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Vocapedia > Arts > Books > Libraries, Digital libraries, Librarians

 

 

 

 

The Bookmobile        Video        StoryCorps        13 April 2016

 

At eight years old,

Storm Reyes was already working full time

with other migrant farm workers

in the fields outside Tacoma, Washington.

 

One day, a bookmobile arrived

and brought her new worlds—and hope.

 

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=11OvHcgh-E4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eyes on the Stars        StoryCorps        27 January 2013

 

 

 

 

Eyes on the Stars        StoryCorps        27 January 2013

 

On January 28, 1986,

NASA Challenger mission STS-51-L ended in tragedy

when the shuttle exploded 73 seconds after takeoff.

 

On board was physicist Ronald E. McNair,

who was the second African American to enter space.

 

But first, he was a kid with big dreams

in Lake City, South Carolina.

 

Funding Provided by:

Corporation for Public Broadcasting

National Endowment for the Arts

In partnership with POV.

Directed by: The Rauch Brothers

Art Direction: Bill Wray

Producers: Lizzie Jacobs & Mike Rauch

Animation: Tim Rauch

Audio Produced by: Michael Garofalo

Music: Fredrik

Label: The Kora Records

Publisher: House of Hassle

 


Eyes on the Stars

YouTube > StoryCorps

https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=41&v=okF5UGpivR8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

93 of the 100 Great Books arranged in chronological order

on the library shelves of St. John's college

where the curriculum is the traditional discipline

of a classical education.

 

Location: Annapolis, MD, US

Date taken: 1940

 

Photographer: Alfred Eisenstaedt

 

Life Images

http://images.google.com/hosted/life/9f11b83fcb0cd643.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

library, libraries        UK / USA

 

https://www.theguardian.com/books/libraries 

http://images.google.com/hosted/life/6862a988b5e08f67.html

http://images.google.com/hosted/life/bab8c800fe398681.html

 

 

https://www.npr.org/2022/08/02/
1114851706/library-notes-books-collection

 

https://www.npr.org/2022/04/26/
1094807686/texas-library-book-ban-lawsuit

 

 

 

 

https://www.npr.org/2021/04/30/
991935818/a-joy-of-reading-sparked-by-a-special-librarian-determined-to-make-a-difference

 

https://www.npr.org/2021/03/28/
980434263/libraries-are-key-tools-for-people-getting-out-of-prison-even-during-a-pandemic

 

 

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2018/dec/07/
nearly-130-public-libraries-closed-across-britain-in-the-last-year

 

https://www.theguardian.com/books/gallery/2018/sep/06/
neil-gaiman-and-chris-riddell-on-why-we-need-libraries-an-essay-in-pictures

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2018/03/01/
589912466/dolly-parton-gives-the-gift-of-literacy-a-library-of-100-million-books

 

 

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/books/gallery/2017/oct/25/
borrowing-history-expired-library-books-in-pictures

 

http://www.npr.org/2017/10/13/
557328529/how-living-in-a-library-gave-one-man-the-thirst-of-learning

 

http://www.npr.org/2017/04/13/
522606808/file-this-under-nostalgia-new-book-pays-tribute-to-the-library-card-catalog

 

 

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/gallery/2016/oct/06/
most-beautiful-libraries-america-pictures

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/alltechconsidered/2016/05/31/
477819498/in-omaha-a-library-with-no-books-brings-technology-to-all

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/11/19/nyregion/
an-opulent-bronx-library-in-decay-and-in-search-of-a-purpose.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2015/11/06/nyregion/new-york-
101-how-the-library-works-a-book-odyssey.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/24/
opinion/reinventing-the-library.html

 

 

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/aug/26/
doris-lessing-book-collection-zimbabwe-library

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/19/nyregion/
a-century-later-children-still-finding-sanctuary-at-brownsville-library.html

 

http://www.theguardian.com/books/gallery/2014/mar/24/
libraries-around-world-pictures

 

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/mar/10/
womens-library-reopen-london-school-economics-lse

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/08/us/
breaking-out-of-the-library-mold-in-boston-and-beyond.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/27/
arts/design/library-renovation-plan-awaits-word-from-de-blasio.html

