself and my family to be completely integrated in American society, we were now perceived differently.

In the weeks that followed, I volunteered to speak wherever I was invited, to try to distance the religion I had grown up with in Egypt from the atrocity perpetrated in its name. The first time my neighbor of eight years heard me speak at a church, she burst out, “I didn’t know we had Muslims in the cul-de-sac!”

Today, 10 years later, it seems evident that efforts to distance Islam from terrorism have proved futile; an unapologetic Islamophobia is the last allowable prejudice in America. The only hope of reversing that alarming trend lies in the Arab Spring; if it succeeds, it might open the eyes of the world to a different image of Arabs and Muslims — not as an undifferentiated horde of potential terrorist recruits but as peaceful young protesters aspiring to dignity and democracy.

SAMIA SERAGELDIN
Chapel Hill, N.C., Sept. 8, 2011

On that fateful morning I was in the South Tower above the 90th floor. I escaped without injury, but 13 of my colleagues lost their lives. I have been living with the memories of that day, just as I have been living with memories of the Holocaust. But enough is enough!

When will we stop this nonstop memorializing? Ten years have passed and the reconstruction on the World Trade Center site has barely begun. Ten years after World War II Europe was largely rebuilt.

I know families who lost loved ones, and all they ask for is that they stop being reminded constantly about what happened. A quiet and tasteful memorial for first responders and victims should be enough. It is time to close the door on the event and let the survivors live our normal lives.

W. BODKIN
New York, Sept. 7, 2011

I was at Stanford in California; it was a little before 6 a.m., local time. I was preparing to go for a walk with a friend and turned on the radio — something I rarely do in the morning. Then I heard the shocking news that a plane had hit the World Trade Center. I quickly turned on the television.

When my friend arrived, we watched in horror as the second plane hit. I did not immediately think “war.” President Bush was much too quick to announce that we were at war.

I was even more shocked when he decided to send troops to Iraq. Saddam Hussein had nothing to do with 9/11. That was a mistake from the beginning and has made me very suspicious about decisions politicians make and about those who are influencing them.

That war and the one in Afghanistan have cost us too many lives and too much money. They have also cost us our once-noble standing in the world. Instead of making us safer, they have increased Muslim hostility toward us. I see no end in sight until we get out of the wars and focus on rebuilding our own declining country.

 CAROL DELANEY
Providence, R.I., Sept. 7, 2011

Of all the stories I’ve read in the days and years after 9/11, the ones most vividly recalled have to do with people’s desire for connection until their very last moments — the jumpers who clung to one another as they stepped off the towers or the final phone calls made to loved ones to say goodbye.

In this post-9/11 world where connections seem more superficial, where the only way some people keep up with loved ones is by following Facebook and Twitter feeds, this 10th anniversary of 9/11 is a reminder to me to really connect to the people around me.

For all those we lost on 9/11, I hope those personal connections provided some comfort in their final moments.

JUDIE PARK
New York, Sept. 7, 2011

    Sept. 11: A Decade Later, a Day of Reflection, NYT, 11.9.2011
    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/11/opinion/sunday/
    sept-11-a-decade-later-a-day-of-reflection.html

 

 

 

 

 

On Sept. 11 Anniversary,

Rifts Amid Mourning

 

September 11, 2010

The New York Times

By ANNE BARNARD

and MANNY FERNANDEZ

 

The ninth anniversary of the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, was marked on Saturday by the memorials and prayer services of the past, but also by events hard to envision just a year ago — heated demonstrations blocks from ground zero, political and religious tensions and an unmistakable sense that a once-unifying day was now replete with division.

The names of nearly 3,000 victims were read under crisp blue skies in Lower Manhattan after the bells of the city’s houses of worship tolled at the exact moment — 8:46 a.m. — that the first plane struck the north tower of the World Trade Center. At the Pentagon, President Obama called for tolerance and said, “As Americans we are not — and never will be — at war with Islam.”

