Les anglonautes

About | Search | Grammar | Vocapedia | Learning | News podcasts | Videos | History | Arts | Science | Translate and listen

 Previous Home Up Next

 

Vocapedia > Drugs > Drug abuse, Drug addiction, Overdose > UK, USA

 

 

 

warning: graphic / distressing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Opioid Diaries - James Nachtwey for Time

Holly, detoxing in the Montgomery County Jail in Dayton, Ohio,

on 3 July 2017.

 

Over the course of 2017,

photographer James Nachtwey

set out to document the opioid crisis in America

through the people on its front lines

 

Photograph: James Nachtwey

 

‘The jobs went, the drugs moved in’:

America’s addiction nightmare – in pictures

From opioids to crack,

families have been torn apart by the drug crisis rampaging through the US

– as the stark work of these three photographers shows

G

Thu 3 Jun 2021    07.00 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2021/jun/03/
the-jobs-went-the-drugs-moved-in-americas-addiction-nightmare-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Opioid Diaries - James Nachtwey for Time

Cheryl Schmidtchen, 67,

being consoled at the funeral for her granddaughter Michaela Gingras

in Manchester, New Hampshire, on 17 September 2017.

Gingras, a heroin user, was 24.

Alongside Time’s deputy director of photography, Paul Moakley,

Nachtwey travelled the country gathering stories from users, families,

first responders and others at the heart of the epidemic

 

Photograph: James Nachtwey

 

‘The jobs went, the drugs moved in’:

America’s addiction nightmare – in pictures

From opioids to crack,

families have been torn apart by the drug crisis rampaging through the US

– as the stark work of these three photographers shows

G

Thu 3 Jun 2021    07.00 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2021/jun/03/
the-jobs-went-the-drugs-moved-in-americas-addiction-nightmare-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For two and a half years,

Horace Bush lived in a "three-quarter" house,

an unregulated type of housing that dooms tenants

to a cycle of treatment and relapse.

 

Photograph:

Ruth Fremson/The New York Times

 

A Choice for Recovering Addicts: Relapse or Homelessness

By KIM BARKER        NYT        MAY 30, 2015

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/31/nyregion/
three-quarter-housing-a-choice-for-recovering-addicts-or-homelessness.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Barry and Candace Crupi’s son Johnathan

died of a heroin overdose at their home on Staten Island.

 

He was 21.

 

Photograph:

Damon Winter/The New York Times

 

Heroin’s New Hometown

On Staten Island, Rising Tide of Heroin Takes Hold

NYT

MAY 4, 2014

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/05/nyregion/heroins-new-hometown-in-staten-island.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Both my sons died after taking ecstasy – that's why I want to legalise it    G    2 July 2018

 

 

 

 

Both my sons died after taking ecstasy – that's why I want to legalise it        Video        G        2 July 2018

 

Jacques and Torin Lakeman

died from a drug overdose on the same night.

 

Speaking from their home on the Isle of Man

their father, Ray,

says they would still be alive if drugs were legal,

as he pushes for decriminalisation

to save other young lives

 

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GJhpXhlcQWQ

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In and Out of Prison, and His Daughter’s Life        NYT        2 November 2017

 

 

 

 

In and Out of Prison, and His Daughter’s Life        Video        Times Documentary        NYT        2 November 2017

 

As a child,

Rob Sullivan watched his parents

battle drug addiction and depression.

 

Now a father himself,

he’s struggling to break the cycle.

 

The Times,

in collaboration

with the PBS series “Frontline,”

tells the story.

 

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kf3EuwOcybA

 

Related

https://www.nytimes.com/video/us/
100000005198256/prison-addiction-parenting.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Trever

Comment cartoon

The Albuquerque Journal

New Mexico

Cagle

29 April 2010

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

drug abuse        UK

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/money/2013/jul/27/
blackpool-most-unhealthy-place-england

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

substance use / drug abuse        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/itsallpolitics/2015/08/14/
432154800/at-clinton-event-an-emotional-conversation-on-substance-use

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

drug and alcohol abuse        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/04/20/
health/life-expectancy-decline-mortality.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The world in drugs use

 

*Want to know

how many people use drugs in your country?