 

 

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2013/dec/11/norfolk-norwich-
library-most-popular-top-20

 

http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/08/05/
a-library-where-the-hush-is-over-its-very-existence/

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2013/feb/08/
bibliotherapy-books-lift-mood

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2013/apr/29/birmingham-
library-ready-books

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2013/jan/15/
libraries-crisis-worse-sheffield-islington

 

 

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2012/jan/08/aberdeen-
university-library-architecture

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2012/jan/04/
libraries-imperial-age

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/03/nyregion/queens-
libraries-serve-59-languages.html

 

 

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2011/oct/18/
library-closures-local-people

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2011/may/01/
the-secret-life-of-libraries

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/21/
books/21margin.html

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2011/feb/18/
library-most-borrowed-books

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2011/feb/04/
protests-save-our-libraries-day

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/gallery/2011/feb/04/
save-libraries-protest-posters-cuts

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2011/feb/03/
hands-off-our-libraries

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2011/feb/04/
libraries-dvds

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/video/2011/feb/01/
we-love-libraries-video

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/interactive/2011/feb/01/
library-protests-map

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2011/jan/27/
philip-pullman-defend-libraries-web

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/31/
realestate/31scapes.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/27/
business/27libraries.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/04/
opinion/l04library.html

http://roomfordebate.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/02/10/
do-school-libraries-need-books/

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/06/20/us/
20ventura.html

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/10/23/nyregion/
23fiction.html

http://www.theguardian.com/uk/2007/sep/23/
artnews.highereducation 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

build one's library        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/may/17/
linda-grant-author-killed-books-library-murder

 

 

 

 

local libraries        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2012/nov/23/
protect-our-libraries-jeanette-winterson

 

 

 

 

local library        USA

https://www.npr.org/2022/04/26/
1094807686/texas-library-book-ban-lawsuit

 

 

 

 

public libraries        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2018/dec/07/
nearly-130-public-libraries-closed-across-britain-in-the-last-year

 

 

 

 

New York Public Library        USA

https://www.nytimes.com/topic/organization/
new-york-public-library

 

https://www.npr.org/2022/04/15/
1093095474/new-york-public-library-makes-banned-books-available-for-free

 

 

 

 

British Library        UK

https://www.bl.uk/

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2009/mar/17/
british-library-books-mein-kampf

 

 

 

 

Library of Congress        USA

https://www.loc.gov/ 

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/12/26/
573609499/library-of-congress-will-no-longer-archive-every-tweet

 

 

 

 

Duke University libraries         Durham NC, USA

https://library.duke.edu/  

 

 

 

 

USA > Digital Public Library of America    DPLA        UK/ USA

 

Discover images, texts, videos, and sounds

from across the United States

https://dp.la/ 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2013/may/02/
digital-public-library-america-dpla

 

 

 

 

Future Library project        USA

http://www.npr.org/2015/05/27/
409939054/author-margaret-atwood-contributes-manuscript-to-future-library

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

librarian        UK / USA

 

https://ask.loc.gov/

 

 

https://www.npr.org/2022/08/02/
1114851706/library-notes-books-collection

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/26/us/26mcohen.html

 

http://www.theguardian.com/uk/2006/oct/26/books.ukcrime

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

supervising librarian        USA

 

http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/08/05/
a-library-where-the-hush-is-over-its-very-existence/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

card catalog / index cards        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/2017/04/13/
522606808/file-this-under-nostalgia-new-book-pays-tribute-to-the-library-card-catalog

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

library users        UK

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2011/feb/18/
library-most-borrowed-books

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

borrow        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/books/gallery/2017/oct/25/
borrowing-history-expired-library-books-in-pictures

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2011/feb/18/
library-most-borrowed-books

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

borrower        UK

 

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/apr/29/
borrower-returns-library-book-67-years-late-fine

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

bibliotherapist        UK

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2013/feb/08/
bibliotherapy-books-lift-mood

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

archive        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2013/08/05/nyregion/
05cityroom-archive.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

on the shelves        USA

 

http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/08/05/
a-library-where-the-hush-is-over-its-very-existence/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

in storage        USA

 

http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/08/05/
a-library-where-the-hush-is-over-its-very-existence/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dean Scott Buchanan (2L)

leading seminar with students and faculty

at St. John's college where the curriculum

is the traditional discipline of a classical education.

