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Vocapedia > USA > Law, Justice > Bail / bond hearing

 

 

 

 

The Burden of Bail        Video        The New York Times        16 June 2015

 

When Dominick Torrence was arrested in Baltimore

and unable to make bail set at $250,000,

his girlfriend was faced with child care

and other responsibilities.

 

Produced by: Axel Gerdau

Read the story here: http://nyti.ms/1Go85TT

Watch more videos at: http://nytimes.com/video

 

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ODH-hWsrLwk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trayvon's Murder: Zimmerman's Bond Hearing        2012

 

 

 

 

Trayvon's Murder: Zimmerman's Bond Hearing


Zimmerman's Bond Hearing

Source: CNN

Added April 21, 2012 by manybuddies

YouTube
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8VSrA5YV-XE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

a bail / bond hearing

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2015/06/19/
415792559/-1-million-bond-for-church-shooting-suspect

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/21/us/
george-zimmerman-bail-hearing.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

judge > set bail of $1 million for N

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/31/us/
bail-set-at-1-million-for-ex-university-of-cincinnati-officer-charged-with-murder.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

be held on $50 million bail at the King County Jail

pending formal charges of murder and attempted murder

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/07/30/us/30seattle.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

bail

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/16/magazine/the-bail-trap.html

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ODH-hWsrLwk - 16 June 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

be released on $2 million bail        USA

 

https://www.npr.org/2020/11/20/
937323873/kyle-rittenhouse-released-on-2-million-bail-awaiting-trial-in-kenosha-wis-deaths

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

appear at a bond hearing

via video link from the Charleston County jail on Sunday

and be ordered held without bond on five counts of murder

http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2006-09-30-sc-
shootings_x.htm

 

 

 

 

take the witness stand

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/21/us/
george-zimmerman-bail-hearing.html

 

 

 

 

bond

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_xcDwDpT_HU

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/21/us/
george-zimmerman-bail-hearing.html

http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2006-02-26-
teacheraccused_x.htm

 

 

 

 

set bond at $50,000

http://www.usatoday.com/sports/college/football/2006-01-03-
clarett-bond_x.htm

 

 

 

 

post bond

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2015/11/30/
457896218/chicago-police-officer-charged-with-murdering-black-teen-posts-bond-leaves-jail

 

 

 

 

be released on $1 million bond

https://www.npr.org/sections/live-updates-protests-for-racial-justice/2020/10/07/
921213607/derek-chauvin-is-released-on-1-million-bail-bond

 

 

 

 

be free on bond

 

 

 

 

be granted bail

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_xcDwDpT_HU

 

 

 

 

be released (from jail) on $150,000 bail

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/24/us/
george-zimmerman-released-after-posting-bail-in-trayvon-martin-case.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/21/us/
george-zimmerman-bail-hearing.html

 

 

 

 

bail

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2015/06/08/
412842780/kalief-browder-jailed-for-years-at-rikers-island-without-trial-commits-suicide

http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2007-09-26-
jenasix-ruling_N.htm

 

 

 

 

nonprofit bail funds

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2015/08/11/
magazine/a-night-in-brooklyn-court.html

 

 

 

 

set bond for / set bail at $200,000 for N

http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2006-02-01-
yates_x.htm

 

 

 

 

post bail

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/16/
magazine/the-bail-trap.html

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2015/08/11/
magazine/a-night-in-brooklyn-court.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/24/us/
george-zimmerman-released-after-posting-bail-in-trayvon-martin-case.html

 

 

 

 

bail out  N

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/16/magazine/the-bail-trap.html

 

 

 

 

jump / skip bail

http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2006-08-03-wanted-professor_x.htm

 

 

 

 

 

be monitored with an electronic bracelet

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/24/us/
george-zimmerman-released-after-posting-bail-in-trayvon-martin-case.html

 

 

 

 

await trial on charges of second-degree murder

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/24/us/
george-zimmerman-released-after-posting-bail-in-trayvon-martin-case.html

 

 

 

 

revoke the bond of N

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/02/us/
bond-revoked-for-suspect-in-martin-shooting.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Corpus of news articles

 

USA > Law, Justice > Bail / bond hearing

 

 

 

Judge Tells Zimmerman

He Must Go Back to Jail

 

June 1, 2012

The New York Times

By SERGE F. KOVALESKI

 

A Florida judge on Friday revoked the bond of George Zimmerman, who has been charged with second-degree murder in the shooting of Trayvon Martin, after state prosecutors argued that Mr. Zimmerman, with the help of his wife, had misled the court about his finances.

During an afternoon hearing in Sanford, Fla., a Seminole County Circuit Court judge, Kenneth R. Lester Jr., ordered Mr. Zimmerman, 28, a former neighborhood watch volunteer who himself aspired to be a judge, to surrender to authorities within 48 hours.