 

These are the latest numbers        UK        May 2009

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/datablog/2009/jun/24/
drugs-trade-drugs

 

http://image.guardian.co.uk/sys-files/Guardian/documents/2009/06/24/
druguse2506.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

cocaine use / abuse        UK

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2011/apr/10/
cocaine-review-government-drug-advisers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Watch the 'Frank' anti-cocaine ad

voiced by Peep Show star David Mitchell        UK        December 2008

 

See the advert for the government's

'Frank' drugs awareness campaign,

focusing on cocaine and featuring

the character 'Pablo the drug mule dog',

voiced by Peep Show star David Mitchell.

 

The ad was created by Mother

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/video/2008/dec/04/
advertising-drugsandalcohol

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Watch an anti-cocaine ad

voiced by Peep Show star David Mitchell        UK        December 2009

 

Pablo the drug mule dog interviews

DJ Brandon Block about his cocaine addiction

for the next stage of the government's

anti-drugs campaign.

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/video/2009/dec/18/
david-mitchell-cocaine-pablo-the-drug-mule-dog

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

methamphetamines

 

Sometimes called crank,

ice, tina or crystal meth,

methamphetamine is not new.

 

For years, abuse has spread

from rural areas

of the West and South,

slowly expanding

to the Midwest and the East.

 

Today meth abuse

exists around the globe

- NYT, Updated: March 29, 2011

https://www.nytimes.com/topic/subject/methamphetamines 

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/topic/subject/methamphetamines

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/10/world/americas/
mexico-seizes-15-tons-of-methamphetamine.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

meth addiction

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2019/06/17/
730803759/meth-in-the-morning-heroin-at-night-inside-the-seesaw-struggle-of-dual-addiction

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lysergic acid diethylamide    LSD        UK / USA

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lysergic_acid_diethylamide

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucy_in_the_Sky_with_Diamonds

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/apr/13/
lsd-has-improved-my-life-state-hallucinogenic-drugs-suzanne-moore

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/04/13/
474071268/how-lsd-makes-your-brain-one-with-the-universe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Heroin and the War on Drugs        NYT        28 November 2015

 

 

 

 

Heroin and the War on Drugs        Video        Retro Report | The New York Times        28 November 2015

 

In the 1970s,

frustration over heroin related, urban crime

led to the War on Drugs.

 

Today, heroin is back.

 

But the users, and the response,

are very different.

 

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=MxE6wa-ljkM

 

Related

http://www.nytimes.com/video/us/100000004052626/
surviving-heroin.html?playlistId=100000002148738

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA > heroin        UK / USA

 

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2016/may/25/
opioid-epidemic-prescription-painkillers-heroin-addiction

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/03/19/
470280334/a-family-engulfed-by-heroin-fights-to-keep-a-son-alive

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/03/12/
469954366/a-small-town-wonders-what-to-do-when-heroin-is-everywhere

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/03/08/
469585044/an-addict-now-sober-discusses-needle-exchanges-and-hope-after-heroin

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/01/11/
462390288/anatomy-of-addiction-how-heroin-and-opioids-hijack-the-brain

 

 

 

 

http://www.npr.org/2015/12/27/
460847616/portraits-of-those-killed-by-heroin-bring-healing-and-awareness

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2015/12/08/
458280574/drug-cocktails-fuel-massachusetts-overdose-crisis

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2015/08/26/
434618809/ilicit-version-of-painkiller-fentanyl-makes-heroin-deadlier

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/12/us/
obituaries-shed-euphemisms-to-confront-heroins-toll.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/07/
opinion/sunday/nicholas-kristof-heroin-doesnt-have-to-be-a-killer.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In Myanmar, Harvesting for Heroin

BY Jonah M. Kessel | Jan. 3, 2015 | 6:31        NYT        USA

 

A toxic mix of civil war and poverty

has driven some Burmese farmers back to poppy,

satisfying a growing global hunger for heroin.

 

https://www.nytimes.com/video/world/asia/100000003421982/
in-myanmar-harvesting-for-heroin.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nashville, USA > the addict        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2022/mar/10/
the-drake-life-on-the-edge-in-nashville-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

heroin addict        UK

 

http://www.theguardian.com/society/interactive/2014/feb/11/
heroin-addiction-recovery-readers-response-interactive

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

heroin addict        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/03/08/
469585044/an-addict-now-sober-discusses-needle-exchanges-and-hope-after-heroin

 

http://www.npr.org/2016/02/18/
464463631/when-a-loved-one-dies-of-overdose-what-happens-to-the-family

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/05/nyregion/
heroins-new-hometown-in-staten-island.html

 

 

