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Chris Riddell

 

The climate change horseman of the apocalypse rides out – cartoon

Chris Riddell on the urgent need for action

as extreme weather becomes the norm around the world

G

Sat 31 Jul 2021    18.00 BST

Last modified on Wed 25 Aug 2021    14.42 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/picture/2021/jul/31/
the-climate-change-horseman-of-the-apocalypse-rides-out-cartoon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stuart Carlson

political cartoon

GoComics

April 23, 2021

https://www.gocomics.com/stuartcarlson/2021/04/23

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mike Luckovich

political cartoon

GoComics

December 04, 2015

http://www.gocomics.com/mikeluckovich/2015/12/04

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Schrank

cartoon

The Independent on Sunday

28 December 2008

http://www.independent.co.uk/opinion/the-daily-cartoon-760940.html

 

L to R:

President-elect Barack Obama,

President George W. Bush

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Illustration: Bill Bragg

 

For the sake of life on Earth, we must put a limit on wealth

It’s not just the megarich:

increased spending power leads us all

to inflict environmental damage.

It’s time for a radical plan

The Guardian

Thu 19 Sep 2019    06.00 BST

Last modified on Thu 19 Sep 2019    08.50 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/sep/19/
life-earth-wealth-megarich-spending-power-environmental-damage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Felix Condori, 31,

the mayor of Llapallapani and a former fisherman,

next to a boat in the dry bed

that was once Bolivia’s second-largest lake.

 

He now must travel to find construction jobs

as a means to make money now

that the lake that defined

their culture and livelihood disappeared.

May 2016.

 

Photograph:

Josh Haner/The New York Times

 

Interview by James Estrin

The New York Times

May 14, 2019

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/14/
lens/climate-change-josh-haner-air-land-and-sea.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Why Climate Change Is Making Hurricanes Worse    NYT    14 September 2018

 

 

 

 

Why Climate Change Is Making Hurricanes Worse        Video        NYT News        The New York Times        14 September 2018

 

Rising ocean temperatures

have fueled some of the most devastating storms

in recent years.

 

Kendra Pierre-Louis,

a reporter on The New York Times’s climate team,

explains how.

 

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RZ-DCyP1RBc

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exclusive Obama Interview on ‘Terrifying’ Threat of Climate Change    NYT    2016

 

 

 

 

Exclusive Obama Interview on ‘Terrifying’ Threat of Climate Change        Video        The New York Times        8 September 2016

 

In an exclusive interview on his legacy,

President Obama speaks

to The Times's Mark Landler and Coral Davenport

on climate change

while visiting Marine Corps Base Hawaii.

 

Produced by:

BEN LAFFIN, A.J. CHAVAR AND ABE SATER

 

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SpzuGfZ7xrY

 

 

Related

 

Obama on ‘Terrifying’ Threat of Climate Change

The New York Times

Sep. 8, 2016 | 13:44

http://www.nytimes.com/video/us/politics/
100000004632792/obama-on-terrifying-threat-of-climate-change.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

climate        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/series/
covering-climate-now

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

climate        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2017/07/23/
538373985/as-the-climate-changes-kenyan-herders-find-centuries-old-way-of-life-in-danger

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

climate crisis        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/climate-crisis

 

 

2022

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2022/jul/30/
total-climate-meltdown-inevitable-heatwaves-global-catastrophe

 

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2022/jul/28/
climate-crisis-emergency-rebecca-solnit-terry-tempest-williams

 

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2022/jul/18/
heatwave-extreme-weather-uk-climate-crisis

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2022/jul/18/
humanity-faces-collective-suicide-over-climate-crisis-warns-un-chief

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2022/jul/11/
why-so-hot-uk-europe-dangers-climate-crisis

 

https://www.theguardian.com/news/audio/2022/jul/06/
bangladeshs-catastrophic-flooding-the-climate-crisis-frontline

 

https://www.theguardian.com/news/audio/2022/may/27/
how-the-climate-crisis-upturned-australian-politics-podcast

 

 

 

 

2021

 

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/dec/29/
climate-scientist-dont-look-up-madness

 

https://www.theguardian.com/science/audio/2021/dec/16/
the-climate-crisis-and-devastating-drought-in-eastern-africa

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/dec/09/
climate-crisis-wine-industry

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/gallery/2021/sep/30/
enduring-and-surviving-the-climate-crisis-in-pictures

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/video/2021/jul/29/
climate-crisis-what-one-month-of-extreme-weather-looks-like-video

 

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/jun/30/
canada-temperatures-limits-human-climate-emergency-earth

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/jan/27/
climate-crisis-world-now-at-its-hottest-for-12000-years

 

 

 

 

2020

 

https://www.theguardian.com/news/audio/2020/oct/19/
leaded-petrol-acid-rain-cfcs-why-the-green-movement-can-overcome-the-climate-crisis

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/gallery/2020/oct/08/
fragile-planet-documenting-the-impact-of-the-climate-crisis-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA > climate crisis        UK / USA

 

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/
climate-crisis-in-the-american-west

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/12/09/
climate/redwood-sequoia-tree-fire.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

climate reckoning        USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/09/10/
us/climate-change-california-wildfires.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

climate emergency        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2022/jul/28/
climate-crisis-emergency-rebecca-solnit-terry-tempest-williams

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

change        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2017/07/23/
538373985/as-the-climate-changes-kenyan-herders-find-centuries-old-way-of-life-in-danger

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

climate science        USA

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/12/27/
680513764/2018-was-a-milestone-year-for-climate-science-if-not-politics

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/19/
science/earth/pope-francis-aligns-himself-with-mainstream-science-on-climate.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

climate scientist        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/dec/29/
climate-scientist-dont-look-up-madness

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

climate scientist        USA

 

https://www.npr.org/2022/05/03/
1096085028/climate-scientists-say-south-asias-heat-wave-120f-is-a-sign-of-whats-to-come

 

 

 

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/08/09/
637161725/the-arid-west-moves-east-with-big-implications-for-agriculture

 

 

 

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/11/29/
564043596/climate-scientists-watch-their-words-hoping-to-stave-off-funding-cuts

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/02/
opinion/climate-hurricanes-flooding-harvey.html

 

 

 

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/08/19/
490628323/as-julys-record-heat-builds-through-august-arctic-ice-keeps-melting

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

climate appeasement        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2022/jul/30/
total-climate-meltdown-inevitable-heatwaves-global-catastrophe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

climate migration        USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/09/15/
magazine/climate-crisis-migration-america.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

THE GREAT CLIMATE MIGRATION

A Warming Planet and a Shifting Population        USA

 

https://www.propublica.org/series/
the-great-climate-migration

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

climatologist

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

climate colonialism        USA

 

https://www.propublica.org/article/
mia-mottley-barbados-imf-climate-change - July 27, 2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

climate change        FR / UK / USA

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/climate-change

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/series/covering-climate-now

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2015/11/28/
science/what-is-climate-change.html

https://www.ametsoc.org/ams/index.cfm/publications/
bulletin-of-the-american-meteorological-society-bams/state-of-the-climate/

https://www.propublica.org/series/the-great-climate-migration

https://www.nytimes.com/
article/climate-change-global-warming-faq.html    *****

 

 

 

2022

 

https://www.gocomics.com/mikeluckovich/2022/07/08

 

https://www.npr.org/2022/07/07/
1107814440/researchers-can-now-explain-how-climate-change-is-affecting-your-weather

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2022/06/23/
world/asia/china-floods-heatwaves.html

 

https://www.npr.org/2022/05/28/
1101706286/city-of-orange-is-a-post-apocalyptic-tale-starting-with-memory-loss

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2022/05/27/
climate/hazel-henderson-dead.html

 

https://www.npr.org/2022/05/03/
1096085028/climate-scientists-say-south-asias-heat-wave-120f-is-a-sign-of-whats-to-come

 

https://www.npr.org/2022/02/28/
1082564304/billions-of-people-are-in-danger-from-climate-change-u-n-report-warns

 

https://www.npr.org/2022/02/28/
1082934438/supreme-court-to-hear-a-case-that-could-limit-the-epas-power-to-fight-climate-ch

 

 

 

 

2021

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/11/29/
world/canada/british-columbia-floods-storm.html

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2021/11/09/
1053818525/theyre-the-invisible-victims-of-climate-change

 

https://www.npr.org/2021/11/08/
1052198840/1-5-degrees-warming-climate-change

 

https://www.npr.org/2021/11/07/
1051468823/iraq-marshes-climate-change-cop26

 

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/nov/05/
the-climate-crisis-is-just-another-form-of-global-oppression-by-the-rich-world

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/nov/01/
the-island-has-been-shrinking-living-on-the-frontline-of-global-heating

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/nov/01/
the-island-has-been-shrinking-living-on-the-frontline-of-global-heating

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/oct/30/
capitalism-is-killing-the-planet-its-time-to-stop-buying-into-our-own-destruction

 

https://www.npr.org/2021/10/29/
1045344199/cop26-glasgow-climate-summit

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/video/2021/oct/25/
2050-what-happens-if-we-ignore-the-climate-crisis-video-explainer

 

https://www.npr.org/2021/10/23/
1047753592/anxiety-from-climate-change-isnt-going-away-heres-how-you-can-manage-it

 

https://www.npr.org/2021/10/20/
1047531537/fossil-fuel-paris-global-warming-climate-un

 

https://www.theguardian.com/news/audio/2021/oct/20/
cop-26-a-question-of-degrees-what-a-hotter-planet-means-for-all-of-us-podcast

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/ng-interactive/2021/oct/14/
climate-change-happening-now-stats-graphs-maps-cop26

 

https://www.npr.org/2021/10/12/
1043991519/climate-change-puffins-maine

 

https://www.npr.org/2021/09/11/
1035241392/climate-change-disasters-mental-health-anxiety-eco-grief

 

https://www.npr.org/2021/09/07/
1034670549/climate-change-is-the-greatest-threat-to-public-health-top-medical-journals-warn

 

https://www.npr.org/2021/09/02/
1033054816/our-future-on-a-hotter-planet-means-more-climate-disasters-happening-simultaneou

 

https://www.npr.org/2021/08/30/
1032442544/how-climate-change-is-fueling-hurricanes-like-ida

