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Vocapedia > Earth > Gardening, Farming

 

Livestock, Cattle, Meat industry, Abattoirs, Outbreaks, Animal rights / welfare

 

 

The Guardian        Weekend        p. 66        15 July 2006

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Penkridge, England

 

Piglets feed at Lower Drayton farm in Staffordshire.

Agricultural operations in the UK continue

during the restrictions imposed to control the spread of Covid-19

 

Photograph: Christopher Furlong/Getty

 

Cardboard crowd and Wuhan wedding: Thursday's best photos

The Guardian’s picture editors select photo highlights from around the world

G

Thu 16 Apr 2020    12.36 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/news/gallery/2020/apr/16/
cardboard-crowd-wuhan-wedding-thursdays-best-photos

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

warning: graphic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

‘The march of human progress is strewn with dead animals.’

 

Photograph: John Eveson/Rex

 

Industrial farming is one of the worst crimes in history

G

Friday 25 September 2015    07.59 BST

Last modified on Saturday 26 September 2015    00.02 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/sep/25/
industrial-farming-one-worst-crimes-history-ethical-question

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Christmas poultry sale

in York, 21 December 2018.

 

Photograph: Ian Forsyth/Getty Images

 

Why I’m looking forward to my first vegan Christmas

I won’t be eating turkey this year

because of meat’s environmental impact

G

Sat 22 Dec 2018    06.00 GMT

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/dec/22/
looking-forward-vegan-christmas-turkey-meat-environmental-impact

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Yes Men's solution to California's drought: if you eat beef, don't wash    G    20 July 2015

 

 

 

 

The Yes Men's solution to California's drought: if you eat beef, don't wash        Video        Guardian Docs        20 July 2015

 

Would you stop showering

if it meant that was the only way

you could keep eating beef?

 

California's ongoing drought needs radical action.

But in a state dependent on water-hungry meat production,

it would be politically dangerous to suggest eating less beef.

 

Activists the Yes Men

collaborated with comedy video website Funny or Die

to produce a spoof campaign encouraging California's hipsters

to skip showers for beef.

 

Did it fool anyone?

 

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jjQhVPkKDcE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chasing Outbreaks: How Safe Is Our Food?        NYT        11 May 2015

 

 

 

Chasing Outbreaks: How Safe Is Our Food?        Video        Retro Report | The New York Times        11 May 2015

 

A 1993 E. coli outbreak linked to Jack in the Box hamburgers

sickened 700 people and drew new attention

to the dangers of food-borne illness.

 

More than 20 years later, how far have we come?

 

Produced by: Retro Report

Read the story here: http://nyti.ms/1cIMkV7

Visit Retro Report's website: http://www.RetroReport.org

 

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yfGOJKbqrWk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

farm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

factory farm        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2020/may/19/
its-time-to-get-used-to-eating-less-meat

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA > fur farm        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/oct/11/
utah-10000-minks-dead-from-coronavirus

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

farmer        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/08/01/
539580994/how-and-why-some-farmers-are-bringing-livestock-back-to-the-prairie

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

farming        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/farming

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

industrial farming        UK

 

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/sep/25/
industrial-farming-one-worst-crimes-history-ethical-question

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

dairy farm

 

 

 

 

dairy farmers

 

 

 

 

cow

 

 

 

 

drove        AUS

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-09-10/
drovers-cross-border/4948862

 

 

 

 

drover        AUS

https://www.abc.net.au/news/rural/2013-09-10/
drovers-cross-border/4948862?nw=0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Farmers gather for livestock auction in Cumbria - in pictures        UK        4 July 2013

 

Christopher Thomond photographs

farmers selling their livestock

after the harsh winter weather

depleted their herds and drove up feed prices

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/gallery/2013/jul/04/
farming-supermarkets
 

 

 

 

 

farmer        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/27/us/
new-mexico-farmers-push-to-be-made-a-priority-in-drought.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/13/us/politics/
drought-driven-voters-vent-anger-over-farm-bill.html

 

 

 

 

on a farm

 

 

 

 

at an Iowa farm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

animal feed > antibiotic use on farms / antibiotics use for livestock        USA

Food and Drug Administration    F.D.A.

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/12/07/
569198029/is-the-tide-of-antibiotic-use-on-farms-now-turning

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/11/02/
561584723/big-chicken-connects-poultry-farming-to-antibiotic-resistant-bacteria

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/22/
opinion/sunday/the-peril-of-antibiotic-use-on-farms.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/12/health/
fda-to-phase-out-use-of-some-antibiotics-in-animals-raised-for-meat.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Antibiotic Use On Farms Skyrockets Worldwide        USA        2015

 

http://www.npr.org/blogs/goatsandsoda/2015/03/20/
394064680/for-the-love-of-pork-antibiotic-use-on-farms-skyrockets-worldwide

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

livestock > fecal waste        USA

http://video.nytimes.com/video/playlist/us/1194811622217/index.html

 

 

 

 

farm emissions        USA        2008

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/12/04/science/earth/04meat.htm

 

 

 

 

Methane (CH4)        2011

 

Methane (CH4)

accounts for around 14%

of the impact of current

human greenhouse-gas emissions.

 

Key sources include agriculture

(especially livestock and rice fields),

fossil fuel extraction

and the decay of organic waste

in landfill sites.

 

Methane doesn't persist

in the atmosphere as long as CO2,

though its warming effect

is much more potent

for each gram of gas released.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2011/feb/04/
man-made-greenhouse-gases

 

 

 

 

meat > water footprint        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/08/
opinion/meat-makes-the-planet-thirsty.html

 

 

 

 

aquifers        USA

http://video.nytimes.com/video/playlist/us/1194811622217/index.html

 

 

 

 

Environmental Protection Agency        USA

https://www.nytimes.com/topic/organization/
environmental-protection-agency

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

meat        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2020/may/19/
its-time-to-get-used-to-eating-less-meat

 

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/may/19/
chicken-welfare-human-health-meat

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

lab-grown chicken burger        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/food/2020/dec/04/
no-kill-lab-grown-chicken-burger-restaurant-israel

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

meat >  lab grown meat        USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/02/
opinion/lab-grown-meat.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

meat industry        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/meat-industry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

meat industry        USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/21/
opinion/coronavirus-meat-vegetarianism.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/29/
business/coronavirus-trump-meat-plants.html

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/20/
dining/animal-welfare-at-risk-in-experiments-for-meat-industry.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

food companies > meat producer > JBS        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2015/07/10/
421532548/inside-the-world-s-largest-food-company-you-ve-probably-never-heard-of

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

livestock > prime lamb, cast ewes, sheep        UK

 

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/gallery/2013/jul/04/
farming-supermarkets

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

livestock        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2021/may/01/
how-to-love-animals-by-henry-mance-review-the-case-against-modern-farming

 

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2008/dec/14/
birdlovers-split-reintroduction-sea-eagle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

livestock        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/08/01/
539580994/how-and-why-some-farmers-are-bringing-livestock-back-to-the-prairie

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/06/05/
531234497/this-farmer-wants-to-give-animals-a-better-life-and-death

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

industrial livestock farming        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/jul/02/
revealed-development-banks-funding-industrial-livestock-farms-around-the-world