 

 

http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2006-10-04-
baltimore-addiction_x.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

heroin addiction        UK

 

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/audioslideshow/2014/may/03/
heroin-addiction-graham-macindoe-photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

heroin addiction        USA

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2019/06/17/
730803759/meth-in-the-morning-heroin-at-night-inside-the-seesaw-struggle-of-dual-addiction

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/01/11/
462390288/anatomy-of-addiction-how-heroin-and-opioids-hijack-the-brain

 

http://www.npr.org/2015/08/23/
433575293/ravages-of-heroin-addiction-haunt-friends-families-and-whole-towns

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA > addiction in America        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/society/series/
addiction-in-america

 

 

 

 

Nashville, USA > addiction        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2022/
mar/10/the-drake-life-on-the-edge-in-nashville-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

(be) addicted to heroin        USA

http://www.npr.org/2016/05/12/
477652738/politics-in-real-life-dying-from-overdose-while-waiting-for-treatment

 

 

 

 

clean        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/03/08/
469585044/an-addict-now-sober-discusses-needle-exchanges-and-hope-after-heroin

 

 

 

 

 

crack > addiction        USA

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2021/jun/03/
the-jobs-went-the-drugs-moved-in-americas-addiction-nightmare-in-pictures

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/09/
opinion/when-addiction-has-a-white-face.html

 

 

 

 

British drugs survey 2014:

drug use is rising in the UK – but we're not addicted        UK        2014

 

Nearly one in three British adults

has taken an illegal substance

and a fifth of those still do so,

with 40% of drug takers

in the higher echelons of society

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2014/oct/05/
-sp-drug-use-is-rising-in-the-uk-but-were-not-addicted

 

 

 

 

drug use > the world's biggest drug survey        UK         2013

http://www.theguardian.com/news/datablog/2013/nov/19/
drug-use-survey-2014-tell-us-what-you-take

 

 

 

 

drug user        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2013/apr/19/
online-high-net-drugs-deal

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2010/dec/07/
ex-offenders-drug-users-westminster-policy-makers

 

 

 

 

Drugs party gets wild in viral ad        UK        January 2008

 

Teenage drug users at a party

get David Attenborough-style

wildlife documentary treatment

in a viral ad as part of drugs

awareness programme Frank

http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/video/2008/jan/18/
frank.advertisement

 

 

 

 

illegal drug use

 

 

 

 

heroin use        USA

http://www.npr.org/2015/05/20/
405936140/many-native-american-communities-
struggle-with-effects-of-heroin-use

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ageing addicts        UK

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2011/jan/26/
older-drug-users-habits-die-hard

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA > addiction        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/feb/23/
addiction-suicide-family-wyoming-downward-spiral

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

addiction / drug addiction        USA

 

https://www.npr.org/2021/06/19/
1006229180/addiction-treatable-disease-discrimination

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2021/jun/03/
the-jobs-went-the-drugs-moved-in-americas-addiction-nightmare-in-pictures

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2021/05/01/
992500811/an-artist-and-a-scientist-take-on-the-stigma-of-addiction

 

 

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/video/us/
100000005198256/prison-addiction-parenting.html - Oct. 15, 2017

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/09/
opinion/when-addiction-has-a-white-face.html

 

http://www.npr.org/2016/01/30/
463952989/tragedy-moves-a-community-to-combat-drug-addiction

 

 

 

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2015/12/08/
458280574/drug-cocktails-fuel-massachusetts-overdose-crisis

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/07/nyregion/
in-speech-and-essay-chiara-de-blasio-details-her-depression-and-addiction.html

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/08/
science/08prof.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/23/us/
23drugs.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

fall into heroin addiction        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/05/31/us/
31border.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

combat drug addiction        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/2016/01/30/
463952989/tragedy-moves-a-community-to-combat-drug-addiction

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

addiction treatment        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/02/24/
467961911/can-baltimore-provide-addiction-treatment-on-demand

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

addict        USA

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vWyDB-yYzpI

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/31/nyregion/
three-quarter-housing-a-choice-for-recovering-addicts-or-homelessness.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

rehab        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2015/08/16/
430437514/when-rehab-might-help-an-addict-but-insurance-wont-cover-it

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

recover        USA

 

https://www.npr.org/2022/01/15/
1071282194/addiction-substance-recovery-treatment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

recovering addicts        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/31/nyregion/
three-quarter-housing-a-choice-for-recovering-addicts-or-homelessness.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

relapse        USA

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vWyDB-yYzpI

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/31/nyregion/
three-quarter-housing-a-choice-for-recovering-addicts-or-homelessness.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

relapse        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2015/12/08/
458280574/drug-cocktails-fuel-massachusetts-overdose-crisis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Life After a Heroin Overdose        NYT    13 August 2014

 

 

 

 

Life After a Heroin Overdose        Video        The New York Times    13 August 2014

 

Gail Morris cares for her son Alex,

who overdosed on heroin 13 years ago.