 

Location: Annapolis, MD, US

Date taken: 1940

 

Photographer: Alfred Eisenstaedt

 

Life Images

http://images.google.com/hosted/life/8ac7b4f1b528593e.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Corpus of news articles

 

Arts > Books > Libraries,

 

Digital libraries, Librarians

 

 

 

Urban Fiction

Goes From Streets

to Public Libraries

 

October 23, 2008

The New York Times

By ANNE BARNARD

 

In one book, the hero spirals toward a violent death dealing drugs on the streets of Laurelton, Queens, witnessing, along the way, a baby ripped apart by bullets. In another, a convict plots the seduction of his prison psychotherapist.

And then there’s Angel, a Versace-clad seductress who shoots her boyfriend in the head during sex, stuffs money from his safe into her Louis Vuitton bags and, as she fondles the cash, experiences a sexual frisson narrated in terms too graphic to reproduce here.

All these characters, and the novels they populate, are favorites of Shonda Miller, 35, a devoted library-goer who devours a book a day, enforces a daily hour reading time for her entire family and scours street stands and the Internet for new titles. She also acts as an unofficial guide and field scout for the Queens Library as it builds its collection of a fast-growing genre, written mainly by black authors about black characters and variously known as urban fiction, street lit or gangsta lit.

It’s not the kind of literary fare usually associated with the prim image of librarians. But public libraries from Queens, the highest-circulation library system in the country, to York County in central Pennsylvania, are embracing urban fiction as an exciting, if sometimes controversial, way to draw new people into reading rooms, spread literacy and reflect and explore the interests and concerns of the public they serve.

“We’ve got people who are reading for the first time. We’ve got people coming into our building asking for Teri Woods” — the creator of Angel — “who have never come here before,” said Lora-Lynn Rice, the director of collections at the Martin Library in York County, which held a weeklong symposium on urban fiction during National Library Week in April. “Why would we not embrace this?”

Urban fiction’s journey from street vendors to library shelves and six-figure book deals is a case of culture bubbling from the bottom up. That is especially true in New York, where the genre, like hip-hop music, was developed by, for and about people in southeast Queens and other mostly black neighborhoods that have struggled with drugs, crime and economic stagnation.

Writers like Mark Anthony — who at 35 is Ms. Miller’s contemporary and the author of “Paper Chasers,” based on his youth in Laurelton — found themselves being rejected by agents and publishers. So they paid to self-publish their books, with rudimentary design and cheap bindings, and sold them on 125th Street in Harlem, or on Jamaica Avenue in Queens, around the corner from the borough library’s main branch. Soon, a stream of people — high-school students, first-time library users, the library’s own staff — were asking for the books. And the librarians went out on the street to buy them.

“If there’s some cultural phenomenon going on out there and it’s not in here, we want to know why,” said Joanne King, a spokeswoman for the Queens Library.

As a teenager in Far Rockaway, Queens, where she still lives, Ms. Miller read gritty novels set in urban black neighborhoods of the 1960s and ’70s, by Donald Goines and Iceberg Slim. Then there was a dry spell. She made do with Jackie Collins until a new generation of urban fiction sprang up in the late 1990s.

“I read what I can relate to,” she said. “They’re writing about what I’ve experienced. It’s easier than reading about Beverly Hills and Rodeo Drive.”

Which is not to say Ms. Miller, a mother of four, has ever murdered anyone, worked as a prostitute or been draped in diamonds by a drug-dealing boyfriend. (Her husband of 19 years, an ex-Army man, is a garbage collector.) What she recognizes are the characters’ fashions and pleasures (door-knocker earrings, clubbing), their problems (few jobs, drug dealers offering your children fast cash, people you know getting shot or stabbed) and their aspirations (striving for a better life).

So she has made it her mission to bring more urban fiction into the Queens libraries, which she visits as many as five times a week, checking out books she reads on her subway rides to Manhattan to visit her son Tad, 17, who has been hospitalized for four years with brain damage from a near-drowning.