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

raise several types of livestock        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/08/01/
539580994/how-and-why-some-farmers-are-bringing-livestock-back-to-the-prairie

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

raise massive amounts of corn and soybeans

to feed big livestock operations        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/08/01/
539580994/how-and-why-some-farmers-are-bringing-livestock-back-to-the-prairie

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

graze livestock        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/08/01/
539580994/how-and-why-some-farmers-are-bringing-livestock-back-to-the-prairie

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

beef        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/05/12/
528139468/chinese-chicken-is-headed-to-america-but-its-really-all-about-beef

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jjQhVPkKDcE - NYT, July 20, 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

lamb        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/06/05/
531234497/this-farmer-wants-to-give-animals-a-better-life-and-death

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

lambing season        UK

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/gallery/2011/apr/03/
lambing-season-begins

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

livestock markets

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

live-animal markets        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/05/25/nyregion/
25slaughter.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Calving Season: Life and Death On a Montana Cattle Ranch        NYT        17 August 2018

 

 

 

 

Calving Season: Life and Death On a Montana Cattle Ranch        Video        Op-Docs        The New York Times        17 august 2018

 

“Calving Season” is Nathan Reich’s

beautiful portrait of life on a family cattle ranch.

 

It’s a quietly intimate story that rewards close attention

— and the film unfolds with a patient focus

that mimics that of its main character:

a teenage girl tasked with helping calves into the world

during a snowy Montana spring.

 

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=_wRsGNgvuao

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

cattle

 

 

 

 

cattle theft        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2015/08/25/434605993/
an-old-crime-is-on-the-rise-cattle-theft

 

 

 

 

ranch

 

 

 

 

cattle ranchers        USA

http://www.npr.org/2015/06/09/
412236562/texas-cattle-ranchers-whipsawed-between-drought-and-deluge

 

 

 

 

raise cattle        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/31/
opinion/sunday/nicholas-kristof-our-water-guzzling-food-factory.html

 

 

 

 

raise cows        USA

 

 

 

 

herd

 

 

 

 

herd of cattle

 

 

 

 

a 400-strong herd

 

 

 

 

sheep        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/uk/2007/sep/18/
footandmouth.immigrationpolicy1 

 

 

 

 

calf / calves

 

 

 

 

calving season        USA

https://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=_wRsGNgvuao - NYT - 17 August 2018

 

 

 

 

pig

 

 

 

 

piglets        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/news/gallery/2020/apr/16/
cardboard-crowd-wuhan-wedding-thursdays-best-photos

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

cow

 

 

 

 

mad cow disease        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/25/
health/case-of-mad-cow-disease-is-found-in-us.html

 

 

 

 

brain

 

 

 

 

spinal tissue

 

 

 

 

infected

 

 

 

 

cull        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2012/sep/16/
badger-cull-government-go-ahead

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2007/aug/07/
footandmouth.immigrationpolicy

 

 

 

 

quarantine

 

 

 

 

disease

 

 

 

 

contract the disease        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/uk/2007/sep/25/
footandmouth 

 

 

 

 

bluetongue        UK        2007

http://www.theguardian.com/uk/2007/sep/30/ruralaffairs.jorevill 

http://www.theguardian.com/uk/2007/sep/29/ruralaffairs.uknews4 

http://www.theguardian.com/uk/2007/sep/28/footandmouth.ruralaffairs 

http://www.theguardian.com/uk/2007/sep/26/ruralaffairs.davidadam1 

http://www.theguardian.com/uk/2007/sep/25/footandmouth 

 

 

 

 

first case of bluetongue disease in Britain        2007

 

 

 

 

foot and mouth        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/uk/footandmouth 

 

 

 

 

foot and mouth virus        UK        2007

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2007/aug/07/footandmouth.immigrationpolicy 

https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2007/sep/13/
footandmouth.jamessturcke 

 

 

 

 

foot and mouth disease        UK        2007

https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2007/nov/22/
footandmouth.haroonsiddique 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/footandmouth/story/0,,2172558,00.html

http://www.guardian.co.uk/footandmouth/story/0,,2171879,00.html

http://www.guardian.co.uk/footandmouth/story/0,,2169834,00.html
http://www.guardian.co.uk/footandmouth/story/0,,2169297,00.html

http://commentisfree.guardian.co.uk/simon_jenkins/2007/09/an_immoral_panic.html

http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/gallery/2007/sep/13/footandmouth?picture=330733694

http://www.guardian.co.uk/footandmouth/story/0,,2168069,00.html

http://www.guardian.co.uk/footandmouth/story/0,,2168069,00.html

https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2007/sep/12/footandmouth.matthewweaver

 

 

 

 

The Guardian > Special report > Foot and mouth disease        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/uk/footandmouth 

 

 

 

foot and mouth outbreak        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/uk/2007/sep/15/
footandmouth.patrickwintour

 

 

 

 

vet        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/uk/2007/sep/15/
footandmouth.patrickwintour 

 

 

 

 

foot and mouth epidemic        UK        2001

https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2007/sep/15/footandmouth.patrickwintour

 

 

 

 

foot and mouth        UK        1967

https://www.theguardian.com/uk/1967/nov/28/footandmouth

https://www.theguardian.com/uk/1967/nov/18/footandmouth 

https://www.theguardian.com/uk/1967/nov/16/footandmouth 

 

 

 

 

Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs    Defra

https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/
department-for-environment-food-rural-affairs 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

pork        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/blogs/goatsandsoda/2015/03/20/
394064680/for-the-love-of-pork-antibiotic-use-on-farms-skyrockets-worldwide

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

pork / hog producers > Smithfield Farms

manure ponds > methane - powerful greenhouse gas    USA

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2018/10/29/
661064123/worlds-biggest-pork-producer-pledges-to-cover-manure-ponds

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 About 7,000 turkeys

in one of the barns at the Moline family farm.

 

Photograph:

Damon Casarez for The New York Times

 

The Looming Threat of Avian Flu

 

Last year’s outbreak

showed just how difficult it is to protect America’s

agricultural system from devastating diseases.

 

Next time it could be even worse.

NYT

APRIL 13, 2016

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/04/17/
magazine/the-looming-threat-of-avian-flu.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

U.S. poultry        USA

https://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/27/
business/global/27yuan.html

 

 

 

 

poultry industry        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/09/10/
549586646/big-chicken-the-medical-mystery-that-traced-back-to-slaughterhouse-workers

 

 

 

 

poultry cull        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2007/nov/14/
birdflu.world

 

 

 

 

Christmas poultry

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/dec/22/
looking-forward-vegan-christmas-turkey-meat-environmental-impact

 

 

 

 

farmland bird        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2007/oct/19/
conservation1

 

 

 

 

bird flu / avian flu / avian influenza        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/world/bird-flu 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2007/nov/19/birdflu.uk 

https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2007/nov/14/birdflu.world 

https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2007/nov/13/birdflu.world   

https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2007/nov/12/birdflu.world 

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2007/feb/05/theissuesexplained.health 

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2007/feb/12/health.birdflu 

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2007/feb/03/infectiousdiseases.birdflu  

 

 

 

 

bird / avian flu        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/04/17/
magazine/the-looming-threat-of-avian-flu.html

