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Vocapedia > Health > Genetics > Cells > Cancer > Breast cancer

 

 

 

 

The Waiting Room - a single parent's unflinching account of living with breast cancer        Video        The Guardian        28 June 2019

 

When Victoria Mapplebeck

was diagnosed with breast cancer,

she decided to record each step

of her journey from diagnosis to recovery.

 

Shot on an iPhone X,

Victoria filmed her time in waiting rooms,

surgery and chemotherapy.

 

The Waiting Room

is an unflinching portrait

of the blood, sweat and tears of cancer treatment.

 

Victoria makes visible

the often invisible parts of cancer treatment,

the sickness, the fatigue, the tears and the hair loss.

 

At home she filmed with her teenage son,

as they came to terms with how single parent family life

was transformed by a year of living with cancer.

 

Victoria documents cancer from a patient’s POV,

exploring what we can and what we can’t control

when our bodies fail us.

 

We have made cancer our enemy,

a dark force to be fought by a relentlessly upbeat attitude.

 

The Waiting Room

is the antidote to the ‘tyranny of positive thinking’.

 

It challenges the cultural myths that surround this disease,

putting under the microscope the language of illness.

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Toj9nCf4BaM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Cancer Divide: Mary's Story        NYT        27 December 2013

 

 

 

 

The Cancer Divide: Mary's Story        NYT        27 December 2013

 

Mary Singleton, 57,

learned in July

that she had Stage 4 breast cancer.

 

After the diagnosis her son, George,

moved home to Memphis

to help take care of her

and to help run her printing business.

 

Read the story here: http://nyti.ms/1bglTxb

 

YouTube

http://www.youtube.com/watch?
v=zo1TPCXRdtU&list=PL4CGYNsoW2iDMMRQRGO02ZDfhEiIUxy9G&index=6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Cancer Divide: Jessy's Story        NYT        16 October 2013

 

 

 

 

The Cancer Divide: Jessy's Story | The New York Times               16 October 2013

 

Jessy Acen, 30,

who has advanced breast cancer,

contends with her own poverty

and with Uganda's limited resources

in her fight to stay alive.

 

YouTube

http://www.youtube.com/watch?
v=8Zv0p2veD0Q&list=PL4CGYNsoW2iDMMRQRGO02ZDfhEiIUxy9G&index=10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

tumor        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/06/29/
534882955/tumor-test-helps-identify-which-breast-cancers-dont-require-extra-treatment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

breast cancer > prevention        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2020/oct/26/
almost-half-british-women-do-not-self-examine-breast-cancer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

breast cancer        UK / USA

 

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2021/sep/05/
sarah-harding-singer-with-girls-aloud-dies-aged-39-from-breast-cancer

 

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2021/jan/10/
how-race-to-track-mystery-gene-with-links-to-three-cancers-saved-millions

 

 

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2020/oct/26/
almost-half-british-women-do-not-self-examine-breast-cancer

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2020/10/17/
924589334/my-breast-cancer-diagnosis-came-in-the-pandemic-i-wanted-more-than-a-virtual-hug

 

 

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=Toj9nCf4BaM
- G - 28 June 2019

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2019/02/17/
694918793/not-letting-it-define-us-walking-the-runway-with-metastatic-breast-cancer

 

 

 

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/06/13/
617310207/betty-casts-a-quirky-light-on-life-after-breast-cancer

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/03/
health/breast-cancer-chemo.html

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2018/06/03/
616298863/for-some-breast-cancer-patients-the-chemo-decision-just-got-easier

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2018/02/19/
585249587/she-survived-breast-cancer-but-says-a-treatment-side-effect-almost-killed-her

 

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2018/feb/04/
cancer-mastectomy-losing-breast-joanna-moorhead

 

 

 

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/12/06/
568836583/even-low-dose-contraceptives-slightly-increase-breast-cancer-risk-study-finds

 

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/jul/15/
maryam-mirzakhani-mathematician-dies-40

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/06/29/
534882955/tumor-test-helps-identify-which-breast-cancers-dont-require-extra-treatment

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/01/
well/live/going-flat-after-breast-cancer.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/17/
health/transgender-health-care-breast-cancer.html

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/08/
24/491213713/study-of-breast-cancer-treatment-reveals-paradox-of-precision-medicine

 

http://www.npr.org/2016/07/29/
487671579/for-dad-and-daughter-fighting-breast-cancer-grit-runs-in-the-family

 

 

 

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2015/10/29/
452650557/black-womens-breast-cancer-risk-rises-to-equal-white-womens

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/27/
opinion/sunday/elizabeth-wurtzel-the-breast-cancer-gene-and-me.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/10/us/
carolyn-kaelin-breast-cancer-surgeon-dies-at-54.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/10/
health/lisa-bonchek-adams-dies-at-45-chronicled-fight-with-breast-cancer.html

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/31/
opinion/treatment-choices-for-breast-cancer.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/27/
opinion/sunday/the-wrong-approach-to-breast-cancer.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/20/
opinion/a-cancer-treatment-in-your-medicine-cabinet.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/07/
business/breast-cancer-drug-shows-groundbreaking-results.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/14/
opinion/why-black-women-die-of-cancer.html

 

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/02/24/
when-men-get-breast-cancer/

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/20/
your-money/how-doctors-die.html

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2013/nov/02/
breast-cancer-450-poor-women-die-needlessly

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2013/oct/15/
xeni-jardin-breast-cancer-public-private

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2013/aug/07/
mastectomy-tattoo-breast-cancer

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2013/jul/07/
drugs-prevent-breast-cancer-tamoxifen

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2013/jul/01/
breast-cancer-working-night-shifts

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2013/jun/25/
women-risk-breast-cancer-daily-drug

http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/datablog/2013/may/14/
breast-cancer-worldwide-uk

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2013/may/03/
breast-cancer-increase-younger-women

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/27/
health/advanced-breast-cancer-may-be-rising-among-young-women-study-finds.html

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/27/us/
elwood-v-jensen-pioneer-in-breast-cancer-treatment-dies-at-92.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/24/
health/study-finds-variations-of-breast-cancer.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/07/health/
katherine-russell-rich-who-wrote-of-cancer-fight-dies-at-56.html

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/13/nyregion/
evelyn-h-lauder-champion-of-breast-cancer-research-dies-at-75.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/09/
health/research/09breast.html

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/20/
health/20hormone.html

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/
dramatic-advance-in-treatment-of-breast-cancer-1992682.html

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/18/
opinion/l18mammo.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/10/
opinion/10DeVries.html

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2008/nov/30/
breast-cancer-health-family-pregnancy

 

https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2006/may/03/
health.healthandwellbeing
  

 

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2004/sep/07/
lifeandhealth.medicineandhealth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 metastatic breast cancer, MBC, stage 4        USA

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2021/12/12/
1061099577/living-with-breast-cancer-metastatic

 

https://www.npr.org/2021/06/22/
1009065462/breast-cancer-research-funding-metastatic-disease

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

male breast cancer

genetic test > inherit a pathogenic version of a gene called BRCA2        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2021/jan/10/
how-race-to-track-mystery-gene-with-links-to-three-cancers-saved-millions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

male breast cancer        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/2016/07/29/
487671579/for-dad-and-daughter-fighting-breast-cancer-grit-runs-in-the-family

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

breast cancer gene        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/27/
opinion/sunday/elizabeth-wurtzel-the-breast-cancer-gene-and-me.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

genetic tests for breast cancer        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/21/
business/more-accurate-affordable-tests-for-detecting-breast-cancer-genes.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

breast cancer relapse        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2015/aug/27/
breast-cancer-blood-test-predict-relapse

 

 

 

 

breast cancer awareness        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2010/mar/28/
kylie-minogue-breast-cancer-campaign

 

 

 

 

Breast Cancer Action

https://bcaction.org/ 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/21/us/
barbara-brenner-breast-cancer-iconoclast-dies-at-61.html

 

 

 

 

prevent against breast cancer > diet

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2016/02/01/
464854395/a-diet-high-in-fiber-may-help-prevent-against-breast-cancer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

breast cancer treatment / therapy / drug        UK / USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/19/
science/dr-bernard-fisher-dead.html

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/06/29/
534882955/tumor-test-helps-identify-which-breast-cancers-dont-require-extra-treatment

 

 

 

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/08/
24/491213713/study-of-breast-cancer-treatment-reveals-paradox-of-precision-medicine

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/29/
business/roche-breast-cancer-drug-appears-
to-greatly-extend-patients-lives.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/27/
opinion/sunday/the-wrong-approach-to-breast-cancer.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/27/
opinion/sunday/the-wrong-approach-to-breast-cancer.html

 

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2014/jul/25/
intrabeam-radiotherapy-single-dose-breast-cancer-surgery

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/20/
opinion/a-cancer-treatment-in-your-medicine-cabinet.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/07/
business/breast-cancer-drug-shows-groundbreaking-results.html

 

 

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2013/dec/12/
call-breast-cancer-drug-made-available-nhs-anastrozole

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/27/us/
elwood-v-jensen-pioneer-in-breast-cancer-treatment-dies-at-92.html

 

 

 

 

breast cancer surgeon        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/10/us/
carolyn-kaelin-breast-cancer-surgeon-dies-at-54.html

 

 

 

 

reduce breast cancer death rate        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/23/
health/research/23mammogram.html

 

 

 

 

breast self-exams        USA

http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2014/04/02/
297678849/is-it-time-to-reconsider-breast-self-exams

 

 

 

 

breast cancer > causes        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2014/aug/10/
breast-cancer-professor-anthony-swerdlow

 

 

 

 

be genetically prone to breast cancer        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/09/16/
health/16gene.html

 

 

 

 

cancer genes        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/science/2007/mar/08/
genetics.medicineandhealth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Illustration: Jenny Wildfang

 

The Wrong Approach to Breast Cancer

SundayReview | Opinion

NYT

JULY 26, 2014

https://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/27/
opinion/sunday/the-wrong-approach-to-breast-cancer.html 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

mammography        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/20/
opinion/20fri1.html

 

 

 

 

3-D mammography        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/25/
health/breast-cancer-3d-mammography-test-x-ray.html

 

 

 

 

mammogram        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/29/
opinion/why-the-annual-mammogram-matters.html

http://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2015/10/20/
450175885/in-israeli-shops-knives-get-harder-to-find-demand-for-guns-goes-up

http://www.npr.org/2015/10/20/
450257125/american-cancer-society-changes-mammogram-guidelines

http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2015/04/13/
398818949/the-hidden-cost-of-mammograms-more-testing-and-overtreatment

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/12/
health/study-adds-new-doubts-about-value-of-mammograms.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/28/
opinion/l28mammo.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/23/
health/research/23mammogram.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/01/
health/research/01cancer.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/20/
opinion/20fri1.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/17/
health/17cancer.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/09/16/
health/16gene.html

 

 

 

 

mammogram        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2013/dec/12/
call-breast-cancer-drug-made-available-nhs-anastrozole

 

 

 

 

cartoons > Cagle > No more mammograms        USA        2009

http://www.cagle.com/news/Mammograms/main.asp

 

 

 

 

mammologists        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/10/
opinion/10DeVries.html
 

 

 

 

 

mastectomy        UK / USA

 

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2021/jan/10/
how-race-to-track-mystery-gene-with-links-to-three-cancers-saved-millions

 

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2018/feb/04/
cancer-mastectomy-losing-breast-joanna-moorhead

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/01/
well/live/going-flat-after-breast-cancer.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/15/
health/angelina-jolies-disclosure-highlights-a-breast-cancer-dilemma.html

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2012/nov/11/
mastectomy-risk-reducing-personal-procedure

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/09/16/
health/16gene.html

 

 

 

 

double mastectomy        UK / USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/24/
opinion/angelina-jolie-pitt-diary-of-a-surgery.html

 

http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2014/04/09/
301021505/why-my-wife-didnt-choose-a-double-mastectomy

 

http://www.nytimes.com/video/2013/05/14/
us/100000002225345/revisiting-a-previvor.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/15/
health/angelina-jolies-disclosure-highlights-a-breast-cancer-dilemma.html

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2013/may/14/
angelina-jolie-double-mastectomy-women

 

 

 

 

breast reconstruction        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/01/
well/live/going-flat-after-breast-cancer.html

 

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/05/20/
no-easy-choices-on-breast-reconstruction/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Illustration: Bianca Bagnarelli

 

Treatment Choices for Breast Cancer

 The Opinion Pages | Letters

NYT        JULY 30, 2014

https://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/31/
opinion/treatment-choices-for-breast-cancer.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

men > breast cancer        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/02/08/
465578231/when-men-get-breast-cancer-they-enter-a-world-of-pink

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Corpus of news articles

 

Health > Genetics > Cells > Cancer >

 

Breast cancer

 

 

 

Katherine Russell Rich,

Who Wrote of Battle With Cancer,

Dies at 56

 

April 6, 2012

The New York Times

By MARGALIT FOX

 

Katherine Russell Rich, whose gritty, darkly comic memoir of her protracted battle with breast cancer became a beacon for other patients, died of the disease on Tuesday. She was 56, and against all predictions had lived with cancer for nearly a quarter-century.

The death was confirmed by a friend, Emma Sweeney.

In “The Red Devil: To Hell With Cancer — and Back,” published in 1999, Ms. Rich chronicles finding a lump in her breast in 1988, when she was 32. An editor at GQ magazine at the time, she had ended her marriage just three weeks earlier.

She goes on to chart her odyssey through a parallel universe she calls Cancerland, where she encounters insensitive doctors (one dropped her, calling her difficult), obtuse psychotherapists (one told her that her health problems were rooted in childhood), unsupportive support groups (one was run by someone with a mail-order divinity degree) and even less supportive bosses (one, apparently discomforted by Ms. Rich’s cancer, fired her).

She had a lumpectomy, chemotherapy and radiation, and the cancer seemed to remit. But as her book recounts, it returned with a vengeance in 1993, just after she had begun a job at Allure magazine.

This time the cancer was Stage 4 — the most advanced stage possible. It spread to her spine, breaking her bones and leaving her temporarily paralyzed. She was told she would live a year or two at most.

Over time, Ms. Rich underwent a number of additional treatments, including more chemotherapy and radiation, hormone therapy and, in 1995, a bone-marrow transplant. In the book, she describes the exquisite irony of working at Allure, with its emphasis on the feminine ideal, while being bald for long periods.

The treatments bought her more time. As Ms. Rich recounted, they also gave her the courage to quit editing and become a writer.

“The Red Devil” received wide attention in the news media and inspired an outpouring of support from fellow cancer patients. Reviewers praised the book’s unsentimental voice and unflinching candor.

Ms. Rich’s pugnacious engagement with her illness even gave her the fortitude, she said, to move to India for a year to learn Hindi. Her sojourn there, begun in 2001, is recounted in a second memoir, “Dreaming in Hindi: Coming Awake in Another Language,” published in 2009.

Though there was no oncologist around for hundreds of miles, she wrote, her cancer was largely manageable during her time there.

Ms. Rich wrote about her experience with cancer, and her life in India, in first-person articles in The New York Times and elsewhere.

“Here, you live among outlaws, your body’s own cells,” she wrote in an essay in O: The Oprah Magazine in June 2010. “Whole phalanxes of them turn mutinous, become silent killers. This is a country that’s both narrow and vast, where geography bends at the edges and landmarks vanish like Cheshire cats. ‘Oh, we don’t use that drug anymore,’ a doctor will say, five minutes after the drug was invented. So you have to become your own cartographer, make your own way.”

Katherine Russell Rich, known as Kathy, was born in Bryn Mawr, Pa., on Nov. 17, 1955. She earned a bachelor’s degree in religious studies from Syracuse University.

Ms. Rich’s marriage to Diego Olivé ended in divorce. Survivors include a brother, Stuart P. Rich Jr., and a sister, Lucy Harrison.

In the Oprah Magazine essay, Ms. Rich explored her decision to forsake editing for freelance writing. “When I was told I was going to die, I was shredded to realize I hadn’t made any real difference,” she wrote. She added, “The life of a writer was uncertain, but as a writer, it seemed, I might leave a mark.”

Katherine Russell Rich, Who Wrote of Battle With Cancer, Dies at 56,
NYT,
6.4.2012,
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/07/
health/katherine-russell-rich-who-wrote-of-cancer-fight-dies-at-56.html

 

 

 

 

 

New breast cancer genes identified

Most significant advance in decade

 

Monday May 28, 2007

Guardian

Polly Curtis,

health correspondent

 

The most significant advance in the understanding of breast cancer for a decade was announced last night with the identification of a new group of common genetic markers for the disease.

Scientists have discovered four genes which, if faulty, can increase a woman's chance of developing breast cancer - by up to 60% in the case of two of the genes. This helps explain why women with a close relative with breast cancer are twice as likely to develop the disease, and offers the hope of a test in the near future. The scientists also believe the techniques used will help them unravel other cancers.

Karol Sikora, a leading cancer specialist, said of the studies published online in Nature and Nature Genetics last night: "This set of incredible papers points to the future understanding [of] the genetics of cancer."

It is the most significant discovery in the field since the 1990s, when scientists identified two rare genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, which make carriers likely to develop breast cancer. An international coalition of researchers led by Cancer Research UK at Cambridge University has proved the theory that geneticists have been working on ever since: that most familial patterns of breast cancer can be explained by myriad smaller genetic effects.

Breast cancer is twice as common in those who have a close relative who develops it due to a fault in a gene, although the presence of a faulty gene does not mean that cancer will definitely occur.

The scientists trawled large parts of the genome in 800 people. They identified 11,000 "tags", or blocks of DNA which point to genes, which were more common in women with breast cancer and studied them in 8,000 more women. In the final process, which involved 40,000 women, they narrowed the search down to five tags which were significantly more common among women with breast cancer than those without. The tags pointed them to four genes which they believe are responsible for the increased breast cancer risk among the patients studied. Scientists expect that they will find a fifth.

Two of the genes identified, FGFR2 and TNRC9, are thought to increase the risk of breast cancer by about 20% in women who carry one faulty copy of a gene and by between 40% and 60% in those who carry two faulty copies. The lifetime risk for women with two faulty copies in either of these two genes would rise from one in 11 to around one in six or seven. The other two genes increase risk by 10% if there is one fault.

A maximum 10% of breast cancers have a genetic element, and the genes scientists know about so far account for 25% of these. The genes identified today account for a further 4% and are responsible for only a small number of breast cancers - up to 179 of the 44,000 diagnosed every year.

The ultimate aim is genetic screening that would band women according to risk. But scientists warn this could create an army of "worried well". They stress that the findings do not merit genetic testing immediately.

The findings do, however, hint at a different cause of familial breast cancers. Three of the new genes are involved in the control of cell growth or cell signalling, mechanisms which have never been linked to breast cancer before.

The author of the study, Douglas Easton, director of Cancer Research UK's Genetic Epidemiology Unit in Cambridge, said: "We're very excited by these results because the regions we identified don't contain previously known inherited cancer genes. This opens the door to new research directions." The techniques used are similar to those which helped identify the genes for obesity last month.

New breast cancer genes identified,
G,
28.5.2007,
https://www.theguardian.com/society/2007/may/28/
cancercare.health

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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