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Vocapedia > Politics, Economy > USA > Immigration > Illegal immigration, Illegals, Undocumented workers

 

 

 

Arguments about illegal immigration

flared Wednesday among an overflow crowd

for a meeting on the subject in Murrieta, Calif.

 

The town-hall-style meeting took place a day

after protesters blocked

buses taking immigrant mothers and children

to a Border Patrol station in town.

 

The migrants,

who had illegally crossed the Texas border,

were diverted to San Diego.

 

Monica Almeida/The New York Times

 

The Town Where Immigrants Hit a Human Wall

Influx of Central American Migrants Roils Murrieta, Calif.

by JENNIFER MEDINA        NYT        JULY 3, 2014

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/04/us/
influx-of-central-american-migrants-roils-murrieta-calif.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Women and children,

among a group of 700 migrants from Central America,

are transported in a police vehicle in Mexico.

 

Credit Miguel Sierra/European Press photo Agency

 

Stowaways Are Stranded in Mexico by Train Ban

By PAULINA VILLEGAS        NYT        MAY 10, 2014

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/11/world/americas/
stowaways-are-stranded-in-mexico-by-train-ban.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Immigrants from Latin America and Asia

show up inside a truck bound for the US

and detected by Mexican police X-ray equipment

in Chiapas State, Mexico on May 18.

 

The Police detected more than 500 hundred immigrants

inside two trucks at a check point.

 

AFP/Getty Images

Boston Globe > Big Picture > Immigration        June 13, 2011

http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2011/06/immigration.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Living Undocumented        Netflix        Official Trailer        2019

 

 

 

 

From Executive Producer Selena Gomez | Living Undocumented | Official Trailer        17 sept. 2019

 

From executive producer Selena Gomez,

Living Undocumented

follows eight undocumented immigrant families

who have volunteered to tell their stories

as they face potential deportation.

 

Ranging from harrowing to hopeful,

their journeys illuminate and humanize

the complex US immigration system

and depict the struggles that many must endure

in their quest to pursue the American dream.

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=WSGBP-Z4UXI

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Desierto Official Trailer #1        2016        Gael García Bernal, Jeffrey Dean Morgan

 

 

 

 

Desierto Official Trailer #1 (2016) - Gael García Bernal, Jeffrey Dean Morgan Movie HD

YouTube > Movieclips Trailers

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VEt8Mhya3vI

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

America’s 11 Million        NYT        23 November 2014

 

 

 

 

America’s 11 Million | The New York Times        23 November 2014

 

The demographics of America’s undocumented immigrants,

more than half of whom have been the United States for more than 10 years

and nearly a third of whom own homes.

 

Produced by: Emily B. Hager, Natalia V. Osipova and Aaron Byrd

Read the story here: http://nyti.ms/1F8d0qO

Watch more videos at: http://nytimes.com/video

 

YouTube

http://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=ba0F0IWjnlc&list=UUqnbDFdCpuN8CMEg0VuEBqA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Obama Immigration Reform 2014 Speech        NYT        20 November 2014

 

 

 

 

Obama Immigration Reform 2014 Speech:

Announcing Executive Action [FULL] Today on November 20th (2014)        NYT

 

Immigration Reform 2014 News:

In an address from the White House,

President Obama chose confrontation over conciliation

as he asserted the powers of the Oval Office

to reshape the nation’s immigration system.

 

Read the story here: http://nyti.ms/1F8d0qO

Watch more videos at: http://nytimes.com/video

 

YouTube

http://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=wejt939QXko&list=PL4CGYNsoW2iC8GsjBJHkBjKcm2RCnmSFa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

illegal immigration

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/06/01/
616257822/immigration-rights-activists-protest-trump-administration-child-separation-polic

 

http://www.npr.org/2017/08/22/
545087674/fact-check-what-has-president-trump-done-to-fight-illegal-immigration

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/03/08/
517561046/how-americas-idea-of-illegal-immigration-doesnt-always-match-reality

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/11/20/us/
2014-11-20-immigration.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/04/us/
influx-of-central-american-migrants-roils-murrieta-calif.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/21/us/us
-plans-to-step-up-detention-and-deportation-of-migrants.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

illegal immigrant

https://www.npr.org/2018/05/10/
609478998/john-kelly-despite-times-of-deep-frustration-no-regrets-taking-white-house-job

 

http://www.npr.org/2017/03/07/
518201210/how-did-we-get-to-11-million-unauthorized-immigrants

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/03/06/us/
politics/undocumented-illegal-immigrants.html

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2016/01/20/
463190789/to-be-young-gifted-and-black-it-helps-to-have-a-black-teacher

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/16/
nyregion/life-sentences-for-two-sex-traffickers-
who-preyed-on-mexican-immigrants.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/14/us/
obama-orders-review-of-deportations.html

 

http://takingnote.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/04/04/
no-more-illegal-immigrants/

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/18/us/
politics/white-house-continues-work-on-its-own-immigration-bill.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/30/us/
politics/obama-issues-call-for-immigration-overhaul.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/17/us/la-
takes-step-to-issuing-id-cards-to-illegal-immigrants.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2011/10/04/
should-alabama-schools-help-catch-illegal-immigrants

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/21/nyregion/
illegal-immigrants-transplant-cheaper-over-life-isnt-covered.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/03/world/
americas/mexican-immigrants-repeatedly-brave-risks-
to-resume-lives-in-united-states.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/17/
opinion/borderline-ridiculous.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/04/us/
04immig.html

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?
res=9507EED8163EF933A25756C0A9609C8B63&sec=&spon=

 

 

 

 

illegal immigrant > U visa

http://www.npr.org/2016/01/20/
463619424/immigration-relief-possible-in-return-for-crime-victims-cooperation

 

 

 

 

illegals

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/02/us/
protesters-in-california-delay-transfer-of-migrants.html

 

 

 

 

migrants        UK / USA

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2018/may/09/
refugee-odyssey-photographing-mexicos-viacrucis-migrante

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/10/us/
trump-immigration-border.html

 

 

 

 

living In the U.S. illegally

http://www.npr.org/2016/02/20/
467499864/a-family-tells-its-story-about-living-in-the-u-s-illegally

 

 

 

 

be in the country illegally

http://www.npr.org/2016/10/14/
494780972/-were-not-hypothetical-immigrants-in-the-us-illegally-speak-out

 

 

 

 

 unauthorized immigrants

https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2018/05/17/
611877563/during-roundtable-trump-calls-some-unauthorized-immigrants-animals

 

http://www.npr.org/2017/03/07/
518201210/how-did-we-get-to-11-million-unauthorized-immigrants

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/30/us/
politics/states-are-divided-by-the-lines-they-draw-on-immigration.html

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2015/03/30/us/
laws-affecting-unauthorized-immigrants.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/08/
opinion/reforms-for-work-visas.html

 

 

 

 

 unauthorized newcomers

 

 

 

 

child migrants /  young unauthorized migrants / undocumented minors

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/26/us/
snakes-and-thorny-brush-and-children-at-the-border-alone.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/18/nyregion/
immigration-child-migrant-surge-in-New-York-City.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/17/
opinion/immigrant-children-need-safety-shelter-and-lawyers.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/05/
opinion/children-on-the-run.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/03/us/
politics/new-us-effort-to-aid-unaccompanied-child-migrants.html

 

 

 

 

flee

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/10/us/
sharp-rise-in-cuban-migration-stirs-worries-of-a-mass-exodus.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

stowaway

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/11/world/americas/
stowaways-are-stranded-in-mexico-by-train-ban.html

 

 

 

 

be smuggled into the United States from Mexico

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/16/nyregion/
life-sentences-for-two-sex-traffickers-who-preyed-on-mexican-immigrants.html

 

 

 

 

(be) smuggled by truck

http://www.npr.org/2017/07/27/
539711819/why-are-undocumented-migrants-smuggled-by-truck

 

 

 

 

sneak into the United States

http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/08/12/
us-usa-immigration-decline-insight-idUSKBN0GC09G20140812

 

 

 

 

human trafficking

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/23/us/
san-antonio-truck-walmart-trafficking.html

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/07/23/
538838253/8-dead-20-in-critical-or-serious-condition-found-in-tractor-trailer-in-san-anton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

immigration violator

 

 

 

 

illegal alien

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/07/
opinion/even-at-berkeley-i-face-threats-as-an-undocumented-student.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/20/
opinion/a-fight-over-aliens.html

 

 

 

 

federal prosecutors > charge N with "transporting illegal aliens"

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/07/24/
539051518/truck-driver-charged-with-human-smuggling-after-10-die-in-stifling-conditions

 

 

 

 

aliens

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/03/
opinion/sunday/anti-immigrant-hatred-1920s.html?

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/10/16/
558198196/texas-truck-driver-pleads-guilty-to-smuggling-deaths-of-ten-undocumented-immigra

 

 

 

 

the foreign-born

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/01/
opinion/brooks-the-easy-problem.html

 

 

 

 

IDs

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/17/us/
la-takes-step-to-issuing-id-cards-to-illegal-immigrants.html

 

 

 

 

undocumented

https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2019/oct/02/
living-undocumented-selena-gomez-netflix-documentary

 

https://www.npr.org/2019/09/01/
755578194/9-months-after-salvadoran-woman-took-refuge-in-maryland-church-she-still-cant-le

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/07/18/
630185473/on-the-seventh-day-they-played-soccer

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/01/22/
578930256/undocumented-irish-unexpectedly-caught-in-trumps-immigration-dragnet

 

 

 

 

the undocumented

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/17/
opinion/borderline-ridiculous.html

 

 

 

 

undocumented migrant        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/world/ng-interactive/2014/aug/06/
-sp-texas-border-deadliest-state-undocumented-migrants

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/nov/29/
joaquin-luna-immigration-texas-suicide

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

undocumented immigrants        UK / USA

 

https://www.npr.org/2019/08/04/
745609635/undocumented-woman-finds-healing-and-support-in-sanctuary

 

https://www.npr.org/2019/01/01/
681241982/for-undocumented-immigrants-getting-a-drivers-license-could-spell-trouble-with-i

 

 

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2018/oct/16/
zero-tolerance-u-visa-victims-crime-women-undocumented

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/09/15/
648011874/dear-america-writes-a-pulitzer-winning-journalist-and-undocumented-immigrant

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/15/
opinion/sunday/immigration-laws-jose-antonio-vargas.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/03/
lens/photographs-that-humanize-the-immigration-debate.html

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/07/18/
630185473/on-the-seventh-day-they-played-soccer

 

https://www.nytimes.com/video/us/
100000005756490/how-texas-immigration-policies-silence-domestic-violence-survivors.html - June 3, 2018

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2018/05/21/
613115383/another-cause-of-doctor-burnout-being-forced-to-give-immigrants-unequal-care

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/03/06/
591301485/justice-department-sues-california-over-immigration-laws

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/02/09/
582522670/undocumented-immigrants-face-growing-backlog-of-crime-victim-visas

 

 

 

 

https://www.npr.org/2017/12/02/
567785978/actor-who-came-out-as-undocumented-is-fighting-for-hollywood-to-stand-with-daca

 

http://www.npr.org/2017/11/03/
561883665/fearing-checkpoints-undocumented-immigrants-cut-off-from-medical-care

 

http://www.npr.org/2017/08/25/
545282459/president-trump-pardons-former-sheriff-joe-arpaio

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/12/us/
stay-hide-or-leave-hard-choices-for-immigrants-in-the-heartland.html

 

http://www.npr.org/2017/07/27/
539711819/why-are-undocumented-migrants-smuggled-by-truck

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/05/us/
ingrid-encalada-latorre-deportation-denver.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/cities/video/2017/mar/17/
undocumented-workers-american-cities-video

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/20/
opinion/sunday/undocumented-in-trumps-america.html

 

http://www.gocomics.com/jen-sorensen/2016/07/26

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/03/08/
469221408/medicaid-rules-can-thwart-immigrants-who-need-dialysis

 

http://www.npr.org/2016/02/09/
466145280/u-s-churches-offer-safe-haven-for-a-new-generation-of-migrants

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/20/
opinion/the-supreme-court-the-nativists-and-immigrants.html

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/15/us/
politics/undocumented-immigrants-line-up-for-door-opened-by-obama.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

undocumented immigrants > health > Medicaid, medical care

http://www.npr.org/2017/11/03/
561883665/fearing-checkpoints-undocumented-immigrants-cut-off-from-medical-care

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/03/08/
469221408/medicaid-rules-can-thwart-immigrants-who-need-dialysis

 

 

 

 

undocumented person

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/24/
opinion/why-i-will-not-leave.html

 

 

 

 

undocumented people

https://www.npr.org/2018/03/06/
591301485/justice-department-sues-california-over-immigration-laws

 

 

 

 

undocumented worker

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/24/
opinion/my-undocumented-mom-americas-housekeeper.html

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/mar/28/
undocumented-migrants-worker-abuse-deportation

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/09/
magazine/undocumented-diner.html

 

 

 

 

undocumented student

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/07/
opinion/even-at-berkeley-i-face-threats-as-an-undocumented-student.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/11/
us/2-valedictorians-in-texas-declare-undocumented-status-and-outrage-ensues.html

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2015/10/26/
449279730/the-online-college-thats-helping-undocumented-students