 

http://www.npr.org/2015/05/31/
410924073/secretary-of-agriculture-bird-flu-poses-no-health-issue-to-humans

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/22/
business/food-companies-fear-avian-flu-may-cause-egg-shortages.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

turkey        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/dec/22/
looking-forward-vegan-christmas-turkey-meat-environmental-impact

 

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2007/nov/14/
birdflu.uk 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

food tycoon > Donald John Tyson        USA        1930-2010

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/07/
business/07tyson.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

turkey tycoon > Bernard Matthews        UK

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2010/nov/26/
bernard-matthews-turkey-tycoon-dies

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2010/nov/26/
bernard-matthews-timeline

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA > Thanskgiving > turkeys        USA

 

https://www.npr.org/2020/11/21/
936697911/small-turkeys-are-in-demand-as-americans-downsize-at-thanksgiving

 

https://www.npr.org/2020/11/13/
934762663/turkey-business

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

hens        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/video/2018/apr/16/
how-half-a-million-hens-were-saved-from-battery-farm-hell-video

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

chicken        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/11/02/
561584723/big-chicken-connects-poultry-farming-to-antibiotic-resistant-bacteria

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2015/09/10/
438934607/the-latest-scramble-in-the-egg-industry-mcdonalds-is-going-cage-free

http://www.npr.org/blogs/goatsandsoda/2015/03/20/
394064680/for-the-love-of-pork-antibiotic-use-on-farms-skyrockets-worldwide

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

chicken industry / chicken factory / poultry plant        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/business/series/
undercover-in-the-chicken-industry

 

https://www.theguardian.com/business/2017/nov/03/
chicken-safety-scandal-2-sisters-factory-to-resume-production

https://www.theguardian.com/business/2017/sep/28/
blood-sweat-deceit-west-midlands-poultry-plant

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

chicken farm        UK

 

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/may/19/
chicken-welfare-human-health-meat

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

chicken farm        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/15/
business/global/15trade.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

chicken production        USA

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/10/22/
659561091/costco-builds-nebraska-supply-chain-for-its-5-rotisserie-chickens

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

rotisserie chicken        USA

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/10/22/
659561091/costco-builds-nebraska-supply-chain-for-its-5-rotisserie-chickens

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

process more than 2 million chickens per week        USA

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/10/22/
659561091/costco-builds-nebraska-supply-chain-for-its-5-rotisserie-chickens

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

cage        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2015/09/10/
438934607/the-latest-scramble-in-the-egg-industry-mcdonalds-is-going-cage-free

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

egg farmers        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2015/09/10/
438934607/the-latest-scramble-in-the-egg-industry-mcdonalds-is-going-cage-free

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The world’s first ever no-kill eggs

are now on sale in Berlin

after German scientists found an easy way

to determine a chick’s gender before it hatches,

in a breakthrough that could put

an end to the annual live shredding

of billions of male chicks worldwide.         UK        2018

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/dec/22/
worlds-first-no-kill-eggs-go-on-sale-in-berlin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

bird flu        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2015/04/20/us/
ap-us-bird-flu.html - broken URL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

broiler chicken

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

chicken breeding method

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

rabbit battery farms        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2011/apr/29/
rabbit-battery-farms-could-return

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Smithfield Foods plant in 2017.

 

“Slaughterhouses are a critical bottleneck in the system,”

a professor who studies supply chains said.

 

Photograph: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg

 

The Food Chain’s Weakest Link: Slaughterhouses

A relatively small number of plants

process much of the beef and pork in the United States,

and some of them have closed because workers are getting sick.

NYT

April 18, 2020

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/18/
business/coronavirus-meat-slaughterhouses.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

abattoir        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2021/may/01/
how-to-love-animals-by-henry-mance-review-the-case-against-modern-farming

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/jan/19/
horse-abbatoir-investigated-abuse

 

http://www.theguardian.com/uk/2007/sep/15/
footandmouth.patrickwintour

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

slaughter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

slaughter        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/video/2018/apr/16/
how-half-a-million-hens-were-saved-from-battery-farm-hell-video

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA > slaughter        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/gallery/2017/aug/04/
animal-activists-vegan-protest-los-angeles

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

slaughter        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/06/05/
531234497/this-farmer-wants-to-give-animals-a-better-life-and-death

 

http://www.humanesociety.org/news/resources/research/
stats_slaughter_totals.html 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

chickens > be slaughtered / be scalded alive        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/04/17/
opinion/sunday/animal-cruelty-or-the-price-of-dinner.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

horse slaughter        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/01/
business/usda-may-approve-horse-slaughter-plant.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

slaughterhouse        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/video/2021/oct/26/
this-is-a-place-of-death-the-fight-for-a-meat-free-world-video

 

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2020/may/19/
its-time-to-get-used-to-eating-less-meat

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/aug/11/
all-slaughterhouses-in-england-to-have-compulsory-cctv

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

slaughterhouse        USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/18/
business/coronavirus-meat-slaughterhouses.html

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/06/05/
531234497/this-farmer-wants-to-give-animals-a-better-life-and-death

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/13.7/2016/02/04/
465530255/a-virtual-view-of-a-slaughterhouse

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2015/12/03/
458314767/how-chicago-s-slaughterhouse-spectacles-paved-the-way-for-big-meat

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/05/25/nyregion/
25slaughter.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

poultry slaughterhouse        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/15/
opinion/sunday/nicholas-kristof-to-kill-a-chicken.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

slaughtermen        UK

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/jan/19/
horse-abbatoir-investigated-abuse

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Guardian        p. 28        9 October 2004

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

animals        USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/13/
opinion/animal-cruelty-coronavirus.html

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/13.7/2016/08/26/
491351265/inconsistency-of-human-animal-relationships-on-display

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

animals farmed        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/series/
animals-farmed

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/jan/20/
hidden-lives-the-animals-behind-the-products-we-consume-photo-essay

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

animals > abuse and cruelty > laws        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/06/02/
531283235/in-a-first-connecticuts-animals-get-advocates-in-the-courtroom

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

animal abuse        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/2016/01/16/
463094761/along-with-assault-and-arson-fbi-starts-to-track-animal-abuse

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

animal cruelty        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/04/17/
opinion/sunday/animal-cruelty-or-the-price-of-dinner.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

animal welfare        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/animal-welfare

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/series/animals-farmed

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/jan/20/
hidden-lives-the-animals-behind-the-products-we-consume-photo-essay

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/jun/27/
gestation-crates-farming-cheap-bacon-how-shops-and-shoppers-let-down-our-pigs

 

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/may/19/
chicken-welfare-human-health-meat

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2011/apr/29/
rabbit-battery-farms-could-return

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

animal welfare        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/2017/05/21/
528982484/ringling-bros-curtain-call-is-latest-victory-for-animal-welfare-activists

 

 

 

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2015/09/10/
438934607/the-latest-scramble-in-the-egg-industry-mcdonalds-is-going-cage-free

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/20/dining/
animal-welfare-at-risk-in-experiments-for-meat-industry.htm
l

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

animal welfare activists        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/2017/05/21/
528982484/ringling-bros-curtain-call-is-latest-victory-for-animal-welfare-activists

