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Vocapedia > Arts > Architecture, Cities > Towns, Cities, Suburbs, Urban living > UK, USA

 

 

 

Discrimination In Washington Dc Schools

 

Date taken: January 1948

 

Photograph: Thomas Mcavoy

 

Life Images

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

hamlet

 

 

 

 

hamlet of houses

 

 

 

 

village        USA

http://www.npr.org/2015/08/19/
431959508/double-disasters-leave-an-alabama-fishing-village-struggling

 

 

 

 

town        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/money/2013/dec/20/
lets-move-to-bradford-on-avon

 

 

 

 

town        USA

https://www.npr.org/sections/pictureshow/2021/06/26/
997465316/a-photographer-saw-an-arkansas-town-fading-his-new-book-keeps-its-stories-alive

 

http://www.npr.org/2017/06/24/
531617584/meyers-chuck-ak-99903

http://www.npr.org/2017/06/04/
528650995/saving-cairo-a-once-thriving-river-town-finds-itself-on-life-support

 

 

 

 

environmentally friendly towns / eco towns        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/cities/2015/may/06/
dangers-ecogentrification-best-way-make-city-greener

 

http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2007/may/13/
uk.labourleadership

 

 

 

 

buildings covered in plants        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2021/apr/05/
re-wilding-our-cities-beauty-biodiversity-and-the-biophilic-cities-movement

 

 

 

 

new towns        USA

http://www.theguardian.com/cities/2014/jun/03/
from-garden-city-to-new-towns-why-britain-should-be-proud-of-its-planners

 

 

 

 

Green belt        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/may/18/
housing-crisis-solution-build-on-green-belt

 

 

 

 

Chinatown        USA

http://www.npr.org/blogs/codeswitch/2015/03/06/
391216309/the-fascinating-story-of-new-orleans-two-lost-chinatowns

 

 

 

 

hometown        USA

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/08/03/
crumbling-american-dreams/

 

 

 

 

ghost town        USA

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/04/
business/coronavirus-rural-america-oregon.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/01/business/
energy-environment/a-ghost-town-going-green.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/06/12/us/
12ghosttown.html

 

 

 

 

boomtown        USA

http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/11/26/
who-is-responsible-for-making-sure-san-francisco-
is-accessible-to-everyone-not-just-the-tech-elite/

 

 

 

 

IRE > In Ireland, Ghosts of Towns That Never Were / Ghost Estates

Valérie Anex photographs        USA        2011

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/08/22/
in-ireland-ghosts-of-towns-that-never-were/

 

 

 

 

model towns

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dismantling Detroit        NYT        19 January 2012

 

 

 

 

Dismantling Detroit        Video        Op-Docs        19 January 2012

 

The filmmakers Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady look at young men

who salvage scrap metal from Detroit's derelict buildings,

set against the backdrop of globalization.

 

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qTEIGtHXOT4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

city, cities        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/cities

https://www.theguardian.com/cities/series/extreme-cities

https://www.theguardian.com/cities/series/blueprint-for-a-city

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2021/apr/25/
thomas-heatherwick-the-city-will-be-a-new-kind-of-space

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2021/feb/07/
the-big-picture-a-different-side-to-glasgow-tenements-douglas-corrance

 

 

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2020/jun/25/
dystopia-or-utopia-the-future-of-cities-could-go-either-way

 

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2020/jun/02/
coronavirus-cities-elite-community

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/may/22/
coronavirus-will-reshape-our-cities-we-just-dont-know-how-yet

 

 

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/cities/2014/jan/27/
guardian-cities-site-urban-future-dwell-human-history-welcome

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

city        USA

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/money/2020/05/19/
858068115/what-is-the-future-of-cities

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/11/
opinion/coronavirus-us-cities-inequality.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/19/
us/coronavirus-moving-city-future.html

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/17/
opinion/designing-private-cities-open-to-all.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Guardian series > the story of cities        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/cities/series/
the-story-of-cities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

city living        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2021/feb/07/
the-big-picture-a-different-side-to-glasgow-tenements-douglas-corrance

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

sustainable city        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/12/07/
opinion/how-to-build-a-sustainable-city.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

twin cities        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2016/mar/04/
twin-cities-coventry-stalingrad-war

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

city dwellers        USA

 

https://www.npr.org/2020/07/08/
887585383/new-yorkers-look-to-suburbs-and-beyond-other-city-dwellers-may-be-next

 

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/07/22/
how-nature-changes-the-brain/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

supercity        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/20/world/asia/in-china-
a-supercity-rises-around-beijing.html 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

cities and cars        UK

 

http://www.theguardian.com/cities/2015/apr/28/
end-of-the-car-age-how-cities-outgrew-the-automobile

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

privatized cities        UK

 

http://www.theguardian.com/cities/2015/apr/21/
privatised-cities-your-pictures-and-stories

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

urbanize        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/17/
opinion/designing-private-cities-open-to-all.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

city > livability        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/04/
opinion/las-vegas-gets-a-new-act.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

city > environmental impact > energy-efficiency standards        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/21/nyregion/
new-york-city-plans-major-energy-efficiency-improvements-in-its-buildings.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 10 world cities

with the highest murder rates – in pictures        UK        2014

 

Data from the UN Office on Drugs and Crime

shows the most up-to-date available

homicide rates per 100,000 people

for the most populous cities of 137 countries.