Her oldest, Raishon, 19, reads his favorite urban titles aloud to Tad. Some nurses blush at the profanity and sex; others ask to borrow the books.

“A lot of people ask me, ‘How can you let him read that?’ ” she said. “He lives it every day. This is cotton candy compared to what they hear out there. And it shows him there are consequences to living such a fast life.”

And besides, she said, when she makes her husband and children read every day from 5 to 6 p.m., at home in the Ocean Bay housing project, “I don’t care what they read — I only care that they read.”

Librarians tend to agree. But many libraries are only now catching up to their public, which has already made urban fiction big business. Writers like Ms. Woods, from Philadelphia, and Vickie Stringer, who writes about her former life as a drug dealer and madam, have started their own publishing companies.

Mainstream publishers saw dollar signs and jumped in. St. Martin’s Press now publishes authors from Mr. Anthony to the rapper 50 Cent — another Queens native, born Curtis Jackson — and a subgenre of black erotica led by the writer Zane.

The genre has spawned best-selling authors like Omar Tyree and the rapper Sister Souljah, whose novel “The Coldest Winter Ever” has sold a million copies; a long-awaited sequel, "Midnight," is due out Nov. 4. It has also spawned literary feuds: Kwame Teague, the convict whose life story was featured in Ms. Woods’s “Dutch” and “Dutch II,” broke with her to publish the third volume himself.

And, of course, it has spawned a backlash, which has complicated its reception in libraries. Its street language, graphic sex and violence — not to mention covers featuring scantily clad models, often brandishing weapons — are controversial in black literary circles, where critics say it perpetuates stereotypes and lament that it is shelved next to literary writers like Toni Morrison, a Nobel laureate. Mr. Tyree himself has declared that he’s not going to write any more of it.

“There are black librarians who hate the genre, because they feel like it’s an embarrassment culturally,” said Vanessa Morris, an assistant teaching professor of library sciences at Drexel University.

But she says the genre tells the stories of African-Americans who survived the 1980s drug wars: “This is about documenting history, or, I should say, collective memory.”

Librarians point out that Harlequin romances, the Bobbsey Twins and even paperbacks were once considered too lowbrow for libraries — and that Stephen King and Ms. Collins also trade in sex and violence.

Ms. Morris credits the genre for a jump in circulation at the Widener Library in North Philadelphia, where she began a book club for teenagers in 2005 and found that three years later, many had expanded their interests to read science fiction and biography.

At Q-Boro Books — Mr. Anthony’s publishing company, with offices over a Jamaican-Chinese restaurant in Jamaica, Queens — the library’s embrace has been great for business, since libraries buy multiple copies and reorder when they wear out or disappear. The company, which he says has revenues of over $1 million, was recently sold to Urban Books. based in West Babylon, on Long Island. Q-Boro has already published 100 books, including “The Moanin’ After” by L. M. Ross, with a gay theme that Mr. Anthony says reflects Queens’ diversity, and Mr. Anthony’s coming “Queen Bee” — renamed after Wal-Mart balked at the original title, “Promiscuous Girl.”

At the Far Rockaway library, one of the busiest spots on the neighborhood’s faded commercial strip, a stream of commuters heads to the urban fiction shelf at the end of the workday. The head librarian there, Sharon Anderson, who said she grew up on Mr. Goines and was now obsessed with spy novels, says some readers start with urban fiction and branch out to histories of the civil rights movement, or to “The Godfather.” Sometimes she recommends something harder: “If you want sex, dirt and murder, read Shakespeare! We have the CliffsNotes!”

Urban fiction has influenced a generation of library staffers, too. Down the street at a special library branch for teenagers, the librarian Sandra Michele Echols wrote her bachelor’s thesis at New York University comparing street lit to slave narratives.

Barbara Orlandi, a lifelong Far Rockaway resident who was checking out “Little Black Girl Lost II,” said she moved out of the Redfern housing project at age 11 and has not gone back since. But she reads about the dangerous life she remembers — some books even mention specific Far Rockaway streets — on her subway rides to her night shift as an AirTrain dispatcher.