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

animal rights groups        UK

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2010/sep/13/
lady-gaga-meat-dress-vmas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

animal rights        UK

 

http://www.theguardian.com/uk/2004/jul/27/
animalwelfare.comment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

animal rights activist / campaigner        UK

 

http://www.theguardian.com/business/2006/may/10/
animalrights.highereducation 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/uk/2005/apr/30/
businessofresearch.animalwelfare 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

animal rights extremists        UK

 

http://www.theguardian.com/uk/2007/may/01/
animalwelfare.world

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

animal rights letter bomb        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/fromthearchive/
story/0,12269,1362801,00.html - 1 December 1982

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

animal testing        UK

 

http://www.theguardian.com/science/2006/jul/23/
businessofresearch.research 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

animal experiments        UK

 

http://www.theguardian.com/uk/2005/may/25/
animalwelfare.highereducation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

live trade

ban on the transport of live animals for use in experiments        UK

 

http://www.theguardian.com/business/2005/may/28/
theairlineindustry.science

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

animal rights group        USA

 

http://goryfoodservice.com/ 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/15/
opinion/sunday/nicholas-kristof-to-kill-a-chicken.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

animal welfare group > Compassion in world farming

 

https://www.ciwf.org.uk/ 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

animal welfare campaigner

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

international farm animal welfare group

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals    PETA        UK

 

https://www.peta.org/ 

 

http://www.youtube.com/user/PETAEurope

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2010/oct/28/
peta-women-meat

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2010/oct/22/
pamela-anderson-poster-peta-vegetarianism

 

 

 

 

animal rights group Peta's most shocking campaigns        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009/may/28/
dan-mathews-peta-campaigner

 

 

 

 

Peta's animal rights protests        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/gallery/2009/may/28/
peta-animal-rights-protests?picture=348057605

 

 

 

 

Humane Society of the United States    USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/23/us/
john-a-hoyt-dies-guided-humane-society-to-prominence.html

 

 

 

 

animal transport

 

 

 

 

animal experiment laboratory        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2004/jul/20/health

 

 

 

 

animal suffering        USA

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/08/10/
how-similar-are-human-and-animal-suffering/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Guardian > Foot-and-mouth disease        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/uk/footandmouth 

 

 

 

 

outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease

 

 

 

 

veterinary surgeon

 

 

 

 

destroy

 

 

 

 

mass cull

 

 

 

 

culling

 

 

 

 

rural affairs minister

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

bovine tuberculosis / TB

http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2009/06/02/us/
AP-US-Farm-Scene-Bovine-TB.html

 

 

 

 

be quarantined

http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2009/06/02/us/
AP-US-Farm-Scene-Bovine-TB.html - broken URL

 

 

 

 

E. coli bacteria        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/04/business/04vaccine.html

 

 

 

 

salmonella        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/22/
business/22eggs.html
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

horse

 

 

 

 

horseman        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/27/us/
in-west-tex-blast-wrangler-died-trying-to-save-horses.html

 

 

 

 

horse abattoir        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/jan/19/
horse-abbatoir-investigated-abuse

 

 

 

 

horsemeat scandal        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/uk/horsemeat-scandal

 

http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2013/oct/22/
horsemeat-scandal-guardian-investigation-public-secrecy

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk-news/2013/jul/16/
horsemeat-scandal-mps-food-standards-agency

 

 

 

 

horsemeat        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/20/us/
20mustangs.html

 

 

 

 

herd        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/20/us/
20mustangs.html

 

 

 

 

mane

 

 

 

 

tail

 

 

 

 

corral        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/20/us/
20mustangs.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

fish        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/15/
opinion/15hilborn.html

 

 

 

 

fish stocks        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/15/
opinion/15hilborn.html

 

 

 

 

fisheries        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/21/
opinion/l21fish.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/15/
opinion/15hilborn.html

 

 

 

 

The Atlantic bluefin tuna        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/15/
opinion/15hilborn.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meat Makes the Planet Thirsty

 

MARCH 7, 2014

The New York Times

The Opinion Pages

Op-Ed Contributor

By JAMES MCWILLIAMS

 

AUSTIN, Tex. — CALIFORNIA is experiencing one of its worst droughts on record. Just two and a half years ago, Folsom Lake, a major reservoir outside Sacramento, was at 83 percent capacity. Today it’s down to 36 percent. In January, there was no measurable rain in downtown Los Angeles. Gov. Jerry Brown has declared a state of emergency. President Obama has pledged $183 million in emergency funding. The situation, despite last week’s deluge in Southern California, is dire.

With California producing nearly half of the fruit and vegetables grown in the United States, attention has naturally focused on the water required to grow popular foods such as walnuts, broccoli, lettuce, tomatoes, strawberries, almonds and grapes. These crops are the ones that a recent report in the magazine Mother Jones highlighted as being unexpectedly water intensive. Who knew, for example, that it took 5.4 gallons to produce a head of broccoli, or 3.3 gallons to grow a single tomato? This information about the water footprint of food products — that is, the amount of water required to produce them — is important to understand, especially for a state that dedicates about 80 percent of its water to agriculture.

But for those truly interested in lowering their water footprint, those numbers pale next to the water required to fatten livestock. A 2012 study in the journal Ecosystems by Mesfin M. Mekonnen and Arjen Y. Hoekstra, both at the University of Twente in the Netherlands, tells an important story. Beef turns out to have an overall water footprint of roughly four million gallons per ton produced. By contrast, the water footprint for “sugar crops” like sugar beets is about 52,000 gallons per ton; for vegetables it’s 85,000 gallons per ton; and for starchy roots it’s about 102,200 gallons per ton.

Factor in the kind of water required to produce these foods, and the water situation looks even worse for the future of animal agriculture in drought-stricken regions that use what’s known as “blue water,” or water stored in lakes, rivers and aquifers, which California and much of the West depend on.

Vegetables use about 11,300 gallons per ton of blue water; starchy roots, about 4,200 gallons per ton; and fruit, about 38,800 gallons per ton. By comparison, pork consumes 121,000 gallons of blue water per ton of meat produced; beef, about 145,000 gallons per ton; and butter, some 122,800 gallons per ton. There’s a reason other than the drought that Folsom Lake has dropped as precipitously as it has. Don’t look at kale as the culprit. (Although some nuts, namely almonds, consume considerable blue water, even more than beef.) That said, a single plant is leading California’s water consumption.

Unfortunately, it’s a plant that’s not generally cultivated for humans: alfalfa. Grown on over a million acres in California, alfalfa sucks up more water than any other crop in the state. And it has one primary destination: cattle. Increasingly popular grass-fed beef operations typically rely on alfalfa as a supplement to pasture grass. Alfalfa hay is also an integral feed source for factory-farmed cows, especially those involved in dairy production.

If Californians were eating all the beef they produced, one might write off alfalfa’s water footprint as the cost of nurturing local food systems. But that’s not what’s happening. Californians are sending their alfalfa, and thus their water, to Asia. The reason is simple. It’s more profitable to ship alfalfa hay from California to China than from the Imperial Valley to the Central Valley. Alfalfa growers are now exporting some 100 billion gallons of water a year from this drought-ridden region to the other side of the world in the form of alfalfa. All as more Asians are embracing the American-style, meat-hungry diet.