 

The Americas overtook Africa

as the region

with the highest murder rate in 2012

– with eight of the world’s 10 deadliest cities

found there

 

http://www.theguardian.com/cities/gallery/2014/jun/24/
10-world-cities-highest-murder-rates-homicides-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

cities > urban decay

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rogers’ images,

showing in Birmingham for the first time

since they were taken fifty years ago,

offer a panorama of the city

at a time of disorienting change

 

Photograph: Richard P Rogers

 

The ghost streets of 1960s Birmingham – in pictures

In 1968,

American photographers

Janet Mendelsohn and Richard P. Rogers

documented the suburbs of Birmingham,

fraught with poverty and poor housing conditions.

Their photographs are currently being exhibited

as part of the Flatpack Film Festival

G

Tue 17 Apr 2018

https://www.theguardian.com/cities/gallery/2018/apr/17/
the-ghost-streets-of-1960s-birmingham-in-pictures-janet-mendelsohn-richard-p-rogers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

cities > Birmingham        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/cities/gallery/2018/apr/17/
the-ghost-streets-of-1960s-birmingham-in-pictures-janet-mendelsohn-richard-p-rogers

 

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2016/jan/11/
tin-baths-beehives-and-brothels-life-on-the-wickedest-road-in-britain-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

cities > Glasgow        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2021/feb/07/
the-big-picture-a-different-side-to-glasgow-tenements-douglas-corrance

 

https://www.theguardian.com/cities/gallery/2017/jun/02/
urchins-alleyways-glimpse-19th-century-glasgow-industry-in-pictures#img-11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

cities > Glasgow > Demolition        UK

 

http://www.theguardian.com/cities/2015/apr/22/
disappearing-glasgow-documenting-demolition-city-troubled-past

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

derelict        UK

 

http://www.theguardian.com/cities/2015/apr/22/
disappearing-glasgow-documenting-demolition-city-troubled-past

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UK > Bristol        UK

 

http://www.theguardian.com/cities/2015/nov/05/
bristol-conundrum-gentrification-danger-poor-
really-stretched-stokes-croft-george-ferguson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UK > Leeds        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2020/may/30/
the-northern-view-leeds-through-the-decades-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UK > Manchester        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2021/jul/10/
open-all-hours-manchester-shopfronts-of-the-early-80s-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UK > Plymouth        UK

 

http://www.theguardian.com/cities/2015/nov/04/
rich-people-reinvention-once-great-naval-city-plymouth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

San Francisco, New York and Boston

- the United States' most walkable cities        USA

 

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-cities/
san-francisco-most-walkable-u-s-city-website-says-idUSN16662315
20080717

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA > city > Atlanta        UK

 

http://www.theguardian.com/cities/2014/mar/17/atlanta-
food-deserts-stranded-struggling-survive

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA > city > Baltimore        USA

 

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/06/24/
devin-allens-inside-story-in-baltimore/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA > city > Camden, N.J.        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/01/nyregion/camden-
turns-around-with-new-police-force.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA > city > Chicago        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/2016/04/09/
473623484/chicago-murder-rate-spikes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA > city > Detroit        UK / USA

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2020/jun/30/
detroit-opulent-ruins-20th-century-architecture-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

http://www.npr.org/2015/12/12/
459192004/post-bankruptcy-a-booming-detroit-is-still-fragile

https://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=tRG4y98PkvI - video -NYT - 13 September 2015

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/09/
opinion/frank-bruni-the-spirit-and-promise-of-detroit.html

http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2015/08/11/
420905069/who-fixes-detroit-young-black-detroiters-
want-to-resurrect-a-lost-neighborhood

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/15/
opinion/let-syrians-settle-detroit.html

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/12/07/
opinion/sunday/exposures-detroit-by-air-alex-maclean.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/08/us/
finding-816-million-and-fast-to-save-detroit.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/13/magazine/
the-post-post-apocalyptic-detroit.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/29/arts/design/
detroit-artists-at-marianne-boesky-and-marlborough-galleries.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/07/opinion/
calls-for-rebirth-not-demolition-in-detroit.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/28/us/
detroit-task-force-says-blight-cleanup-will-cost-850-million.html

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/05/14/
detroit-from-both-sides-of-the-coin/

http://www.theguardian.com/cities/ng-interactive/2014/apr/11/
rise-fall-revival-detroit-in-pictures-photography-then-now

http://www.theguardian.com/cities/2014/apr/03/
the-death-of-a-great-american-city-why-does-anyone-still-live-in-detroit

http://www.npr.org/2014/03/09/
287877060/city-versus-suburb-a-longstanding-divide-in-detroit

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/18/us/detroit-
tries-to-get-a-clear-picture-of-its-blight.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/06/opinion/detroits-
immigration-solution.html

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2014/01/21/
264689426/buying-a-detroit-house-for-500-and-then-explaining-why

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA > city > Los Angeles        UK / USA

 

https://www.theguardian.com/cities/gallery/2017/feb/09/
unbuilt-los-angeles-city-might-have-been-in-pictures

 

http://www.theguardian.com/cities/2016/apr/25/
story-cities-los-angeles-great-american-streetcar-scandal

