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Vocapedia > Earth > Climate change > Rising temperatures

 

Global warming / heating

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

warming        USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/05/24/
climate/dry-rio-grande.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

global warming        FR / UK / USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/topic/subject/
global-warming-climate-change

 

 

2022

 

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2022/aug/05/
the-guardian-view-on-accelerating-global-heating-follow-the-science

 

https://www.propublica.org/article/
mia-mottley-barbados-imf-climate-change - July 27, 2022

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2022/06/23/
world/asia/china-floods-heatwaves.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/jun/18/
europe-heatwave-france-braces-for-record-breaking-temperatures-as-spain-battles-forest-fires

 

https://www.npr.org/2022/06/16/
1105482394/cattle-kansas-heat-wave

 

https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/240522/
au-pakistan-la-temperature-frole-les-50-c-et-accable-les-plus-pauvres

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/gallery/2022/may/18/
heatwave-in-south-asia-in-pictures

 

https://www.npr.org/2022/05/03/
1096085028/climate-scientists-say-south-asias-heat-wave-120f-is-a-sign-of-whats-to-come

 

https://www.npr.org/2022/03/19/
1087752486/antarctica-record-heat-arctic

 

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2022/jan/11/
ocean-temperatures-earth-heat-increase-record

 

 

 

 

2021

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/oct/22/
heat-arctic-africa-wildlife-climate-chaos-aoe

 

https://www.theguardian.com/news/audio/2021/oct/20/
cop-26-a-question-of-degrees-what-a-hotter-planet-means-for-all-of-us-podcast

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/06/22/
climate/climate-change-southwest-humidity.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/06/17/
climate/wildfires-drought-climate-change-west-coast.html

 

https://www.npr.org/2021/05/26/
1000465487/earth-is-barreling-toward-1-5-degrees-celsius-of-warming-scientists-warn

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/jan/27/
climate-crisis-world-now-at-its-hottest-for-12000-years

 

 

 

 

2020

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/24/
nyregion/lamont-doherty-earth-observatory-global-warming.html

 

 

 

 

2019

 

https://www.npr.org/2019/10/16/
770066763/as-the-climate-warms-companies-are-scrambling-to-calculate-the-risk-to-their-pro

 

https://www.theguardian.com/news/audio/2019/jul/02
/life-in-the-fastest-warming-place-on-earth-podcast

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/16/
climate/climate-change-coffee.html

 

 

 

 

2018

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/oct/05/
from-london-to-shanghai-worlds-sinking-cities-face-devastating-floods

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/08/03/
635312852/san-diego-researchers-measure-the-highest-ocean-surface-temperature-in-a-century

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/31/
climate/the-city-of-my-birth-in-india-is-becoming-a-climate-casualty-it-didnt-have-to-be.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/29/
opinion/sunday/immigration-climate-change-trump.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/23/
opinion/sunday/james-e-hansen-climate-global-warming.html

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2018/05/24/
614105843/asteroid-impact-that-wiped-out-the-dinosaurs-also-caused-abrupt-global-warming

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2018/05/02/
607800921/a-temperature-roller-coaster-could-be-coming

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/12/
climate/kenya-drought.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/video/climate/
100000005539793/billion-dollar-storms-is-this-the-new-normal.html - 29 January 2018

 

 

 

 

2017

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/11/02/
561608576/massive-government-report-says-climate-is-warming-and-humans-are-the-cause

 

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/10/26/
world/middleeast/india-farmers-drought.html

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2017/10/21/
554271726/impossible-to-save-scientists-are-watching-chinas-glaciers-disappear

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/03/us/
hurricanes-global-warming.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/17/world/europe/norway-
climate-oil.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/17/world/asia/
climate-change-asia-heat-records.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/19/
magazine/how-a-warming-planet-drives-human-migration.html

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/03/16/
520450521/study-urgent-action-against-global-warming-needed-to-save-coral-reefs

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/01/10/
509008803/warmer-oceans-could-boost-the-toxins-in-your-shellfish-dinner

 

 

 

 

2016

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/03/
business/energy-environment/climate-crisis-big-question-how-to-inspire-innovation.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/aug/30/
nasa-climate-change-warning-earth-temperature-warming

 

http://www.npr.org/2016/08/27/
491337521/in-warmer-climate-a-luxury-cruise-sets-sail-through-northwest-passage

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/jul/07/
great-tide-is-britain-equipped-cope-glbal-warming

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/jun/16/
what-would-a-global-warming-increase-of-15c-be-like

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/11/
science/global-warming-cited-as-wildfires-increase-in-fragile-boreal-forest.html

 

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/jan/20/2015
-smashes-record-for-hottest-year-final-figures-confirm

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/01/20/
463709775/a-scorcher-2015-shatters-record-as-warmest-year-nasa-and-noaa-say

 

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/jan/18/
world-oceans-warming-faster-rate-new-study-fossil-fuels

 

 

 

 

2015

 

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/projects/cp/climate/2015-
paris-climate-talks/type/from-the-archives/from-the-archives-1988-
global-warming-has-begun-expert-tells-senate - December 5, 2015

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/11/29/
opinion/sunday/tales-of-a-warmer-planet.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/11/03/
science/global-warming-pacific-ocean-el-nino-blob.html

 

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/may/31/
the-heat-and-the-death-toll-are-rising-in-india-is-this-a-glimpse-of-earths-future

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/14/
opinion/gail-collins-globe-warm-who-me.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/17/
science/earth/2014-was-hottest-year-on-record-surpassing-2010.html

 

 

 

 

2014

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/12/
opinion/john-kerry-our-historic-agreement-with-china-on-climate-change.html