Further intensifying this ecological injustice are incidents such as the Rancho Feeding Corporation’s recent recall of 8.7 million pounds of beef because the meat lacked a full federal inspection. That equals 631.6 million gallons of water wasted by an industry with a far more complex and resource-intensive supply chain than the systems that move strawberries from farm to fork.

This comparison isn’t to suggest that produce isn’t occasionally recalled, but the Rancho incident reminds us that plants aren’t slaughtered, a process that demands 132 gallons of water per animal carcass, contributing even more to livestock’s expanding water footprint.

It’s understandable for concerned consumers to feel helpless in the face of these complex industrial and global realities. But in the case of agriculture and drought, there’s a clear and accessible action most citizens can take: reducing or, ideally, eliminating the consumption of animal products. Changing one’s diet to replace 50 percent of animal products with edible plants like legumes, nuts and tubers results in a 30 percent reduction in an individual’s food-related water footprint. Going vegetarian, a better option in many respects, reduces that water footprint by almost 60 percent.

It’s seductive to think that we can continue along our carnivorous route, even in this era of climate instability. The environmental impact of cattle in California, however, reminds us how mistaken this idea is coming to seem.

 

James McWilliams is a professor of history

at Texas State University and the author, most recently,

of “The Politics of the Pasture: How Two Cattle Inspired

a National Debate About Eating Animals .”

A version of this op-ed appears in print

on March 8, 2014, on page A19

of the New York edition with the headline:

Meat Makes the Planet Thirsty.

Meat Makes the Planet Thirsty,
NYT,
7.3.2014,
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/08/
opinion/meat-makes-the-planet-thirsty.html

 

 

 

 

 

John A. Hoyt,

Champion for Animals,

Is Dead at 80

 

April 22, 2012

The New York Times

By PAUL VITELLO

 

John A. Hoyt, who made the Humane Society of the United States the largest anticruelty organization in the country during an era when changing cultural attitudes were greatly expanding the number of animal protection groups, died on April 15 in Fredericksburg, Va. He was 80.

The cause was progressive supranuclear palsy, a rare brain disorder, said his daughter Peggy Hoyt.

Mr. Hoyt, who was president and chief executive of the Humane Society from 1970 to 1996, was best known for expanding its traditional stewardship over dogs and cats to include laboratory animals, livestock, wild horses, whales, endangered fish and rodeo bulls.

The society’s expanded agenda reflected both cultural sensitivity and public relations savvy in a period when environmentalism and the animal liberation and natural food movements were emerging, said Bernard Unti, a historian of the Humane Society. The new movements were expanding public consciousness, but also competing for contributions.

“It was a rapidly changing landscape,” Mr. Unti said, “and John made sure that the society blossomed while continuing to be itself.”

Mr. Hoyt also established the Humane Society as one of Washington’s most sophisticated lobbying operations. He began campaigns to save porpoises and baby seals. He worked against fur trapping, sport hunting, roadside zoos, cockfighting and bullfighting, and fought to end unnecessarily painful lab experiments on rats, mice and chimpanzees.

The suffering of livestock became a major focus of Humane Society lobbying in the mid-1970s, soon after Mr. Hoyt met Temple Grandin, the animal behaviorist, who was then developing a stress-reducing corral for young cattle being slaughtered for veal.

The Humane Society financed research for a prototype of her famous double-rail restrainer system. “That system is in use in half the slaughterhouses in the country, and it probably would not have existed if not for John Hoyt,” she said in an interview Friday. “He took the practical approach — ‘If we’re gonna eat meat, well, let’s make sure the animals don’t suffer needlessly.’ ”

Mr. Hoyt was also an early proponent of laws against organized dogfighting. Lobbying efforts by the Humane Society beginning in the 1980s were instrumental in persuading 40 states to adopt laws making deliberate animal cruelty a felony rather than a misdemeanor. Those laws were considered instrumental in the passage of the 2007 Virginia law under which Michael Vick, the N.F.L. quarterback, was prosecuted for dogfighting.

By its own accounting, the Humane Society grew to over 5 million members during Mr. Hoyt’s tenure from 100,000. Its annual budget, which was under $1 million when he became president in 1970, had grown to about $50 million by the time he retired.

When confrontational animal rights organizations like People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals emerged in the 1980s — criticizing organizations like the Humane Society for being too focused on fund-raising and for not recognizing the inherent equal rights of humans and animals — Mr. Hoyt vigorously defended his group’s approach, which he described as “pragmatic idealism.”

He dismissed staff members he considered too sympathetic to the animal liberation movement, and in a speech at the society’s 1988 annual conference refused to accept “censure for our willingness to accept compromise” or for the society’s “organizational growth and financial success.”

John Arthur Hoyt was born March 30, 1932, in Marietta, Ohio, one of six children of Claremont and Margaret Hoyt. His father was an itinerant Baptist minister. Mr. Hoyt was ordained a Baptist minister, too, after graduating in 1957 from what is now Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School in Rochester.

He was serving as senior minister of the First Presbyterian Church in Fort Wayne, Ind., when he was recruited as president of the Humane Society by a friend who was a board member and an executive in the American Bible Society.

At the time, he told his family it was “like leaving one church for another.”

Mr. Hoyt’s survivors include his wife, Gertrude, and four daughters. Besides Peggy, they are Karen Willcox, Anne Williams and Julie Dorman. He is also survived by a brother, David, and four sisters, Carolyn Harman, Josephine Bero, Mary Griffes and Margaret Nasemann.

The Humane Society was established in 1954 as a result of a schism within the American Humane Association, which was established in 1877 as a loose national federation, based in Denver, of animal rescue groups. While the leaders of the Humane Association were committed to remaining decentralized, the dissidents who founded the Humane Society believed that the cause required a national focus, federal legislation and a headquarters in Washington.

During his tenure, Mr. Hoyt commuted to the society’s L Street townhouse headquarters from a small farm in Fredericksburg, where he lived with his family and the many dogs, cats, horses and other animals that he and his daughters brought home on a regular basis, Peggy Hoyt said.

Though he had no training in animal welfare when he began the job, Mr. Hoyt told interviewers that he had always loved animals, mainly because of the influence of his grandmother, a vegetarian who lived to be 106. “My grandmother had 40 pet sheep,” he once said, “and each one had a name.”

John A. Hoyt, Champion for Animals, Is Dead at 80, NYT, 22.4.2012,
https://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/23/
us/john-a-hoyt-dies-guided-humane-society-to-prominence.html

 

 

 

 

Vt. Slaughterhouse Closed

for Inhumane Treatment

 

November 3, 2009

Filed at 4:31 a.m. ET

The New York Times

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

 

MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) -- A Vermont slaughterhouse ordered closed Friday after video showed calves kicked, shocked and cut while conscious had its operating license suspended three times earlier this year for similar conduct.

U.S. Department of Agriculture records show Bushway Packing Inc. of Grand Isle was shut down for a day in May, again in June and again in July after an inspector cited it for inhumane treatment of animals.

The revelation came Monday as the Humane Society of the United States released more video footage taken with a hidden camera this summer. The video shows days-old male calves culled from dairy herds being dragged, kicked, repeatedly shocked with electric prods and apparently cut while still conscious.