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/12/29/
opinion/los-angeles-a-city-of-better-angels.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/06/
opinion/welcome-to-hooverville-california.html

http://www.npr.org/2015/03/22/
393912929/understanding-skid-rows-tensions-after-a-fatal-police-shooting

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/22/
opinion/sunday/viva-gentrification.html

http://www.theguardian.com/books/booksblog/2015/mar/12/
reading-american-cities-books-about-los-angeles

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/02/us/
pipes-roads-and-walks-crack-as-los-angeles-defers-repairs.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/10/us/
report-finds-a-los-angeles-in-decline.html

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/feb/03/
leave-new-york-for-los-angeles

http://www.theguardian.com/cities/2014/jan/28/
los-angeles-city-plan-california

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/08/us/
garcetti-new-los-angeles-mayor-reflects-changing-city.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA > city > New Orleans

 

http://www.npr.org/series/429056277/
hurricane-katrina-10-years-of-recovery-and-reflection

 

http://www.npr.org/2015/08/28/
432059261/billions-spent-on-flood-barriers-but-new-orleans-still-a-fishbowl

http://www.theguardian.com/cities/gallery/2015/jul/30/
abandoned-new-orleans-hurricane-katrina-in-pictures

http://www.theguardian.com/cities/2015/jul/27/
new-orleans-hurricane-katrina-10-years-lessons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA > city > San Francisco        UK / USA

 

http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2016/mar/21/
death-by-gentrification-the-killing-that-shamed-san-francisco

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/23/us/
high-rents-elbow-latinos-from-san-franciscos-mission-district.html

http://www.theguardian.com/travel/2014/sep/13/-sp-san-francisco-
neighbourhoods-pico-iyer

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/29/travel/san-francisco-noir.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/01/arts/design/san-francisco-
repurposes-the-old-for-the-future.html

http://www.theguardian.com/travel/2014/apr/11/
top-10-historic-sights-san-francisco

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA > Sin City / Las Vegas        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/04/opinion/las-vegas-
gets-a-new-act.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/01/travel/this-is-las-vegas.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA > California desert > Slab City        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/12/us/
talk-of-land-sale-divides-southern-californias-slab-city-dwellers.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

future cities in film        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/cities/gallery/2014/jan/29/
future-cities-in-film

 

 

 

 

metropolis

 

 

 

 

 

downtown

 

 

 

 

urban living > mental health        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/cities/2014/feb/25/
city-stress-mental-health-rural-kind

 

 

 

 

commuting        USA

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/10/28/
commutings-hidden-cost/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

planner        UK

 

http://www.theguardian.com/cities/2014/jun/03/
from-garden-city-to-new-towns-why-britain-should-be-proud-of-its-planners

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2006/jul/17/
communities.homes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peter Geoffrey Hall        UK        1932-2014

 

British planner widely credited

with developing the concept of enterprise zones

to spur growth by reducing taxes and regulations

in blighted urban areas

(...)

Professor Hall,

a student of cities large and small,

was an innovative planner

who favored expansion of rail service

and the creation of “garden cities”

— not suburbs but smaller cities,

set amid small-scale agriculture,

that he believed held particular promise.

 

But he was best known

for proposing enterprise zones

to help cities so awash

in poverty and empty of industry

that they needed drastic assistance.

 

In his view,

government needed

to eliminate taxes and regulations

that made businesses difficult

to start or drove them elsewhere.

 

He was a socialist politically,

but also a pragmatist.

 

By the late 1970s

he had begun working with officials

close to the conservative

prime minister, Margaret Thatcher,

to create enterprise zones

in several big cities in England.

 

Appealing

to small-government conservatives

and liberals from stricken cities,

the idea quickly crossed the Atlantic.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/07/business/
peter-hall-city-planner-who-devised-the-enterprise-zone-dies-at-82.html

 

 

 

 

city planning

http://www.npr.org/2017/04/21/
525046934/city-planning-as-a-contact-sport-in-citizen-jane-battle-for-the-city

 

 

 

 

USA > storms > cities > critical infrastructure

civil engineering / public works projects        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/23/
opinion/international/the-stormy-politics-of-building.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

inhabitant        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/money/2014/apr/07/
londons-most-expensive-street-kensington-palace-gardens

 

 

 

 

resident        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/cities/2014/jan/28/
los-angeles-city-plan-california

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

cityscapes

 

 

 

 

skyscraper        UK / USA

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2012/dec/02/
london-high-rise-craze-ruins-skyline

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/26/nyregion/
26empire.html

 

 

 

 

high-rise        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2012/dec/02/
london-high-rise-craze-ruins-skyline

 

 

 

 

 

high-rise        USA

https://www.nytimes.com/projects/2013/high-rise/index.html

 

 

 

 

tower        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2012/dec/02/
london-high-rise-craze-ruins-skyline

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

skyline        UK / USA

 

http://www.theguardian.com/cities/2016/apr/20/
london-housing-crisis-sub-prime-problem-super-prime

 

 

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/apr/13/
boris-johnson-proper-debate-london-skyline

 

http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2014/mar/12/
london-skyscrapers-shard-gherkin-architecture

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/30/realestate/commercial/
the-superman-building-in-providence-now-dark-is-in-need-of-a-savior.html

 

 

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2012/dec/02/
london-high-rise-craze-ruins-skyline

 