 

Produced by: Anne Lagamayo

Read the story here: http://nyti.ms/1r5FZbB

Watch more videos at: http://nytimes.com/video

 

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A6EdZbV2HFY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA > drug overdose        UK / USA

 

2022

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2022/06/24/
opinion/addiction-overdose-mental-health.html

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2022/05/11/
1098314220/overdose-deaths-continued-to-rise-in-2021-reaching-historic-highs

 

https://www.npr.org/2022/03/02/
1083838947/black-americans-dying-drug-overdoses

 

https://www.npr.org/2022/02/05/
1076830470/san-francisco-mayor-homelessness-tenderloin-district

 

 

 

 

2021

 

https://www.npr.org/2021/11/17/
1056484849/drug-overdose-deaths-100000-us

 

https://www.npr.org/2021/11/03/
1049637659/drug-overdose-deaths-san-francisco-mobile-response

 

https://www.npr.org/2021/10/27/
1049245787/biden-hhs-tackle-drug-overdose-deaths

 

https://www.npr.org/2021/07/17/
1017137386/opinion-2020s-other-medical-crisis

 

https://www.npr.org/2021/07/14/
1016029270/drug-overdoses-killed-a-record-number-of-americans-in-2020-jumping-by-nearly-30

 

https://www.npr.org/2021/06/19/
1006891729/overdose-deaths-rose-during-the-war-on-drugs-but-efforts-to-reduce-them-face-bac

 

https://www.npr.org/2021/04/01/
983414684/white-house-says-drug-overdose-deaths-spiked-to-88-000-during-the-pandemic

 

https://www.npr.org/2021/03/03/
970964576/drug-overdose-deaths-surge-among-black-americans-during-pandemic

 

 

 

 

2019

 

https://www.npr.org/2019/12/23/
789951160/drug-overdoses-contribute-to-rise-in-midlife-mortality-in-ohio-river-valley

 

 

 

 

2017

 

http://www.npr.org/2017/08/08/
542116681/nashville-mayor-mourning-sons-overdose-death-aims-to-save-other-children

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/12/
magazine/a-small-town-police-officers-war-on-drugs.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/04/14/
upshot/drug-overdose-epidemic-you-draw-it.html

 

 

 

 

2016

 

http://www.theguardian.com/society/ng-interactive/2016/may/25/
opioid-epidemic-overdose-deaths-map

 

 

 

 

2015

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2015/12/08/
458280574/drug-cocktails-fuel-massachusetts-overdose-crisis

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2015/09/09/
437599795/baltimore-fights-heroin-overdoses-with-antidote-outreach

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/itsallpolitics/2015/08/14/
432154800/at-clinton-event-an-emotional-conversation-on-substance-use

 

http://www.npr.org/2015/08/04/
429385919/in-a-florida-county-overdose-epidemic-is-more-like-a-war

 

http://www.npr.org/2015/07/13/
422490049/were-losing-43-000-people-each-year-dea-chief-focuses-on-overdoses

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/itsallpolitics/2015/05/28/
410306003/drug-addiction-on-the-rise-cropping-up-as-campaign-trail-issue

 

 

 

 

2014

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/05/nyregion/
heroins-new-hometown-in-staten-island.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/03/nyregion/
new-york-program-to-help-police-get-a-kit-to-combat-overdoses.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/04/nyregion/
hoffmans-heroin-points-to-surge-in-grim-trade.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

drug overdose epidemic

 

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/04/14/
upshot/drug-overdose-epidemic-you-draw-it.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA > A deadly crisis:

mapping the spread

of America's drug overdose epidemic        UK        25 May 2015

 

Overdoses kill more Americans

than car crashes or guns

– and experts say

the crisis hasn’t yet peaked.

 

Data reveals how a local problem

became a national epidemic

 

http://www.theguardian.com/society/ng-interactive/2016/may/25/
opioid-epidemic-overdose-deaths-map

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

overdose        UK

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/tv-and-radio/2013/jul/16/
cory-monteith-heroin-alcohol-overdose

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

kill        USA

 

https://www.npr.org/2021/07/14/
1016029270/drug-overdoses-killed-a-record-number-of-americans-in-2020-jumping-by-nearly-30

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

drug overdose deaths        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/01/07/us/
drug-overdose-deaths-in-the-us.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

overdose epidemic        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2015/09/10/
439219409/naloxone-price-soars-key-weapon-against-heroin-overdoses

 

http://www.npr.org/2015/08/04/
429385919/in-a-florida-county-overdose-epidemic-is-more-like-a-war

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

fatally overdose on heroin        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/28/nyregion/
heroins-death-toll-rising-in-new-york-amid-a-shift-in-who-uses-it.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

die from an overdose of heroin and fentanyl        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/2016/05/12/
477652738/politics-in-real-life-dying-from-overdose-while-waiting-for-treatment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

fatal dose        UK

 

http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2015/jan/20/
father-jason-wilkes-daughter-chloe-fatal-ecstasy-dose

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

die of an opiate overdose        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/12/us/
obituaries-shed-euphemisms-to-confront-heroins-toll.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA > opioid overdose        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2016/jun/02/
prince-died-opioid-overdose-tests

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

anti-overdose drug naloxone / Narcan        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2015/09/10/
439219409/naloxone-price-soars-key-weapon-against-heroin-overdoses

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2015/09/09/
437599795/baltimore-fights-heroin-overdoses-with-antidote-outreach

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

methadone treatment        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/20/
opinion/every-drug-court-should-allow-methadone-treatment.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Corpus of news articles

 

Drugs > Drug abuse,

 

Drug addiction, Overdose > UK, USA

 

 

 

Report:

Illegal Drug Use

Up Sharply Last Year

 

The New York Times

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

September 16, 2010

Filed at 3:28 a.m. ET

 

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The rate of illegal drug use rose last year to the highest level in nearly a decade, fueled by a sharp increase in marijuana use and a surge in ecstasy and methamphetamine abuse, the government reported Wednesday.

Gil Kerlikowske, the director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy, called the 9 percent increase in drug use disappointing but said he was not surprised given ''eroding attitudes'' about the perception of harm from illegal drugs and the growing number of states approving medicinal marijuana.

''I think all of the attention and the focus of calling marijuana medicine has sent the absolute wrong message to our young people,'' Kerlikowske said in an interview.

The annual report from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration found marijuana use rose by 8 percent and remained the most commonly used drug.

Mike Meno, a spokesman for the pro-legalization Marijuana Policy Project, said the survey is more proof that the government's war on marijuana has failed in spite of decades of enforcement efforts and arrests.

''It's time we stop this charade and implement sensible laws that would tax and regulate marijuana the same way we do more harmful -- but legal -- drugs like alcohol and tobacco,'' Meno said.

On a positive note, cocaine abuse continues to decline, with use of the drug down 32 percent from its peak in 2006.

About 21.8 million Americans, or 8.7 percent of the population age 12 and older, reported using illegal drugs in 2009. That's the highest level since the survey began in 2002. The previous high was just over 20 million in 2006.

The survey, which was being released Thursday, is based on interviews with about 67,500 people. It is considered the most comprehensive annual snapshot of drug use in the United States.

Other results show a 37 percent increase in ecstasy use and a 60 percent jump in the number of methamphetamine users. In the early 2000s, there was a widespread public safety campaign to warn young people about the dangers of ecstasy as a party drug, but that effort declined as use dropped off.

''The last few years, I think we've taken our eye off the ball on ecstasy,'' Kerlikowske said.

Meth use had been dropping after a passage of a 2006 federal law that put cold tablets containing pseudoephedrine behind pharmacy counters. But law enforcement officials have seen a rise in ''smurfing,'' or traveling from store to store to purchase the medicines, which can be used to produce homemade meth in kitchen labs.

Kerlikowske attributed the rise in meth abuse to more people getting around the law and an increase in meth coming across the border with Mexico.

The rise in marijuana use comes as California voters prepare to decide in November whether to legalize the drug. An Associated Press-CNBC poll earlier this year found that most Americans still oppose legalizing marijuana, but larger majorities believe it has medical benefits and want the government to allow its use for that purpose.

Medical marijuana sales in the 14 states that allow it have also taken off since the federal government signaled last year that it wouldn't prosecute marijuana sellers who follow state rules. The survey does not distinguish between medicinal and non-medicinal marijuana use.

The survey found the number of youths aged 12-17 who perceived a great risk of harm from smoking marijuana once or twice a week dropped from 54.7 percent in 2007 to 49.3 percent in 2009.

------

Online:

SAMHSA: http://www.samhsa.gov/

Report: Illegal Drug Use Up Sharply Last Year,
NYT,
16.9.2010,
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2010/09/16/us/
politics/AP-US-Drug-Abuse.html - broken link

 

 

 

 

War Without Borders

In Heartland Death,

Traces of Heroin’s Spread

 

May 31, 2009

The New York Times

By RANDAL C. ARCHIBOLD

 

GROVE CITY, Ohio — For five hours, Dana Smith huddled stunned and bewildered in her suburban living room while the body of her son Arthur Eisel IV, 31, lay slumped in an upstairs bathroom, next to a hypodermic needle.

Family and friends streamed in. Detectives scurried about. For Mrs. Smith, the cold realization set in that her oldest son Artie — quiet, shy, car enthusiast, football and softball fanatic — was dead of a heroin overdose.

The death was the end of a particular horror for Mrs. Smith, whose two other children, Mr. Eisel’s younger brothers, also fell into heroin addiction “like dominoes,” she said, and still struggle with it.

To the federal government, which prosecuted the heroin dealers for Mr. Eisel’s death, it was a stark illustration of how Mexican drug cartels have pushed heroin sales beyond major cities into America’s suburban and rural byways, some of which had seen little heroin before.

In Ohio, for instance, heroin-related deaths spread into 18 new counties from 2004 to 2007, the latest year for which statistics are available. Their numbers rose to 546 in that period, from 376 for 2000 to 2003.

Federal officials now consider the cartels the greatest organized crime threat to the United States. Officials say the groups are taking over heroin distribution from Colombians and Dominicans and making new inroads across the country, pushing a powerful form of heroin grown and processed in Mexico known as “black tar” for its dark color and sticky texture.

Their operations often piggyback on a growing and struggling Mexican immigrant population. In a case that provides a window into how this works, two illegal immigrant dealers pleaded guilty to manslaughter last year in Mr. Eisel’s death, in a rare federal manslaughter prosecution from a drug overdose.

Investigators determined that the two immigrants, Jose Manuel Cazeras-Contreras, 30, and Victor Delgadillo Parra, 23, began distributing heroin when they were unable to find jobs. Mr. Parra, in an interview from prison, where he was sentenced to spend 16 ½ years, said he was afraid of being arrested at first, but took the job to support his wife and son, as well as relatives in Mexico.

“I was living a hard life here in the United States,” Mr. Parra said. “And I didn’t have any other job I was going to go to.”

Another man in the drug ring, who was not directly connected to the death and therefore not charged with manslaughter, was recruited off the streets of Mexico and smuggled into the country expressly to peddle drugs in Ohio, the government said.

Fat on profits made largely in the United States, drug traffickers in Mexico are engaged there in a bloody war among themselves and with the government, which began a crackdown on them three years ago. Since then the violence, including assaults on the police and the army, has left more than 10,000 people dead.

But on this side of the border, the traffickers continue to expand their reach.

Drug Enforcement Administration officials say that Ohio is of particular concern because of the crisscrossing network of freeways here that make it well suited as a transshipment point. Anthony C. Marotta, who heads the agency’s Columbus office, said heroin tied to the Columbus-area dealers had been cropping up in nearby states like Indiana, Kentucky and West Virginia and as far away as the Baltimore area.

The case of Arthur Eisel and the men arrested for selling him heroin shows how the traffickers pushed their product and how in Mr. Eisel, already addicted to expensive pain killers because of a back injury, they found a ready customer for heroin, which was cheaper.

Investigators say that Arthur Eisel was not alone in switching from a prescription painkiller to heroin. It gives a similar, euphoric high at a fraction of the cost, $10 to $20 for a “balloon” — one dose, usually a gram or less — as opposed to upwards of $60 for a typical prescription pill dose on the street.

The traffickers found a ripe market in Grove City, a suburb of Columbus, as they have elsewhere in the nation. Drug seizures ebb and flow over the years, but the amount of heroin confiscated nationwide has been arcing up since the mid-90s, going from 370 kilograms in 1998 nationwide to about 600 kilograms — roughly $150 million worth of heroin — last year, though officials believe it is a small fraction of what is available on the street.