''We found even two calves who appeared to be skinned alive while they were still conscious,'' said Michael Markarian, the Humane Society's chief operating officer.

The video also appeared to back up a Friday statement in which U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack described the conduct of a USDA inspector at the slaughterhouse as ''inexcusable.''

It showed an unidentified inspector appearing to coach a plant worker on how to avoid being shut down by another inspector and failing to stop an animal being cut while awake.

A call to the slaughterhouse on Monday was not immediately returned, nor was a call to a Ronald Bushway listed in Grand Isle.

USDA spokesman Caleb Weaver said Monday he could not comment on the inspector's conduct because it was a personnel matter.

Markarian said it appeared several calves were abused because they would not or could not stand up to be prepared for slaughter. The slaughterhouse specialized in ''bob veal'' -- meat from days-old calves that ends up in hot dogs and lunch meats. Meat sold as veal usually come from animals raised to about 4 months old.

Some in the Vermont dairy industry said they worried the revelations would give an enterprise generally viewed as wholesome a black eye. Bushway Packing was certified as an organic processor, raising extra concern in that sector.

''That's not right, that's really nasty,'' said Paul Stecker, an organic dairy farmer from Cabot, after watching the video on the Humane Society's Web site. ''I wouldn't be in this business if that's the way it was. That's not the norm, I can tell you that.''

Stecker said the slaughterhouse's problems also would bring attention to an aspect of dairying most farmers don't like or talk about much: The vast majority of male calves born on dairy farms face very short lives.

''That kind of thing hurts us all, like our industry really needed that,'' he said.

Dairy farmers nationwide have been struggling as a global milk glut has resulted in dramatically lower prices for their milk.

The Humane Society said it would propose tighter rules for the meatpacking and related industries, including a requirement that male calves born on dairy farms be kept there until they are 10 days old to ensure they are strong enough to travel.

Kelly Loftus, a spokeswoman for the state Agency of Agriculture, said she expected there would be strong opposition to such a measure.

''There are labor costs involved. There are feeding costs involved,'' she said. With the current crisis in dairy farming, ''any extra expense could mean that a farm has to close.''

Nicole Dehne of Vermont Organic Farmers, a group that certifies Vermont farms as organic under an agreement with the USDA, said the group's national counterpart is meeting in Washington this week and will discuss humane treatment of farm animals.

Organic rules now are geared mainly toward ensuring meat labeled organic comes from animals raised without hormones or chemicals.

''I think consumers expect organic regulations to cover all aspects of animal welfare, including slaughter and transportation,'' Dehne said. ''If we need to tighten the regulations in regard to processing facilities, and come up with guidelines to address more humane transportation, I think we would respond to the expectations of the organic consumer.''

------

Humane Society of the United States: http://www.hsus.org/

Vt. Slaughterhouse Closed for Inhumane Treatment,
NYT,
3.11.2009,
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2009/11/03/us/
AP-US-Farm-Scene-Slaughterhouse-Closed.html

 

 

 

 

 

China to Resume

Imports of U.S. Pork

 

October 29, 2009

Filed at 6:14 a.m. ET

The New York Times

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

 

HANGZHOU, China (AP) -- Chinese officials said Thursday that Beijing will lift a ban on imports of U.S. pork that was imposed last spring due to swine flu fears.

China's agriculture minister and commerce minister, speaking after a day of trade talks with U.S. officials, emphasized that the decision was based on scientific analysis.

"Since this is a new disease, it takes time to understand it," said China's agriculture minister, Sun Zhengcai.

"This decision was based on scientific analysis and assessment," he told reporters.

"It is my hope the U.S. side will follow the Chinese requirements to safely resume export of pork products to China," Sun said.

The ban has cost the U.S. hog industry millions of dollars every week. It had continued despite insistence by international health officials that pork is safe and the country's hogs are not to blame for the epidemic.

China to Resume Imports of U.S. Pork, NYT, 29.10.2009,
http://www.nytimes.com/
aponline/2009/10/29/business/AP-AS-China-US-Pork.html  - broken link

 

 

 

 

 

Meeting, Then Eating, the Goat

 

May 25, 2009
The New York Times
By ANNE BARNARD

 

From the street, the shop could be mistaken for a bodega, but its red-and-yellow awning advertises live poultry, goats, lamb and beef. Scores of chickens flutter in cages. A dozen placid goats stare from a pen at customers from Bangladesh, Trinidad and Colombia. A worker slices the throats of Rhode Island Reds, uttering a prayer each time, according to the rites of Islam.

A block away from this tiny slaughterhouse, Jamaica Archer Live Poultry, which is housed in a former auto-body shop, commuters and students pour from buses and subways into the commercial hub of Jamaica, Queens, where tourists catch the train to Kennedy Airport. A few blocks the other way stand rows of frame houses and postage-stamp yards that make Jamaica look like any blue-collar American suburb.

In the Jamaica shop, where custom-slaughtered beef is sold for $3.50 a pound, there is not much mention of the “locavore” movement, which prizes eating locally grown food and knowing how it is produced, and whose Greenwich Village mecca, Blue Hill restaurant, serves a plate of grass-fed lamb and fiddlehead ferns for $36.

Yet the shop’s owner, Muhammad Ali, is part of a growing immigrant-driven market that has taken root in cities but is reviving a practice dating back to America’s agrarian past: seeing the live animal that will soon become your meal.

“I like to see it fresh and choose what I want,” said Mitchella Christian, a native of Trinidad who was visiting L. Alladin, a nearby competitor of Mr. Ali’s market, to buy a lamb and three chickens.

The lucky cow that escaped another slaughterhouse in Jamaica this month was only the tip of the horn. There are about 90 live-poultry markets in the metropolitan area. That number has doubled since the mid-1990s, state officials say, because of the demands of immigrants from countries where eyeballing your meat while it is alive is considered common sense. About a quarter of the markets are also licensed to slaughter larger livestock.

New York has probably the country’s highest concentration of live-animal markets, though there are pockets in New Jersey, New England, Philadelphia, California and the Midwest, said Susan Trock, a veterinarian who manages poultry health inspections for the State Department of Agriculture and Markets.

Tom Mylan, who carves up cows in front of customers at Marlow & Daughters, a butcher shop and locavore’s temple in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, said he lived near three live-animal markets, two run by Hasidic Jews and one by Latin Americans. Although they may not share his obsession with animal welfare and organic feed, he said, he views them as allies against the mass-market industry he calls “big meat.”

What he teaches his gourmet followers, he said, is what the working-class live-market customers have never forgotten: “To eat meat, you have to kill — something that we got pulled out of during the last 50 years in America,” he said. “We’re used to going into the grocery store and there’s not even a butcher counter, just a bunch of foam trays with a lot of anonymous blobs of meat in them.”

Perhaps inevitably, when it comes to killing animals for food, immigrant Queens clashes with suburban-homeowning Queens: Some of the people who worry about factory-produced meat are unenthusiastic about having mom-and-pop abattoirs next door.