 

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/aug/21/
global-warming-slowdown-answer-lies-in-depths-of-atlantic-study-finds

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/24/
science/report-tallies-toll-on-economy-from-global-warming.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/09/
opinion/krugman-interests-ideology-and-climate.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2014/06/01/
can-the-market-stave-off-global-warming

 

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/may/27/
americans-climate-change-global-warming-yale-report

 

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/may/17/
climate-change-antarctica-glaciers-melting-global-warming-nasa

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/13/science/earth/
collapse-of-parts-of-west-antarctica-ice-sheet-has-begun-scientists-say.html

 

 

 

 

2013

 

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2013/sep/27/
ipcc-world-dangerous-climate-change

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2013/may/31/
global-warning-rise-cli-fi

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/30/world/europe/
in-swiss-alps-glacial-melting-unglues-mountains.html

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/climate-consensus-97-per-cent/2013/apr/24/
reuters-puzzled-global-warming-acceleration

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2013/jan/12/
us-scientists-effects-global-warming

 

 

 

 

2012

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/07/
science/earth/extreme-heat-is-covering-more-of-the-earth-a-study-says.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/21/
opinion/the-climate-change-tipping-point.html

 

 

 

 

2011

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/18/
business/global/warming-revives-old-dream-of-sea-route-in-russian-arctic.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/16/
sunday-review/whatever-happened-to-global-warming.html

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2010/may/13/
lizards-mexico-extinction-climate-change

 

 

 

 

2009

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2009/may/29/1

 

 

 

 

2008

 

http://www.theguardian.com/theguardian/2008/mar/01/
scienceofclimatechange.climatechange

 

 

 

 

2007

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2007/jun/19/china.usnews

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2007/jun/02/energy.business

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2007/may/04/climatechange.climatechangeenvironment

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2007/apr/28/climatechange.climatechangeenvironment

 

http://www.usatoday.com/tech/science/2007-04-16-global-warming-water_N.htm

 

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2007/mar/26/globalwarming.china

 

http://www.usatoday.com/weather/climate/globalwarming/2007-04-03-tipping-points_N.htm

 

https://www.theguardian.com/climatechange/heat/0,16122,1518079,00.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2007/apr/28/climatechange.climatechangeenvironment

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2007/feb/02/greenpolitics.climatechange

 

 

 

 

2006

 

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2006/oct/31/comment.politics

 

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2006/sep/26/
conservationandendangeredspecies.climatechange

 

http://www.usatoday.com/news/washington/2006-07-31-global-warming_x.htm

 

http://www.usatoday.com/weather/climate/2006-05-31-business-globalwarming_x.htm

 

http://www.usatoday.com/weather/climate/2006-05-29-alaska-globalwarming_x.htm

 

http://www.usatoday.com/weather/climate/2006-05-30-everglades-globalwarming_x.htm

 

http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/weather/climate/2006-05-29-warming-water_x.htm

 

 

 

 

2004

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2004/mar/13/environment.uselections2004

 

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2004/jan/08/biodiversity.sciencenews

 

 

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2003/dec/03/research.sciencenews

 

 

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1995/09/10/
world/global-warming-experts-call-human-role-likely.html

 

 

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1990/05/26/
world/scientists-urge-rapid-action-on-global-warming.html

 

 

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1986/06/12/
us/aide-sees-need-to-head-off-global-warming.html

 

 

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1975/05/21/
archives/scientists-ask-why-world-climate-is-changing-major-cooling-may-be-a.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA > Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory        USA

 

It is where

the very phrase “global warming”

was coined.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/24/
nyregion/lamont-doherty-earth-observatory-global-warming.html

 

 

https://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/24/
nyregion/lamont-doherty-earth-observatory-global-warming.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

cope with global warming        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/jul/07/
great-tide-is-britain-equipped-cope-glbal-warming

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

warming oceans        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/01/10/
509008803/warmer-oceans-could-boost-the-toxins-in-your-shellfish-dinner

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

warmer oceans        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/sep/28/
how-our-warmer-oceans-are-contributing-to-climate-breakdown

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

extreme heat        USA

 

https://www.npr.org/2022/03/19/
1087752486/antarctica-record-heat-arctic

 

 

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/08/06/
climate/climate-change-inequality-heat.html

 

https://www.npr.org/2020/02/06/
803130948/bumblebees-are-disappearing-because-of-extreme-heat

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

global heating        UK

 

2022

 

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2022/aug/05/
the-guardian-view-on-accelerating-global-heating-follow-the-science

 

 

 

 

2021

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/oct/22/
heat-arctic-africa-wildlife-climate-chaos-aoe

 

https://www.theguardian.com/news/audio/2021/jun/10/
the-g7-and-a-crucial-moment-for-the-climate

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/may/31/
human-induced-global-heating-causes-over-third-heat-deaths

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/jan/07/
global-heating-stabilize-net-zero-emissions

 

 

 

 

2020

 

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/gallery/2020/oct/13/
the-great-thaw-global-heating-upends-life-on-arctic-permafrost-photo-essay

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/ng-interactive/2020/oct/05/
climate-data-dashboard-carbon-atmosphere-sea-level-arctic-ice

 

 

 

 

2019

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2019/nov/10/
meltdown-visualizing-climate-change-project-pressure-glaciers-photography

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/gallery/2019/sep/19/
extreme-survivors-greenlands-hardy-wildlife-under-threat-from-global-heating

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

global heating > statistics, charts        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/ng-interactive/2020/oct/05/
climate-data-dashboard-carbon-atmosphere-sea-level-arctic-ice