“It actually helps you to understand what’s going on around you,” she said, “instead of walking around blind.”

Urban Fiction Goes From Streets to Public Libraries,
NYT,
23.10.2008,
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/10/23/nyregion/23fiction.html

 

 

 

 

 

Why Libraries Are Back in Style

It's Not Because of Books;
They're 'Memory Rooms'
Or TV-Free Private Spaces

 

September 12, 2008
The Wall Street Journal
By JUNE FLETCHER
Page W8

 

In the library of her 5,800-square-foot house in Glen Cove, N.Y., Linda Teitelbaum keeps trophies from dog shows, needlepoint pillows of bulldogs and gold-framed photos of family. Though the plaid-papered room has a scattering of books, she often retreats to it not just to read but to remember the dogs she used to breed, to nap, or to get away from the TV. "It's my veg-out room," Ms. Teitelbaum says.

Reading rates are down and Americans say they love casual living. And yet, one of the most popular rooms in big new houses is a library. Rather than being about books, their appeal is often about creating a certain ambiance. "Libraries connote elegance and quality," says New York architect and interior designer Campion Platt, adding that most of his wealthy clients want one, even if they do most of their reading online.

Libraries have become so fashionable that this month, talk-show host Oprah Winfrey featured the one in her Santa Barbara, Calif., home on the cover of her magazine; it contains first editions collected for her by a rare-book dealer.

In the latest annual National Association of Home Builders consumer survey, 63% of home buyers said they wanted a library or considered one essential, a percentage that has been edging up for the past few years. Many mass-market home builders are including libraries in their house plans, sometimes with retro touches like rolling ladders and circular stairs.



A RETURN TO THE CLASSIC

Jeani Ziering, an interior designer in Manhasset, N.Y., says the newfound popularity of libraries is part of a general movement toward traditional design and décor. "When the economy turns bad, people turn to the classics," she says. Libraries are especially appealing during anxious times because they project coziness and comfort, she adds.

The Journal's June Fletcher discusses the resurgence of libraries.What can make libraries more soothing than other formal rooms isn't so much books but the framed family photographs, awards and mementos that share the shelves and define a family's interests and identity, says McLean, Va., architect Chris Lessard. "They're memory rooms," he says. Because libraries are public rooms, oftentimes the books are purely decorative and don't say as much about the family who lives there. The books that people really read, like paperback novels and how-to guides, often are kept out of sight elsewhere in the home.

Even in a downturn, U.S. adult hardcover and paperback book sales reached $16.6 billion last year, a slight increase from the year before, according to the Book Industry Study Group, a New York trade group. But crammed schedules and the Web have slashed the amount of time people spend reading books. According to the National Endowment for the Arts, 5% of Americans said they read literature in 2002, the latest survey data available, down from 14% in 1992.
 


HIS AND HERS LIBRARIES

Still, some homeowners are book lovers. Michael Burkitt and his wife, Roberta, own an estimated 9,000 books, all hardbound, which they keep in two formal libraries in their new, 5,800-square-foot home in Reno, Nev., and their 3,800-square-foot vacation house in Newport Coast, Calif. Mr. Burkitt, 65, the recently retired co-owner of a structural-plastics firm, says he's been too busy working most of his life to read even a fraction of them. But he enjoys relaxing among them in what he considers his "sanctuaries" -- one paneled in dark wood, the other in white -- free from distractions like computers. "They're the wombs of my homes," he says.

Tucson, Ariz., interior designer Terri Taylor says she spends a lot of time scouring flea markets and bookstores for books with fancy bindings for her clients' bookshelves. She selects books to match color schemes rather than for their content. She once was ecstatic to find a stash of beautiful, leather-bound books at the bargain price of $20 apiece -- never mind that they were written in German, a language her clients didn't read. "I bought cases of them," she says.

For home builders who are scaling back the size of houses to make them more affordable and cheaper to construct, libraries are a more functional way to create an upscale look than the "old, crazy massive foyers and 'Gone With the Wind' staircases," that characterized houses a few years ago, says Memphis, Tenn., architect Carson Looney.