Last year, residents of St. Albans, Queens, blocked a small slaughterhouse from opening on Farmers Boulevard. One resident, Marie Wilkerson, told The New York Times that she feared its stink would ruin backyard barbecues. Their state legislators pushed through a law barring new slaughterhouses within 1,500 feet of a residence for four years, effectively freezing the expansion of slaughterhouses in most of the city.

Complaints about slaughterhouses often fall among local, federal and state regulators, said City Councilman Peter F. Vallone Jr. of Astoria, Queens, where a fleeing cow made headlines in 2000. “It’s a complete maze,” he said.

The rules are so confusing that officials at the Food Safety and Inspection Service of the United States Department of Agriculture initially told a reporter that their agency had nothing to do with live-animal markets.

But while retail poultry markets fall under state jurisdiction, if they sell goats, sheep or cows, the federal agency steps in.

There is inevitable potential for friction between the businesses’ traditional values and the public-health priorities of the regulating agencies. Some market owners fear, apparently erroneously, that rules could interfere with religious rites. Others, when they dress a cow or a goat for a family to share on holidays, can run afoul of federal regulations requiring each animal to be custom-slaughtered for a specific buyer.

More-established market owners say that some new businesses skirt the rules or do not understand them.

Mr. Mylan, the Williamsburg shop owner, blames a big meat lobby that wants regulations that favor companies that kill thousands of animals a day. State and federal officials say they want the smaller businesses to thrive and are reaching out to help them comply.

Mr. Ali, meanwhile, says he is performing a much-needed service. Some come for the halal meat, killed according to Islam. (He weighs his goats on a scale built for pigs, an animal that Islam proscribes as food. A pig decoration on the scale had been scratched out.) But customers also want to see that the animals, usually trucked from no farther than Pennsylvania, are healthy.

“I want to see it with my own eyes,” said Shamsul Rahman, 65, who is originally from Bangladesh and was buying 11 chickens.

After each chicken’s throat was cut, the bird was placed upside down for the blood to drain. Then it was scalded and thrown into a machine that plucked its feathers with rubber mechanical fingers.

Nearby, an energetic goat placed its hooves on an iron rail and craned its neck toward a photographer like a supermodel flirting with the camera.

“He wants to make a connection with you,” Mr. Ali said.

A few blocks away, F & D Live Poultry stands opposite the ultimate urban spot: the scene of the 50-shot killing of Sean Bell by police officers in 2006.

Inside the shop, Edelsa Angel, 27, who grew up on a Guatemalan farm, had brought her small son in his stroller. He watched with equanimity as chickens went into the killing room flapping and came out in plastic bags.

The owner, Joey Rosario, said the shop, just feet from a house, had been there for 100 years. But he is open to change: He plans to hire a halal slaughterer to keep up his market share as Muslims move in.

“I’m already talking to a guy,” he said.

Meeting, Then Eating, the Goat, NYT, 25.5.2009,
https://www.nytimes.com/2009/05/25/
nyregion/25slaughter.html 

 

 

 

 

 

As More Eat Meat,

a Bid to Cut Emissions

 

December 4, 2008
The New York Times
By ELISABETH ROSENTHAL

 

STERKSEL, the Netherlands — The cows and pigs dotting these flat green plains in the southern Netherlands create a bucolic landscape. But looked at through the lens of greenhouse gas accounting, they are living smokestacks, spewing methane emissions into the air.

That is why a group of farmers-turned-environmentalists here at a smelly but impeccably clean research farm have a new take on making a silk purse from a sow’s ear: They cook manure from their 3,000 pigs to capture the methane trapped within it, and then use the gas to make electricity for the local power grid.

Rising in the fields of the environmentally conscious Netherlands, the Sterksel project is a rare example of fledgling efforts to mitigate the heavy emissions from livestock. But much more needs to be done, scientists say, as more and more people are eating more meat around the world.

What to do about farm emissions is one of the main issues being discussed this week and next, as the environment ministers from 187 nations gather in Poznan, Poland, for talks on a new treaty to combat global warming. In releasing its latest figure on emissions last month, United Nations climate officials cited agriculture and transportation as the two sectors that remained most “problematic.”

“It’s an area that’s been largely overlooked,” said Dr. Rajendra Pachauri, head of the Nobel Prize-winning United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. He says people should eat less meat to control their carbon footprints. “We haven’t come to grips with agricultural emissions.”

The trillions of farm animals around the world generate 18 percent of the emissions that are raising global temperatures, according to United Nations estimates, more even than from cars, buses and airplanes.

But unlike other industries, like cement making and power, which are facing enormous political and regulatory pressure to get greener, large-scale farming is just beginning to come under scrutiny as policy makers, farmers and scientists cast about for solutions.

High-tech fixes include those like the project here, called “methane capture,” as well as inventing feed that will make cows belch less methane, which traps heat with 25 times the efficiency of carbon dioxide. California is already working on a program to encourage systems in pig and dairy farms like the one in Sterksel.

Other proposals include everything from persuading consumers to eat less meat to slapping a “sin tax” on pork and beef. Next year, Sweden will start labeling food products so that shoppers can look at how much emission can be attributed to serving steak compared with, say, chicken or turkey.

“Of course for the environment it’s better to eat beans than beef, but if you want to eat beef for New Year’s, you’ll know which beef is best to buy,” said Claes Johansson, chief of sustainability at the Swedish agricultural group Lantmannen.

But such fledgling proposals are part of a daunting game of catch-up. In large developing countries like China, India and Brazil, consumption of red meat has risen 33 percent in the last decade. It is expected to double globally between 2000 and 2050. While the global economic downturn may slow the globe’s appetite for meat momentarily, it is not likely to reverse a profound trend.

Of the more than 2,000 projects supported by the United Nations’ “green” financing system intended to curb emissions, only 98 are in agriculture. There is no standardized green labeling system for meat, as there is for electric appliances and even fish.

Indeed, scientists are still trying to define the practical, low-carbon version of a slab of bacon or a hamburger. Every step of producing meat creates emissions.

Flatus and manure from animals contain not only methane, but also nitrous oxide, an even more potent warming agent. And meat requires energy for refrigeration as it moves from farm to market to home.

Producing meat in this ever-more crowded world requires creating new pastures and planting more land for imported feeds, particularly soy, instead of relying on local grazing. That has contributed to the clearing of rain forests, particularly in South America, robbing the world of crucial “carbon sinks,” the vast tracts of trees and vegetation that absorb carbon dioxide.

“I’m not sure that the system we have for livestock can be sustainable,” said Dr. Pachauri of the United Nations. A sober scientist, he suggests that “the most attractive” near-term solution is for everyone simply to “reduce meat consumption,” a change he says would have more effect than switching to a hybrid car.

The Lancet medical journal and groups like the Food Ethics Council in Britain have supported his suggestion to eat less red meat to control global emissions, noting that Westerners eat more meat than is healthy anyway.

Producing a pound of beef creates 11 times as much greenhouse gas emission as a pound of chicken and 100 times more than a pound of carrots, according to Lantmannen, the Swedish group.

But any suggestion to eat less meat may run into resistance in a world with more carnivores and a booming global livestock industry. Meat producers have taken issue with the United Nations’ estimate of livestock-related emissions, saying the figure is inflated because it includes the deforestation in the Amazon, a phenomenon that the Brazilian producers say might have occurred anyway.