The share of heroin-related prosecutions among federal drug cases in this region has also been climbing, reaching 15 percent of cases last year compared with 4 percent a decade ago.

The numbers here are small in comparison with other populous states like New York, California or Texas, which have always been centers of drug use. But the growth here has prompted much soul-searching.

Mr. Marotta said he had been alarmed recently to see dealing in the parking lot of a supermarket in Dublin, a quiet, upscale suburb of Columbus, where he was shopping.

Paul Coleman, the director of Maryhaven, the largest rehabilitation center in the region, said the percentage of patients reporting opiates, principally heroin, as their preferred drug — whether it is smoked, inhaled or injected — grew to 68 percent last year from 38 percent in 2002.

Mr. Coleman said he believed that the trend reflected an increased supply of heroin.

Mike G., who is undergoing treatment at Maryhaven and asked that his last name be withheld for fear enemies on the street would find him there, said, “In some places it is like going to pick up beer.”

 

A Fatal Link

The group linked to the Mexican cartel that sold Arthur Eisel his fatal dose was just one of at least 10 trafficking organizations, known by the authorities as cells, operating in central Ohio, said Tim Reagan, a D.E.A. agent who investigated the case as part of the Southwest Border Task Force, a group of Ohio law enforcement officials focused on drugs coming from Mexico.

Each cell consists of a handful of people who distribute the drug after it is smuggled across the Southwest border, 1,500 miles away. Many cell members, like Mr. Parra and Mr. Contreras, have roots in Nayarit, a state on the Pacific Coast of Mexico.

Mexican authorities say that growers in Nayarit are using a highly productive form of the poppy from Colombia and processing the heroin in laboratories scattered around Tepic, Nayarit’s capital, despite efforts to kill the plants through fumigation.

The cells take orders over disposable mobile phones, making it hard for the police to trace them or their calls. They use a system of “dispatchers” and “runners” to take orders and deliver the drug. Members of the cells typically stay in an area for only four or five months before replacements arrive. The drugs are sold at rendezvous points, usually in shopping center parking lots, in an effort to blend in with the bustle.

The men convicted in the Eisel case told the authorities similar stories. Mr. Contreras, the dispatcher in the case, told federal authorities that he had crossed the border illegally and lived in Oregon for several years before moving to Columbus in 2007 on the promise of a job as an auto mechanic. But that job never materialized. In a letter to The New York Times, he said he had worked a variety of other jobs but had hit an unemployment streak that left him without a car or a house for his wife and two young children.

Desperate for work, he said he found an acquaintance in Columbus who promised him easy money for distributing heroin.

“Since I spoke English and Spanish, they proposed that I answer the phone only,” Mr. Contreras wrote. “I didn’t touch the drug or see it. I was only answering the phone. I was with them for three months, and that was when they caught me.”

He said he never imagined that anyone could die from the heroin, “since I have used the drug and nothing ever happened to me.”

Mr. Parra said he illegally crossed the border in 2005 and settled in California, working in the kitchen of a seafood restaurant for several months. When that work and other jobs dried up, friends suggested he come to Ohio for work. But when he arrived, Mr. Parra said, he learned that the work would be helping to distribute heroin.

At turns repentant and defiant, Mr. Parra said he felt sorry for the family of Mr. Eisel but did not fully accept responsibility for his death and wondered aloud if the government was making an example of him.

“It was never my intention for someone to die,” Mr. Parra said, “but neither did I put a syringe or something in somebody so that they could inject the drug,” adding, “I am serving as an example” to discourage other dealers.

Jose Garcia Morales, a third man who was arrested in the case but was not prosecuted for the death of Mr. Eisel, was recruited off the streets of Nayarit’s capital, according to a memorandum his lawyer prepared for the court in urging a lenient sentence.

The document describes how the ring arranged for the payment of a “coyote,” or human smuggler, to bring Mr. Morales across the border. Then, he piled into the back of a Ryder truck, was driven to Columbus and, over a two-week training period, was taught to deliver heroin by other drug traffickers already established there.

“Mr. Morales was promised that he would make a lot of money,” the document said. “In reality, when he was paid, if it all, he generally received between $400 and $500 a week, a place to sleep, and occasionally some food. As expected, Mr. Morales sent much of the money he earned back to his family in Mexico.”