Judge Lester made his ruling shortly after an assistant state attorney, Bernardo de la Rionda, asserted that Mr. Zimmerman and his wife, Shellie, during a bail hearing on April 20, had “lied” and “were very deceptive” about assets available to them. That hearing cleared the way for Mr. Zimmerman’s release from jail on $150,000 bond. He had to put up 10 percent, or $15,000, to make bail.

The judge determined that Mr. Zimmerman, who has been in hiding because of concerns about his safety, had engaged in “material falsehoods.” At issue is the roughly $200,000 Mr. Zimmerman raised through a legal defense Web site, money that Mr. Zimmerman’s lawyer, Mark M. O’Mara, said he learned of several days after the bond hearing.

In an interview, Mr. O’Mara said: “Was it a misrepresentation? Possibly. It looks like they should have told the judge about the money. But they did not take the funds and run. They only used $5,000 towards the bond and, more significantly, when I found out about the money and suggested that they turn it over to me to put in trust, they did so immediately.”

Benjamin Crump, a lawyer for the Martin family, said, “Judge Lester’s decision is the most important ruling in this case so far because it focuses everyone’s attention back on the credibility of George Zimmerman, which is the crux of the matter in this case.” Mr. Martin, 17, who was unarmed, was killed on the night of Feb. 26 after an encounter with Mr. Zimmerman that turned violent.

Mr. Martin had been walking through the gated community in Sanford, where he was staying and where Mr. Zimmerman lived. The case created a national uproar after Mr. Zimmerman was not initially arrested, raising questions about Florida’s broad self-defense law and racial profiling.

On April 11, a special prosecutor, Angela B. Corey, charged Mr. Zimmerman with second-degree murder. Mr. Zimmerman, who told the police he acted in self-defense, has pleaded not guilty.

In a motion filed Friday, Mr. de la Rionda contended that recordings of phone conversations Mr. Zimmerman and his wife had in the days before Mr. Zimmerman’s bond hearing about how to pay his possible bond demonstrated that the couple had misrepresented its financial circumstances to the court. At Mr. Zimmerman’s bond hearing, Ms. Zimmerman testified that she was unaware of how much money his Web site had collected.

“During the jail phone calls, both of them spoke in code to hide what they were doing,” the motion said. According to the motion, credit union statements show that on the day before the bond hearing, Mr. Zimmerman and his wife had access to more than $135,000.

Mr. de la Rionda also said that Mr. Zimmerman had failed to hand over a second passport, an issue played down by Judge Lester.

Judge Tells Zimmerman He Must Go Back to Jail,
NYT,
1.6.2012,
https://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/02/
us/bond-revoked-for-suspect-in-martin-shooting.html

 

 

 

 

 

George Zimmerman Released

After Posting Bail

 

April 23, 2012
The New York Times
By MATT FLEGENHEIMER

 

George Zimmerman was released on $150,000 bail from a county jail in Florida around midnight Sunday as he awaits trial on charges of second-degree murder in the fatal shooting of Trayvon Martin.

As he left, Mr. Zimmerman was wearing a brown jacket and blue jeans and carrying a paper bag. He followed a man, who was also carrying bags, into a white vehicle and drove away, according to The Associated Press.

His destination was being kept secret for his protection and could be outside of Florida.

The release was a rare low-key moment in a case that has captured feverish national interest in recent weeks. No questions were shouted at Mr. Zimmerman as he left and he gave no statement, The A.P. said.

Last week, Mr. Zimmerman’s lawyer, Mark O’Mara, said his client would remain in jail for several days until arrangements were made for financing his bond and finding a secure location. Mr. Zimmerman has received death threats.

During a hearing last week, a Seminole County Circuit Court judge set the bail and imposed a series of restrictions on Mr. Zimmerman’s release. He was not to contact the Martin family or witnesses to the shooting. The judge, Kenneth R. Lester Jr., also set a curfew requiring Mr. Zimmerman to remain at home from 7 p.m. to 6 a.m. and banned access to alcohol or firearms. The judge also stipulated that Mr. Zimmerman’s movements be monitored with an electronic bracelet.

The bail figure was considerably less severe than prosecutors’ request for no bail or $1 million.

Mr. Martin, 17, was shot and killed on Feb. 26 while walking through the gated community where he was staying and where Mr. Zimmerman was a neighborhood watch volunteer. The case roused a national uproar, including many demonstrations across the country, as weeks passed without Mr. Zimmerman’s arrest. He was taken into custody earlier this month.

During the hearing, members of Mr. Zimmerman’s family, including his wife, Shellie, testified by telephone out of concern for their safety. They told the judge that they would monitor Mr. Zimmerman’s whereabouts and notify authorities if they lost contact with him for any reason before his trial.