United Nations scientists defend their accounting. With so much demand for meat, “you do slash rain forest,” said Pierre Gerber, a senior official at the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization. Soy cultivation has doubled in Brazil during the past decade, and more than half is used for animal feed.

Laurence Wrixon, executive director of the International Meat Secretariat, said that his members were working with the Food and Agriculture Organization to reduce emissions but that the main problem was fast-rising consumption in developing countries. “So whether you like it or not, there’s going to be rising demand for meat, and our job is to make it as sustainable as possible,” he said.

Estimates of emissions from agriculture as a percentage of all emissions vary widely from country to country, but they are clearly over 50 percent in big agricultural and meat-producing countries like Brazil, Australia and New Zealand.

In the United States, agriculture accounted for just 7.4 percent of greenhouse gas emissions in 2006, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.

The percentage was lower because the United States produces extraordinarily high levels of emissions in other areas, like transportation and landfills, compared with other nations. The figure also did not include fuel burning and land-use changes.

Wealthy, environmentally conscious countries with large livestock sectors — the Netherlands, Denmark, Germany and New Zealand — have started experimenting with solutions.

In Denmark, by law, farmers now inject manure under the soil instead of laying it on top of the fields, a process that enhances its fertilizing effect, reduces odors and also prevents emissions from escaping. By contrast, in many parts of the developing world, manure is left in open pools and lathered on fields.

Others suggest including agriculture emissions in carbon cap-and-trade systems, which currently focus on heavy industries like cement making and power generation. Farms that produce more than their pre-set limit of emissions would have to buy permits from greener colleagues to pollute.

New Zealand recently announced that it would include agriculture in its new emissions trading scheme by 2013. To that end, the government is spending tens of millions of dollars financing research and projects like breeding cows that produce less gas and inventing feed that will make cows belch less methane, said Philip Gurnsey of the Environment Ministry.

At the electricity-from-manure project here in Sterksel, the refuse from thousands of pigs is combined with local waste materials (outdated carrot juice and crumbs from a cookie factory), and pumped into warmed tanks called digesters. There, resident bacteria release the natural gas within, which is burned to generate heat and electricity.

The farm uses 25 percent of the electricity, and the rest is sold to a local power provider. The leftover mineral slurry is an ideal fertilizer that reduces the use of chemical fertilizers, whose production releases a heavy dose of carbon dioxide.

For this farm the scheme has provided a substantial payback: By reducing its emissions, it has been able to sell carbon credits on European markets. It makes money by selling electricity. It gets free fertilizer.

And, in a small country where farmers are required to have manure trucked away, it saves $190,000 annually in disposal fees. John Horrevorts, experiment coordinator, whose family has long raised swine, said that dozens of such farms had been set up in the Netherlands, though cost still makes it impractical for small piggeries. Indeed, one question that troubles green farmers is whether consumers will pay more for their sustainable meat.

“In the U.K., supermarkets are sometimes asking about green, but there’s no global system yet,” said Bent Claudi Lassen, chairman of the Danish Bacon and Meat Council, which supports green production. “We’re worried that other countries not producing in a green way, like Brazil, could undercut us on price.”

As More Eat Meat, a Bid to Cut Emissions, NYT, 4.12.2008,
https://www.nytimes.com/2008/12/04/
science/earth/04meat.html

 

 

 

 

 

Agriculture Futures Trade Higher

 

September 26, 2007
Filed at 11:01 a.m. ET
The New York Times
By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
 

 

CHICAGO (AP) -- Wheat, corn and soybean prices rose Wednesday on the Chicago Board of Trade.

Wheat for December delivery rose 10.75 cents to $8.98 a bushel; December corn rose 2.75 cents to $3.745 a bushel; December oats dipped 1 cent to $2.805 a bushel; November soybeans jumped 16 cents to $9.89 a bushel.

Beef futures rose and pork futures were mixed on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange.

October live cattle rose 0.18 cent to 97.75 cents a pound; October feeder cattle rose 0.23 cent to $1.163 a pound; October lean hogs fell 0.25 cent to 60.75 cents a pound; February pork bellies rose 0.58 cent to 89.3 cents a pound.

Agriculture Futures Trade Higher, NYT, 26.9.2007,
http://www.nytimes.com/
aponline/business/AP-Board-of-Trade.html - broken URL

 

 

 

 

 

Foot and mouth disease rages on

 

July 17 2001

 

The Guardian

 

"You think it's all over? Not a bit of it," says Roy Benson on his farm near Tiverton in Devon. From a window overlooking the valley up which he believes the disease was carried by the wind, he sees only empty farmyards and fields.

Benson is officially Case 1737. The ministry vets came a month ago, the animals were slaughtered after a legal fight and, like farmers on up to 5,000 other premises, he's getting used to life without beasts.

Since just before the election, there have been more than 200 cases. In the last week there have been 12 in Cumbria, 17 in Yorkshire and a handful in Powys. They are taking place quietly, beyond the glare of the media and often without the sympathy of the public.

The total is now more than 4,787,447, with 4,000 more being killed each week. There is now the likelihood that up to 2m lambs born in the past six months around Britain may have to be killed.

As the number of cases declines, and farmers begin to meet again and talk, sometimes for the first time in months of isolation, stories emerge of widespread financial waste, divided communities and the human toll.

Steve Phillips in the village of Knowstone feels raw. With his partner dying of cancer, and his animals at no risk of being infected, he said Maff began to bully him to gain entry to his farm. He said: "They harassed me non-stop. When my partner died I couldn't arrange her funeral for fear that they would come in and kill our animals."

Gordon Wilmott has not recovered from May, when marksmen botched a cull at a nearby farm and began taking potshots with rifles at berserk animals which fled on to his land. In another case, the ministry stopped a cull on a farm, disputing the legality of the slaughter, and then left cattle walking around the yard half full of dead animals for a week. The distress to the elderly farmers was immense.

"It was sustained cruelty," said Matt Knight, who objected to his uninfected animals being culled. His family was isolated for 42 days and kept on tenterhooks over whether his cows would be culled. "They knew the animals were healthy but said they would be coming in, like it or not. What is it in the job description of Maff officers that allows them to treat people so cruelly?"

Maff said: "It is possible people were given little advance notice. Things moved fast. It wasn't pleasant for anyone. We deny any allegations of bullying. People were given four hours to lodge an appeal."

 

John Vidal and Sally James Gregory

Foot and mouth disease rages on,
G,
17.7.2001,
republished 17.7.2007,
p. 30,
http://digital.guardian.co.uk/guardian/2007/07/17/pages/ber30.shtml

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Related > Anglonautes > Vocapedia

 

agriculture / farming, gardening

 

 

Earth,

population growth, resources,

environment, pollution,

nuclear disasters, waste

 

 

weather

 

 

natural disasters

 

 

wildlife

 

 

greenhouse gases, global warming, climate change

 

 

greenhouse gases > Methane

 

 

commodities

 

 

lifestyle > food, cooking, eating, diet,

veganism, vegetarianism

 

 

lifestyle / health > exercise,

smoking / tobacco, vaping,

drinking / alcohol,

diet, obesity

 

 

the poor > food > hunger

 

 

 

 

 

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