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

overheating        USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/08/06/
climate/climate-change-inequality-heat.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Earth just broke a heat increase record        UK

 

Last year (2020) the oceans absorbed heat

equivalent to seven Hiroshima atomic bombs

detonating each second,

24 hours a day, 365 days a year

 

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2022/jan/11/
ocean-temperatures-earth-heat-increase-record

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

global warming > coral reefs        USA

 

Great Barrier Reef

and other coral reefs

around the world

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/03/16/
520450521/study-urgent-action-against-global-warming-needed-to-save-coral-reefs

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/15/
science/great-barrier-reef-coral-climate-change-dieoff.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Australia > the Great Barrier Reef        UK / USA

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2017/07/09/
535754962/while-corals-die-along-the-great-barrier-reef-humans-struggle-to-adjust

 

 

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/aug/01/
-sp-great-barrier-reef-and-coal-mine-could-kill-it

 

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/ng-interactive/2014/mar/
great-barrier-reef-obituary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

heat        UK

 

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/may/31/
the-heat-and-the-death-toll-are-rising-in-india-is-this-a-glimpse-of-earths-future

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

heat        USA

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/07/05/
626057055/melting-roads-and-runny-roofs-heat-scorches-the-northern-hemisphere

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/17/world/asia/
climate-change-asia-heat-records.html

 

www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/08/19/
490628323/as-julys-record-heat-builds-through-august-arctic-ice-keeps-melting

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

scorching heat            USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2022/06/23/
world/asia/china-floods-heatwaves.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Europe > heatwave        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/jun/18/
europe-heatwave-france-braces-for-record-breaking-temperatures-as-spain-battles-forest-fires

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

intense heatwave        USA

 

https://www.npr.org/2022/06/16/
1105482394/cattle-kansas-heat-wave

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

extreme heatwave > hit        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/news/gallery/2022/jun/17/
extreme-heatwave-hits-the-uk-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

heat up        USA

 

www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/08/19/
490628323/as-julys-record-heat-builds-through-august-arctic-ice-keeps-melting

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

hot        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/08/20/
sunday-review/climate-change-hot-future.html

 

www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/08/19/
490628323/as-julys-record-heat-builds-through-august-arctic-ice-keeps-melting

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/17/
science/earth/2014-was-hottest-year-on-record-surpassing-2010.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

hot up        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2006/jul/22/
environment.frontpagenews

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

scorch        USA

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/07/05/
626057055/melting-roads-and-runny-roofs-heat-scorches-the-northern-hemisphere

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

scorcher        USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/17/world/asia/
climate-change-asia-heat-records.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

cook        USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2022/07/17/
us/politics/climate-change-manchin-biden.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

fry        USA

 

https://www.npr.org/2022/07/18/
1111996473/france-wildfires-heat-wave-europe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

warm        UK

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/global-development/2013/apr/13/
climate-change-millions-starvation-scientists

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

warm / warm        UK

 

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/mar/20/
february-was-the-warmest-month-in-recorded-history-climate-experts-say

 

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/jan/18/
world-oceans-warming-faster-rate-new-study-fossil-fuels

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

warm        USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/22/
climate/global-warming-temperature-range.html

 

https://www.npr.org/2019/10/16/
770066763/as-the-climate-warms-companies-are-scrambling-to-calculate-the-risk-to-their-pro

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2017/10/21/
554271726/impossible-to-save-scientists-are-watching-chinas-glaciers-disappear

 

 

 

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/12/13/
505434080/scientists-report-the-arctic-is-melting-even-more-rapidly

 

www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/08/19/
490628323/as-julys-record-heat-builds-through-august-arctic-ice-keeps-melting

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

warm up        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/12/13/
505434080/scientists-report-the-arctic-is-melting-even-more-rapidly

 

 

 

 

warming        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/aug/30/
nasa-climate-change-warning-earth-temperature-warming

 

 

 

 

warmer climate        USA

http://www.npr.org/2016/08/27/
491337521/in-warmer-climate-a-luxury-cruise-sets-sail-through-northwest-passage

 

 

 

 

climate shift        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/23/
science/global-warming-sea-level-carbon-dioxide-emissions.html

 

http://www.usatoday.com/weather/climate/2006-05-30-
sports-globalwarming_x.htm

 

 

 

 

warming pattern affecting the world

 

 

 

 

Earth's temperature        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2006/sep/26/
conservationandendangeredspecies.climatechange

 

 

 

 

temperature roller coaster        USA

https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2018/05/02/
607800921/a-temperature-roller-coaster-could-be-coming

 

 

 

 

cartoons > Cagle > Global warming        USA        2012

http://www.cagle.com/news/global-warming-2012/#.UQK-tGeoR8E

 

 

 

 

cartoons > Cagle > Global warming?        USA        2010

http://www.cagle.com/news/GlobalWarming11/main.asp

 

 

 

 

Test our climate simulator        UK        2009

 

Play the role

of a climate change negotiator

at the Copenhagen summit

and use this tool to see

how different emission levels

affect global temperature

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/interactive/2009/dec/14/
climate-simulator

 

 

 

 

Climate map shows world after 4C rise        UK        2009

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/interactive/2009/oct/22/
climate-change-carbon-emissions

 

 

 

 

global warming / climate change > desert cities        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2006/jun/05/
climatechange.climatechange 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

temperatures        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2011/jan/21/
does-small-rise-temperatures-matter

 

 

 

 

global temperatures rise        USA

https://www.nytimes.com/video/climate/
100000005539793/billion-dollar-storms-is-this-the-new-normal.html - 29 January 2018

 

 

 

 