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/27/
nyregion/financial-aid-for-undocumented-students-
no-longer-discussed-in-hushed-tones.html

 

http://www.npr.org/2014/05/08/
310794117/new-rules-aim-to-keep-school-doors-open-for-undocumented-students

 

 

 

 

undocumented minor

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/18/nyregion/
immigration-child-migrant-surge-in-New-York-City.html

 

 

 

 

without documentation

http://www.npr.org/2017/04/12/
522991849/one-taxi-drivers-mission-to-help-refugees-reach-the-canadian-border

 

 

 

 

come out as undocumented

https://www.npr.org/2017/12/02/
567785978/actor-who-came-out-as-undocumented-is-fighting-
for-hollywood-to-stand-with-daca

 

 

 

 

 

stay illegally

http://www.npr.org/2014/04/09/
300819913/obama-aunt-who-stayed-in-u-s-illegally-dies-at-61

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

pathway to legal residency

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/26/us/
politics/obama-and-senators-to-push-for-an-immigration-overhaul.html

 

 

 

 

noncitizens

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/21/us/
california-leads-in-expanding-noncitizens-rights.html

 

 

 

 

Obama’s Immigration Plan

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/11/20/us/
2014-11-20-immigration.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

federal immigration agents

 

 

 

 

immigration raid at N

 

 

 

 

E-Verify

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/04/us/
04immig.html

 

 

 

 

Alabama's immigration law        2011

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/28/
opinion/the-price-of-intolerance.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/17/us/in-alabama-
calls-for-revamping-immigration-law.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/28/us/alabama-
immigration-laws-critics-question-target.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/20/
opinion/its-what-they-asked-for.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/15/us/2-alabama-
immigration-law-provisions-are-blocked.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/04/opinion/alabamas-
shame.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/29/us/alabama-
immigration-law-upheld.html

 

 

 

 

Arizona Immigration Law (SB 1070)

https://www.nytimes.com/topic/subject/arizona-immigration-law-sb-1070

 

 

 

 

immigration crackdown

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/14/us/
measures-to-capture-illegal-aliens-nab-citizens.html

 

 

 

 

crackdown on illegal immigrants

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/29/us/
crackdown-on-criminal-immigrants-operation-cross-check-brings-2901-arrests.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Price of Intolerance

 

November 27, 2011

The New York Times


It’s early yet for a full accounting of the economic damage Alabama has done to itself with its radical new immigration law.

Farmers can tally the cost of crops left to rot as workers flee. Governments can calculate the loss of revenues when taxpayers flee. It’s harder to measure the price of a ruined business reputation or the value of investments lost or productivity lost as Alabamians stand in line for hours to prove their citizenship in any transaction with the government. Or what the state will ultimately spend fighting off an onslaught of lawsuits, or training and deploying police officers in the widening immigrant dragnet, or paying the cost of diverting scarce resources away from fighting real crimes.

A growing number of Alabamians say the price will be too high, and there is compelling evidence that they are right. Alabama is already at the low end of states in employment and economic vitality. It has long struggled to lure good jobs and shed a history of racial intolerance.

That was turning around and many foreign manufacturers, including Mercedes-Benz, Hyundai and Honda, have set up there. Its business-friendly reputation took a serious blow with the arrest in Tuscaloosa of a visiting Mercedes manager who was caught driving without his license and taken to jail as a potential illegal immigrant.

Sheldon Day, the mayor of Thomasville, has aggressively recruited foreign companies to his town, including a Chinese company — Golden Dragon Precise Copper Tube Group — that plans to build a $100 million plant there, with more than 300 jobs.

Mayor Day is now worried about that project and future prospects. He was quoted by The Press-Register in Mobile as saying business inquiries had dried up since the law was passed. “I know the immigration issue is being used against us.”

Alabama’s competitors certainly won’t waste any time. After the Tuscaloosa incident, the editorial page of The St. Louis Post-Dispatch invited Mercedes to Missouri. “We are the Show-Me State,” it said, “not the ‘Show me your papers’ state.”

Undocumented immigrants make up about 4.2 percent of Alabama’s work force, or 95,000 people in a state of 4.8 million. For all of the talk about clearing the way for unemployed Americans, there is no evidence that Alabamians in any significant numbers are rushing to fill the gap left by missing farm laborers and other low-wage immigrant workers.

The loss of job-filling, tax-paying workers may get even worse if Alabama is allowed to enforce a law requiring people who own or rent a trailer home to obtain an annual registration sticker. This puts the undocumented in a Catch-22 — criminals if they don’t have a sticker, criminals if they try to get one. For now, a judge has issued an order blocking enforcement. But if the state wins, many thousands may simply join the exodus, tearing more shreds in the economy.

The law’s damage is particularly heartbreaking in poor towns across the state, where small businesses are the economic lifeblood. We’ve spoken with Latino shopkeepers and restaurant owners in places like Albertville who say business is catastrophically down, with customers in hiding or flight. The situation isn’t much better in Huntsville and Birmingham.

There should be no doubt about the moral repugnance of Alabama’s law, which seeks to deny hardworking families the means to live. But even some of the law’s most enthusiastic supporters are beginning to acknowledge the law’s high economic cost. There is growing talk of revising or repealing the legislation. The sooner Alabama does so — and other states learn — the better.

The Price of Intolerance,
NYT,
27.11.2011,
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/28/
opinion/the-price-of-intolerance.html

 

 

 

 

 

It’s What They Asked For

 

October 19, 2011

The New York Times

 

Alabama’s new anti-immigrant law, the nation’s harshest, went into effect last month (a few provisions have been temporarily blocked in federal court), and it is already reaping a bitter harvest of dislocation and fear. Hispanic homes are emptying, businesses are closing, employers are wondering where their workers have gone. Parents who have not yet figured out where to go are lying low and keeping children home from school.

To the law’s architects and supporters, this is excellent news. “You’re encouraging people to comply with the law on their own,” said Kris Kobach, the Kansas secretary of state, who has a side career of drafting extremist immigration legislation for states and cities, notoriously in Arizona and now in Alabama.

Alabama’s law is the biggest test yet for “attrition through enforcement,” a strategy espoused by Mr. Kobach and others to drive away large numbers of illegal immigrants without the hassle and expense of a police-state roundup. All you have to do, they say, is make life hard enough and immigrants will leave on their own. In such a scheme, panic and fear are a plus; suffering is the point.

The pain isn’t felt just by the undocumented. Legal immigrants and native-born Alabamans who happen to be or look Hispanic are now far more vulnerable to officially sanctioned harassment. Many of those children being kept home from school by frightened parents are born and bred Americans.

The problems do not stop there. Farmers are already worrying that with the exodus, crops will go unpicked. Like much of the rest of the country, Alabama needs immigrant labor, because too many native-born citizens lack the skill, the stamina and the willingness to work in the fields — even in a time of steep unemployment.

The new law has also added frustrating layers of paperwork for Alabamans who must now prove legal status when enrolling schoolchildren, signing leases and interacting with government. After the law went into effect, the lines at the Department of Motor Vehicles in Birmingham grew so long that officials had to bring in portable toilets.

Alabama’s reputation has also taken a huge hit just when it is trying to lure international businesses. No matter how officials may try to tempt foreign automakers, say, with low taxes and wages, the state is already infamous as a regional capital of xenophobia.

If Alabama succeeds in driving out all of its estimated 120,000 unauthorized immigrants, restrictionists will surely cheer. They will have only 49 states and 11 million more people to go.

There is another more humane and realistic path in which immigrants could earn the right to stay — if Congress would accept its responsibility and move ahead with serious immigration reform. America’s history shows that assimilation works better than deportation — for everyone. If first-generation immigrants don’t all learn English, their children and grandchildren invariably do. They may be poor, but their children grow up to be productive citizen taxpayers. Unless, of course, you frighten and oppress them, and forbid them to work, live and go to school.

Other states that are tempted to follow should look at what is happening in Alabama. Nobody is winning there.

It’s What They Asked For,
NYT,
19.10.2011,
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/20/
opinion/its-what-they-asked-for.html

 

 

 

 

 

Alabama’s Shame

 

October 3, 2011

The New York Times

 

Only about 3.5 percent of Alabama’s population is foreign-born, according to the Census Bureau. Undocumented immigrants made up roughly 4.2 percent of its work force in 2010, according to the Pew Hispanic Center. But the drafters of Alabama’s harsh immigration law wanted to turn their state into the country’s most hostile territory for illegal immigrants. They are succeeding, as many of Alabama’s most vulnerable residents can attest.

The law went into effect over the weekend, after being largely upheld by a federal district judge. Volunteers on an immigrant-rights group’s hot line said that since then they have received more than 1,000 calls from pregnant women afraid to go to the hospital, crime victims afraid to go the police, parents afraid to send their children to school.

School superintendents and principals across the state confirm that attendance of Hispanic children has dropped noticeably since the word went out that school officials are now required to check the immigration status of newly enrolled students and their parents.