 

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/aug/11/
no-getting-back-to-normal-climate-breakdown-ipcc-report

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/aug/09/
ipcc-reports-verdict-on-climate-crimes-of-humanity-guilty-as-hell

 

https://www.npr.org/2021/08/09/
1025898341/major-report-warns-climate-change-is-accelerating-and-humans-must-cut-emissions-

 

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/picture/2021/jul/31/
the-climate-change-horseman-of-the-apocalypse-rides-out-cartoon

 

https://www.npr.org/2021/07/29/
1022241936/climate-change-is-driving-deadly-weather-disasters-from-arizona-to-mumbai

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/07/26/
world/asia/china-climate-change.html

 

https://www.npr.org/2021/07/25/
1019923949/celestia-manuele-fior-review

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/07/18/
climate/napa-wine-heat-hot-weather.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/06/23/
magazine/climate-change-impact-bahamas.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2021/jul/05/
sixty-years-of-climate-change-warnings-the-signs-that-were-missed-and-ignored

 

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/jun/30/
canada-temperatures-limits-human-climate-emergency-earth

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/06/27/
climate/climate-Native-Americans.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2021/jun/26/
stories-to-save-the-world-the-new-wave-of-climate-fiction

 

https://www.npr.org/2021/06/19/
1008248475/the-record-temperatures-enveloping-the-west-is-not-your-average-heat-wave

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/06/17/
climate/wildfires-drought-climate-change-west-coast.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/06/02/
us/miami-fl-seawall-hurricanes.html

 

https://www.npr.org/2021/04/30/
981331348/biden-administration-seeks-to-build-trust-and-diversity-among-federal-scientists

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/30/
us/wildfires-fire.html

 

https://www.npr.org/2021/04/23/
990307470/john-kerry-says-climate-change-is-an-existential-crisis

 

https://www.nytimes.com/
article/climate-change-global-warming-faq.html    *****

 

https://www.gocomics.com/stuartcarlson/2021/04/23

 

https://www.npr.org/2021/04/08/
985307780/is-your-home-at-risk-from-climate-change-heres-how-to-know

 

https://www.npr.org/2021/03/22/
979932115/noaa-upgrades-forecasts-as-climate-change-drives-more-severe-storms

 

https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/160321/
le-climat-face-au-risque-de-bascules-irreversibles

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/02/01/
well/eat/climate-change-health.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/01/07/
climate/2020-disaster-costs.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/jan/02/
the-sea-is-rising-the-climate-is-changing-the-lessons-
learned-from-mozambiques-deadly-cyclone

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/01/01/
climate/trump-national-climate-assessment.html

 

 

 

 

2020

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/12/28/
opinion/climate-change-earth.html

 

https://www.propublica.org/article/
climate-change-will-make-parts-of-the-u-s-uninhabitable-americans-are-still-moving-there - Nov. 10, 2020

 

https://theintercept.com/2020/10/22/
intercepted-american-mythology-trump-climate/

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/gallery/2020/oct/08/
fragile-planet-documenting-the-impact-of-the-climate-crisis-in-pictures

 

https://www.gocomics.com/robrogers/2020/09/18

 

https://www.npr.org/2020/06/17/
879041024/brooklyn-students-win-student-podcast-challenge-
with-show-on-race-and-climate-ch

 

https://www.npr.org/2020/06/16/
878941532/the-inseparable-link-between-climate-change-and-racial-justice

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/apr/27/
meteorologists-say-2020-on-course-to-be-hottest-year-since-records-began

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2020/04/22/
808853706/this-earth-day-is-like-no-other-heres-how-to-grieve-and-stay-engaged

 

https://www.propublica.org/article/
climate-change-wont-stop-for-the-coronavirus-pandemic - April 13, 2020

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2020/02/17/
805688641/warm-winters-threaten-nut-trees-can-science-help-them-chill-out

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/feb/10/
overwhelming-and-terrifying-impact-of-climate-crisis-on-mental-health

 

https://www.npr.org/2020/02/10/
802218309/climate-change-complicates-counting-some-alaska-native-villages-for-census

 

 

 

 

2019

 

https://www.theguardian.com/news/audio/2019/dec/31/
how-greta-thunberg-school-strike-went-global-a-look-back-podcast

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2019/12/27/
788552728/mozambique-is-racing-to-adapt-to-climate-change-the-weather-is-winning

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2019/12/11/
782918005/meteorologists-cant-keep-up-with-climate-change-in-mozambique

 

https://www.npr.org/2019/12/07/
784557923/in-a-warming-greenland-a-farming-family-adapts-to-drought-and-new-opportunities

 

https://www.npr.org/2019/10/22/
772241282/exxon-is-on-trial-accused-of-misleading-investors-about-risks-of-climate-change

 

https://www.npr.org/2019/10/22/
772266241/how-to-talk-to-your-kids-about-climate-change

 

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/sep/19/
life-earth-wealth-megarich-spending-power-environmental-damage

 

https://www.npr.org/2019/06/08/
730456004/more-people-see-climate-change-in-record-floods-and-extreme-weather-will-that-me

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/30/
sports/everest-bodies-global-warming.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/14/
lens/climate-change-josh-haner-air-land-and-sea.html

 

https://www.npr.org/2019/05/02/
718736830/californias-latest-weapon-against-climate-change-is-low-tech-farm-soil

 

https://www.npr.org/2019/04/23/7
16284808/new-york-city-lawmakers-pass-landmark-climate-measure

 

https://www.npr.org/2019/04/22/
714262267/most-teachers-dont-teach-climate-change-4-in-5-parents-wish-they-did

 

https://www.npr.org/2019/04/17/
714098828/climate-change-was-the-engine-that-powered-hurricane-marias-devastating-rains

 

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/04/11/
magazine/climate-change-bangladesh-scavenging.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/news/audio/2019/mar/14/
greta-thunberg-how-her-school-strike-went-global-podcast

 

https://www.npr.org/2019/02/25/
697615977/how-climate-change-is-affecting-alaskas-military-radar-stations

 

https://www.theguardian.com/news/audio/2019/feb/05/
is-climate-change-way-worse-than-we-realise-today-in-focus-podcast

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/audio/2019/jan/21/
what-can-we-do-right-now-about-climate-change

 

 

 

 

2018

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/30/
opinion/climate-change-weather-2018.html

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/12/27/
680513764/2018-was-a-milestone-year-for-climate-science-if-not-politics

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/12/16/
676913451/deep-seagrass-bed-could-stall-climate-change-if-climate-change-doesnt-kill-it-fi

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/06/
opinion/cop24-climate-change.html

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/11/23/
668555773/climate-change-is-already-hurting-u-s-communities-federal-report-says

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/oct/30/
migrant-caravan-causes-climate-change-central-america

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/16/
climate/climate-change-historic-sites.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/08/
opinion/climate-change-report.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/07/
climate/ipcc-climate-report-2040.html

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/09/20/
648700837/price-tag-of-natural-disasters-grows

 

https://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=RZ-DCyP1RBc - 14 September 2018

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/09/11/
646313648/climate-change-drives-bigger-wetter-storms-storms-like-florence

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/08/31/
642641191/industry-looks-for-hurricane-lessons-as-climate-changes

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2018/08/31/
642435250/german-farmers-struck-by-drought-fear-further-damage-from-climate-change

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/08/09/
637161725/the-arid-west-moves-east-with-big-implications-for-agriculture

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2018/08/07/
632840187/climate-change-threatens-midwests-wild-rice-a-staple-for-native-americans

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/08/02/
634831131/californias-gov-brown-wildfires-are-evidence-of-changing-climate-in-real-time

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2018/08/01/
634135514/a-few-more-bad-apples-as-the-climate-changes-fruit-growing-does-too

 

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/08/01/
magazine/climate-change-losing-earth.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/31/
climate/the-city-of-my-birth-in-india-is-becoming-a-climate-casualty-it-didnt-have-to-be.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/30/
climate/record-heat-waves.html

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/07/29/
633203732/when-the-weather-is-extreme-is-climate-change-to-blame

 

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/07/18/
climate/lebanon-climate-change-environment-cedars.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/23/
opinion/sunday/james-e-hansen-climate-global-warming.html

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/06/15/
619348584/as-nuclear-struggles-a-new-generation-of-engineers-is-motivated-by-climate-chang

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2018/04/18/
602995137/climate-change-is-killing-coral-on-the-great-barrier-reef

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2018/03/02/
590056872/from-almonds-to-rice-climate-change-could-slash-california-crop-yields-by-2050

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2018/02/26/
588811506/scientists-predict-king-penguins-face-major-threats-due-to-climate-change

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2018/01/10/
576807635/climate-change-means-virtually-no-male-turtles-born-in-a-key-nesting-ground

 

 

 

 

2017

 

https://www.npr.org/2017/12/26/
556121513/as-corals-wither-around-the-world-scientists-try-ivf

 

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/12/21/
world/asia/jakarta-sinking-climate.html

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2017/12/17/
571050071/how-to-survive-climate-change-clues-are-buried-in-the-arctic

 

https://www.npr.org/2017/12/16/
571305462/the-future-of-polar-bears

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/12/04/
568329677/this-years-hurricane-season-was-intense-is-it-a-taste-of-the-future

 

https://www.npr.org/2017/12/01/
567843604/credit-rating-agency-issues-warning-on-climate-change-to-cities

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/09/
climate/fema-flooding-trump.html

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2017/10/31/
561041342/scientists-from-around-the-world-report-on-health-effects-from-climate-change

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2017/10/21/
554271726/impossible-to-save-scientists-are-watching-chinas-glaciers-disappear

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/10/13/
557393274/california-blazes-are-part-of-a-larger-and-hotter-picture-fire-researchers-say

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/09/
opinion/environmental-protection-obama-pruitt.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/02/
movies/mother-darren-aronofsky-climate-change.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/sep/27/
climate-change-made-lucifer-heatwave-far-more-likely-scientists-find

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/18/
climate/climate-change-denial.html

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/09/11/
550169720/coffee-bees-and-climate-change-are-linked-in-ways-you-may-not-have-expected

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/11/
climate/hurricane-irma-climate-change.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/sep/11/
threat-climate-change-hurricane-harvey-irma-droughts

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/09/08/
549280066/hurricanes-are-sweeping-the-atlantic-whats-the-role-of-climate-change

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/02/
opinion/sunday/hurricane-harvey-climate-change.html

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/13.7/2017/08/30/
547322858/when-nature-teaches-us-how-to-be-human

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/08/22/
545022259/does-sustainability-help-the-environment-or-just-agricultures-public-image

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2017/08/13/
542645647/in-egypt-a-rising-sea-and-growing-worries-about-climate-changes-effects

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/11/world/asia/guam-north-korea-
climate-change.html

 

http://www.npr.org/2017/08/02/
541124579/al-gore-warns-that-trump-is-a-distraction-from-the-issue-of-climate-change

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/08/02/
540650904/carbon-dioxide-may-rob-crops-of-nutrition-leaving-millions-at-risk

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/13.7/2017/08/02/
541095519/why-we-are-naively-optimistic-about-climate-change

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/29/
opinion/sunday/when-life-on-earth-was-nearly-extinguished.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/29/world/africa/
africa-climate-change-kenya-land-disputes.html

 

http://www.npr.org/2017/07/24/
538391386/despite-climate-change-setbacks-al-gore-comes-down-on-the-side-of-hope

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2017/07/23/
538373985/as-the-climate-changes-kenyan-herders-find-centuries-old-way-of-life-in-danger

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2017/07/16/
536896748/in-chile-many-regard-climate-change-as-the-greatest-external-threat

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2017/07/09/
535754962/while-corals-die-along-the-great-barrier-reef-humans-struggle-to-adjust

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/06/19/
533538555/ethiopias-coffee-farmers-are-on-the-front-lines-of-climate-change

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/17/world/europe/norway-
climate-oil.html

 

http://www.npr.org/2017/06/17/
528453625/in-this-alaska-family-life-lessons-are-passed-down-on-the-water

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2017/06/17/
533050733/photos-of-somalia-surviving-in-one-of-the-worlds-driest-places

 

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/06/15/world/europe/
climate-change-rotterdam.html

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/06/06/
531580368/photos-here-s-what-climate-change-looks-like-to-uganda-s-coffee-farmers

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/05/
opinion/kick-this-rock-climate-change-and-our-common-reality.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/04/us/
education-climate-change-science-class-students.html

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/06/02/
531223294/a-farm-journalist-tells-farmers-what-theyd-rather-not-hear-about-climate-change

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/06/02/
531238185/bloomberg-promises-15-million-to-help-make-up-for-u-s-withdrawal-from-climate-de

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/13.7/2017/06/02/
531187912/climate-accord-decision-is-a-win-for-self-destruction

 

http://www.npr.org/2017/06/01/
531090243/trumps-speech-on-paris-climate-agreement-withdrawal-annotated

 

http://www.npr.org/2017/06/01/
531056661/5-things-that-could-change-when-the-u-s-leaves-the-paris-climate-deal

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/06/01/
531048986/so-what-exactly-is-in-the-paris-climate-accord

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/06/01/
530748899/watch-live-trump-announces-decision-on-paris-climate-agreement

 

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/05/18/
climate/antarctica-ice-melt-climate-change-flood.html

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/05/18/
528133891/will-the-government-help-farmers-adapt-to-a-changing-climate

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/28/
opinion/climate-of-complete-certainty.html

 

http://www.npr.org/2017/04/22/
524557600/first-step-to-eco-grieving-over-climate-change-admit-theres-a-problem

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2017/04/21/
523066394/-curiousgoat-will-climate-change-help-ticks-and-mosquitoes-spread-disease

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/04/18/
523406934/in-the-rockies-climate-change-spells-trouble-for-cutthroat-trout

 

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/03/21/
climate/how-americans-think-about-climate-change-in-six-maps.html

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/03/16/
520399205/trumps-budget-slashes-climate-change-funding

 

http://www.npr.org/2017/02/22/
516437877/for-islanders-in-lake-superior-warmer-winters-mean-they-cant-drive

 

http://www.npr.org/2017/02/18/
514523987/when-their-food-ran-out-these-reindeer-kept-digging

 

http://www.npr.org/2017/02/17/
515621902/in-massachusetts-coastal-residents-consider-how-to-adapt-to-climate-change

 

http://www.gocomics.com/joe-heller/2017/01/24

 

http://www.npr.org/2017/01/10/
509176361/alaskan-village-citing-climate-change-seeks-disaster-relief-in-order-to-relocate

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/01/10/
509008803/warmer-oceans-could-boost-the-toxins-in-your-shellfish-dinner

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/06/
opinion/sunday/as-donald-trump-denies-climate-change-these-kids-die-of-it.html

 

 

 

 

2016

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/03/
opinion/sunday/cashing-in-on-climate-change.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/video/2016/nov/29/
david-attenborough-on-climate-change-the-world-will-be-transformed-video

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/18/us/
intensified-by-climate-change-king-tides-change-ways-of-life-in-florida.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/08/
science/ralph-cicerone-scientist-who-sounded-climate-change-alarm-dies-at-73.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/03/
business/energy-environment/climate-crisis-big-question-how-to-inspire-innovation.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/30/
opinion/sunday/the-kind-of-thinking-cities-need.html

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2016/10/12/
497578413/coffee-and-climate-change-in-brazil-a-disaster-is-brewing

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/08/us/
politics/obama-climate-change.html

 

https://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=SpzuGfZ7xrY - NYT - Sep. 8, 2016

 

http://www.nytimes.com/video/us/politics/100000004624557/
the-times-interviews-obama-on-climate-change.html - Sep. 2, 2016

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/aug/30/
nasa-climate-change-warning-earth-temperature-warming

 

http://www.npr.org/2016/08/24/
488523371/climate-change-complicates-predictions-of-damage-from-big-surf

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/22/
science/english-village-becomes-climate-leader-by-quietly-cleaning-up-its-own-patch.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/08/20/
sunday-review/climate-change-hot-future.html

 

www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/08/19/
490628323/as-julys-record-heat-builds-through-august-arctic-ice-keeps-melting

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/02/
science/looking-quickly-for-the-fingerprints-of-climate-change.html

 

http://www.npr.org/2016/07/27/
485601554/visitors-to-a-shrinking-alaskan-glacier-get-a-lesson-on-climate-change

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2016/07/27/
487364060/in-alaskas-remote-towns-climate-change-is-already-leaving-many-hungry

 

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/07/07/world/americas/bolivia-
climate-change-lake-poopo.html

 

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/jun/10/
the-great-barrier-reef-and-the-subtle-power-of-psychological-distance

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/04/21/
474690936/can-the-u-s-and-china-keep-their-climate-pledges

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/04/20/
474690481/climate-change-some-people-may-not-be-sweating-it-because-the-weather-is-nicer

 

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/apr/09/
melting-ice-sheets-changing-the-way-the-earth-wobbles-on-its-axis-says-nasa

 

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/mar/20/
february-was-the-warmest-month-in-recorded-history-climate-experts-say

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/11/
opinion/what-weather-is-the-fault-of-climate-change.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/23/
opinion/bill-gatess-clean-energy-moon-shot.html

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2016/02/19/
467206769/why-science-teachers-are-struggling-with-climate-change

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/17/
opinion/sunday/cancer-and-climate-change.html

 

 

 

 

2015

 

http://www.npr.org/2015/12/15/
459693015/scientists-see-u-n-climate-accord-as-a-good-start-but-just-a-start

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/12/14/
opinion/falling-short-on-climate-in-paris.html

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2015/12/13/
459580031/4-pieces-you-should-read-about-the-global-climate-deal

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2015/12/12/
459502597/2-degrees-100-billion-the-world-climate-agreement-by-the-numbers

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/12/13/
opinion/sunday/the-climate-path-ahead.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/12/13/
science/earth/climate-accord-is-a-healing-step-if-not-a-cure.html

 

http://www.npr.org/2015/12/12/
459502952/paris-climate-talks-conclude-with-landmark-international-agreement

 

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2015/12/12/
science/What-Does-the-Climate-Deal-Mean.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2015/12/12/
science/document-final-cop21-draft.html

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/13.7/2015/12/08/
458825867/childhood-s-end-the-planetary-meaning-of-climate-change

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2015/12/07/
458487877/climate-change-is-killing-us-literally-and-heres-how

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2015/12/04/
458349068/they-need-millions-make-that-billions-to-cope-with-climate-change

 

http://www.npr.org/2015/12/02/
457921595/how-obama-hopes-to-achieve-u-s-climate-goals

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2015/12/01/
456369536/as-big-food-feels-threat-of-climate-change-companies-speak-up

 

http://www.npr.org/2015/11/30/
457794505/big-data-predicts-centuries-of-harm-if-climate-warming-goes-unchecked

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/11/29/
opinion/sunday/what-the-paris-climate-meeting-must-do.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2015/11/28/
science/what-is-climate-change.html

 

http://www.npr.org/2015/11/27/
456716184/indias-quandary-climate-change-and-coal

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2015/11/06/
science/climate-change-extreme-weather-global-warming.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/04/
opinion/obama-takes-a-crucial-step-on-climate-change.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/19/
opinion/the-pope-and-climate-change.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/16/
science/naomi-oreskes-a-lightning-rod-in-a-changing-climate.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/19/
opinion/joe-nocera-chemo-for-the-planet.html

 

http://www.theguardian.com/science/2015/may/03/
climate-change-myths-warming-ice-antarctic-arctic

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/28/world/europe/
pope-francis-steps-up-campaign-on-climate-change-to-conservatives-alarm.html

 

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/apr/27/
extreme-weather-already-on-increase-due-to-climate-change-study-finds

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/01/us/
obama-to-offer-major-blueprint-on-climate-change.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/01/us/
obama-to-offer-major-blueprint-on-climate-change.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/31/
science/earth/climate-change-threatens-to-kill-off-more-aspen-forests-
by-2050s-scientists-say.html

 

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/mar/06/
dont-look-away-now-the-climate-crisis-needs-you

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/01/
business/energy-environment/climate-changes-bottom-line.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/04/
opinion/sunday/playing-dumb-on-climate-change.html

 

 

 

 

2014

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/23/us/
climate-change-threatens-to-strip-the-identity-of-glacier-national-park.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/12/
opinion/wobbling-on-climate-change.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/12/
opinion/john-kerry-our-historic-agreement-with-china-on-climate-change.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/24/world/europe/
european-leaders-agree-on-targets-to-fight-climate-change-.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/14/us/
pentagon-says-global-warming-presents-immediate-security-threat.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/30/
science/earth/human-related-climate-change-led-to-extreme-heat-scientists-say.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/28/
opinion/sunday/a-group-shout-on-climate-change.html

 

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2014/09/23/
350911527/obama-to-lays-out-approach-to-climate-change-in-u-n-speech

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/09/us/
climate-change-will-disrupt-half-of-north-americas-bird-species-study-says.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/24/
opinion/sunday/the-climate-swerve.html

 

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/jun/25/
three-reasons-climate-change-real-and-humans-cause-it

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/22/
opinion/sunday/lessons-for-climate-change-in-the-2008-recession.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/01/us/
politics/obama-sets-the-stage-for-curbing-emissions.html

 

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/may/27/
americans-climate-change-global-warming-yale-report

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/08/
opinion/climate-disruptions-close-to-home.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/07/
science/earth/climate-change-report.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/07/
opinion/the-gop-cant-ignore-climate-change.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/21/
opinion/running-out-of-time.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/01/
opinion/climate-signals-growing-louder.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/01/
world/climate-study-puts-diplomatic-pressure-on-obama.html

 

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/mar/31/
climate-change-threat-food-security-humankind

 

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/mar/28/
climate-change-bad-expensive-coffee-ipcc

 

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/feb/17/
time-to-join-preppers-survive-climate-change-apocalypse

 

http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2014/feb/15/
ed-miliband-stark-warning-climate-change

 

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/feb/14/
climate-change-floods-government

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/19/
opinion/sunday/kristof-neglected-topic-winner-climate-change.html

 

 

 

 

2013

 

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2013/sep/27/
ipcc-climate-change-report-ar5-live-coverage

 

http://www.theguardian.com/science/2013/sep/11/
astronomer-royal-global-warming-lord-rees

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/10/
science/a-climate-alarm-too-muted-for-some.html

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2013/may/19/
climate-change-meltdown-unlikely-research

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2013/may/12/
climate-change-expert-stern-displacement

 

http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2013/01/27/
is-divestment-an-effective-means-of-protest

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/22/us/
politics/climate-change-prominent-in-obamas-inaugural-address.html

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2013/jan/11/
climate-change-america-hotter-drier-disaster

 

 

 

 

2012

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/28/
opinion/time-to-confront-climate-change.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/21/
science/earth/jane-holtz-kay-predictor-of-climate-change-dies-at-74.html

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2012/nov/19/
climate-change-world-bank

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/global-development/poverty-matters/2012/nov/19/
latest-predictions-climate-change-shock-action

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2012/feb/26/
why-climate-change-shake-earth

 

 

 

 

2011

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2011/oct/10/
glacier-lakes-melt-himalayas

 

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/02/14/
us-alaska-climate-idUSTRE71B23320110214

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2011/jan/31/
public-belief-climate-change

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2011/jan/21/
does-small-rise-temperatures-matter

 

 

 

 

2010

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/blog/2010/dec/22/
climate-change-faq-update

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/28/
opinion/28usher.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/08/world/americas/
08climate.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/28/
opinion/28victor.html

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2010/nov/28/
antarctica-ice-climate-change

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2010/nov/08/
scientists-unite-climate-sceptics

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/cif-green/2010/nov/08/
climate-science-bad-information?intcmp=239

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/22/
opinion/22mon1.html

 

http://www.independent.co.uk/environment/climate-change/
climate-change-will-damage-your-health-1787948.html

 

http://www.independent.co.uk/opinion/commentators/
tom-burke-the-debate-must-focus-on-the-human-cost-1787949.html

 

 

 

 

2009

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2009/may/29/1

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/georgemonbiot/2009/may/29/
monbiot-kofi-annan-climate-change

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2009/feb/20/
climate-funds-developing-nations

 

 

 

 

2008

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2008/may/15/
climatechange.scienceofclimatechange

 

 

 

 

2007

 

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2007/jun/01/usa.
environment 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2007/apr/28/
climatechange.climatechangeenvironment 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2007/apr/10/
comment.georgemonbiot 

 

http://www.usatoday.com/weather/climate/globalwarming/2007-04-03-
tipping-points_N.htm

 

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2007/mar/15/
desertification.ethicalliving 

 

http://www.usatoday.com/weather/climate/2007-01-28-
ice-sheets-ipcc_x.htm

 

 

 

 

2006

 

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2006/oct/31/greenpolitics.environment 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2006/oct/31/greenpolitics.ethicalliving 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2006/oct/31/science.greenpolitics 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2006/oct/31/economy.politics 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2006/oct/31/politics.greenpolitics   

 

https://www.theguardian.com/business/2006/oct/30/usnews.greenpolitics 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2006/oct/30/greenpolitics.uk1 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2006/oct/30/travelsenvironmentalimpact.tax 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2006/oct/30/
internationalaidanddevelopment.climatechange 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2006/oct/30/comment.tax 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2006/oct/26/topstories3.politics 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2006/oct/06/
travelsenvironmentalimpact.travelnews 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2006/sep/26/
conservationandendangeredspecies.climatechange 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2006/sep/19/ethicalliving.g2 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2006/sep/20/oilandpetrol.business

 

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2006/sep/05/greenpolitics.renewableenergy 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2006/apr/21/greenpolitics.environment  

 

 

 

 

2005

 

http://www.theguardian.com/news/2005/jun/08/us
news.climatechange

 

 

 

 

2004

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2004/feb/22/us
news.theobserver

 

 

 

 

1975

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1975/05/21/
archives/scientists-ask-why-world-climate-is-changing-major-cooling-may-be-a.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

climate change > hurricanes        USA

 

https://www.npr.org/2021/08/30/
1032442544/how-climate-change-is-fueling-hurricanes-like-ida

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report - August 2021        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/aug/09/
ipcc-reports-verdict-on-climate-crimes-of-humanity-guilty-as-hell

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

hotter climate        USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/30/
sports/everest-bodies-global-warming.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

man-made climate change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

human-caused climate change        USA

 

https://www.npr.org/2021/06/19/
1008248475/the-record-temperatures-enveloping-the-west-is-not-your-average-heat-wave

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

climate change's effects        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2017/08/13/
542645647/in-egypt-a-rising-sea-and-growing-worries-about-climate-changes-effects

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

climate shift        USA

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2017/12/17/
571050071/how-to-survive-climate-change-clues-are-buried-in-the-arctic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

climate meltdown        USA

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2022/jul/30/
total-climate-meltdown-inevitable-heatwaves-global-catastrophe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

climate change > drive weather disasters        USA

 

https://www.npr.org/2021/07/29/
1022241936/climate-change-is-driving-deadly-weather-disasters-from-arizona-to-mumbai

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

climate change > extreme weather        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/video/2021/jul/29/
climate-crisis-what-one-month-of-extreme-weather-looks-like-video

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2012/sep/19/
extreme-weather-new-normal-climate-change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

climate change > extreme heat > Australia        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/30/
science/earth/human-related-climate-change-
led-to-extreme-heat-scientists-say.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

freak storm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

satellite tracking system

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

adapt to climate change        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/2017/02/17/
515621902/in-massachusetts-coastal-residents-consider-how-to-adapt-to-climate-change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

climate carnage        USA

 

https://theintercept.com/2020/10/22/
intercepted-american-mythology-trump-climate/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

climate chaos        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/12/31/
science/climate-chaos-across-the-map.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

climate breakdown        UK

 

2022

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2022/aug/04/
climate-breakdown-supercharging-extreme-weather

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2022/jul/30/
total-climate-meltdown-inevitable-heatwaves-global-catastrophe

 

https://www.theguardian.com/news/audio/2022/may/18/
the-carbon-bombs-set-to-blow-up-the-worlds-climate-pledges

 

 

 

 

2021

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/nov/01/
the-island-has-been-shrinking-living-on-the-frontline-of-global-heating

 

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/aug/11/
no-getting-back-to-normal-climate-breakdown-ipcc-report

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/feb/25/
atlantic-ocean-circulation-at-weakest-in-a-millennium-say-scientists

 

 

 

 

2020

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/sep/28/
how-our-warmer-oceans-are-contributing-to-climate-breakdown

 

 

 

 

2019

 

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/sep/19/
life-earth-wealth-megarich-spending-power-environmental-damage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

climate crash        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/22/
opinion/sunday/lessons-for-climate-change-in-the-2008-recession.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

climate disaster        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/oct/30/
capitalism-is-killing-the-planet-its-time-to-stop-buying-into-our-own-destruction

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/ng-interactive/2021/oct/14/
climate-change-happening-now-stats-graphs-maps-cop26

 

 

 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/blog/2012/sep/30/
50-months-climate-change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

eco disaster        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2009/oct/04/
arctic-seas-turn-to-acid

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

climate change wreaking havoc on Earth        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/19/
opinion/joe-nocera-chemo-for-the-planet.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

climate change myths        UK

 

http://www.theguardian.com/science/2015/may/03/
climate-change-myths-warming-ice-antarctic-arctic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

threat to our planet

and the lives of billions of people        UK

 

http://www.theguardian.com/science/2015/may/03/
climate-change-myths-warming-ice-antarctic-arctic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.5-degree climate threshold        USA

 

https://www.npr.org/2021/11/08/
1052198840/1-5-degrees-warming-climate-change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

climate change in the USA        USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/07/18/
climate/napa-wine-heat-hot-weather.html

 

 

 

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2018/03/02/
590056872/from-almonds-to-rice-climate-change-could-slash-california-crop-yields-by-2050

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/20/us/
politics/in-california-climate-issues-moved-to-fore-by-governor.html

 

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/may/17/
climate-change-global-warming-miami-floods-hurricanes

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/08/us/florida-
finds-itself-in-the-eye-of-the-storm-on-climate-change.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/08/
opinion/climate-disruptions-close-to-home.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/07/
science/earth/climate-change-report.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency        USA

 

https://www.epa.gov/

 

 

https://www.gocomics.com/robrogers/2022/07/05

 

https://www.gocomics.com/lisabenson/2022/07/01

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

shifting climate        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/2017/04/22/
524557600/first-step-to-eco-grieving-over-climate-change-admit-theres-a-problem

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

fossil fuels        USA

 

https://www.npr.org/2021/10/20/
1047531537/fossil-fuel-paris-global-warming-climate-un

 

http://www.npr.org/2017/05/18/
528998592/energy-companies-urge-trump-to-remain-in-paris-climate-agreement

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

global warming / climate change > desert cities        UK

 

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2006/jun/05/
climatechange.climatechange 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

corals        USA

 

https://www.npr.org/2017/12/26/
556121513/as-corals-wither-around-the-world-scientists-try-ivf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Australia > the Great Barrier Reef        UK / USA

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/great-barrier-reef

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/news/audio/2021/jul/29/
the-lobbying-push-that-killed-off-a-fight-to-save-the-great-barrier-reef-podcast

 

 

 

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2017/07/09/
535754962/while-corals-die-along-the-great-barrier-reef-humans-struggle-to-adjust

 

 

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/aug/01/
-sp-great-barrier-reef-and-coal-mine-could-kill-it

 

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/ng-interactive/2014/mar/
great-barrier-reef-obituary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bahamas        USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/06/23/
magazine/climate-change-impact-bahamas.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ozone level

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ozone layer        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/ozone-layer

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/apr/07/
record-size-hole-opens-in-ozone-layer-above-the-arctic

 

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/apr/18/
scientist-who-discovered-hole-in-ozone-layer-warns

 

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/sep/10/
ozone-layer-recovery-report-shows

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ozone hole        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/apr/07/
record-size-hole-opens-in-ozone-layer-above-the-arctic

 

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/mar/09/
ozone-hole-antarctica-chemicals

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Earth        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/picture/2017/jan/01/
peter-schrank-on-the-year-ahead-cartoon#img-1

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/gallery/2008/mar/04/
fragileearth?picture=332783927

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Earth        USA

 

https://www.google.com/earth/ 

https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/ 

 

 

https://www.gocomics.com/robrogers/2016/12/30

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Earth day        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/04/22/
475266801/earth-day-brings-celebrations-signing-of-historic-climate-pact

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/22/
science/earth/22earth.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Earth hour        UK

 

http://www.theguardian.com/sustainable-business/gallery/2016/mar/20/
hamburg-coffee-pod-ban-bogota-buses-sustainable-cities-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Timeline: 70 Years of Environmental Change

 

Environmental milestones

over 13 presidential administrations        USA        April 21, 2010

 

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2010/04/22/
science/earth/20100422_environment_timeline.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

unsustainable exploitation

of the world's resources        UK

 

http://www.theguardian.com/uk/2006/oct/09/
science.ethicalliving

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

the Royal Society,

Britain's premier scientific academy        UK

 

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2006/sep/20/
oilandpetrol.business 

 

http://image.guardian.co.uk/sys-files/Guardian/documents/2006/09/19/
LettertoNick.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2004 > USA > movies / films > climate change disaster movie

The Day After Tomorrow        UK

 

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2004/may/28/
activists.climatechange

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

due to climate change        UK

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2011/oct/10/
glacier-lakes-melt-himalayas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Guardian > The ultimate climate change FAQ        UK

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/series/
the-ultimate-climate-change-faq

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

climate change adaptation        UK

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2012/feb/27/
climate-change-adaptation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

rain        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/13/
science/looks-like-rain-again-and-again.html

 

 

 

 

acid rain        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2004/oct/10/
environment.theobserversuknewspages 

 

 

 

 

torrential rain

 

 

 

 

floods

 

 

 

 

catastrophic floods

 

 

 

 

deluge

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

lakes > Lake Mead        USA

 

https://www.gocomics.com/mikeluckovich/2022/07/08

 

https://www.npr.org/2022/05/03/
1096241339/history-of-home-economics-lake-mead-levels-plummet

 

https://www.npr.org/2021/12/22/
1066642328/3-states-and-washington-agree-to-help-low-reservoirs-along-colorado-river

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

in the wild

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

habitat

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

forest        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/01/
science/earth/01forest.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2011/10/01/
science/earth/forests.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Changing Forests        USA        2011

 

The world’s

9.9 billion acres of forest

absorb roughly a quarter

of human emissions

of carbon dioxide,

and help limit

the increase of the gas

in the atmosphere.

 

While many healthy forests

are robustly absorbing carbon,

others are threatened

by a warming climate.

 

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2011/10/01/
science/earth/forests.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

the New Forest        UK        1079

 

https://www.theguardian.com/news/2004/jun/29/
netnotes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

deforestation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Corpus of news articles

 

Earth > Climate change

 

 

 

Editorial

Climate Change

 

February 22, 2010

The New York Times

 

Yvo de Boer’s resignation on Thursday after nearly four tumultuous years as chief steward of the United Nations’ climate change negotiations has deepened a sense of pessimism about whether the world can ever get its act together on global warming. Mr. de Boer was plainly exhausted by endless bickering among nations and frustrated by the failure of December’s talks in Copenhagen to deliver the prize he had worked so hard for: a legally binding treaty committing nations to mandatory reductions in greenhouse gases.

His resignation comes at a fragile moment in the campaign to combat climate change. The Senate is stalemated over a climate change bill. The disclosure of apparently trivial errors in the U.N.’s 2007 climate report has given Senate critics fresh ammunition. And without Mr. de Boer, the slim chances of forging a binding agreement at the next round of talks in December in Cancún, Mexico, seem slimmer still.

Yet his departure is hardly the death knell for international negotiations. It is not proof that such talks are of no value or that the U.N. negotiating framework in place since 1992 should be abandoned. Even Copenhagen, messy as it was, brought rich and poor nations closer together than they had been. And more than 90 countries representing 83 percent of the world’s greenhouse gases promised, at least notionally, to reduce their emissions.

But his resignation does remind us that the U.N. process is tiring, cumbersome and slow. It reinforces the notion that some parallel negotiating track will be necessary if the world is to have any hope of achieving the reductions scientists believe are necessary to avert the worst consequences of climate change.

The Copenhagen pledges, even if all of them are met, will merely stabilize global emissions by 2020. What really matters is what happens after 2020, whether the world can achieve reductions of at least 50 percent by midcentury. That won’t happen without big cuts by big emitters like the United States, the European Union, China, India and Brazil.

Even before Copenhagen, global leaders were exploring parallel tracks. Former President George W. Bush brought together some of the big emitters, and President Obama has expanded on this idea with the Major Economies Forum on Energy and Climate, a group of 17 countries that plans to meet regularly. The Group of 20 has put climate change high on its agenda, and bilateral efforts — technology exchanges between China and the United States, for instance — are under discussion.

The underlying thought is that the ultimate goal is a safe planet, and that absent a top-down global treaty, that goal is probably best achieved by aggressive, bottom-up national strategies to reduce emissions. Not that these are a sure thing; the United States, embarrassingly, has no national strategy. Until it gets one, it can hardly lecture anyone else. Nor will the world stand a ghost of a chance of bringing emissions under control.

Climate Change,
NYT,
22.2.2010,
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/22/
opinion/22mon1.html

 

 

 

 

 

Op-Ed Contributor

A Farm on Every Floor

 

August 24, 2009

The New York Times

By DICKSON D. DESPOMMIER

 

IF climate change and population growth progress at their current pace, in roughly 50 years farming as we know it will no longer exist. This means that the majority of people could soon be without enough food or water. But there is a solution that is surprisingly within reach: Move most farming into cities, and grow crops in tall, specially constructed buildings. It’s called vertical farming.

The floods and droughts that have come with climate change are wreaking havoc on traditional farmland. Three recent floods (in 1993, 2007 and 2008) cost the United States billions of dollars in lost crops, with even more devastating losses in topsoil. Changes in rain patterns and temperature could diminish India’s agricultural output by 30 percent by the end of the century.

What’s more, population increases will soon cause our farmers to run out of land. The amount of arable land per person decreased from about an acre in 1970 to roughly half an acre in 2000 and is projected to decline to about a third of an acre by 2050, according to the United Nations. With billions more people on the way, before we know it the traditional soil-based farming model developed over the last 12,000 years will no longer be a sustainable option.

Irrigation now claims some 70 percent of the fresh water that we use. After applying this water to crops, the excess agricultural runoff, contaminated with silt, pesticides, herbicides and fertilizers, is unfit for reuse. The developed world must find new agricultural approaches before the world’s hungriest come knocking on its door for a glass of clean water and a plate of disease-free rice and beans.

Imagine a farm right in the middle of a major city. Food production would take advantage of hydroponic and aeroponic technologies. Both methods are soil-free. Hydroponics allows us to grow plants in a water-and-nutrient solution, while aeroponics grows them in a nutrient-laden mist. These methods use far less water than conventional cultivation techniques, in some cases as much as 90 percent less.

Now apply the vertical farm concept to countries that are water-challenged — the Middle East readily comes to mind — and suddenly things look less hopeless. For this reason the world’s very first vertical farm may be established there, although the idea has garnered considerable interest from architects and governments all over the world.

Vertical farms are now feasible, in large part because of a robust global greenhouse initiative that has enjoyed considerable commercial success over the last 10 years. (Disclosure: I’ve started a business to build vertical farms.) There is a rising consumer demand for locally grown vegetables and fruits, as well as intense urban-farming activity in cities throughout the United States. Vertical farms would not only revolutionize and improve urban life but also revitalize land that was damaged by traditional farming. For every indoor acre farmed, some 10 to 20 outdoor acres of farmland could be allowed to return to their original ecological state (mostly hardwood forest). Abandoned farms do this free of charge, with no human help required.

A vertical farm would behave like a functional ecosystem, in which waste was recycled and the water used in hydroponics and aeroponics was recaptured by dehumidification and used over and over again. The technologies needed to create a vertical farm are currently being used in controlled-environment agriculture facilities but have not been integrated into a seamless source of food production in urban high-rise buildings.

Such buildings, by the way, are not the only structures that could house vertical farms. Farms of various dimensions and crop yields could be built into a variety of urban settings — from schools, restaurants and hospitals to the upper floors of apartment complexes. By supplying a continuous quantity of fresh vegetables and fruits to city dwellers, these farms would help combat health problems, like Type II diabetes and obesity, that arise in part from the lack of quality produce in our diet.

The list of benefits is long. Vertical farms would produce crops year-round that contain no agro-chemicals. Fish and poultry could also be raised indoors. The farms would greatly reduce fossil-fuel use and greenhouse-gas emissions, since they would eliminate the need for heavy farm machinery and trucks that deliver food from farm to fork. (Wouldn’t it be great if everything on your plate came from around the corner, rather than from hundreds to thousands of miles away?)

Vertical farming could finally put an end to agricultural runoff, a major source of water pollution. Crops would never again be destroyed by floods or droughts. New employment opportunities for vertical farm managers and workers would abound, and abandoned city properties would become productive once again.

Vertical farms would also make cities more pleasant places to live. The structures themselves would be things of beauty and grace. In order to allow plants to capture passive sunlight, walls and ceilings would be completely transparent. So from a distance, it would look as if there were gardens suspended in space.

City dwellers would also be able to breathe easier — quite literally. Vertical farms would bring a great concentration of plants into cities. These plants would absorb carbon dioxide produced by automobile emissions and give off oxygen in return. So imagine you wanted to build the first vertical farm and put it in New York City. What would it take? We have the technology — now we need money, political will and, of course, proof that this concept can work. That’s why a prototype would be a good place to start. I estimate that constructing a five-story farm, taking up one-eighth of a square city block, would cost $20 million to $30 million. Part of the financing should come from the city government, as a vertical farm would go a long way toward achieving Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s goal of a green New York City by 2030. Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer has already expressed interest in having a vertical farm in the city. City officials should be interested. If a farm is located where the public can easily visit it, the iconic building could generate significant tourist dollars, on top of revenue from the sales of its produce.

But most of the financing should come from private sources, including groups controlling venture-capital funds. The real money would flow once entrepreneurs and clean-tech investors realize how much profit there is to be made in urban farming. Imagine a farm in which crop production is not limited by seasons or adverse weather events. Sales could be made in advance because crop-production levels could be guaranteed, thanks to the predictable nature of indoor agriculture. An actual indoor farm developed at Cornell University growing hydroponic lettuce was able to produce as many as 68 heads per square foot per year. At a retail price in New York of up to $2.50 a head for hydroponic lettuce, you can easily do the math and project profitability for other similar crops.

When people ask me why the world still does not have a single vertical farm, I just raise my eyebrows and shrug my shoulders. Perhaps people just need to see proof that farms can grow several stories high. As soon as the first city takes that leap of faith, the world’s first vertical farm could be less than a year away from coming to the aid of a hungry, thirsty world. Not a moment too soon.

 

Dickson D. Despommier,

a professor of public health at Columbia University,

is writing a book about vertical farms.

A Farm on Every Floor,
NYT,
24.8.2009,
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/24/
opinion/24Despommier.html

 

 

 

 

 

Study Halves

Prediction of Rising Seas

 

May 15, 2009

The New York Times

By ANDREW C. REVKIN

 

A new analysis halves longstanding projections of how much sea levels could rise if Antarctica’s massive western ice sheets fully disintegrated as a result of global warming.

The flow of ice into the sea would probably raise sea levels about 10 feet rather than 20 feet, according to the analysis, published in the May 15 issue of the journal Science.

The scientists also predicted that seas would rise unevenly, with an additional 1.5-foot increase in levels along the east and west coasts of North America and the east coast of southern Africa. That is because the shift in a huge mass of water away from the South Pole would subtly change the shape and rotation of the Earth, the authors said.

Several Antarctic specialists familiar with the new study had mixed reactions to the projections.

But they and the study’s lead author, Jonathan L. Bamber of the British Glaciology Center, agreed that the odds of a disruptive rise in seas from warming over the next century or so remain serious enough to warrant the world’s attention.

They also uniformly called for renewed investment in ice-probing satellites and field missions that could within a few years substantially clarify the risk.

There is strong consensus that warming waters around Antarctica, and Greenland in the Arctic, would result in centuries of rising seas. But glaciologists and oceanographers still say uncertainty prevails on the vital question of how fast coasts will retreat in a warming world in the next century or two.

The new study combined computer modeling with measurements of the ice and underlying bedrock, both direct and by satellite.

It did not assess the pace or likelihood of a rise in seas. The goal was to examine as precisely as possible how much ice could flow into the sea if warming seawater penetrated between the West Antarctic ice sheet and the bedrock beneath. For decades West Antarctic ice has been identified as particularly vulnerable to melting because, although piled more than one mile above sea level in many places, it also rests on bedrock a half mile to a mile beneath sea level in others.

That topography means that warm water could progressively melt spots where ice is stuck to the rock, allowing it to flow more freely.

Erik I. Ivins, at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, described the new paper as “good solid science,” but added that the sea-level estimates cannot be verified without renewed investment in satellite missions and other initiatives that are currently lagging.

A particularly valuable satellite program called Grace, which measures subtle variations in gravity related to the mass of ice and rock, “has perhaps a couple of years remaining before its orbit deteriorates,” Dr. Ivins said.

“The sad truth is that we in NASA are watching our earth-observing systems fall by the wayside as they age – without the sufficient resources to see them adequately replaced.”

Robert Bindschadler, a longtime specialist in polar ice at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, said the study only provided a low estimate of Antarctica’s possible long-term contribution to rising seas because it did not deal with other mechanisms that could add water to the ocean.

The prime question, he said, remains what will happen in the next 100 years or so, and other recent work implies that a lot of ice can be shed within thattime.

“Even in Bamber’s world,” he said, referring to the study’s author, “there is more than enough ice to cause serious harm to the world’s coastlines.”

Study Halves Prediction of Rising Seas,
NYT,
15.5.2009,
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/05/15/
science/earth/15antarctica.html

 

 

 

 

 

Southern Baptists

Back a Shift on Climate Change

 

March 10, 2008

The New York Times

By NEELA BANERJEE

 

Signaling a significant departure from the Southern Baptist Convention’s official stance on global warming, 44 Southern Baptist leaders have decided to back a declaration calling for more action on climate change, saying its previous position on the issue was “too timid.”

The largest denomination in the United States after the Roman Catholic Church, the Southern Baptist Convention, with more than 16 million members, is politically and theologically conservative.

Yet its current president, the Rev. Frank Page, signed the initiative, “A Southern Baptist Declaration on the Environment and Climate Change.” Two past presidents of the convention, the Rev. Jack Graham and the Rev. James Merritt, also signed.

“We believe our current denominational engagement with these issues has often been too timid, failing to produce a unified moral voice,” the church leaders wrote in their new declaration.

A 2007 resolution passed by the convention hewed to a more skeptical view of global warming.

In contrast, the new declaration, which will be released Monday, states, “Our cautious response to these issues in the face of mounting evidence may be seen by the world as uncaring, reckless and ill-informed.”

The document also urges ministers to preach more about the environment and for all Baptists to keep an open mind about considering environmental policy.

Jonathan Merritt, the spokesman for the Southern Baptist Environment and Climate Initiative and a seminarian at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary in Wake Forest, N.C., said the declaration was a call to Christians to return to a biblical mandate to guard the world God created.

The Southern Baptist signatories join a growing community of evangelicals pushing for more action among believers, industry and politicians. Experts on the Southern Baptist Convention noted the initiative marked the growing influence of younger leaders on the discussions in the Southern Baptist Convention.

While those younger Baptists remain committed to fight abortion, for instance, the environment is now a top priority, too.

“In no way do we intend to back away from sanctity of life,” said the Rev. Dr. Timothy George, dean of Beeson Divinity School in Birmingham, Ala.

Still, many powerful Southern Baptist leaders and agencies did not sign the declaration, including the convention’s influential political arm, the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission.

Dr. Barrett Duke, vice president for public policy at the commission, played down the differences between the declaration and the Southern Baptist Convention’s position.

The declaration says in fact that lack of scientific unanimity should not preclude “prudent action,” which includes changing individual habits and giving “serious consideration to responsible policies that effectively address” global warming.

The declaration is the outgrowth of soul-searching by Mr. Merritt, 25. The younger Mr. Merritt said that for years he had been “an enemy of the environment.” Then, he said, he had an epiphany.

“I learned that God reveals himself through Scripture and in general through his creation, and when we destroy God’s creation, it’s similar to ripping pages from the Bible,” Mr. Merritt said.

Southern Baptists Back a Shift on Climate Change,
NYT,
10.3.2008,
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/10/us/10baptist.htm

 

 

 

 

Global Warming

May Make Humidity Worse

 

October 10, 2007

Filed at 1:00 p.m. ET

The New York Times

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

 

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The world isn't just getting hotter from man-made global warming, it's getting stickier. It really is the humidity. The amount of moisture in the air near the surface -- the stuff that makes hot weather unbearable -- increased 2.2 percent in just under three decades. And computer models show that the only explanation is man-made global warming, according to a study published in Thursday's journal Nature.

''This humidity change is an important contribution to heat stress in humans as a result of global warming,'' said Nathan Gillett of the University of East Anglia in the United Kingdom, a co-author of the study.

Gillett studied changes in specific humidity, which is a measurement of total moisture in the air, between 1973-2002. Increases in humidity can be dangerous to people because it makes the body less efficient at cooling itself, said University of Miami health and climate researcher Laurence Kalkstein. He was not connected with the research.

Humidity increased over most of the globe, including the eastern United States, said study co-author Katharine Willett, a climate researcher at Yale University. However, a few regions, including the U.S. West, South Africa and parts of Australia were drier.

The finding isn't surprising to climate scientists. Physics dictates that warmer air can hold more moisture. But Gillett's study shows that the increase in humidity already is significant and can be attributed to gas emissions from the burning of fossil fuels.

To show that this is man-made, Gillett ran computer models to simulate past climate conditions and studied what would happen to humidity if there were no man-made greenhouse gases. It didn't match reality.

He looked at what would happen from just man-made greenhouse gases. That didn't match either. Then he looked at the combination of natural conditions and greenhouse gases. The results were nearly identical to the year-by-year increases in humidity.

Gillett's study followed another last month that used the same technique to show that moisture above the world's oceans increased and that it bore the ''fingerprint'' of being caused by man-made global warming.

Climate scientists have now seen the man-made fingerprint of global warming on 10 different aspects of Earth's environment: surface temperatures, humidity, water vapor over the oceans, barometric pressure, total precipitation, wildfires, change in species of plants in animals, water run-off, temperatures in the upper atmosphere, and heat content in the world's oceans.

''This story does now fit together; there are now no loose ends,'' said Ben Santer, a scientist at Lawrence Livermore National Lab and author of the September study on moisture above the oceans. ''The message is pretty compelling that natural causes alone just can't cut it.''

The studies make sense, said University of Victoria climate scientist Andrew Weaver, who was not part of either team's research.

It will only feel worse in the future, Gillett said. Moisture in the air increases by about 6 percent with every degree Celsius (1.8 degrees Fahrenheit), he said. Using the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's projections for temperature increases, that would mean a 12 to 24 percent increase in humidity by the year 2100.

''Although it might not be a lethal kind of thing, it's going to increase human discomfort,'' Willett said.

------

On the Net:

Nature: http://www.nature.com/nature

Global Warming May Make Humidity Worse,
NYT, 10.10.2007,
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/
us/AP-Global-Warming-Humidity.html - broken link

 

 

 

 

 

Atlantic Tropical Storms

Have Doubled

 

July 29, 2007

Filed at 7:05 p.m. ET

The New York Times

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

 

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The number of tropical storms developing annually in the Atlantic Ocean more than doubled over the past century, with the increase taking place in two jumps, researchers say.

The increases coincided with rising sea surface temperature, largely the byproduct of human-induced climate warming, researchers Greg J. Holland and Peter J. Webster concluded. Their findings were being published online Sunday by Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London.

An official at the National Hurricane Center called the research ''sloppy science'' and said technological improvements in observing storms accounted for the increase.

From 1905 to 1930, the Atlantic-Gulf Coast area averaged six tropical cyclones per year, with four of those storms growing into become hurricanes.

The annual average jumped to 10 tropical storms and five hurricanes from 1931 to 1994. From 1995 to 2005, the average was 15 tropical storms and eight hurricanes annually.

Even in 2006, widely reported as a mild year, there were 10 tropical storms.

''We are currently in an upward swing in frequency of named storms and hurricanes that has not stabilized,'' said Holland, director of mesoscale and microscale meteorology at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colo.

''I really do not know how much further, if any, that it will go, but my sense is that we shall see a stabilization in frequencies for a while, followed by potentially another upward swing if global warming continues unabated,'' Holland said.

It is normal for chaotic systems such as weather and climate to move in sharp steps rather than gradual trends, he said.

''What did surprise me when we first found it in 2005 was that the increases had developed for so long without us noticing it,'' he said in an interview via e-mail.

Holland said about half the U.S. population and ''a large slice'' of business are ''directly vulnerable'' to hurricanes.

''Our urban and industrial planning and building codes are based on past history,'' he said. If the future is different, ''then we run the very real risk of these being found inadequate, as was so graphically displayed by (Hurricane) Katrina in New Orleans.''

Hurricanes derive their energy from warm ocean water. North Atlantic surface temperature increased about 1.3 degrees Fahrenheit during the 100-year period studied. Other researchers have calculated that at least two-thirds of that warming can be attributed to human and industrial activities.

Some experts have sought to blame changes in the sun. But a recent study by British and Swiss experts concluded that ''over the past 20 years, all the trends in the sun that could have had an influence on the Earth's climate have been in the opposite direction to that required to explain the observed rise in global mean temperatures.''

As the sea surface temperatures warm, they cause changes in atmospheric wind fields and circulations, and these changes are responsible for the changes in storm frequency, Holland said.

Chris Landsea, science and operations officer at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Hurricane Center, said the study is inconsistent in its use of data.

The work, he said, is ''sloppy science that neglects the fact that better monitoring by satellites allows us to observe storms and hurricanes that were simply missed earlier. The doubling in the number of storms and hurricanes in 100 years that they found in their paper is just an artifact of technology, not climate change.''

But Kerry Emanuel, a hurricane expert at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, said the study was significant. ''It refutes recent suggestions that the upward trend in Atlantic hurricane activity is an artifact of changing measurement systems,'' said Emanuel, who was not part of the research team.

Improvements in observation began with aircraft flights into storms in 1944 and satellite observations in 1970. The transitions in hurricane activity that were noted in the paper occurred around 1930 and 1995.

''We are of the strong and considered opinion that data errors alone cannot explain the sharp, high-amplitude transitions between the climatic regimes, each with an increase of around 50 percent in cyclone and hurricane numbers,'' wrote Webster, of Georgia Institute of Technology, and Holland.

The research was funded by the National Science Foundation.

------

On the Net:

Royal Society Publishing: http://www.pubs.royalsoc.ac.uk/

National Center for Atmospheric Research: http://www.ncar.ucar.edu/

Georgia Institute of Technology: http://www.gatech.edu

Atlantic Tropical Storms Have Doubled,
NYT, 29.7.2007,
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/us/AP-More-Storms.html

 

 

 

 

 

10.45am

Global warming

'will continue for centuries'

 

Friday February 2, 2007

Guardian Unlimited

Peter Walker and agencies

 

Global warming is an "unequivocal" fact and is likely to continue for centuries, the leading international body studying climate change said in a report today.

It is "very likely" - a probability of more than 90% - that the phenomenon has been caused by human activity, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) concluded in its fourth report.

In 2001, the body - which brings together 2,500 scientists from more than 30 countries - said global warming was "likely", or 66% probable, to have been caused by humans.

Today's report predicted that global average temperatures would rise by between 1.1C and 6.4C (2-11.5F) by 2100 - a slightly broader range than in the 2001 findings.

However, it said the best estimate was for increases of between 1.8C and 4C. In comparison, the world is currently around 5C warmer than during the last ice age. The report predicts a rise of between 18cm and 58cm in sea levels by the end of this century, a figure that could increase by as much as 20cm if the recent melting of polar ice sheets continues.

The 21-page summary of the findings, called Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis, was formally agreed by the IPCC in Paris yesterday.

It steers clear of policy recommendations, instead providing a rigorously scientific assessment of the likely risks.

"Warming of the climate system is unequivocal, as is now evident from observations of increases in global average air and ocean temperatures, widespread melting of snow and ice, and rising global mean sea level," the summary said.

It added that greenhouse gases were already responsible for a series of existing problems, including fewer cold days, hotter nights, intense heatwaves, floods and heavy rains, droughts and an increase in the strength of hurricanes and tropical storms.

The scale of such phenomena in the 21st century "would very likely be larger than those observed during the 20th century", it said, warning that no matter how much humanity reduces greenhouse gas emissions, global warming and sea level rises would continue for hundreds of years.

"This is just not something you can stop. We're just going to have to live with it," co-author Kevin Trenberth, the director of climate analysis for the US-based National Centre for Atmospheric Research, said.

"We're creating a different planet. If you were to come up back in 100 years, we'll have a different climate."

However, the scientists stressed this did not mean governments should accept the inevitable.

"The point here is to highlight what will happen if we don't do something and what will happen if we do something," another co-author, Jonathan Overpeck, of the University of Arizona, said.

"I can tell if you will decide not to do something, the impacts will be much larger than if we do something."

The head of the US delegation to the body said the report was a "comprehensive and accurate" presentation of the science.

Sharon Hays, the associate director of the White House office of science and technology policy, claimed George Bush's policy of slowing a rise in emissions rather than cutting them was working.

"The president has put in place a comprehensive set of policies to address what he has called the serious challenge of climate change," she told Reuters.

Climate change activists have lambasted Mr Bush for pulling out of the Kyoto protocol on greenhouse gas emissions, which he said was ineffective and harmful to the US economy. Instead, he has focused on investments in technologies such as hydrogen and biofuels.

Global warming 'will continue for centuries',
G, 2.2.2007,
http://environment.guardian.co.uk/climatechange/story/0,,2004550,00.html

 

 

 

 

 

Global Warming: The vicious circle

 

Published: 29 January 2007

The Independent

By Steve Connor,

Science Editor

 

The effects of man-made emissions of carbon dioxide are being felt on every inhabited continent in the world with very different parts of the climate now visibly responding to human activity.

These are among the main findings of the most intensive study of climate change by 2,000 of the world's leading climate scientists. They conclude that there is now little doubt that human activity is changing the face of the planet.

In addition to rising surface temperatures around the world, scientists have now linked man-made emissions of greenhouse gases to significant increases in ocean temperatures, rises in sea levels and the dramatic melting of Arctic sea ice over the past 35 years.

A draft copy of the fourth report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) says that global temperature rises this century of between 2C and 4.5C are almost inevitable. Ominously, however, it also says that much higher increases of 6C "or more" cannot be ruled out.

The final version of the IPCC's latest report is to be published on Friday but a draft copy, seen by The Independent, makes it clear that climate change could be far worse than previously thought because of potentially disastrous "positive" feedbacks which could accelerate rising temperatures.

A warmer world is increasing evaporation from the oceans causing atmospheric concentrations of water vapour, a powerful greenhouse agent, to have increased by 4 per cent over the sea since 1970. Water vapour in the atmosphere exacerbates the greenhouse effect. This is the largest positive feedback identified in the report, which details for the first time the IPCC's concern over the uncertainties - and dangers - of feedback cycles that may quickly accelerate climate change.

All the climate models used by the IPCC also found that rising global temperatures will erode the planet's natural ability to absorb man-made CO2. This could lead to CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere rising by a further 44 per cent, causing global average temperatures to increase by an additional 1.2C by 2100.

The IPCC's Fourth Assessment Report will go further than any of its three previous reports in linking the clear signs of global climate change with increases in man-made emissions of CO2 and other greenhouse gases since the start of the Industrial Revolution.

"Confidence in the assessment of the human contributions to recent climate change has increased considerably since the TAR [Third Assessment Report]," says the draft report. This is due to the stronger signs of climate change emerging from longer and more detailed records and scientific observations, it says.