2016 Hit Records

For Global Temperature And Climate Extremes        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/08/10/
542720189/2016-hit-records-for-global-temperature-and-climate-extremes

 

 

 

 

global temperatures        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2009/nov/17/
global-temperature-rise

 

 

 

 

global temperatures        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/08/10/
542720189/2016-hit-records-for-global-temperature-and-climate-extremes

 

 

 

 

soaring Arctic temperatures        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2011/feb/14/
warming-arctic-southern-species

 

 

 

 

increase in mean temperature        UK

http://image.guardian.co.uk/sys-files/Guardian/documents/2006/06/05/
world_temperature_rise.pdf

 

 

 

 

rising temperatures        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/aug/07/
canadian-ice-shelf-area-bigger-than-manhattan-collapses-due-to-rising-temperatures

 

 

 

 

rising global temperatures > insects / insect pests        UK

http://www.independent.co.uk/environment/nature/
insect-explosion-a-threat-to-food-crops-781016.html

 

 

 

 

extreme heat > Australia        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/30/
science/earth/human-related-climate-change-
led-to-extreme-heat-scientists-say.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

rain        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/13/
science/looks-like-rain-again-and-again.html

 

 

 

 

acid rain        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2004/oct/10/
environment.theobserversuknewspages 

 

 

 

 

torrential rain

 

 

 

 

floods

 

 

 

 

catastrophic floods

 

 

 

 

deluge

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Corpus of news articles

 

Earth > Climate change > Rising temperatures >

 

Global warming / heating
 

 

 

Environment

2014

Was Hottest Year on Record,

Surpassing 2010

 

JAN. 16, 2015

The New York Times

By JUSTIN GILLIS

 

Last year was the hottest in earth’s recorded history, scientists reported on Friday, underscoring scientific warnings about the risks of runaway emissions and undermining claims by climate-change contrarians that global warming had somehow stopped.

Extreme heat blanketed Alaska and much of the western United States last year. Several European countries set temperature records. And the ocean surface was unusually warm virtually everywhere except around Antarctica, the scientists said, providing the energy that fueled damaging Pacific storms.

In the annals of climatology, 2014 now surpasses 2010 as the warmest year in a global temperature record that stretches back to 1880. The 10 warmest years on record have all occurred since 1997, a reflection of the relentless planetary warming that scientists say is a consequence of human emissions and poses profound long-term risks to civilization and to the natural world.

Of the large inhabited land areas, only the eastern half of the United States recorded below-average temperatures in 2014, a sort of mirror image of the unusual heat in the West. Some experts think the stuck-in-place weather pattern that produced those extremes in the United States is itself an indirect consequence of the release of greenhouse gases, though that is not proven.

Several scientists said the most remarkable thing about the 2014 record was that it occurred in a year that did not feature El Niño, a large-scale weather pattern in which the ocean dumps an enormous amount of heat into the atmosphere.

Longstanding claims by climate-change skeptics that global warming has stopped, seized on by politicians in Washington to justify inaction on emissions, depend on a particular starting year: 1998, when an unusually powerful El Niño produced the hottest year of the 20th century.

With the continued heating of the atmosphere and the surface of the ocean, 1998 is now being surpassed every four or five years, with 2014 being the first time that has happened in a year featuring no real El Niño pattern. Gavin A. Schmidt, head of NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies in Manhattan, said the next time a strong El Niño occurs, it is likely to blow away all temperature records.

“Obviously, a single year, even if it is a record, cannot tell us much about climate trends,” said Stefan Rahmstorf, head of earth system analysis at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research in Germany. “However, the fact that the warmest years on record are 2014, 2010 and 2005 clearly indicates that global warming has not ‘stopped in 1998,’ as some like to falsely claim.”

Such claims are unlikely to go away, though. John R. Christy, an atmospheric scientist at the University of Alabama in Huntsville who is known for his skepticism about the seriousness of global warming, pointed out in an interview that 2014 had surpassed the other record-warm years by only a few hundredths of a degree, well within the error margin of global temperature measurements.

“Since the end of the 20th century, the temperature hasn’t done much,” Dr. Christy said. “It’s on this kind of warmish plateau.”

NASA and the other American agency that maintains long-term temperature records, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, issued separate data compilations on Friday that confirmed the 2014 record. A Japanese agency had released preliminary information in early January showing 2014 as the warmest year.

The last scientific group that curates the world’s temperature record, in Britain, is scheduled to report in the coming weeks.

“Why do we keep getting so many record-warm years?” Dr. Schmidt asked in an interview. “It’s because the planet is warming. The basic issue is the long-term trend, and it is not going away.”

February 1985 was the last time global temperatures fell below the 20th-century average for a given month, meaning that no one younger than 30 has ever lived through a below-average month.

The contiguous United States set its temperature record in 2012. But, mainly because of the unusual chill in the East last year, 2014 was only the 34th warmest year on record for the lower 48 states.

That cold was brought into the interior of the country by a loop in a current called the jet stream that allowed Arctic air to spill southward. But an offsetting kink allowed unusually warm tropical air to settle over the West, large parts of Alaska and much of the Arctic.

A few recent scientific papers say that such long-lasting kinks in the jet stream have become more likely because global warming is rapidly melting the sea ice in the Arctic, disturbing longstanding weather patterns. But many leading scientists are not convinced on that point.

Whatever the underlying cause, last year’s extreme warmth in the West meant that Alaska, Arizona, California and Nevada all set temperature records. Some parts of California had basically no winter last year, with temperatures sometimes running 10 or 15 degrees above normal for the season.

Those conditions exacerbated the severe drought in California, which has been alleviated only slightly by recent rains. Some small towns have run out of water, the sort of impact that scientists fear will become commonplace as global warming proceeds in the coming decades.