 

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/gallery/2010/sep/21/
aerial-views-of-new-york

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/26/nyregion/
26empire.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

street

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

tenement streets        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2021/feb/07/
the-big-picture-a-different-side-to-glasgow-tenements-douglas-corrance

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

high streets        UK

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2012/apr/28/high-streets

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

streetscapes        USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/column/streetscapes

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/19/realestate/
a-co-op-beyond-the-pale-as-well-as-the-els.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/27/realestate/27scapesready.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/26/realestate/26scapesready.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/19/realestate/19scape.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/06/28/realestate/28scapes.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/18/realestate/18scapes.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA > America’s treeless streets        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2021/jun/28/
houston-trees-shade-heat-temperatures-race-class

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

cobblestones        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/01/
realestate/living-in-soho-chic-stores-and-cobblestones.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

cul-de-sac        UK

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2006/jul/17/
communities.homes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

cul-de-sac        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/21/
opinion/cul-de-sac-poverty.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

underpass        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2021/nov/13/
the-nocturnal-urban-beauty-of-the-underpass-in-pictures-pero-karl-hyde

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

National Archives and Records Administration        USA        NARA

Pictures of the American City

 

https://www.archives.gov/research/american-cities 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

cities at sea        UK

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2008/jul/19/
climatechange.greenbuilding

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Holidaytown: images of Blackpool        UK

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/gallery/2008/jul/18/
bolton.holidaytown?picture=335775486

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Council housing in Hemel Hempstead in 1954,

at the height of the New Town boom.

 

Photograph:

John Chillingworth/Getty Images

 

A brief history of British housing

G

Saturday 24 May 2014    09.09 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/business/2014/may/24/
history-british-housing-decade 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

block        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/19/
realestate/a-co-op-beyond-the-pale-as-well-as-the-els.html

 

 

 

 

block of flats        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2012/dec/31/
london-teenage-stabbing-victim-named

 

 

 

 

social housing        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/architecture-design-blog/2014/jan/10/
future-social-housing-crisis-peabody-young-architects

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/money/blog/2009/oct/16/
council-houses-heygate-estate

 

 

 

 

estate        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/cities/2016/apr/20/
london-housing-crisis-sub-prime-problem-super-prime

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2013/apr/21/
fight-to-save-ringo-starr-estate

 

 

 

 

council estates        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/money/blog/2009/oct/16/
council-houses-heygate-estate

 

 

 

 

council houses        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/money/blog/2009/oct/16/
council-houses-heygate-estate

 

 

 

 


A history of British housing        UK

 

From a land fit for heroes to live in'

to the 2000s boom,

housebuilding has gone

through many peaks and troughs

http://www.theguardian.com/business/2014/may/24/
history-british-housing-decade

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Into the valleys

The Guardian        pp. 2-3        6 May 2005

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2005/may/06/
communities.ruralaffairs 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

terraced houses

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

be listed

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/joepublic/2009/jul/27/
robin-hood-gardens-listed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

slumburbia        USA

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/02/10/
slumburbia/

 

 

 

 

run-down neighbourhoods

 

 

 

 

slum clearance programme        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2013/apr/21/
fight-to-save-ringo-starr-estate

 

 

 

 

zoning > zoning law        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/29/
opinion/shadows-over-central-park.html

 

 

 

 

rezoning        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/16/nyregion/
16rezone.html

 

 

 

 

renewal / urban renewal        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/01/
arts/design/san-francisco-repurposes-the-old-for-the-future.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/10/nyregion/newburgh-ny-
seeks-renewal-without-gentrification.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

cities        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2013/mar/03/
aerotropolis-london-kasarda-rowan-moore

 

 

 

 

inner cities

 

 

 

 

megacities        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/global-development/interactive/2012/oct/04/
rise-of-megacities-interactive

 

 

 

 

megacity        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2017/02/18/
514541322/this-photographer-captures-a-megacitys-vibe-in-a-single-photo

 

 

 

 

megalopolis        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/17/world/americas/
murder-of-malcolm-xs-grandson-shows-dark-side-of-gentrifying-town.html

 

 

 

 

aerotropolis        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2013/mar/03/
aerotropolis-london-kasarda-rowan-moore

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

city > water > The New York City watershed

 

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/03/24/
nyregion/how-nyc-gets-its-water-new-york-101.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/video/nyregion/
100000003176142/living-city-a-billion-gallons-a-day.html - Oct. 16, 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

inhabitants

 

 

 

 

residents

 

 

 

 

locals

 

 

 

 

local amenities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

the Land Registry        UK

 

http://www.theguardian.com/business/2004/feb/09/
housingmarket.houseprices

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

beach

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

boardwalk        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/07/nyregion/
long-beach-new-york-says-goodbye-to-its-boardwalk.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

public transit system        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/27/nyregion/
population-growth-in-new-york-city-is-reversing-decades-old-trend-estimates-show.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

modern ruins        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/23/
travel/exploring-modern-ruins-in-southern-california.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

cities > trees > tree equity        USA

 

https://www.npr.org/2021/06/23/
1006223328/bringing-back-trees-to-forest-citys-redlined-areas-helps-residents-and-the-clima

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Corpus of news articles

 

Arts > Architecture, Cities > Towns, Cities,

 

Urban living, Gentrification > UK, USA

 

 

 

From Vacant to Vibrant

 

December 7, 2011

The New York Times

By NICK BUNKLEY

 

DETROIT — Shuttered auto plants have been a surprising beneficiary of the gloomy economy, with developers buying as many closed plants over the last three years as during the previous 26, according to the first comprehensive study of plants closed by American automakers since 1979.

Helped by lower property values and a rash of closings that suddenly put many more sites on the market, developers have bought 32 properties since 2008. Many have welcomed smaller manufacturers as tenants, while some have been turned into housing developments, offices and research centers. Eight are now schools or colleges, the study found.

Over all, nearly half of the 263 plants that automakers have closed in the United States have been revived in some form, according to the study, which was commissioned by the Labor Department’s Office of Recovery for Auto Communities and Workers.

The new developments have helped communities regain considerable tax revenue lost when the plants closed, but only a fraction of the jobs that were lost. Almost three-quarters of the closed plants had been one of their county’s top three employers, and nearly one-third had more than 2,000 workers. In contrast, 55 percent of the repurposed sites have or will have fewer than 100 employees, and only 17 percent have or will have more than 800 employees.

“These communities are often defined by these facilities in terms of employment and of their identity, and there’s an emotional and psychological benefit” to the new developments, said Jay Williams, executive director of the office.

Mr. Williams said the study could help communities with vacant plants understand which approaches had been successful as well as provide hope that more prosperous times might still be ahead. But he cautioned that with so many closures, bringing in new users was not always feasible and the best use for some sites might ultimately be green space. The study found that 135 former plants remain unused, including 24 that closed more than two decades ago.

“They’re not all going to be repurposed,” he said. “Not every community is going to find a pot of gold at the end of this pathway.”

The study, conducted for the Labor Department by the Center for Automotive Research in Ann Arbor, Mich., found a plant’s location and the local economy significantly influenced its fate after being closed. Sites near the coasts and in the South are cited as having been most successful. All 14 former plants in California and Texas have been repurposed, but in Michigan, the state most affected by closures, only 43 of 105 have been.

The study identified regional cooperation, government financing or incentives, and close proximity to mass transit and other transportation infrastructure as common factors in plants that were redeveloped.

Part of a transmission plant in Batavia, Ohio, that closed in 2008 as part of the Ford Motor Company’s restructuring became a new satellite campus for the University of Cincinnati last year. The college and two manufacturing tenants employ nearly 150 people and occupy about one-quarter of the plant, which had 1,700 workers under Ford. But local officials are happy that the site is creating some jobs rather than staying empty, and they say having multiple, smaller tenants there helps diversify the economy.

“It’s so far succeeded better than we could have hoped for,” said Andy Kuchta, the economic development director for Clermont County, where the plant is located. “It would have been a true blight on the community if it would have sat there abandoned.”

The Ohio plant’s new owner, the Industrial Realty Group, is a firm based in California that specializes in redeveloping closed factories. It has purchased numerous former auto plants, as so many were cast aside in recent years, and found new, generally smaller tenants, including a beer distributor, a fireworks company and green manufacturers.

“These things are so big that finding a user for the entire building is like finding a needle in a haystack,” said Stuart Lichter, the company’s president.

In many cases, redevelopment has not occurred quickly or easily even with local efforts to move it along. Fifteen years after General Motors closed its minivan plant on the Hudson River in North Tarrytown, N.Y., the 99-acre site about 20 miles from Manhattan remains empty. The village, which even changed its name to Sleepy Hollow to help fill the void left by G.M. with tourists, is hopeful that work on a $1 billion housing and commercial development could begin next year, after previous plans fell through.

“We’re starting to get back on our feet and not be dependent on General Motors anymore, but our downtown still has a lot of vacant properties,” the village administrator, Anthony Giaccio, said. “It’s been many years that the village has suffered from that.”

The study recommends that the government focus its efforts on regions with numerous closed plants because those regions have more difficulty finding new users. Counties with only one or two closed plants were successful in reviving them nearly twice as often as counties with at least 10 such sites.

In Flint, Mich., the study lists only three of 24 sites abandoned by G.M. since 1979 as having a new use. A specialty pharmacy last year brought hundreds of jobs to the site of the former Fisher Body 1 plant, where workers staged a famous sit-down strike in the 1930s. But across town, the 452-acre former home of G.M.’s sprawling Buick City complex remains deserted.

The Buick City site is among more than 7,000 acres of property owned by the Revitalizing Auto Communities Environmental Response Trust, which a bankruptcy court judge created in March to sell off former G.M. assets. The trust owns 66 buildings totaling 44 million square feet of space in 14 states. Its Web site, racertrust.org, lists 14 properties as fully or partly sold and three others as under contract with a buyer, though none are in Flint.

“The need in Flint is to have new jobs and employment opportunities, so that industrial corridor is critical for our community’s future,” said the city’s mayor, Dayne Walling, “but we can only do so much to drive investment.”

From Vacant to Vibrant,
NYT, 7.12.2011,
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/08/
business/developers-revive-closed-auto-plants.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Glass Pavilion in Toledo, Ohio,

with exterior and interior walls of curved glass,

houses glass artworks and a glassmaking workshop.

 

Photograph:

Fabrizio Costantini for The New York Times

 

A Crystal Showcase Reflects a City’s Glass Legacy

NYT

28.8.2006

https://www.nytimes.com/2006/08/28/
arts/design/28sana.html  
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Architecture Review | Glass Pavilion

A Crystal Showcase

Reflects a City’s Glass Legacy

 

August 28, 2006

The New York Times

By NICOLAI OUROUSSOFF

 

TOLEDO, Ohio — “Without a glass palace, life becomes a burden,” the poet Paul Scheerbart wrote nearly a century ago. Standing in front of the new Glass Pavilion at the Toledo Museum of Art, designed by the Japanese team of Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa, can reawaken that belief in the power of glass to enchant.

The pavilion, which houses the museum’s vast collection of glass artworks, is a testament to an earlier era when American industrial production and cultural growth were profoundly intertwined. Toledo was once a major center of glass production; now most of its factories are closed and the glass workers gone. The enormous sheets of glass needed for the pavilion were manufactured in Germany and molded in China in preparation for the Aug. 27 opening.

Yet this wholly contemporary building conjures up potent memories of the city’s history. Composed with exquisite delicacy, the pavilion’s elegant maze of curved glass walls represents the latest monument to evolve in a chain extending back to the Hall of Mirrors at Versailles. Its understated elegance recalls a time when investment in the public realm was still driven by civic pride rather than a lust for tourist dollars. The Glass Pavilion is part of a loosely knit complex that includes the Beaux-Arts-style art museum here and the University of Toledo’s Center for the Visual Arts, designed by Frank Gehry. With its grand staircase leading up to a row of Ionic columns, the original museum is both a temple to art and a monument to the belief in high culture’s ability to uplift the life of the worker.

The new structure’s low, horizontal form fits in this context with remarkable delicacy, as if the architects hesitated to disturb the surroundings. Seen from the museum steps, the pavilion’s reflective facade, surrounded by a soft carpet of glass, is barely visible beneath the shadowy canopies of ancient oak trees. Just beyond it is a row of stoic Victorian houses.

The closer you get, the more the building reveals. Its main entry is positioned off center, to line up exactly with the art museum’s grand stairway across the street. The pavilion’s cafe and a glass workshop extend out from there, punctuated by the intense orange glow of the glass furnaces. All this glass brings to mind Philip Johnson’s famous 1949 Glass House in New Canaan, Conn. Both facades dissolve into a collage of reflected and transparent images. Both structures rest on a thin base, firmly rooting them to the ground. In both cases the roof is a thin slab, as if it exists only to frame the view of the interior.

But Johnson’s masterpiece is the work of an exhibitionist. The facade acts as a picture frame, casting a visitor into the slightly creepy role of a peeping Tom. The first time I saw it, nearly two decades ago, I found myself hesitating uneasily as I approached the door. When Johnson’s hand gently pressed against my back, pushing me through, I felt like Alice falling through the looking glass.

By contrast the Glass Pavilion’s design is a diaphanous maze. The interior is a series of rounded glass rooms wrapped in a secondary glass skin, which creates a remarkably layered visual experience. From the lobby, for example, fragments of the landscaped lawn on the other side of the building are visible through a series of glass-walled galleries. Three simple interior courtyards, the largest with its windows hung in a gauzy curtain, separate these rooms, framing views of the sky and allowing light to spill down into the interiors.

The effect is hypnotic. And it is reinforced by the sinuous pattern of lines made by the walls meeting the ceiling, which draws you deeper into the spaces. Once inside the galleries, the eye is constantly slipping around curved surfaces before coming to rest on a particular view: a work of art, a tree in the landscape.

But it is the graceful interplay of human forms that gives the pavilion its enigmatic, ghostly quality. The double layer of glass sets up a delicious contrast between the stillness you experience inside the glass rooms and the more fluid interstitial spaces that separate them. As passing figures drift through these spaces, they seem to momentarily caress one another before pulling apart again where the walls curve to envelop the galleries.

At times the movements look ceremonial. As you watch, you become keenly aware of the different degrees of intimacy and isolation.

The art too looks good. Most in simple cabinets, the objects — elaborate chandeliers, Roman vases, a cast and gilded-glass Louis XIV mirror — seem to hover within the transparent spaces, allowing you to focus on individual pieces or uncover unexpected relationships among objects that are physically segregated in different galleries.

The architects, whose firm is known as Sanaa, designed two opaque galleries for more light-sensitive works. These solid white forms also serve to anchor a structure visually that might otherwise seem about to drift off into space.

That Sanaa could make all of this look so effortless is a sign of its mastery, and an illusion of course. To keep the roof so thin, for example, all of the major mechanical systems — heating, ventilation, plumbing — were buried in the basement or hidden in a nearby building. Pipes, wiring and air ducts were woven through the building’s structural beams as precisely as wires laid into a computer board. A loading dock was buried underground so that it would not detract from the purity of the facade.

The building hides a complex ecological organism, divided into three independent climate zones. A radiant heating-and-cooling system inside the interstitial cavities is used to control the climate in the public areas and to prevent condensation on the glass. The “hot shop” — where visiting artists will hold classes in glassmaking — provides heat for the hot-water systems. The climate in the galleries, which requires more control, is regulated independently.

For me the meaning of Sanaa’s creation snapped into place when I arrived at an empty room overlooking the back garden. Lined with a few simple benches, this area was conceived as a contemplative space, a place to refuel mentally before venturing back into the galleries. In an age when museums are packed with bookstores, cafes and shops, persuading curators to keep this space empty must have been a triumph.

But it also reveals the architects’ awareness of the delicacy of their own creation. This is not a design that can easily sustain an endless crush of tourist traffic. It recognizes that emptiness, in our world, is increasingly a luxury.

It is not architecture with a Big Message. It is about empathy for the human condition. Once you drift outside again, the tree branches seem to sway more gently, the light feels softer, the world more tender. Most important, you are more attuned to the distances between people. There are few higher compliments you could pay a building.

A Crystal Showcase Reflects a City’s Glass Legacy,
NYT,
28.8.2006,
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/08/28/
arts/design/28sana.html

 

 

 

 

 

MOVIE REVIEW

'Urbanscapes,' a Documentary

on the Decaying of Neighborhoods

 

July 5, 2006

The New York Times

By NATHAN LEE

 

"Urbanscapes" plants a camera in neighborhoods gone to seed, cultivating a bittersweet portrait of American ruin. The filmmakers, Lorena Luciano and Filippo Piscopo, grew up in Italy, and they regard the dilapidations of their adopted superpower with a touch of the tourist's sentimentalism. Wastes of Chicago, Detroit, the South Bronx and Newark are reflected through measured montage and digital-video impressionism. A cello suite by Bach is as prevalent as the trash.

As indicated by the title, this documentary tends toward the general, abstract and vague, though some detail and much charm are achieved by the choice of commentators. The photographer Camilo J. Vergara tracks the metamorphosis of specific city blocks over decades, returning to update his extensive record of demolition, gentrification, neglect or renewal.

General Gordon Baker, a Detroit autoworker, remembers better days. Marion, his wife, who is a social worker, recalls the upheavals of urban renewal, a process known in her circle as "Negro removal." Mel Rosenthal, a native of the South Bronx, returns with memories good (then as now, a vibrant street life) and bad (the "planned shrinkage" of the 1970's, whereby municipal services like garbage collection and firefighting were deliberately cut back to encourage the exodus of undesirable populations).

Things go bad for a reason, and in the United States they go very bad where poor black people live. "Urbanscapes" doesn't neglect the politics of blight, but as with every subject glanced at here — memory, architecture, city planning, racism — the emphasis sticks on those poetically entropic facades.

 

Urbanscapes

Opens today in Manhattan

Directed by Lorena Luciano and Filippo Piscopo; director of cinematography, Wolfgang Held; edited by Ms. Luciano; produced by Mr. Piscopo; released by Film2 Productions. At the Two Boots Pioneer Theater, 155 East Third Street, at Avenue A, East Village. Running time: 90 minutes. This film is not rated.

'Urbanscapes,' a Documentary on the Decaying of Neighborhoods,
NYT,
5.7.2006,
https://www.nytimes.com/2006/07/05/
movies/05urba.html 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Muscular bravura:

A lobby inside the new Guthrie Theater,

on the banks of the Mississippi in Minneapolis.

 

Photograph:

Amanda Ortland/Guthrie Theater
 

On the Mississippi,

a Vision Steeped in an Industrial Past

NYT

4.7.2006

https://www.nytimes.com/2006/07/04/
arts/design/04nouv.html 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Architecture Review

On the Mississippi,

a Vision Steeped

in an Industrial Past

 

July 4, 2006

The New York Times

By NICOLAI OUROUSSOFF

 

MINNEAPOLIS — For fans who prefer that their heroes remain predictable, Jean Nouvel has been a bit of a puzzle lately.

Two decades ago he established his reputation with the Institute of the Arab World in Paris, whose southern facade, an enormous grid of filigreed steel apertures, suggested inscrutable camera lenses. In the ensuing years this architect could generally be counted on for big, bold forms; a fetishistic obsession with technology; and a magician's bag of optical tricks.

His most recent projects, however, like the phallic, candy-colored Agbar Tower in Barcelona and the anarchic mix at the Musée du Quai Branly in Paris, have drifted toward the wildly eccentric, as if Mr. Nouvel, now 60, were more interested in letting his imagination roam unfettered than in impressing critics and academics.

The new Guthrie Theater in Minneapolis should offer comfort to those who miss the 1980's Nouvel. Rising at the edge of the Mississippi, its confident forms are rooted in a vision of a muscular industrial America, and its structural bravura will certainly please the techno-fetishists. As a thoughtful response to the American city's evolving role as a haven for cultural tourism, it also coaxes new meaning out of a haggard landscape.

The site is a Modernist heaven on a former industrial strip along the riverfront. Just next to the complex is a grain elevator, similar to those that Le Corbusier once lauded as the American equivalent of the Parthenon, the "magnificent first fruits of a new age." An electric generating plant looms across the river; to the north, water rushes through a series of locks beneath an industrial bridge.

Like so many cities, of course, Minneapolis has gradually undergone an economic transformation. Most of the city's old flour mills were shut down long ago. The concrete grain elevator alongside the theater complex has been preserved as a historic monument, and a nearby row of warehouses has been converted into co-ops. Mr. Nouvel's design takes its initial cues from the city's early history. The complex's scale fits nicely with the structure next door. The boxy, piled-up forms echo the electric power plant across the street, anchoring the theater in the city's early industrial ethos rather than in the shopping centers and office towers downtown.

Yet that virile image of a landscape ruled by men and machines is tempered by Mr. Nouvel's typical subversiveness. The metal cladding is coated in midnight blue, a symbol of buttoned-down conservatism that suggests a killer in a pressed suit. A small terrace in a bright police-tape yellow juts impudently from the building's riverfront facade.

Enormous mirrored panels frame a restaurant terrace, snatching up refracted images of the surrounding city. Orange-colored LED images climb two towers that rise from the complex like high-tech smokestacks.

Mr. Nouvel's biggest gesture is a 175-foot-long cantilevered form that projects toward the river, its end abruptly sliced off at a sharp angle. Viewed from across the river, it looks like a bridge leading nowhere. Yet as you approach the main entrance along Second Street, as most visitors will, the cantilever reads as an extension of a walkway bridge that runs from the theater complex to a parking structure on the other side, an echo of the skywalks found elsewhere in downtown Minneapolis.

The cantilever houses a bar and an outdoor terrace. But its main role is symbolic. In embarking on such a spectacular structural effort for what most would consider a secondary space, Mr. Nouvel is upholding the value of the tangential experiences that are often the most important in life.

Inside, the main 1,100-seat hall, a nod to the liberal Modernism of the 1960's, pays homage to the underappreciated original Guthrie designed by Ralph Rapson with a thrust stage that bridges the distance between the performers and the audience. Seats spill down toward the stage from three sides. Above, a sweeping balcony is set just off center, giving the room a wonderful edginess.

Mr. Nouvel has also designed a more conservative 700-seat proscenium theater — albeit in an erotic lipstick red that plays off the stiff formality of the space — and a 300-seat black box for experimental work.

But the true heart of the building is its connective tissue, like a two-tier public foyer where theatergoers will mingle during intermission. A large window at one end overlooks the area where workers assemble the stage sets; from the other side, people can amble out to the cantilevered bar and terrace.

Here and there, the images of past performances, faint as shadows, are imprinted on the foyer wall, ghosts from the Guthrie's past. But once you drift out to the cantilevered bar, a sense of flux returns. The windows are framed in a mirrored steel that blends city views with refracted images of nearby buildings. In warm weather, a breeze wafts in through a large open window, carrying the scent of the outdoors.

Suddenly we're not altogether sure where we find ourselves, and that's part of the point. The city, too, is a theater, a vast unstable laboratory that is constantly being reshaped by economic, political and imaginative forces. Seldom does that reality seem this seductive.

On the Mississippi, a Vision Steeped in an Industrial Past,
NYT,
4.7.2006,
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/07/04/
arts/design/04nouv.html

 

 

 

 

 

February 13 1945

 

Prefabs — houses built in a day

 

The Guardian archive

 

February 13 1945

The Guardian

 

A new system of house construction was explained to the Manchester Housing Committee yesterday when the members inspected the model and plans of the "Ritonoff" permanent prefabricated house.

Designed in steel or aluminium alloy for an estimated "life" of fifty to sixty years, a semi-detached pair, prefabricated and pre-assembled, can, it is anticipated, be erected in six sections in one day by a gang of six men with the assistance of a crane.

Such houses, being of dry construction, can be occupied the next day. It is hoped the cost will not exceed £1,000. Councillor H. Bentley, chairman, said yesterday that if the committee is in favour of the new type Rotinoff Construction, Limited, will be asked to erect a prototype in Manchester for inspection by people from the whole of the industrial North.

The architect is Mr. Richard Nickson, of London and Liverpool, who is associated with Professor Sir Patrick Abercrombie in a study of post-war town planning and building development. "This particular house," said Mr. Nickson yesterday to a "Manchester Guardian" reporter, "arose from my acquaintance with Mr George Rotinoff, who had patented a system of whole-metal shipping construction which I invited him to apply to housing to a certain lay-out of mine on the system of transportable box sections."

Mr. Nickson is a nephew of Sir William Clare Lees, who introduced him to Councillor Bentley with the result that a deputation from the committee first saw the model in London. Plans seen yesterday provide for a house without home laundry of 968 square feet floor space, or with it, 1,040 square feet. The accommodation on the upper floor is for three bedrooms, (one small) bathroom and separate W.C., while there are alternative layouts for the ground floor.

In one the large living-room opens into the kitchen, a sitting-room opening off the hall. The kitchen comprises larder, refrigerator, washer, dry goods cupboard, sink with double drainers, gas or electric or solid fuel cooker, china cupboards. and a drop-flap table to enable "snack" meals to be served.

The connecting wall between the "semis" is a double one and completely insulated: and all floors are carried on cork insulating pads. Rooms are eight feet high.

 

[ A 1944 act of parliament provided £150m nationally,

the equivalent of £4.3bn today,

for prefabs to house returning servicemen.

Many were meant to stand for only 15 years,

but remained a common sight into the 70s.

In Newport, Gwent, the last were replaced

early this century. ]

The Guardian archive > February 13 1945 >
Prefabs — houses built in a day,
G,
Republished 13.2.2007,
p. 32,
http://digital.guardian.co.uk/guardian/2007/02/13/
pages/ber32.shtml

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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