The familiar rituals at ground zero — the reciting of names, the occasionally cracking voice of a reader, the silences — had a new element. The posters and photographs that victims’ relatives held aloft bluntly injected politics into New York City’s annual ceremony, addressing the debate over plans to build a Muslim community center and mosque near ground zero.

Two posters commemorated the victims James V. DeBlase and Joon Koo Kang. One read, “Where are OUR rights?” The other: “We love you!! Islam mosque right next to ground zero??? We should stop this!!”

Differences were evident at the outset. About 7:25 a.m., as a choir finished up “The Star-Spangled Banner” at Zuccotti Park, just southeast of ground zero, Alyson Low, 39, a children’s librarian from Fayetteville, Ark., faced the media bleachers and held up a photo of her sister, Sara Low.

“Today is ONLY about my sister and the other innocents killed nine years ago,” read the text beside the photograph.

Nick Chiarchiaro, 67, a fire-alarm designer, gave her a hug. Ms. Low’s sister was a flight attendant on the plane that crashed into the north tower, where Mr. Chiarchiaro’s wife and niece were working and were killed.

“I’m tired of talking about everything else, tired of the politics,” she said. “Today is only about loss.”

But for Mr. Chiarchiaro, it was not. “A mosque is built on the site of a winning battle,” he said. “They are symbols of conquest. Hence we have a symbol of conquest here? I don’t think so.”

Thousands filled the makeshift plaza beside a construction site sprouting cranes and American flags on a crystal-clear morning a few degrees cooler than the one nine years ago. They carried cups of coffee and wore T-shirts emblazoned with the symbols of the response agencies that had paid so dearly. Until midday, they placed flowers at ground zero.

During the ceremony, knots of protesters wandered the area, sometimes arguing. In the afternoon, a few blocks away, police officers and barricades separated demonstrations, both for and against the Muslim center, that each drew about 2,000 people.

Around the country, people debated the meaning of 9/11 and the appropriateness of political rallies and protests on its anniversary. The day drew an array of national and international figures. John R. Bolton, the former United States ambassador to the United Nations, addressed the New York rally against the proposed Muslim center via video, and Geert Wilders, a Dutch politician who tried to ban the Koran in his country, described Islam as an intolerant “power of darkness,” saying, “We must draw the line, so that New York, rooted in Dutch tolerance, will never become New Mecca.”

Thousands were expected to gather later in Anchorage, paying $74 to $225 to hear speeches by Glenn Beck, the conservative broadcaster, and Sarah Palin, the former governor of Alaska.

At the Pentagon, in a memorial honoring the nearly 200 victims of the attack there, Mr. Obama said that those responsible had sought to divide the country.

“They may seek to spark conflict between different faiths, but as Americans we are not — and never will be — at war with Islam,” Mr. Obama said. “It was not a religion that attacked us that September day; it was Al Qaeda, a sorry band of men which perverts religion. And just as we condemn intolerance and extremism abroad, so will we stay true to our traditions here at home as a diverse and tolerant nation.”

In Shanksville, Pa., where United Airlines Flight 93 crashed after passengers rebelled against the plane’s hijackers, the focus remained on the victims, with speeches by the first lady, Michelle Obama, and her predecessor, Laura Bush.

Mrs. Obama celebrated the bravery of the passengers. “They called the people they loved — many of them giving comfort instead of seeking it, explaining they were taking action, and that everything would be O.K.,” she said. “And then they rose as one, they acted as one, and together they changed history’s course.”

Terry Jones, the Florida pastor who had announced, and then suspended, plans to burn copies of the Koran, arrived in New York on Friday seeking a meeting with Feisal Abdul Rauf, the imam behind the proposed Muslim center. The pastor’s presence in the city, under police protection, only added to the day’s drama.

On NBC’s “Today” show, Mr. Jones said that neither he nor his congregants would burn the Koran, whether or not he met with the imam. “We feel that God is telling us to stop,” he said.