2014 Was Hottest Year on Record, Surpassing 2010,
NYT,
JAN 16, 2015,
https://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/17/
science/earth/2014-was-hottest-year-on-record-surpassing-2010.html

 

 

 

 

 

Global Warming

May Make Humidity Worse

 

October 10, 2007

Filed at 1:00 p.m. ET

The New York Times

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

 

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The world isn't just getting hotter from man-made global warming, it's getting stickier. It really is the humidity. The amount of moisture in the air near the surface -- the stuff that makes hot weather unbearable -- increased 2.2 percent in just under three decades. And computer models show that the only explanation is man-made global warming, according to a study published in Thursday's journal Nature.

''This humidity change is an important contribution to heat stress in humans as a result of global warming,'' said Nathan Gillett of the University of East Anglia in the United Kingdom, a co-author of the study.

Gillett studied changes in specific humidity, which is a measurement of total moisture in the air, between 1973-2002. Increases in humidity can be dangerous to people because it makes the body less efficient at cooling itself, said University of Miami health and climate researcher Laurence Kalkstein. He was not connected with the research.

Humidity increased over most of the globe, including the eastern United States, said study co-author Katharine Willett, a climate researcher at Yale University. However, a few regions, including the U.S. West, South Africa and parts of Australia were drier.

The finding isn't surprising to climate scientists. Physics dictates that warmer air can hold more moisture. But Gillett's study shows that the increase in humidity already is significant and can be attributed to gas emissions from the burning of fossil fuels.

To show that this is man-made, Gillett ran computer models to simulate past climate conditions and studied what would happen to humidity if there were no man-made greenhouse gases. It didn't match reality.

He looked at what would happen from just man-made greenhouse gases. That didn't match either. Then he looked at the combination of natural conditions and greenhouse gases. The results were nearly identical to the year-by-year increases in humidity.

Gillett's study followed another last month that used the same technique to show that moisture above the world's oceans increased and that it bore the ''fingerprint'' of being caused by man-made global warming.

Climate scientists have now seen the man-made fingerprint of global warming on 10 different aspects of Earth's environment: surface temperatures, humidity, water vapor over the oceans, barometric pressure, total precipitation, wildfires, change in species of plants in animals, water run-off, temperatures in the upper atmosphere, and heat content in the world's oceans.

''This story does now fit together; there are now no loose ends,'' said Ben Santer, a scientist at Lawrence Livermore National Lab and author of the September study on moisture above the oceans. ''The message is pretty compelling that natural causes alone just can't cut it.''

The studies make sense, said University of Victoria climate scientist Andrew Weaver, who was not part of either team's research.

It will only feel worse in the future, Gillett said. Moisture in the air increases by about 6 percent with every degree Celsius (1.8 degrees Fahrenheit), he said. Using the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's projections for temperature increases, that would mean a 12 to 24 percent increase in humidity by the year 2100.

''Although it might not be a lethal kind of thing, it's going to increase human discomfort,'' Willett said.

------

On the Net:

Nature: http://www.nature.com/nature

Global Warming May Make Humidity Worse,
NYT, 10.10.2007,
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/us/AP-Global-Warming-Humidity.html

 

 

 

 

 

Atlantic Tropical Storms

Have Doubled

 

July 29, 2007

Filed at 7:05 p.m. ET

The New York Times

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

 

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The number of tropical storms developing annually in the Atlantic Ocean more than doubled over the past century, with the increase taking place in two jumps, researchers say.

The increases coincided with rising sea surface temperature, largely the byproduct of human-induced climate warming, researchers Greg J. Holland and Peter J. Webster concluded. Their findings were being published online Sunday by Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London.

An official at the National Hurricane Center called the research ''sloppy science'' and said technological improvements in observing storms accounted for the increase.

From 1905 to 1930, the Atlantic-Gulf Coast area averaged six tropical cyclones per year, with four of those storms growing into become hurricanes.

The annual average jumped to 10 tropical storms and five hurricanes from 1931 to 1994. From 1995 to 2005, the average was 15 tropical storms and eight hurricanes annually.

Even in 2006, widely reported as a mild year, there were 10 tropical storms.

''We are currently in an upward swing in frequency of named storms and hurricanes that has not stabilized,'' said Holland, director of mesoscale and microscale meteorology at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colo.

''I really do not know how much further, if any, that it will go, but my sense is that we shall see a stabilization in frequencies for a while, followed by potentially another upward swing if global warming continues unabated,'' Holland said.

It is normal for chaotic systems such as weather and climate to move in sharp steps rather than gradual trends, he said.

''What did surprise me when we first found it in 2005 was that the increases had developed for so long without us noticing it,'' he said in an interview via e-mail.

Holland said about half the U.S. population and ''a large slice'' of business are ''directly vulnerable'' to hurricanes.

''Our urban and industrial planning and building codes are based on past history,'' he said. If the future is different, ''then we run the very real risk of these being found inadequate, as was so graphically displayed by (Hurricane) Katrina in New Orleans.''

Hurricanes derive their energy from warm ocean water. North Atlantic surface temperature increased about 1.3 degrees Fahrenheit during the 100-year period studied. Other researchers have calculated that at least two-thirds of that warming can be attributed to human and industrial activities.

Some experts have sought to blame changes in the sun. But a recent study by British and Swiss experts concluded that ''over the past 20 years, all the trends in the sun that could have had an influence on the Earth's climate have been in the opposite direction to that required to explain the observed rise in global mean temperatures.''

As the sea surface temperatures warm, they cause changes in atmospheric wind fields and circulations, and these changes are responsible for the changes in storm frequency, Holland said.

Chris Landsea, science and operations officer at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Hurricane Center, said the study is inconsistent in its use of data.

The work, he said, is ''sloppy science that neglects the fact that better monitoring by satellites allows us to observe storms and hurricanes that were simply missed earlier. The doubling in the number of storms and hurricanes in 100 years that they found in their paper is just an artifact of technology, not climate change.''

But Kerry Emanuel, a hurricane expert at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, said the study was significant. ''It refutes recent suggestions that the upward trend in Atlantic hurricane activity is an artifact of changing measurement systems,'' said Emanuel, who was not part of the research team.

Improvements in observation began with aircraft flights into storms in 1944 and satellite observations in 1970. The transitions in hurricane activity that were noted in the paper occurred around 1930 and 1995.

''We are of the strong and considered opinion that data errors alone cannot explain the sharp, high-amplitude transitions between the climatic regimes, each with an increase of around 50 percent in cyclone and hurricane numbers,'' wrote Webster, of Georgia Institute of Technology, and Holland.

The research was funded by the National Science Foundation.

------

On the Net:

Royal Society Publishing: http://www.pubs.royalsoc.ac.uk/

National Center for Atmospheric Research: http://www.ncar.ucar.edu/

Georgia Institute of Technology: http://www.gatech.edu

Atlantic Tropical Storms Have Doubled,
NYT, 29.7.2007,
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/
us/AP-More-Storms.html - broken link

 

 

 

 

 

10.45am

Global warming

'will continue for centuries'

 

Friday February 2, 2007

Guardian Unlimited

Peter Walker and agencies

 

Global warming is an "unequivocal" fact and is likely to continue for centuries, the leading international body studying climate change said in a report today.

It is "very likely" - a probability of more than 90% - that the phenomenon has been caused by human activity, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) concluded in its fourth report.

In 2001, the body - which brings together 2,500 scientists from more than 30 countries - said global warming was "likely", or 66% probable, to have been caused by humans.

Today's report predicted that global average temperatures would rise by between 1.1C and 6.4C (2-11.5F) by 2100 - a slightly broader range than in the 2001 findings.

However, it said the best estimate was for increases of between 1.8C and 4C. In comparison, the world is currently around 5C warmer than during the last ice age. The report predicts a rise of between 18cm and 58cm in sea levels by the end of this century, a figure that could increase by as much as 20cm if the recent melting of polar ice sheets continues.

The 21-page summary of the findings, called Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis, was formally agreed by the IPCC in Paris yesterday.

It steers clear of policy recommendations, instead providing a rigorously scientific assessment of the likely risks.

"Warming of the climate system is unequivocal, as is now evident from observations of increases in global average air and ocean temperatures, widespread melting of snow and ice, and rising global mean sea level," the summary said.

It added that greenhouse gases were already responsible for a series of existing problems, including fewer cold days, hotter nights, intense heatwaves, floods and heavy rains, droughts and an increase in the strength of hurricanes and tropical storms.

The scale of such phenomena in the 21st century "would very likely be larger than those observed during the 20th century", it said, warning that no matter how much humanity reduces greenhouse gas emissions, global warming and sea level rises would continue for hundreds of years.

"This is just not something you can stop. We're just going to have to live with it," co-author Kevin Trenberth, the director of climate analysis for the US-based National Centre for Atmospheric Research, said.

"We're creating a different planet. If you were to come up back in 100 years, we'll have a different climate."

However, the scientists stressed this did not mean governments should accept the inevitable.

"The point here is to highlight what will happen if we don't do something and what will happen if we do something," another co-author, Jonathan Overpeck, of the University of Arizona, said.

"I can tell if you will decide not to do something, the impacts will be much larger than if we do something."

The head of the US delegation to the body said the report was a "comprehensive and accurate" presentation of the science.

Sharon Hays, the associate director of the White House office of science and technology policy, claimed George Bush's policy of slowing a rise in emissions rather than cutting them was working.

"The president has put in place a comprehensive set of policies to address what he has called the serious challenge of climate change," she told Reuters.

Climate change activists have lambasted Mr Bush for pulling out of the Kyoto protocol on greenhouse gas emissions, which he said was ineffective and harmful to the US economy. Instead, he has focused on investments in technologies such as hydrogen and biofuels.

Global warming 'will continue for centuries',
G, 2.2.2007,
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2007/feb/02/
greenpolitics.climatechange 

 

 

 

 

 

Global Warming: The vicious circle

 

Published: 29 January 2007

The Independent

By Steve Connor,

Science Editor

 

The effects of man-made emissions of carbon dioxide are being felt on every inhabited continent in the world with very different parts of the climate now visibly responding to human activity.

These are among the main findings of the most intensive study of climate change by 2,000 of the world's leading climate scientists. They conclude that there is now little doubt that human activity is changing the face of the planet.

In addition to rising surface temperatures around the world, scientists have now linked man-made emissions of greenhouse gases to significant increases in ocean temperatures, rises in sea levels and the dramatic melting of Arctic sea ice over the past 35 years.

A draft copy of the fourth report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) says that global temperature rises this century of between 2C and 4.5C are almost inevitable. Ominously, however, it also says that much higher increases of 6C "or more" cannot be ruled out.

The final version of the IPCC's latest report is to be published on Friday but a draft copy, seen by The Independent, makes it clear that climate change could be far worse than previously thought because of potentially disastrous "positive" feedbacks which could accelerate rising temperatures.