Taking the stand briefly at the bail hearing, Mr. Zimmerman apologized to the Martin family. He wore a dark suit, with cuffs around his hands and shackles at his feet and waist.

“I wanted to say I am sorry for the loss of your son,” he said in a soft voice. “I did not know how old he was. I thought he was a little bit younger than I am. And I did not know if he was armed or not.”

A lawyer for the Martin family, Benjamin Crump, called the apology “self-serving” and said he considered it a ploy designed to curry favor with the court and the public and to help secure a release from jail.

    George Zimmerman Released After Posting Bail, NYT, 23.4.2012,
    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/24/us/
    george-zimmerman-released-after-posting-bail-in-trayvon-martin-case.html

 

 

 

 

 

‘I Am Sorry,’ Zimmerman Says

as Bail Set at $150,000

 

April 20, 2012
The New York Times
By SERGE F. KOVALESKI
and JENNIFER PRESTON

 

SANFORD, Fla. — Speaking publicly about the case for the first time, George Zimmerman, the man accused of second-degree murder in the shooting of Trayvon Martin, an unarmed 17-year-old, briefly took the witness stand at his bail hearing on Friday and apologized to the teenager’s parents.

“I wanted to say I am sorry for the loss of your son,” Mr. Zimmerman, 28, said in a soft voice from the stand, dressed in a dark suit, with his hands locked in cuffs, and shackles at his feet and waist. “I did not know how old he was. I thought he was a little bit younger than I am. And I did not know if he was armed or not.”

Mr. Martin’s parents, Tracy Martin and Sybrina Fulton, sitting in the second row of the courtroom here, showed little emotion during Mr. Zimmerman’s remarks. They did not comment after the hearing ended, hurrying to a waiting car.

One of their lawyers, Benjamin Crump, said later that Mr. Martin’s family was “completely devastated” by the Seminole County Circuit Court judge’s decision to allow Mr. Zimmerman to be released from jail on $150,000 bail, which was considerably less severe than the prosecutors’ request for no bail or $1 million.

Describing Mr. Zimmerman’s apology from the stand as “self-serving,” Mr. Crump said he considered it a ploy to help win his release from jail and curry favor with the court and the public through the news media.

“They have to accept the court’s decision,” he said about Mr. Martin’s parents. “But they are praying that his freedom is only temporary because the pain Zimmerman caused them is going to last forever. They are never getting Trayvon back.”

Mr. Martin, a high school student, was shot and killed on Feb. 26 while walking through the gated community where he was staying and where Mr. Zimmerman was a neighborhood watch volunteer. The case incited a national uproar, including protests across the country, after the police did not arrest Mr. Zimmerman, raising questions about Florida’s expansive self-defense law and racial profiling.

A special prosecutor, Angela B. Corey, was assigned to the case by Gov. Rick Scott amid criticism of the way it was being handled by local authorities, and she brought second-degree murder charges against Mr. Zimmerman last week.

Mark M. O’Mara, Mr. Zimmerman’s lawyer, said he had asked that Mr. Zimmerman be allowed to apologize privately to the parents, but the request was rebuffed. He said Mr. Zimmerman wanted to answer the three questions that he had heard Mr. Martin’s mother raise during a television interview.

“He answered very specifically the three questions posed by the mother: Why haven’t you apologized? Did you know he was a teenager? And did you know he was unarmed?” Mr. O’Mara said.

At the end of the hearing, which ran more than two hours, the judge, Kenneth R. Lester Jr., set bail and imposed multiple restrictions on Mr. Zimmerman’s release, including no contact with Mr. Martin’s family or with witnesses to the shooting. Judge Lester also banned access to alcohol or firearms, and ordered that his movements be monitored by an electronic bracelet. He set a curfew that would require Mr. Zimmerman to remain at home from 7 p.m. until 6 a.m. and ordered him to check in with the authorities every three days.

Mr. Zimmerman will not be released from jail for several days, Mr. O’Mara said, because it will take time to arrange financing for the bond and find a secure location for Mr. Zimmerman, who has received death threats.

Testifying by telephone during the proceeding because of concern for their safety, Mr. Zimmerman’s family members, including his wife, Shellie Zimmerman, assured the judge that they would closely monitor his whereabouts and notify the authorities if they lost contact with him for any reason before his pending trial.

As part of his effort to win Mr. Zimmerman’s release on bond, Mr. O’Mara challenged the prosecution’s case, going through the state’s probable cause affidavit line by line, turning the bail hearing into what appeared to be a foretaste of the trial.

He aggressively questioned a state investigator, Dale Gilbreath, about the accusation that Mr. