Les anglonautes

About | Search | Grammar | Vocapedia | Learning | News podcasts | Videos | History | Arts | Science | Translate and listen

 Previous Home Up Next

 

Vocapedia > Arts > Architecture, Cities > Urban living, Gentrification > USA > NYC

 

 

 

 

Is New York City an Empire in Decline?        Video        NYT Opinion        7 October 2019

 

New York City was built on big, bold ideas.

 

The vision of past leaders

kept New Yorkers in town

and captured the imaginations

of millions from around the world

who came here to “make it.”

 

In the Video Op-Ed above, Mara Gay,

a native New Yorker who has reported

on the streets of this city for seven years,

questions where all that vision is today.

 

She argues that New York’s current leaders

need to bring big ambition and hustle

to serve their residents.

 

She supplies ideas of what vision could look like

to a mayor whose reluctant homecoming

offers dim hope for the city.

 

New Yorkers, she says, deserve more.

 

This isn’t just a New York story

— it’s a trend in many cities around the world,

where broad public programs

are pushed aside for narrow corporate interests

and where transformative polices

are as hard to come by as affordable rents.

 

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lk1xKtZvOQ8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photograph: Spencer Platt/Getty

Eyewitness        Rebuilding Ground Zero

The Guardian        pp. 22-23        28 April 2006

 

Oliver Burkeman

 

New York

 

A hastily arranged ceremony

marked the official start of rebuilding at Ground Zero

yesterday morning

after months of tense negotiations

cast doubt over the project.

 

New York’s mayor, Michael Bloomberg,

the state governor, George Pataki,

and developer Larry Silverstein met builders

at the site to inaugurate work on the Freedom Tower,

one day after announcing

that they had finally thrashed out an agreement.

 

The talks had centred on whether Mr Silverstein

— who bought the lease to the World Trade Centre

seven weeks before it was destroyed —

had he resources to meet his commitments.

 

The new deal hands control of the lease

to the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey.

 

The entire project, involving four other skyscrapers,

will provide about 820,000 square metres (8.8m square feet)

of office space at an estimated cost of $6.3bn (£3.5bn),

and is expected to be finished by 2012,

though a memorial should be in place by 2009.

 

“There are some issues that need to be resolved”,

Mr Silverstein said,

“but my focus, like that of all New Yorkers,

is on getting the Freedom Tower under way.”

Not quite all New Yorkers agree, though.

 

The Freedom Tower “should be the last building to be done,

and should be built more modestly”,

said Susan Fainstein,

a professor of urban planning at Columbia University.

 

“First, because it’s such an obvious target, and secondly,

in order to harden it as a target,

it’s become an architectural monstrosity.”

 

No private firms have committed to taking space in the tower.

The Port Authority has guaranteed that about

half of the available floors will be occupied

by government agencies.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lower Manhattan Development Corporation        4.5.2005

 

Gov. George E. Pataki, Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg

and the lead developer at ground zero

acknowledged that the Freedom Tower

would have to be redesigned for security concerns.

 

Pataki and Bloomberg Endorse Changes in Ground Zero Tower

By PATRICK D. HEALY and CHARLES V. BAGLI

NYT        Published: May 5, 2005

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/05/05/nyregion/05rebuild.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The transportation hub for the World Trade Center site.

NYT / Port Authority of New York and New Jersey        22.4.2005

 

Photograph: Santiago Calatrava.

 

An Architect Embraces New York        NYT        April 23, 2005

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/04/23/arts/design/23cala.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Architect David Childs

puts his hand behind the top of the design

for the Freedom Tower to be built

on the World Trade Centre site

 

The design for the world's tallest building

to replace the World Trade Centre's twin towers

has been unveiled in New York. 

 

Ananova        19.12.2003

http://news.independent.co.uk/world/americas/story.jsp?story=474865

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World Trade Center remains        2001        added  c. 2004

http://www.mit.edu/activities/safe/wtc/wtc-photos.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Caffeine fix … Coffee and a Sandwich on Union Square.

 

Photograph:

Janet Delaney / Courtesy the artist and MACK

 

No sleep till Brooklyn: a red-eye view of New York – in pictures

Janet Delaney’s life in California was punctuated

by last-minute flights she would take to NYC as a courier

– where she’d cast a sleepy gaze across the city

G

Thu 21 Oct 2021    07.00 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2021/oct/21/
no-sleep-till-brooklyn-a-red-eye-view-of-new-york-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sunday Morning on Orchard Street, NY, 1980

Whether he focused his camera on subway rides,

dancers at the legendary Studio 54

or hip-hop culture in the streets,

Spiller captured many facets of a bygone world

 

Subway to Studio 54: a bygone New York – in pictures

Skaters, dancers, hustlers, boxers …

Swiss photographer Willy Spiller

prowled the streets of the Big Apple from 1977 and 1985,

capturing characters from all walks of life

G

Wed 14 Apr 2021    07.00 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2021/apr/14/
willy-spiller-subway-studio-54-photography-bygone-new-york-in-pictures-gallery

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Train to Brighton Beach, 1977

His images have appeared

in numerous European newspapers and magazines

and he has received prizes

for both his published and exhibited work

 

Subway to Studio 54: a bygone New York – in pictures

Skaters, dancers, hustlers, boxers …

Swiss photographer Willy Spiller

prowled the streets of the Big Apple from 1977 and 1985,

capturing characters from all walks of life

G

Wed 14 Apr 2021    07.00 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2021/apr/14/
willy-spiller-subway-studio-54-photography-bygone-new-york-in-pictures-gallery

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Touch football near Cooper Union. New York. Early 1960s.

 

Photograph:

Robert James Campbell, via the City of Burlington, Vt.

 

Photographs as Clues to a Mysterious Bohemian Life

NYT

Feb. 19, 2016

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/02/19/
robert-james-campbell-jessica-ferber-rebirth-of-the-cool

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ellis Island [ Anglonautes' note: check caption accuracy ]

Date taken: April 1938

 

Photographer: Hansel Mieth

 

Life Images

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ellis Island [ Anglonautes' note: check caption accuracy ]

Date taken: April 1938

 

Photographer: Hansel Mieth

 

Life Images

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA > city > New York        UK / USA

 

https://www.loc.gov/collections/
early-films-of-new-york-1898-to-1906/about-this-collection/

 

 

2021

 

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2021/08/26/
books/writers-favorite-places-new-york.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2021/oct/21/
no-sleep-till-brooklyn-a-red-eye-view-of-new-york-in-pictures

 

https://www.theguardian.com/cities/gallery/2017/jan/12/
new-york-never-built-skyscraper-cathedral-pneumatic-railway-in-pictures

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/05/21/
nyregion/brickyards-nyc-hudson-valley.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/05/07/
realestate/old-buildings-new-views.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2021/apr/14/
willy-spiller-subway-studio-54-photography-bygone-new-york-in-pictures-gallery

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2021/apr/05/
re-wilding-our-cities-beauty-biodiversity-and-the-biophilic-cities-movement

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/02/26/
t-magazine/co-bigelow-new-york.html

 

 

 

 

2020

 

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/12/02/
arts/design/new-york-city-walking-tours.html

 

 

 

 

2019

 

https://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=Lk1xKtZvOQ8 - NYT - 7 October 2019

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/02/
lens/new-york-chinatown-1980s-bud-glick.html

 

 

 

 

2018

 

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/12/28/
nyregion/nyc-property-tax-photos.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/cities/gallery/2018/oct/19/
rising-high-the-evolving-skyline-new-york-city-manhattan-in-pictures

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2018/oct/10/
evelyn-hofer-immersive-new-york-in-pictures

 

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/06/25/
nyregion/new-york-city-public-housing-history.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/cities/gallery/2018/jun/14/
summer-in-the-city-new-yorks-parks-august-1978-in-pictures

 

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/gallery/2018/apr/09/
jerome-avenue-new-york-city-working-class-areas-in-pictures

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/15/
ens/a-photographers-search-for-joy-in-uncertain-times-new-york-album.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2018/feb/27/
new-york-70s-80s-and-90s-carrie-boretz-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

2017

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2017/sep/24/
iconic-new-york-posters-warhol-studio-54-pictures

 

https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2017/aug/15/
new-york-high-line-crowd-london-garden-bridge-urban-design

 

https://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2017/05/18/
standpipes-of-new-york/

 

https://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2017/05/03/
in-new-yorks-automats-a-cup-of-coffee-and-community/

 

https://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2017/05/02/
jamel-shabazzs-40-years-of-sights-and-styles-in-new-york/

 

https://www.theguardian.com/culture/gallery/2017/apr/22/
new-york-city-after-the-second-world-war-in-pictures

 

https://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2017/04/12/
vintage-photos-what-made-new-york-city-tick-todd-webb/

 

http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2017/03/23/nyregion/
capturing-postwar-new-york/s/26ALBUM1.html

 

https://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2017/02/22/
the-hidden-history-of-photography-and-new-york/

 

https://www.theguardian.com/cities/gallery/2017/jan/12/
new-york-never-built-skyscraper-cathedral-pneumatic-railway-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

2016

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/02/
arts/music/elvis-costellos-new-york-soul.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/29/
fashion/new-york-secret-garden-anna-wintour-bob-dylan.html

 

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/09/15/
they-say-new-york-is-over-photographed-he-disagrees/

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/27/
opinion/new-yorks-disappearing-storefronts.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/22/nyregion/
at-stuyvesant-town-a-childs-utopia.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/06/05/
magazine/new-york-life.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/25/nyregion/
overhauling-8-parks-new-york-seeks-to-create-more-inviting-spaces.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2016/may/24/
new-york-chelsea-hotel-artists-bohemia-gentrification

 

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/05/03/
carrie-boretz-real-life-on-new-yorks-streets/

 

http://www.npr.org/2016/05/01/
476380442/words-youll-hear-gentrification

 

http://www.theguardian.com/cities/2016/apr/28/
story-cities-32-new-york-jane-jacobs-robert-moses

 

https://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/05/03/
carrie-boretz-real-life-on-new-yorks-streets/

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/12/
opinion/saving-a-mixed-income-new-york.html

 

http://www.theguardian.com/culture/gallery/2016/mar/08/
briefly-seen-new-york-harvey-stein-in-pictures

 

http://www.theguardian.com/cities/gallery/2016/feb/02/
guns-snuff-lemonade-1930s-new-york-shops-berenice-abbott

 

 

 

 

2015

 

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2015/10/17/nyregion/
new-york-city-stories.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/20/nyregion/
for-a-street-photographer-the-weirder-the-better.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/10/t-magazine/
1970s-new-york-history.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/10/t-magazine/
downtown-decade-photos-glenn-horowitz.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/10/
t-magazine/1970s-1980s-new-york.html

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/npr-history-dept/2015/08/28/
435144667/holding-on-tight-to-old-new-york

 

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/jul/02/
london-new-york-capital

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?
v=ay9RP5tZA3I - Park Slope, Brooklyn, 29 June 2015

 

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/06/26/
lower-east-side-story/

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=echnNasggEc

 

http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2015/may/13/
harlem-gentrification-new-york-race-black-white

 

http://www.theguardian.com/cities/2015/may/06/
dangers-ecogentrification-best-way-make-city-greener

 

 

 

 

2014

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/16/
opinion/sunday/framing-new-york.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/21/nyregion/
new-york-city-plans-major-energy-efficiency-improvements-
in-its-buildings.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/13/travel/
my-brooklyn-then-and-now.html

 

http://www.npr.org/blogs/theprotojournalist/2014/05/06/
309727058/the-lost-village-in-new-york-city

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/27/nyregion/
population-growth-in-new-york-city-is-reversing-
decades-old-trend-estimates-show.html

 

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/feb/03/
leave-new-york-for-los-angeles

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/07/
opinion/new-york-the-silicon-city.html

 

 

 

 

2013

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/17/
arts/design/for-the-next-mayor-a-to-do-list.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA > New York City > skyline        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/cities/gallery/2018/oct/19/
rising-high-the-evolving-skyline-new-york-city-manhattan-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA > NYC > Manhattan’s High Line        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2021/apr/05/
re-wilding-our-cities-beauty-biodiversity-and-the-biophilic-cities-movement

 

https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2017/aug/15/new-york-
high-line-crowd-london-garden-bridge-urban-design

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA > Skyscraper city:

how New York was built – in pictures        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/cities/gallery/2016/jul/20/
skyscraper-city-manhattan-how-built-new-york-public-library-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mannahatta

 

Before the first Dutch colonists

sailed through the Narrows

into New York Harbor,

Manhattan was still what the Lenape,

who had already lived here for centuries,

called Mannahatta.

 

Times Square

was a forest with a beaver pond.

 

The Jacob K. Javits Federal Building,

at Foley Square, was the site

of an ancient mound of oyster middens.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/13/
arts/design/manhattan-virtual-tour-virus.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/13/
arts/design/manhattan-virtual-tour-virus.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA > Arlene Gottfried's snapshots

of New York's Puerto Rican community – in pictures        UK

 

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2016/mar/12/
arlene-gottfrieds-snapshots-of-new-yorks-puerto-rican-community-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA > NYC > Briefly seen:

New York street life through the decades – in pictures        UK

 

http://www.theguardian.com/culture/gallery/2016/mar/08/
briefly-seen-new-york-harvey-stein-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NYC > neighborhoods

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/20/nyregion/
for-a-street-photographer-the-weirder-the-better.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New York > Chinatown

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/02/
lens/new-york-chinatown-1980s-bud-glick.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA > NYC >  Greenwich Village        UK / USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/02/26/
t-magazine/co-bigelow-new-york.html

 

http://www.theguardian.com/cities/2016/apr/28/
story-cities-32-new-york-jane-jacobs-robert-moses

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

San Francisco, New York and Boston

- the United States'

most walkable cities        2008

 

https://www.reuters.com/article/lifestyleMolt/idUSN16662315
20080717

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA > city > New York > borough > Bronx        UK / USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/26/
nyregion/bronx-coronavirus-outbreak.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/06/
style/bronx-growing-up.html

 

https://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2017/11/24/
from-boys-to-men-in-the-south-bronx/

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/16/
fashion/rebranding-the-bronx.html

http://www.npr.org/2017/08/02/
540638655/forget-the-bronx-is-burning-these-days-the-bronx-is-gentrifying

 

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/09/25/
world-class-photojournalism-at-home-in-the-south-bronx/

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2016/aug/13/
south-bronx-hip-hop-gentrification-the-get-down

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/06/22/
opinion/bronx-jerome-avenue-workers.htm

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/projects/cp/national/unpublished-black-history/
looters-for-jobs-march-in-the-south-bronx-1977

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/19/nyregion/in-a-bronx-
police-precinct-homicides-persist-as-crime-drops-elsewhere.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA > city > New York City > Brooklyn

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/11/09/
style/grand-prospect-hall-brooklyn-demolition.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/01/29/
insider/brooklyn-streets.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2021/01/27/
nyregion/brooklyn-streets-numbers-renaming.html

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/20/
arts/design/brooklyn-virtual-tour-virus.html

 

 

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/04/
lens/italian-american-williamsburg-brooklyn.html

 

 

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2018/dec/04/
brooklyn-portrait-of-a-changing-new-york-borough-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

https://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2017/09/06/
ruin-and-reinvention-in-a-transforming-brooklyn/

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/27/nyregion/
love-and-black-lives-in-pictures-found-on-a-brooklyn-street.html

 

 

 

 

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/09/15/
they-say-new-york-is-over-photographed-he-disagrees/

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/10/
realestate/ashland-brooklyn.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/22/nyregion/at-stuyvesant-town-
a-childs-utopia.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/04/10/
realestate/living-in-bay-ridge-brooklyn.html

 

 

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?
v=ay9RP5tZA3I - Park Slope, Brooklyn, 29 June 2015

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/09/nyregion/
once-torn-by-riots-crown-heights-finds-harmony-in-soccer.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coney Island in 1957,

with the Parachute Jump and Steeplechase Park

in the background.

 

Photograph: Allyn Baum/The New York Times

 

Brooklyn, Before It Was a Global Brand: Walk Its History

NYT

May 20, 2020    Updated 9:21 a.m. ET

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/20/
arts/design/brooklyn-virtual-tour-virus.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA > city > New York > Coney Island         UK / USA

 

https://www.npr.org/2021/04/10/
986098935/in-coney-island-the-wonder-wheel-spins-again

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/20/
arts/design/brooklyn-virtual-tour-virus.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/culture/gallery/2017/apr/28/
coney-island-boardwalk-beach-photos-new-york

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA > city > New York > Queens

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ek24DhSfZ00

 

 

 

 

lower Manhattan

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/10/nyregion/
lower-manhattan-continues-to-grapple-with-recovery.html

 

 

 

 

NYC > borough

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/26/
nyregion/bronx-coronavirus-outbreak.html

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=echnNasggEc

 

 

 

 

suburbanites

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/20/nyregion/
for-a-street-photographer-the-weirder-the-better.html

 

 

 

 

urban living > New York

http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2013/10/17/
arts/design/10172013FUTURE.html

 

 

 

 

commute

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/20/nyregion/
for-a-street-photographer-the-weirder-the-better.html

 

 

 

 

commuting

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/10/28/
commutings-hidden-cost/

 

 

 

 

Astor House, built in 1836

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/27/
realestate/27scapesready.html

 

 

 

 

New York City

 

Between 1938 and 1943,

approximately 700,000 stark,

unsentimental black-and-white pictures

of properties in all five boroughs,

known as tax photographs,

were taken for the city,

both to make assessments

and as an employment program

for the federal Works Progress Administration.

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/13/nyregion/
13taxphotos.html

 

 

 

 

Mapping New York

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/gallery/2009/dec/03/
mapping-new-york

 

 

 

 

1770 > Bernard Ratzer's “Plan of the City of New York”

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/17/nyregion/
17map.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Corpus of news articles

 

Arts > Architecture, Cities >

 

Urban living, Gentrification > USA > NYC

 

 

 

Building a Better City

 

October 16, 2013

The New York Times

By MICHAEL KIMMELMAN

 

On Jan. 1, the next mayor — either Bill de Blasio, the Democratic candidate, or Joe Lhota, the Republican — will face a fiscal cliff of unpaid bills. Schools will need to be saved, union contracts negotiated — the future of New York envisioned.

In his 12-year tenure, Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg built a gleaming Oz of new parks and plazas, skyscrapers and bike lanes. This didn’t stop plenty of terrible buildings from going up. But a focus on streets and architecture redrew whole swaths of the city: Brownstone Brooklyn boomed, the High Line opened, industrial wastelands became waterfront playgrounds. Urban living became a cause, a public good. Design, down to the curbside and the public bench, was no longer an afterthought, although the city became increasingly unaffordable to many.

The next mayor can keep architecture and planning front and center or risk taking the city backward. Courage, guile and not a little art will be required to meet the obvious challenge: building on the good parts of Mr. Bloomberg’s urban vision, but also doing some course correcting. The social welfare of all cities is inextricable from their physical fabric. A more equitable and livable city is ultimately smartly and sustainably designed. New York’s competitive future depends on getting this right.

Some moves are no-brainers: extending the bike lanes, bike shares, the plaza program, rapid-bus service, the High Line and the No. 7 subway; pushing forward with charging stations for electric vehicles, preparations for the next Sandy-like storm, and PlaNYC 2030, Mayor Bloomberg’s guidelines for a greener future.

It would also be hard to find a cogent argument against extending the Bloomberg administration’s Design and Construction Excellence Program, which raised the bar for public buildings like branch libraries, fire stations and police precincts, spreading new work by gifted local architects and by some stars, too, across the five boroughs.

At the same time, the billionaire mayor, unbeholden to special interests and devoted to data, attracted competent and dynamic commissioners, whom he let run departments as they saw fit. And he hired a powerful deputy mayor, Daniel L. Doctoroff, who cooked up major renewal projects across the city. The American Institute of Architects has floated the notion that the next mayor should appoint a deputy for design and planning. The city relies on zoning, a blunt instrument, to shape communities, which leaves us with atrocities like Brooklyn’s Fourth Avenue development.

A new deputy mayor could coordinate parks, schools, transportation, landmarks, buildings and small-business development — now controlled by agencies that have too often failed to work together — in ways that might streamline construction, save tax dollars and foster neighborhoods. A deputy mayor for design could also help rethink some undercooked Bloomberg initiatives, like redeveloping Willets Point in Queens as a shopping mall; rezoning 73 blocks of East Midtown; and awarding $150 million in taxpayer money to redo the New York Public Library building at 42nd Street before there was even a solid renovation plan. (That plan may yet be forthcoming, as library officials promise, but, meanwhile, branches across the city are starved for cash.)

Everything worth doing in New York comes down to money, of course: who has it, how to get it. Building even one new PATH station ends up costing billions of dollars. Cognizant that government can’t pay for everything, Mayor Bloomberg trusted developers and the rich to share his sense of public duty. That produced some innovative public-private ventures, like Brooklyn Bridge Park. But it also fueled the mantra of disgruntled New Yorkers that much of Manhattan was becoming a corporate retreat, illustrated by the conversion of St. Vincent’s Hospital in Greenwich Village into the site for yet another luxury condo complex, and by One57, a 1,000-foot apartment tower for Russian oligarchs and other zillionaires. Now rising across from Carnegie Hall, it is a blight on the skyline.

By contrast, recent residences for the formerly homeless in Los Angeles and San Francisco have been buildings of architectural distinction — boons to their cities. One of the lessons of Via Verde, a pioneering mixed-income development in the South Bronx, which has thrived since opening last year (I drop in from time to time on the gardening club), is that a modest premium for green design and architectural excellence produces social and economic dividends. A new mayor could encourage more exceptional designs like Via Verde for at least a percentage of subsidized housing projects.

And he could also work with Shaun Donovan, the secretary of housing and urban development, which helps oversee the New York City Housing Authority, whose residents account for nearly 5 percent of the city’s population. The authority houses many of New York’s poorest citizens in often bleak and marooned projects. Understandably wary of politicians after decades of broken promises, residents view with suspicion any talk about repurposing parking lots for schools or retail. There was a backlash, including from the mayoral candidates, after the Bloomberg administration proposed leasing some public housing land for market-rate development. But these ideas are still worth exploring, if focused on improving and diversifying neighborhoods and knitting them into the fabric of the city — and if done in collaboration with, and to benefit, residents.

The new mayor ought to try to tackle another housing challenge, posed by the city’s changing demographic: there are more single households, thanks to the young urban migration and the silver tsunami, that gathering wave of urban-minded retirees. The city’s current housing stock doesn’t come close to meeting growing needs. Outmoded regulations and onerous state requirements get in the way of addressing this issue, like scores of others. The city’s brick-and-mortar costs are twice as high as Chicago’s. In some parts of town, developers must still add parking for every new housing unit and retail space. It’s time to redo the books and take a hatchet to rules that only make it harder to live here.

Living in the city is one challenge; getting out of it is another. A direct train to and from LaGuardia and John F. Kennedy airports has long been dreamed about. Other cities around the world have been investing heavily in transportation. London has boomed where it has recently renovated its trains and hubs. All the hoopla about developing East Midtown and Hudson Yards to attract global business assumes a smooth and swift shuttle to the airports.

That’s a joke today. The Shanghai Metro began operations in 1995 and has a network of 300 miles, with more than 300 stations. New York City pondered the Second Avenue subway for decades, poured billions of dollars into constructing the first measly miles, and is still years away from a single functioning station.

The one-seat airport train ride would at least take the city a step into the 21st century, and there happen to be ideas out there about how to get this done and paid for. Like all big, complicated transit projects here, this one would require the new mayor to get the Port Authority, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority and the New York state and federal governments on board, which is where courage and guile come in, along with the bully pulpit.

Like pushing for a one-seat ride, fixing Pennsylvania Station means getting the responsible parties — Madison Square Garden, the railroads, city and state agencies, private developers, and, above all, the governor — to sit down at the same table and negotiate, because the mayor’s authority is limited. The governor should have plenty to gain, since the stakes could hardly be higher for the region or the upside greater. It’s the mayor’s role to drive that point home.

One more thing, for the moment. We’ve had a technocrat as mayor who speaks fluent Wall Street. We could use a bard.

I mean someone in tune with what makes the city hum at street level. Brooklyn’s renaissance hasn’t just been about cheaper housing costs. Areas like Williamsburg and Park Slope are every bit as unaffordable to most New Yorkers as SoHo or Chelsea. Brooklyn’s attraction — to residents and start-ups — has to do with its neighborhood feel, characterful architecture, intimate scale and diversity.

Yes, the city benefits from attracting more rich people, but economic diversity is not just a campaign slogan. A big part of what keeps the city competitive has to do with its pedestrian-friendly streets; lively, inspired public spaces; and eclectic neighborhoods and populations.

The threat now is not just that longtime African-American residents are quitting historic areas from Harlem to Fort Greene because New York no longer feels as if it were still their home. It’s also what an executive at a giant bank in Lower Manhattan said after Hurricane Sandy: companies like his weather floods because they’ve got insurance. But the shopkeepers and small businesses, which supply downtown with its lifeblood, struggle to afford the city even when there’s no disaster. If they leave, he told me, the major employers will follow, because the neighborhood will no longer be worth staying in.

So a new administration must protect and promote local merchants, along with residents, in areas where they’re being priced out. New York’s neighborhoods need to remain magnets for young entrepreneurs, workers, artists and dreamers.

That generation moves to the music of the streets.

The next mayor should, too.

Building a Better City,
NYT,
16.10.2013,
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/17/
arts/design/for-the-next-mayor-a-to-do-list.html

 

 

 

 

 

After Four Decades,

Finishing a Planned City

 

August 19, 2011

The New York Times

By C. J. HUGHES

 

THE last two empty parcels at Battery Park City have been developed, more than four decades after this innovative neighborhood-from-scratch, built on fill from the original World Trade Center site, was proposed.

Called Liberty Green and Liberty Luxe, the two buildings are red-brick rental towers from Milstein Properties, which has built four other buildings in Battery Park City. They are a block west of the West Side Highway on North End Avenue, on side-by-side lots and in various stages of completion.

Liberty Green, a 22-story-high-rise with 191 studio to three-bedroom apartments, is the farthest along. In May, tenants began moving in. In mid-July, about half of the apartments, which range in price from $3,350 a month (studios) to $9,050 and up (three-bedrooms), were leased, according to Charles Zehren, a Milstein spokesman. One-bedrooms start at $4,025; two-bedrooms are $6,600 and up. Renters can get incentives of one month free on a one-year lease, and two free months on a two-year lease.

Liberty Luxe next door, which will have 280 rental units over 32 stories, will open this fall, Mr. Zehren said.

Though Milstein’s portfolio across the city is mainly rentals, its four other Battery Park City properties, which all use the name “Liberty” — Liberty House, Liberty Terrace, Liberty Court and Liberty View, totaling 1,300 units — are to some degree hybrids. The landlord has set aside blocks of apartments in each one of them as rentals, brokers said.

Both Liberty Green and Liberty Luxe were conceived as condominiums, too, with the Marketing Directors, a brokerage firm, tapped to handle sales. Why Milstein scotched plans to sell the units in the two new towers is unclear; a question to that effect directed at the spokesman was not returned.

But Pierre Moran, an associate broker with DJK Residential, who has sold homes in Battery Park City for 23 years, believes the change of plans came about because buyers were turned off by Milstein’s prices, which would have been about $1,300 a square foot, versus the $1,000 more typical in the area.

Mr. Moran, who took a few clients by the buildings, said he had been deterred by the fact the agents there did not want to negotiate.

Stylewise, the exteriors of Liberty Green and Liberty Luxe blend with their neighbors in Battery Park’s northern, newer section, with traditional facades and sliding windows, similar to those at Tribeca Green, a Related Companies rental across the street.

Like Tribeca Green, the two buildings have environmentally friendly features. Since 2000, the Battery Park City Authority has mandated that new buildings in the neighborhood be energy-efficient.

Cabinets and floors are made of bamboo, which can be harvested sustainably; apartments have master cut-off switches so all lights can be turned off at once; and rainwater is collected and reused.

What may differentiate Liberty Green and Luxe from their predecessors is a 52,000-square-foot community center under the base of both buildings, connected by a plaza.

Created by Asphalt Green, the not-for-profit organization known for its Upper East Side sports complex, the center will have a basketball court, a 5,000-square-foot fitness center and an auditorium, all of which can be accessed from newly refurbished baseball fields on the complex’s eastern side, said Carol Tweedy, the executive director of Asphalt Green.

There will also be a 25-yard pool, whose outlines are now visible; it will offer free swim lessons for public-school students during the day, Ms. Tweedy said, adding that the entire facility is supposed to open in November.

The completion of the skyline in Battery Park City comes at a crossroads moment for the neighborhood, which was conceived in 1968 by the State of New York as a way to redevelop a moribund shipping area. Trade Center dirt later filled in rotting piers, though it was not until the 1980s that construction really ramped up. Today the area has 34 residential buildings and a population of 13,000.

Many in the real estate community have complained about the development arrangements, which require landlords to pay ground rents to the state. For condo owners, that can mean common charges 15 percent higher than for comparable units elsewhere, brokers say, adding that home sales can be hurt as a result. (For renters, those extra fees are folded into monthly payments and may be less noticeable.)

The rents can also vary wildly among properties, some of which went up during recessionary periods and others in booms.

But in May, to help level the playing field, the authority decided to equalize the ground rents in 11 of the dozens of buildings in Battery Park City, though Liberty Green and Luxe were not among them.

Under the old system, residents could have paid $804 million over 30 years, but under the new system, those fees will total $525 million, said Gayle Horwitz, the authority president. “It was really important,” she said, “to bring stability to the neighborhood.”

After Four Decades, Finishing a Planned City,
NYT,
19.8.2011,
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/21/
realestate/final-parcels-developed-in-battery-park-city-posting.html

 

 

 

 

 

Compromise Is Reached

on Harlem Rezoning

 

April 16, 2008

The New York Times

By TIMOTHY WILLIAMS

 

The Bloomberg administration’s proposal to rezone 125th Street in Harlem cleared a major hurdle on Tuesday when the area’s three City Council members signed off on a compromise plan that would limit the height of new buildings, add moderately priced housing and provide financial aid to businesses displaced by the rezoning.

The proposal was then approved by the Council’s Zoning and Franchises Subcommittee in a 10-to-1 vote. The agreement between the City Planning Commission and the council members, Inez E. Dickens, Robert Jackson and Melissa Mark-Viverito, virtually assures the plan’s passage by the full City Council later this month.

The rezoning of 24 blocks of Harlem, stretching from Broadway east to Second Avenue, and from 124th to 126th Street, centers on 125th Street — a cultural touchstone for African-Americans in the city and beyond. It has led to widespread opposition in the neighborhood because of concerns that it will change the character of the low-rise street and speed gentrification in the area, including forcing out long-term businesses and low-income residents.

But Councilwoman Dickens, who represents central Harlem, and who led what she and others involved described as contentious negotiations during the past three weeks, said on Tuesday that the agreement would provide sufficient protection for the neighborhood, which is among the poorest in the city.

“This has been one of the most challenging and difficult issues that I have ever faced, personally and professionally, because the rezoning of 125th Street will change the fabric of my district, my community, my home forever,” she said. “I said if there were no protections for my community, there would be no rezoning. After many hours of deliberations, disagreements and debate, I do believe the City Planning Commission heard me loud and clear.”

The rezoning would remake 125th Street, one of the city’s liveliest streets — and home to many small businesses like clothing stores, pawn shops and hair salons — into a regional business hub with office towers and more than 2,000 new market-rate condominiums.

The compromise was reached after an all-night negotiating session that started on Monday evening. It reduces the height limit on new buildings to about 19 stories from 29; creates a $750,000 loan program to assist 71 small businesses that would probably be forced to move; and allocates about $5.8 million in improvements to Marcus Garvey Park.

Residents who spoke at recent community meetings were worried that rezoning, combined with changes already under way in the neighborhood, would soon make Harlem unrecognizable.

Among projects planned for 125th Street are at least two hotels, two shopping malls and a tower that would be the headquarters of a new Major League Baseball cable television network.

In recent years, the street — which only a decade ago was still dotted with abandoned buildings — has become home to national retail stores, including Starbucks and Old Navy, and to the offices of former President Bill Clinton. The area has also seen a flurry of new residential construction, with the average price for a new apartment hovering around $895,000.

Perhaps the most significant change to the plan reached during the Monday night negotiations is the Bloomberg administration’s agreement to expand the number of low-income residents in Harlem eligible for moderately priced housing.

As part of the federal calculation that is used by the city to determine average household income levels, a family of four earning $61,450 can qualify for low-income housing. That figure is about double the average household income in Harlem, city statistics show.

During negotiations, the Bloomberg administration agreed to set aside about 46 percent of the 3,858 new apartment units the city would allow to be built as part of the 125th Street rezoning plan to families earning no more than $30,750 a year.

“It is a milestone,” said Amanda M. Burden, the Planning Commission chairwoman. “It’s something we haven’t done before.”

Some opponents remained unsatisfied.

Erica Razook, general counsel for Voices of the Everyday People, or VOTE People, a community group opposed to the rezoning, said the last-minute concessions by the Bloomberg administration only highlighted the flawed nature of the process.

“An issue like affordable housing should not be discussed by a couple of City Council members and the Planning Commission behind closed doors — it should have been discussed publicly,” Ms. Razook said. “They waited until the last minute and then decided, ‘We’re going to try to squeeze in some stuff about affordable housing to give everyone political cover.’ ”

Compromise Is Reached on Harlem Rezoning,
NYT,
16.4.2008,
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/16/nyregion/16rezone.html


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


A computer rendering of the roughly 30-story tower

designed by Norman Foster for 980 Madison Avenue,

between 76th and 77th Streets.

 

Foster & Partners

 

Injecting a Bold Shot of the New on the Upper East Side

NYT    10.10.2006

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/10/10/arts/design/10fost.html
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Architecture

Injecting a Bold Shot of the New

on the Upper East Side

 

October 10, 2006

The New York Times

By NICOLAI OUROUSSOFF

 

I expect Norman Foster’s design for a new residential tower at 980 Madison Avenue to infuriate people. Rising out of the old Parke-Bernet Gallery building, a spare 1950 office building between 76th and 77th Streets, its interlocking elliptical forms throw down a challenge to a neighborhood known for an aversion to bold contemporary architecture.

The tower’s height, roughly 30 stories, hardly helps its cause; as with other luxury high rises reshaping the Manhattan skyline, its scale is clearly driven by economic considerations. Defenders will point out that the Carlyle Hotel across the street is slightly taller, but the reality is that the Carlyle’s setbacks make it virtually invisible when viewed from the street. Lord Foster’s tower would have a far stronger visual presence, soaring above the apartment buildings flanking it to the north and south.

With a little trimming, though, this could be the most handsome building to rise along Madison Avenue since the Whitney Museum of American Art was completed 40 years ago.

The project approaches the existing building with gentleness, respecting its integrity without resorting to historical mimicry. And its glistening forms reaffirm the city’s faith in progress, suggesting that Lord Foster has a better grip on what makes New York tick than architects who have worked in the city all their lives.

Designed by Walker & Poor, 980 Madison’s austere limestone facades and urban roof garden were meant to replicate the stylish look of Rockefeller Center, completed a decade earlier. But the building signals the end of an era, not a beginning. Its low, subdued profile is the antithesis of Rockefeller Center’s soaring monumentality, giving it a curious sense of incompleteness. And within two years Manhattan would move on to embrace International Style Modernism with the completion of Lever House.

The building suffered through a major renovation in 1960, when the roof garden was stripped away and replaced with a fifth floor whose horizontal windows clashed with the formal rhythm of the windows below. Yet even after the addition it retains a straightforward elegance, serving as a bridge between Beaux Arts monumentality and classical Modernism.

Lord Foster was enlisted as someone who has handled sensitive historic sites, even if the results have been somewhat mixed. In his recent addition to the Hearst Building on Eighth Avenue he plunged a faceted 46-story office tower through the original 1920’s structure with stunning force, and the collision between the two is mesmerizing. But an earlier design for the courtyard of the British Museum simply smoothed over the differences between old and new, an approach that benefited neither.

Here, Lord Foster approaches the 1950 building with care, as if leery of riling old ghosts. The unfortunate fifth-story addition from the 1960’s would be demolished to make way for a spectacular roof garden framed by lush grass. And the tower is set at the building’s northern edge, closer to 77th Street, giving it a connection to the block between Madison and Fifth Avenues and preserving some of the current views from the Carlyle Hotel.

Most ingenious is the delicate way Lord Foster links the old and new structures. A slender exposed elevator core rises from the old building, connecting the 77th Street lobby to the glass tower. The tower’s petal-shaped floors begin 30 feet above the old structure’s roof level, so that the two buildings barely seem to touch.

The tower’s underbelly forms an entrance canopy at one end of the garden. From the street it would seem as though the tower were floating above the old stone base, its elliptical shaft stretching up to the clouds.

As with all of Lord Foster’s recent buildings, the forms are generated by environmental as well as aesthetic considerations. The tower’s interlocking ellipses and uneven heights visually reduce its scale, giving it a more slender profile as it rises. The elegantly curved forms were designed to limit wind resistance; the fluted glass cladding will collect solar energy.

But the tower’s outsize height is a problem. Manhattan was shaped by the hubris of developers struggling against the constraints of the street grid, and its beauty is a result of wild juxtapositions of scales, styles and architectural periods. But I’m not sure a luxury high rise should be allowed the same freedom as a major civic building.

Unlike Renzo Piano’s planned addition to the Whitney Museum of American Art two blocks south, the Foster tower will serve the interests of a wealthy elite, not the public at large. We’re not talking about, say, a project that addresses the city’s desperate need for middle-class housing.

And the argument that the tower’s height is in keeping with the Carlyle’s is misleading. One of Madison Avenue’s most comforting features is the way its scale shifts as you walk north from the corporate towers of Midtown and approach its residential neighborhoods. You read the street differently as the pace and intensity slow.

The tower need not conform to the height levels of its neighbors, but it should at least establish a visual dialogue with the 16-story residential tower immediately to the north across 77th Street. The challenge will be to scale back the height without sacrificing the elegance of the tower’s slender proportions.

These decisions will play out in haggling between the developer, Aby Rosen, and the Landmarks Preservation Commission, not in a design studio. (The building lies within the landmarked Upper East Side Historic District; the commission plans a public hearing on the project on Oct. 24.)

Lord Foster is not a social critic; his job, as he sees it, is to create an eloquent expression of his client’s values. What he has designed is a perfect monument for the emerging city of the enlightened megarich: environmentally aware, sensitive to history, confident of its place in the new world order, resistant to sacrifice.

Still, you cannot help but marvel at the project’s sophistication as a work of architecture.

Injecting a Bold Shot of the New on the Upper East Side,
NYT,
10.10.2006,
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/10/10/
arts/design/10fost.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Related > Anglonautes > Vocapedia

 

architecture, towns, cities

 

 

architecture > gentrification

 

 

USA > African-Americans > NYC > Harlem

 

 

painting > street art > artwork, graffiti, murals

 

 

transports

 

 

 

 

 

Related > Anglonautes > Arts

 

architects, architecture

 

 

cartoons > 11 September 2001 (9/11)

 

 

 

 

 

Related > Anglonautes > History > 21st century > USA

 

21st century > 9/11 > Osama Bin Laden    1957-2011

 

 

21st century > 11 September 2001 - 9/11

 

 

21st century > 11 September 2001 - 9/11 frontpages

 

 

 

home Up