A warmer world is increasing evaporation from the oceans causing atmospheric concentrations of water vapour, a powerful greenhouse agent, to have increased by 4 per cent over the sea since 1970. Water vapour in the atmosphere exacerbates the greenhouse effect. This is the largest positive feedback identified in the report, which details for the first time the IPCC's concern over the uncertainties - and dangers - of feedback cycles that may quickly accelerate climate change.

All the climate models used by the IPCC also found that rising global temperatures will erode the planet's natural ability to absorb man-made CO2. This could lead to CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere rising by a further 44 per cent, causing global average temperatures to increase by an additional 1.2C by 2100.

The IPCC's Fourth Assessment Report will go further than any of its three previous reports in linking the clear signs of global climate change with increases in man-made emissions of CO2 and other greenhouse gases since the start of the Industrial Revolution.

"Confidence in the assessment of the human contributions to recent climate change has increased considerably since the TAR [Third Assessment Report]," says the draft report. This is due to the stronger signs of climate change emerging from longer and more detailed records and scientific observations, it says.

The "anthropogenic signal" - the visible signs of human influence on the climate - has now emerged not just in global average surface temperatures, but in global ocean temperatures and ocean heat content, temperature extremes on the land and the rapidly diminishing Arctic sea ice. "Anthropogenic warming of the climate system is widespread and can be detected in temperature observations taken at the surface, in the free atmosphere and in the oceans," the draft report says. "It is highly likely [greater than 95 per cent probability] that the warming observed during the past half century cannot be explained without external forcing [human activity]."

The report adds that global warming over the past 50 years would have been worse had it not been for the counterbalancing influence of man-made emissions of aerosol pollutants, tiny airborne particles that reflect sunlight to cause atmospheric cooling. "Without the cooling effect of atmospheric aerosols, it is likely that greenhouse gases alone would have caused more global mean temperature rise than that observed during the last 50 years," the draft report says.

"The hypothetical removal from the atmosphere of the entire current burden of anthropogenic sulphate aerosol particles would produce a rapid increase of about 0.8C within a decade or two in the globally averaged temperature."

The IPCC says that over the coming century we are likely to see big changes to the Earth's climate system. These include:

* Heat waves, such as the one that affected southern Europe in summer 2003, are expected to be more intense, longer-lasting and more frequent.

* Tropical storms and hurricanes are likely to be stronger, with increased rainfall and higher storm surges flooding coastlines.

* The Arctic is likely to become ice free in the summer, and there will be continued melting of mountain glaciers, ice caps and ice sheets.

* Sea levels will rise significantly even if levels of CO2 are stabilised. By 2100 sea levels could be 0.43 metres higher on average than present, and by 2300 they could be up to 0.8 metres higher.

The IPCC also finally nails the canard of the climate sceptics who argue that global warming is a myth or the result of natural climate variability; natural factors alone cannot account for the observed warming, the IPCC says. "These changes took place at a time when non-anthropogenic forcing factors (i.e. the sum of solar and volcanic forcing) would be expected to have produced cooling, not warming.

"There is increased confidence that natural internal variability cannot account for the observed changes, due in part to improved studies demonstrating that the warming occurred in both oceans and atmosphere, together with observed ice mass losses."

The report, the first draft of which was formulated last year, will be made public on Friday in Paris.

 

 

 

Key findings of the IPCC's fourth assessment report

* Global temperatures continue to rise with 11 of the 12 warmest years since 1850 occurring since 1995. Computer models suggest a further rise of about 3C by 2100, with a 6C rise a distant possibility

* It is virtually certain (there is more than a 99 per cent probability) that carbon dioxide levels and global warming is far above the range of natural variability over the past 650,000 years

* It is virtually certain that human activity has played the dominant role in causing the increase of greenhouse gases over the past 250 years

* Man-made emissions of atmospheric aerosol pollutants have tended to counteract global warming, which otherwise would have been significantly worse

* The net effect of human activities over the past 250 years has very likely exerted a warming influence on the climate

* It is likely that human activity is also responsible for other observed changes to the Earth's climate system, such as ocean warming and the melting of the Arctic sea ice

* Sea levels will continue to rise in the 21st Century because of the thermal expansion of the oceans and loss of land ice

* The projected warming of the climate due to increases in carbon dioxide during the 21st Century is likely to cause the total melting of the Greenland ice sheet during the next 1,000 years, according to some computer forecasting models

* The warm Gulf Stream of the North Atlantic is likely to slow down during the 21st Century because of global warming and the melting of the freshwater locked up in the Greenland ice sheet. But no models predict the collapse of that warm current by 2100.

Global Warming: The vicious circle,
I,
29.1.2007,
http://news.independent.co.uk/environment/article2193672.ece

 

 

 

 

 

Global warming:

the final verdict

A study by the world's
leading experts
says global warming
will happen faster
and be more devastating
than previously thought

 

Sunday January 21, 2007

The Observer

Robin McKie,

science editor

 

Global warming is destined to have a far more destructive and earlier impact than previously estimated, the most authoritative report yet produced on climate change will warn next week.

A draft copy of the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, obtained by The Observer, shows the frequency of devastating storms - like the ones that battered Britain last week - will increase dramatically. Sea levels will rise over the century by around half a metre; snow will disappear from all but the highest mountains; deserts will spread; oceans become acidic, leading to the destruction of coral reefs and atolls; and deadly heatwaves will become more prevalent.

The impact will be catastrophic, forcing hundreds of millions of people to flee their devastated homelands, particularly in tropical, low-lying areas, while creating waves of immigrants whose movements will strain the economies of even the most affluent countries.