In some mass-market builders' plans, libraries are replacing dens, which have become redundant in the age of huge family rooms. A home plan called the Monterey Mediterranean offered by Toll Brothers, of Horsham, Pa., has 5,183 square feet, and includes a family room and a library with double glass doors off the foyer -- but has no den.

Neither does the 4,289-square-foot Blue Harbor Plan 4 house that John Laing Homes of Irvine, Calif., sells for nearly $1.3 million in San Juan Capistrano, Calif. In addition to a wine room and a family room with fireplace, it puts a library on a landing between the first and second floors, which allows the ceiling height to be extended for more bookshelf space.

Of course, selling built-in bookshelves is a way for builders to pump up their bottom lines, especially if buyers choose custom-made shelving in exotic woods and frills such as secret doors hidden in paneling. About half the clients of London Bay, a Naples, Fla., builder whose prices start at just under $1 million, order such upgrades, at a cost ranging from $30,000 to $300,000. Lately, says Mark Wilson, the builder's chief executive officer and president, there's even been demand for "his and hers" libraries for spouses who like to keep their books, collections and alone-time separate.



JAY MCINERNEY'S PHILOSOPHY

Some builders are also creating mini-libraries scattered throughout the house. Popular spots are under the stairs, in lofts, in alcoves near master bedrooms and along entry hallways. Gary Stefanoni, senior executive vice president of Orleans Homebuilders in Bensalem, Pa., says that for the past few years, he's seen demand for bookcases in children's playrooms, since kids often have more books, trophies and collections than their parents do. "They want to display them in their own space," he says.

Dan Poag, a shopping-center developer, is putting a dedicated library and built-in bookcases in nearly every room of the 10,000-square-foot house he's building in Memphis. He doesn't know how many books he owns -- he estimates several thousand -- but has kept nearly everything he's purchased since college, as well as his three grown sons' college textbooks, a collection of science fiction, and children's books that his five grandchildren read when they visit. Since nearly every wall of his current house is filled with books, his decorator urged him to re-cover them so their multicolored spines wouldn't clash with the décor. He refused. "The books are my priority," he says.

Similarly, author Jay McInerney and his wife, Anne Hearst, happily mix dog-eared paperbacks with first editions of Fitzgerald and Joyce in the overstuffed bookcases of both their Manhattan apartment and their Hamptons house. Mr. McInerney thinks the visual jumble of thousands of mismatched books is appealing. "If you're not reading what's on your bookshelves, you should find something else to decorate with," he says.

    Why Libraries Are Back in Style, WSJ, 12.9.2008,
    http://online.wsj.com/article/
    SB122117550854125707.html?mod=hpp_us_inside_today

 

 

 

 

 

Big Ten Joins Google Book Project

 

June 6, 2007

Filed at 1:44 p.m. ET

The New York Times

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

 

STATE COLLEGE, Pa. (AP) -- Twelve major universities will digitize select collections in each of their libraries -- up to 10 million volumes -- as part of Google Inc.'s book-scanning project. The goal: a shared digital repository that faculty, students and the public can access quickly.

The partnership involves the Committee on Institutional Cooperation, which includes the University of Chicago and the 11 universities in the Big Ten athletic conference (yes, there are 11): Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Michigan State, Minnesota, Northwestern, Ohio State, Penn State, Purdue and Wisconsin.

''We have a collective ambition to share resources and work together to preserve the world's printed treasures,'' said Northwestern Provost Lawrence Dumas.

The committee said Google will scan and index materials ''in a manner consistent with copyright law.'' Google generally makes available the full text of books in the public domain and limited portions of copyrighted books.

Several other universities, including Harvard and California, already have signed up to let Google scan their libraries. But Google still faces a lawsuit by the Association of American Publishers and the Authors Guild over its plans to incorporate parts of copyrighted books.

------

On the Net:

Committee on Institutional Cooperation: http://www.cic.uiuc.edu

Google Book Search: http://books.google.com/googlebooks/library.html

Big Ten Joins Google Book Project,
NYT,
6.6.2007,
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/technology/
AP-TechBit-Google-Big-Ten.html - broken link

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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