The "anthropogenic signal" - the visible signs of human influence on the climate - has now emerged not just in global average surface temperatures, but in global ocean temperatures and ocean heat content, temperature extremes on the land and the rapidly diminishing Arctic sea ice. "Anthropogenic warming of the climate system is widespread and can be detected in temperature observations taken at the surface, in the free atmosphere and in the oceans," the draft report says. "It is highly likely [greater than 95 per cent probability] that the warming observed during the past half century cannot be explained without external forcing [human activity]."

The report adds that global warming over the past 50 years would have been worse had it not been for the counterbalancing influence of man-made emissions of aerosol pollutants, tiny airborne particles that reflect sunlight to cause atmospheric cooling. "Without the cooling effect of atmospheric aerosols, it is likely that greenhouse gases alone would have caused more global mean temperature rise than that observed during the last 50 years," the draft report says.

"The hypothetical removal from the atmosphere of the entire current burden of anthropogenic sulphate aerosol particles would produce a rapid increase of about 0.8C within a decade or two in the globally averaged temperature."

The IPCC says that over the coming century we are likely to see big changes to the Earth's climate system. These include:

* Heat waves, such as the one that affected southern Europe in summer 2003, are expected to be more intense, longer-lasting and more frequent.

* Tropical storms and hurricanes are likely to be stronger, with increased rainfall and higher storm surges flooding coastlines.

* The Arctic is likely to become ice free in the summer, and there will be continued melting of mountain glaciers, ice caps and ice sheets.

* Sea levels will rise significantly even if levels of CO2 are stabilised. By 2100 sea levels could be 0.43 metres higher on average than present, and by 2300 they could be up to 0.8 metres higher.

The IPCC also finally nails the canard of the climate sceptics who argue that global warming is a myth or the result of natural climate variability; natural factors alone cannot account for the observed warming, the IPCC says. "These changes took place at a time when non-anthropogenic forcing factors (i.e. the sum of solar and volcanic forcing) would be expected to have produced cooling, not warming.

"There is increased confidence that natural internal variability cannot account for the observed changes, due in part to improved studies demonstrating that the warming occurred in both oceans and atmosphere, together with observed ice mass losses."

The report, the first draft of which was formulated last year, will be made public on Friday in Paris.

 

 

 

Key findings of the IPCC's fourth assessment report

* Global temperatures continue to rise with 11 of the 12 warmest years since 1850 occurring since 1995. Computer models suggest a further rise of about 3C by 2100, with a 6C rise a distant possibility

* It is virtually certain (there is more than a 99 per cent probability) that carbon dioxide levels and global warming is far above the range of natural variability over the past 650,000 years

* It is virtually certain that human activity has played the dominant role in causing the increase of greenhouse gases over the past 250 years

* Man-made emissions of atmospheric aerosol pollutants have tended to counteract global warming, which otherwise would have been significantly worse

* The net effect of human activities over the past 250 years has very likely exerted a warming influence on the climate

* It is likely that human activity is also responsible for other observed changes to the Earth's climate system, such as ocean warming and the melting of the Arctic sea ice

* Sea levels will continue to rise in the 21st Century because of the thermal expansion of the oceans and loss of land ice

* The projected warming of the climate due to increases in carbon dioxide during the 21st Century is likely to cause the total melting of the Greenland ice sheet during the next 1,000 years, according to some computer forecasting models

* The warm Gulf Stream of the North Atlantic is likely to slow down during the 21st Century because of global warming and the melting of the freshwater locked up in the Greenland ice sheet. But no models predict the collapse of that warm current by 2100.

Global Warming: The vicious circle,
I,
29.1.2007,
http://news.independent.co.uk/environment/article2193672.ece

 

 

 

 

 

Global warming:

the final verdict

A study by the world's
leading experts
says global warming
will happen faster
and be more devastating
than previously thought

 

Sunday January 21, 2007

The Observer

Robin McKie,

science editor

 

Global warming is destined to have a far more destructive and earlier impact than previously estimated, the most authoritative report yet produced on climate change will warn next week.

A draft copy of the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, obtained by The Observer, shows the frequency of devastating storms - like the ones that battered Britain last week - will increase dramatically. Sea levels will rise over the century by around half a metre; snow will disappear from all but the highest mountains; deserts will spread; oceans become acidic, leading to the destruction of coral reefs and atolls; and deadly heatwaves will become more prevalent.

The impact will be catastrophic, forcing hundreds of millions of people to flee their devastated homelands, particularly in tropical, low-lying areas, while creating waves of immigrants whose movements will strain the economies of even the most affluent countries.

'The really chilling thing about the IPCC report is that it is the work of several thousand climate experts who have widely differing views about how greenhouse gases will have their effect. Some think they will have a major impact, others a lesser role. Each paragraph of this report was therefore argued over and scrutinised intensely. Only points that were considered indisputable survived this process. This is a very conservative document - that's what makes it so scary,' said one senior UK climate expert.

Climate concerns are likely to dominate international politics next month. President Bush is to make the issue a part of his state of the union address on Wednesday while the IPCC report's final version is set for release on 2 February in a set of global news conferences.

Although the final wording of the report is still being worked on, the draft indicates that scientists now have their clearest idea so far about future climate changes, as well as about recent events. It points out that:

· 12 of the past 13 years were the warmest since records began;

· ocean temperatures have risen at least three kilometres beneath the surface;

· glaciers, snow cover and permafrost have decreased in both hemispheres;

· sea levels are rising at the rate of almost 2mm a year;

· cold days, nights and frost have become rarer while hot days, hot nights and heatwaves have become more frequent.

And the cause is clear, say the authors: 'It is very likely that [man-made] greenhouse gas increases caused most of the average temperature increases since the mid-20th century,' says the report.

To date, these changes have caused global temperatures to rise by 0.6C. The most likely outcome of continuing rises in greenhouses gases will be to make the planet a further 3C hotter by 2100, although the report acknowledges that rises of 4.5C to 5C could be experienced. Ice-cap melting, rises in sea levels, flooding, cyclones and storms will be an inevitable consequence.

Past assessments by the IPCC have suggested such scenarios are 'likely' to occur this century. Its latest report, based on sophisticated computer models and more detailed observations of snow cover loss, sea level rises and the spread of deserts, is far more robust and confident. Now the panel writes of changes as 'extremely likely' and 'almost certain'.

And in a specific rebuff to sceptics who still argue natural variation in the Sun's output is the real cause of climate change, the panel says mankind's industrial emissions have had five times more effect on the climate than any fluctuations in solar radiation. We are the masters of our own destruction, in short.

There is some comfort, however. The panel believes the Gulf Stream will go on bathing Britain with its warm waters for the next 100 years. Some researchers have said it could be disrupted by cold waters pouring off Greenland's melting ice sheets, plunging western Europe into a mini Ice Age, as depicted in the disaster film The Day After Tomorrow.

The report reflects climate scientists' growing fears that Earth is nearing the stage when carbon dioxide rises will bring irreversible change to the planet. 'We are seeing vast sections of Antarctic ice disappearing at an alarming rate,' said climate expert Chris Rapley, in a phone call to The Observer from the Antarctic Peninsula last week. 'That means we can expect to see sea levels rise at about a metre a century from now on - and that will have devastating consequences.'

However, there is still hope, said Peter Cox of Exeter University. 'We are like alcoholics who have got as far as admitting there is a problem. It is a start. Now we have got to start drying out - which means reducing our carbon output.'

Global warming: the final verdict,
O,
21.1.2007,
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2007/jan/21/
weather.climatechange

 

 

 

 

 

Swans deliver

a climate change warning

 

Published: 28 October 2006

The Independent

By Cahal Milmo

 

For decades, the arrival of the first V-shaped flights of Bewick's swans in Britain's wetlands after a 2,000-mile journey from Siberia heralded the arrival of winter.

This year, a dramatic decline in numbers of the distinctive yellow-billed swans skidding into their winter feeding grounds could be the harbinger of a more dramatic shift in weather patterns: global warming. Ornithologists at the main reserves that host the birds, the smallest of Britain's swans, said only a handful had appeared on lakes and water courses. Normally, there would be several hundred.

The latest arrival in a decade of Britain's seasonal influx of 8,000 Bewick's swans throws into sharp relief the debate on the effects of climate change as it enters a crucial week. As the Government's forthcoming Climate Bill is finalised, Sir Nicholas Stern, a former World Bank economist, is expected to warn in a report on Monday that failure to tackle global warming will provoke a recession deeper than the Great Depression.

But far from Westminster, the potential ecological impact of the same phenomenon was being noted in the absence of the high-pitched honking call of Bewick's swans on reservoirs and wetlands from the Ouse to the Severn estuary. The Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust (WWT) said its first three birds had arrived at its Slimbridge reserve in Glouc-estershire, only on Thursday, the latest arrival since 1995.

In Welney, Cambridgeshire, where there are normally 100 Bewick's by the end of October as the vanguard for a winter population of 1,000; a solitary male was this week the sole representative. The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds said that two of its reserves in East Anglia which host the bulk of the British population - the Ouse Washes and Nene Washes - were also devoid of Bewick's. Experts said that the slow arrival was due to warmer than usual conditions on the continent, in particular the birds' other main wintering grounds in the Netherlands, and an absence of the north-east winds that aid their migration from the Arctic tundra of northern Russia.

The disruption to the swans' migration pattern fits into an emerging pattern of fluctuating numbers of bird species and population movements blamed on climate change. Redwings, another winter visitor to the British Isles, started arriving from Scandinavia only this week. Normally, they come in early September.

Other species which normally leave Europe for the winter, such as the blackcap, are now staying through the year. The WWT and other bird conservation groups said that it would take weeks to assess whether the late arrival of the Bewick's, named after the 18th-century English engraver and ornithologist Thomas Bewick, would affect the overall numbers wintering in Britain.

Since reaching a peak of about 9,000 in 1992, numbers of the swans have fallen by about 5 per cent. In 2004, numbers of wintering ducks, geese, swans and wading birds fell to the lowest level for a decade.

Swans deliver a climate change warning,
I,
28.10.2006,
http://news.independent.co.uk/
environment/article1935939.ece - broken link

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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