That rule is part of the law’s sweeping attempt to curtail the rights and complicate the lives of people without papers, making them unable to enter contracts, find jobs, rent homes or access government services. In other words, to be isolated, unemployable, poor, defenseless and uneducated.

The education crackdown is particularly senseless and unconstitutional. In 1982, the Supreme Court found that all children living in the United States have the right to a public education, whatever their immigration status. The justices’ reasoning was shaped not by compassion but practicality: it does the country no good to perpetuate an uneducated underclass.

Officials in Alabama — some well meaning, others less so — insisted that nothing in the new law is intended to deny children an education. School districts, they noted, are supposed to collect only numbers of children without papers, not names.

“I don’t know where the misinformation’s coming from,” Alabama’s interim state school superintendent, Larry Craven, told NPR. “If you have difficulty understanding the language anyway, then who knows what they’re being told?” With comments like that, it’s not surprising that any of “them” would be frightened.

The Obama administration was right to sue to try to stop the Alabama law. It needs to press ahead with its appeal of the ruling and challenge similar laws in Utah, Georgia, Indiana and South Carolina.

President Obama needs to show stronger leadership in defending core American values in the face of the hostility that has overtaken Alabama and so many other states. He can start by scrapping the Secure Communities program, which encourages local immigration dragnets and reinforces the false notion that most undocumented immigrants pose a threat to this country’s security.

As for Alabama, one has to wonder at such counterproductive cruelty. Do Alabamans want children too frightened to go to school? Or pregnant women too frightened to seek care? Whom could that possibly benefit?

Alabama’s Shame,
NYT,
3.10.2011,
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/04/
opinion/alabamas-shame.html

 

 

 

 

 

2,901 Arrested

in Crackdown

on Criminal Immigrants

 

September 28, 2011
The New York Times
By CHARLIE SAVAGE

 

WASHINGTON — The Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency announced on Wednesday that it had arrested 2,901 immigrants who have criminal records, highlighting the Obama administration’s policy of focusing on such people while putting less emphasis on deporting illegal immigrants who pose no demonstrated threat to public safety.

Officials from the agency portrayed the seven-day sweep, called Operation Cross Check, as the largest enforcement and removal operation in its history. It involved arrests in all 50 states of criminal offenders of 115 nationalities, including people convicted of manslaughter, armed robbery, aggravated assault and sex crimes.

“These are not people who are making a positive contribution to their communities,” said the agency’s director, John Morton. “They are not the kind of people we want walking our streets.”

More than 1,600 of those arrested had been convicted of a felony. The remainder had a misdemeanor conviction for matters like theft, forgery and driving while intoxicated, the agency said. Those arrested included illegal immigrants and lawful resident noncitizens who had been convicted of crimes that made them eligible to be deported.

The agency did not release the names of all the people arrested. But a sampling that showed the geographical breadth of the operation included one person from the New York City area: Virgilio Lopez-Ruiz, a 54-year-old Dominican who was living in the Bronx. He had been convicted on Nov. 16, 1988, of second-degree attempted murder, it said. It did not provide his immigration status.

Mr. Morton issued a memo in June suggesting that the agency should place a priority on deporting noncitizen criminals like drug dealers and gang members, as well as people who have flagrantly violated immigration laws, for example by ignoring deportation orders or re-entering the country after being removed. Under that approach, it would give less emphasis to removing illegal immigrants who are not a public safety or national security threat.

In August, the White House essentially ratified that approach, announcing that the Department of Homeland Security would, on a case-by-case basis, suspend deportation proceedings against people who posed no public safety threat. The policy shift has been criticized by some Republicans as a backdoor form of the so-called Dream Act — a bill, which has stalled in Congress, that would provide relief to illegal immigrants who were brought to the United States as children and who want to attend college or join the armed forces.

But Mr. Morton said Wednesday that there were far more illegal immigrants in the United States than the agency has the resources to remove. He said that the agency has been deporting about 390,000 people annually for the past several years, a record level, and that the question is who those people should be. In 2008, he said, about a third were criminal offenders, but this year about half have been, and the majority of the remainder have been flagrant violators of immigration law.

2,901 Arrested in Crackdown on Criminal Immigrants,
NYT,
28.9.2011,
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/29/us/
crackdown-on-criminal-immigrants-operation-cross-check-brings-2901-arrests.html

 

 

 

 

 

In Alabama, a Harsh Bill

for Residents Here Illegally

 

June 3, 2011

The New York Times

By JULIA PRESTON

 

Alabama has passed a sweeping bill to crack down on illegal immigrants that both supporters and opponents call the toughest of its kind in the country, going well beyond a law Arizona passed last year that caused a furor there.