'The really chilling thing about the IPCC report is that it is the work of several thousand climate experts who have widely differing views about how greenhouse gases will have their effect. Some think they will have a major impact, others a lesser role. Each paragraph of this report was therefore argued over and scrutinised intensely. Only points that were considered indisputable survived this process. This is a very conservative document - that's what makes it so scary,' said one senior UK climate expert.

Climate concerns are likely to dominate international politics next month. President Bush is to make the issue a part of his state of the union address on Wednesday while the IPCC report's final version is set for release on 2 February in a set of global news conferences.

Although the final wording of the report is still being worked on, the draft indicates that scientists now have their clearest idea so far about future climate changes, as well as about recent events. It points out that:

· 12 of the past 13 years were the warmest since records began;

· ocean temperatures have risen at least three kilometres beneath the surface;

· glaciers, snow cover and permafrost have decreased in both hemispheres;

· sea levels are rising at the rate of almost 2mm a year;

· cold days, nights and frost have become rarer while hot days, hot nights and heatwaves have become more frequent.

And the cause is clear, say the authors: 'It is very likely that [man-made] greenhouse gas increases caused most of the average temperature increases since the mid-20th century,' says the report.

To date, these changes have caused global temperatures to rise by 0.6C. The most likely outcome of continuing rises in greenhouses gases will be to make the planet a further 3C hotter by 2100, although the report acknowledges that rises of 4.5C to 5C could be experienced. Ice-cap melting, rises in sea levels, flooding, cyclones and storms will be an inevitable consequence.

Past assessments by the IPCC have suggested such scenarios are 'likely' to occur this century. Its latest report, based on sophisticated computer models and more detailed observations of snow cover loss, sea level rises and the spread of deserts, is far more robust and confident. Now the panel writes of changes as 'extremely likely' and 'almost certain'.

And in a specific rebuff to sceptics who still argue natural variation in the Sun's output is the real cause of climate change, the panel says mankind's industrial emissions have had five times more effect on the climate than any fluctuations in solar radiation. We are the masters of our own destruction, in short.

There is some comfort, however. The panel believes the Gulf Stream will go on bathing Britain with its warm waters for the next 100 years. Some researchers have said it could be disrupted by cold waters pouring off Greenland's melting ice sheets, plunging western Europe into a mini Ice Age, as depicted in the disaster film The Day After Tomorrow.

The report reflects climate scientists' growing fears that Earth is nearing the stage when carbon dioxide rises will bring irreversible change to the planet. 'We are seeing vast sections of Antarctic ice disappearing at an alarming rate,' said climate expert Chris Rapley, in a phone call to The Observer from the Antarctic Peninsula last week. 'That means we can expect to see sea levels rise at about a metre a century from now on - and that will have devastating consequences.'

However, there is still hope, said Peter Cox of Exeter University. 'We are like alcoholics who have got as far as admitting there is a problem. It is a start. Now we have got to start drying out - which means reducing our carbon output.'

Global warming: the final verdict,
O, 21.1.2007,
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2007/jan/21/
weather.climatechange

 

 

 

 

 

Swans deliver

a climate change warning

 

Published: 28 October 2006

The Independent

By Cahal Milmo

 

For decades, the arrival of the first V-shaped flights of Bewick's swans in Britain's wetlands after a 2,000-mile journey from Siberia heralded the arrival of winter.

This year, a dramatic decline in numbers of the distinctive yellow-billed swans skidding into their winter feeding grounds could be the harbinger of a more dramatic shift in weather patterns: global warming. Ornithologists at the main reserves that host the birds, the smallest of Britain's swans, said only a handful had appeared on lakes and water courses. Normally, there would be several hundred.

The latest arrival in a decade of Britain's seasonal influx of 8,000 Bewick's swans throws into sharp relief the debate on the effects of climate change as it enters a crucial week. As the Government's forthcoming Climate Bill is finalised, Sir Nicholas Stern, a former World Bank economist, is expected to warn in a report on Monday that failure to tackle global warming will provoke a recession deeper than the Great Depression.

But far from Westminster, the potential ecological impact of the same phenomenon was being noted in the absence of the high-pitched honking call of Bewick's swans on reservoirs and wetlands from the Ouse to the Severn estuary. The Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust (WWT) said its first three birds had arrived at its Slimbridge reserve in Glouc-estershire, only on Thursday, the latest arrival since 1995.

In Welney, Cambridgeshire, where there are normally 100 Bewick's by the end of October as the vanguard for a winter population of 1,000; a solitary male was this week the sole representative. The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds said that two of its reserves in East Anglia which host the bulk of the British population - the Ouse Washes and Nene Washes - were also devoid of Bewick's. Experts said that the slow arrival was due to warmer than usual conditions on the continent, in particular the birds' other main wintering grounds in the Netherlands, and an absence of the north-east winds that aid their migration from the Arctic tundra of northern Russia.

The disruption to the swans' migration pattern fits into an emerging pattern of fluctuating numbers of bird species and population movements blamed on climate change. Redwings, another winter visitor to the British Isles, started arriving from Scandinavia only this week. Normally, they come in early September.

Other species which normally leave Europe for the winter, such as the blackcap, are now staying through the year. The WWT and other bird conservation groups said that it would take weeks to assess whether the late arrival of the Bewick's, named after the 18th-century English engraver and ornithologist Thomas Bewick, would affect the overall numbers wintering in Britain.

Since reaching a peak of about 9,000 in 1992, numbers of the swans have fallen by about 5 per cent. In 2004, numbers of wintering ducks, geese, swans and wading birds fell to the lowest level for a decade.

Swans deliver a climate change warning,
I,
28.10.2006,
http://news.independent.co.uk/
environment/article1935939.ece - broken link

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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