Yet scattered imitators adopted his idea. Near the White House, 10 members of the anti-abortion group Operation Rescue tore pages from the Koran that they said showed Islam’s intolerance. Near ground zero, a man burned what appeared to be a page of the Koran. Behind him, someone held a sign: “Real Americans don’t burn Korans.”

In Afghanistan, five people were wounded when demonstrators protesting the proposed Koran-burning tried to storm a provincial governor’s house.

At the New York demonstrations, there were no arrests, the police said, and the few clashes were verbal. Priscilla Lynch, 58, a Massachusetts social worker who supported the center and was wearing a T-shirt with Arabic writing, crossed a street near the opposing protesters. Some yelled: “Go back to Mecca!”

Supporters of the center rallied at City Hall Park, two blocks from the proposed center. The group was organized by left-wing and pro-Palestinian groups, following a separate vigil Friday by Christian, Jewish, Muslim, interfaith and neighborhood organizations.

Stephen Northmore, 24, an emergency medical worker who attended both, wore an American flag as a cape. Three friends from his native Staten Island served in Iraq and Afghanistan, he said. One lost a leg; another was the sole survivor when a Humvee hit a roadside bomb.

“I think it’s offensive that my friends are ordered to go to Muslim countries and defend Muslims there against the same radicals that attacked us,” he said, “but peaceful Muslims can’t build a community center in New York City in their own country."

Sharif Chowdhury did not attend the rally after honoring his daughter and her husband, both Muslims who died in the World Trade Center, at the ceremony. But he said that objecting to the Islamic center implied that all Muslims were terrorists and violated religious freedom. “If you want to stop this,” he said, “you have to change the Constitution.”

Opponents of the Muslim center gathered on West Broadway for a protest organized by the Freedom Defense Initiative and Stop Islamization of America, both led by the conservative blogger Pamela Geller.

Jan Loght, 58, a pharmacist from Arizona, said she was “insulted” by the planned center and troubled by Islam. “If we allow them to build this, then that’s saying we gave in, and Americans don’t give in.”

Most of the crowd chanted “No Mosque” or “U.S.A.” When Ilario Pantano, an Iraq war veteran running for Congress in North Carolina, mentioned Muslims, some shouted, “Kill them all!”

It was a Sept. 11 starkly different in tone and emotion from those past. For the first time, the anniversary of the worst attack on American soil and New York’s deadliest disaster served almost as a backdrop to politics. The rancor of a ground zero riven by clashing views on Islam and the United States contrasted with the heartbreak of the place.

For many, the politics were cause for a new kind of mourning — for the setting aside of differences that many Americans felt on previous anniversaries.

“We need to get back to that commonality and spirit that we had after 9/11,” said Julie Menin, the chairwoman of the local community board, who supports the Muslim center.

Many 9/11 rituals went on unchanged. In the East Village, former workers from Windows on the World — the restaurant atop the trade center that lost 73 workers — shared a brunch at Colors, a restaurant some surviving workers opened after the attacks.

People of many faiths, born in places from Egypt and Yugoslavia to Brooklyn, passed around babies and pictures. Zlatko Mundjer, 38, who had tended bar at Windows on the World, said no one was talking politics. “We are all family here — we are neutral.”

Steve Harewood, 45, who had worked as a bartender, received a marriage proposal from Paula Sternitzky, 46. They set their wedding date on the spot: Sept. 11, 2011.


Reporting was contributed by Damien Cave, Helene Cooper,

Adam B. Ellick, Angela Macropoulos, Colin Moynihan,

Andy Newman, Sharon Otterman, Ashley Parker

and Rebecca White.

On Sept. 11 Anniversary, Rifts Amid Mourning,
NYT,
11.9.2010,
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/12/nyregion/12sept11.html 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Related > Anglonautes > Vocapedia

 

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