The measure was passed by large margins in the Alabama Senate and the House, both Republican-controlled, in votes on Thursday. Governor Robert Bentley, a Republican, is expected to sign the bill into law.

“Alabama is now the new No. 1 state for immigration enforcement,” said Kris Kobach, a constitutional lawyer who is secretary of state in Kansas. He has helped write many state bills to curtail illegal immigration, including Alabama’s.

“This bill invites discrimination into every aspect of the lives of people in Alabama,” said Cecillia Wang, director of the immigrants’ rights project of the American Civil Liberties Union, which has brought legal challenges against several state immigration-control laws. Calling Alabama’s bill “outrageous and blatantly unconstitutional,” Ms. Wang said, “We will take action if the governor signs it.”

The Alabama bill includes a provision similar to one that stirred controversy in Arizona, authorizing state and local police officers to ask about the immigration status of anyone they stop based on a “reasonable suspicion” the person is an illegal immigrant. Federal courts have suspended most of that Arizona law.

Alabama’s bill goes beyond Arizona’s. It bars illegal immigrants from enrolling in any public college after high school. It obliges public schools to determine the immigration status of all students, requiring parents of foreign-born students to report the immigration status of their children.

The bill requires Alabama’s public schools to publish figures on the number of immigrants — both legal and illegal — who are enrolled and on any costs associated with the education of illegal immigrant children.

The bill, known as H.B. 56, also makes it a crime to knowingly rent housing to an illegal immigrant. It bars businesses from taking tax deductions on wages paid to unauthorized immigrants.

“This is a jobs-creation bill for Americans,” said Representative Micky Hammon, a Republican who was a chief sponsor of the bill. “We really want to prevent illegal immigrants from coming to Alabama and to prevent those who are here from putting down roots,” he said.

The Alabama bill comes at the end of a legislative season when many states wrestled with immigration crackdown proposals. Measures focusing only on enforcement failed in 16 states, according to a tally by the National Immigration Forum in Washington, a group opposing such laws.

In May, Georgia adopted a tough enforcement law, which civil rights groups filed a lawsuit on Thursday seeking to stop. Proponents of state immigration enforcement laws won a major victory last week when the Supreme Court upheld a 2007 law in Arizona imposing penalties on employers who hire illegal immigrants.

Alabama’s law includes some provisions similar to the Arizona statute that courts rejected as incursions on legal terrain reserved for the federal government. But Michael Hethmon, general counsel of the Immigration Reform Law Institute in Washington, said the Alabama bill was a compendium of measures against illegal immigrants that his group had tested in other states. Mr. Hethmon’s group is the legal arm of the Federation for American Immigration Reform, which seeks to reduce immigration.

The bill requires all Alabama employers to use a federal system, E-Verify, to confirm the legal status of all workers. The measure also makes it a state crime for an immigrant to fail to carry a document proving legal status, and makes it a crime for anyone to transport an illegal immigrant.

    In Alabama, a Harsh Bill for Residents Here Illegally, NYT, 3.6.2011,
    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/04/us/04immig.html

 

 

 

 

 

Judge Blocks

Arizona’s Immigration Law

 

July 28, 2010

The New York Times

By RANDAL C. ARCHIBOLD

 

PHOENIX — A federal judge on Wednesday blocked the most controversial parts of Arizona’s immigration enforcement law from going into effect, a ruling that at least temporarily squashed a state policy that had inflamed the national debate over immigration.

Judge Susan Bolton of Federal District Court issued a preliminary injunction against sections of the law, scheduled to take effect on Thursday, that called for police officers to check a person’s immigration status while enforcing other laws and required immigrants to prove that they were authorized to be in the country or risk state charges. She issued the injunction in response to a legal challenge brought against the law by the Obama administration.

A spokesman for Gov. Jan Brewer, a Republican who signed the law and has campaigned on it for election to a full term, said Wednesday that the governor would appeal the injunction on Thursday and ask for a speedy review. Legal experts predicted that the case could end up before the Supreme Court.

The law, designed to seek and deport illegal immigrants in a state that is the principal gateway for illegal border crossers, had provoked intense debate from coast to coast, drawing support in several polls but generating boycotts of the state by major civil rights groups and several cities and towns.