Connecting the distribution rings to the cartel leadership in Mexico has proved difficult. Those arrested here typically say they fear for the safety of their families in Mexico if word gets back that they have been too cooperative.

“If they are caught, they are terrified what will happen to their families, and for good reason,” said David M. DeVillers, a federal prosecutor here who has handled several drug cases. “They want to do the prison time.”

The authorities say that local arrests rarely make a difference. New dealers pop up within weeks.

“It’s like sweeping sunshine off the roof,” Mr. Marotta of the D.E.A. said.

 

Shared Addictions

Standing before a federal judge last summer as he faced the prospect of 20 years in prison on manslaughter charges in Mr. Eisel’s death, Mr. Contreras begged for forgiveness.

“I truly did not intend to do any damage to their family,” said Mr. Contreras, 30, before the judge handed down a 15-year sentence. “I have two children, and I would not like something like this to happen to my sons.”

Dana Smith listened, horrified. At home, her two younger sons were still struggling with addiction.

Arthur had been, in her eyes, a typical suburban child, shy around girls, a devotee of the radio host Howard Stern, a member of a local softball league, popular with the children of friends.

He eventually found work as a bank clerk and rented an apartment with one of his brothers, Robby. Robby Eisel, who is undergoing treatment at a residential center in Columbus, said the progression from prescription medicine to heroin was easy “because the heroin is everywhere around here.”

When Arthur Eisel injured his back in a car accident in 2005, he started taking prescription medication, Percocet and OxyContin, for chronic pain, under a doctor’s supervision.

Robby Eisel said he had been taking similar medications after he broke his arm on the job as a maintenance worker at a golf course. Soon, all three brothers were acquiring OxyContin illegally and sharing it. When supplies dried up and their dealer suggested heroin, they tried it and quickly developed an addiction.

Mrs. Smith said she struggled to comprehend what took hold of her sons. She works as a clerk at a courthouse and had seen the regular parade of drug addicts and offenders come through. But one day in 2007, she heard the names of two of her boys, Arthur and Robby, announced in arraignment court. They had broken into a store.

“It was devastating,” she said.

More horrors came. She would find needles in pillow cases, in coats, under living room chairs. She watched her sons writhe in agony from head and bone pain and diarrhea as they experienced withdrawal trying to beat the addiction at home.

Mrs. Smith said she sometimes feels pangs of guilt and wonders if she could have done more to help Arthur break the addiction. She concedes that she gave him food, a place to stay and sometimes even money when his stupor made clear what he was up to.

“I was an enabler,” she said quietly. “I was his mother.”

At one point, she called a private rehabilitation facility in Florida, hoping to get all of her sons in treatment. But she was told the facility did not accept siblings.

“Which one has it the worst?” she recalled a counselor there asking.

The question still gnaws at her.

“How do you choose which one of your children to save?” Mrs. Smith asks now. She decided at the time that she could not choose and sent none of them to Florida.

 

Regret and Resolve

Arthur Eisel went through a revolving door of treatment centers in the Columbus area in the months before his death. He would get free of the drug, seemingly set on a positive path only to relapse and fall into it again. But, his family said, he did not appear to be using heavily in the weeks before his death.

The night before he died, he and his brother Ryan paid their mother a visit, watching television there until late in the evening.

At work the next morning, Mrs. Smith got the kind of call parents dread. She remembers hearing Ryan say, “His lips are blue.” Mrs. Smith spent the next months in a state of shock. She said she does not remember much.

As it turned out, investigators had already been trailing the ring that sold Arthur his fatal dose. That work, in addition to confidential informants whose testimony would have allowed investigators to trace Mr. Eisel’s dose to Mr. Parra and Mr. Contreras, emboldened prosecutors to charge them with manslaughter and other crimes.

Prosecutors asked Mrs. Smith to go to the sentencing hearings and make a statement. She stood feet from the men accused of killing her son and listened to their words of regret.

“Part of my heart goes out to their families,” she said in a recent interview. “But something has got to be done to stop this.”

 

Antonio Betancourt

contributed reporting from Mexico City.

In Heartland Death, Traces of Heroin’s Spread,
NYT,
31.5.2009,
https://www.nytimes.com/2009/05/31/
us/31border.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Related > Anglonautes > Vocapedia

 

drugs, opioids > Mexico, UK, USA

 

 

 

home Up