It renewed calls for an overhaul of federal immigration law and led to repeated rebukes of it from President Obama and Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr., who maintained that immigration policy is under the purview of the federal government, not individual states. The Mexican government, joined by seven other Latin American nations, supported one of the lawsuits against the law; the attorneys general of several states backed Arizona.

The ruling came four days before 1,200 National Guard members were scheduled to report to the Southwest border to assist federal and local law enforcement agencies there, part of the Obama administration’s response to growing anxiety over the border and immigration that has fed support for the law.

Judge Bolton, appointed to the bench by President Bill Clinton, did allow some, less debated provisions of the law to go into effect, including one that bans cities from refusing to cooperate with federal immigration agents.

But she largely sided with arguments in a lawsuit by the Obama administration that the law, rather than closely hewing to existing federal statutes, as its supporters have claimed, interferes with longstanding federal authority over immigration and could lead to harassment of citizens and legal immigrants.

“Preserving the status quo through a preliminary injunction is less harmful than allowing state laws that are likely pre-empted by federal law to be enforced,” she said.

“There is a substantial likelihood that officers will wrongfully arrest legal resident aliens,” she wrote. “By enforcing this statute, Arizona would impose,” she said, citing a previous Supreme Court case, a “ ‘distinct, unusual and extraordinary’ burden on legal resident aliens that only the federal government has the authority to impose.”

The judge’s decision was not her final word on the case. In granting the injunction, she simply indicated that the Justice Department was likely, but not certain, to prevail on those points at a later trial in federal court. She made no ruling on the six other suits that also challenged the law.

Her ruling, issued as demonstrators both for and against the law gathered here, and after hearings in three of the seven lawsuits against the it, seemed more likely to add another log to the fire than settle matters.

“This fight is far from over,” said Ms. Brewer, whose lawyers had argued that Congress granted states the power to enforce immigration law particularly when, in their view, the federal government fell short. “In fact,” she added, “it is just the beginning, and at the end of what is certain to be a long legal struggle, Arizona will prevail in its right to protect our citizens.”

State Senator Russell Pearce, a Republican and chief sponsor of the law, said in a statement that he was confident that the sections blocked by Judge Bolton would survive on appeal, noting the state’s previous victories in court on other statutes designed to give it a larger role in immigration enforcement. “The courts have made it clear states have the inherent power to enforce the laws of this country,” he said.

But Gabriel Chin, a professor at the University of Arizona School of Law who has studied the law, called the ruling “a nearly complete victory for the position of the United States.”

He noted that she ruled in the federal government’s favor on most of the points it challenged.

Aside from stopping the requirement that the police initiate immigration checks, the judge also blocked provisions that allowed the police to hold anyone arrested for any crime until his immigration status was determined.

“Requiring Arizona law enforcement officials and agencies to determine the immigration status of every person who is arrested burdens lawfully present aliens because their liberty will be restricted while their status is checked,” she wrote.

She also said Arizona could not make it a state crime for noncitizens to be in the state without proper documents, nor could it allow the police to conduct arrests without warrants if officers believed the offense would result in their deportation. She said there was a “substantial likelihood” of wrongful arrests.

The parts of the law she did allow were not challenged by the Justice Department, but do figure in some of the other lawsuits filed. They include forbidding “sanctuary city” policies by allowing residents to sue the local authorities if they adopt policies restricting cooperation with the federal government in immigration enforcement.

She also let stand a provision aimed at day laborers, who are mostly Latin American immigrants, by making it a crime to stop a vehicle in traffic or block traffic to hire someone off the street. But she blocked a provision that barred illegal immigrants from soliciting work in public places.

The law, adopted in April, coincided with economic anxiety and followed a number of high-profile crimes attributed to illegal immigrants and smuggling. It has become an issue in Congressional and local campaigns across the country.

Terry Goddard, the Arizona attorney general who opposed the law and is a possible Democratic opponent to Ms. Brewer, was quick to condemn her for signing it. “Jan Brewer played politics with immigration, and she lost,” he said in a statement.

But Republican candidates, including Senator John McCain of Arizona, who is seeking re-election, criticized the Obama administration for bringing suit.

“Instead of wasting taxpayer resources filing a lawsuit against Arizona and complaining that the law would be burdensome,” Mr. McCain said in a joint statement with Senator Jon Kyl, Republican of Arizona, “the Obama administration should have focused its efforts on working with Congress to provide the necessary resources to support the state in its efforts to act where the federal government has failed to take responsibility.”

Judge Blocks Arizona’s Immigration Law,
NYT,
28.7.2010,
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/29/us/29arizona.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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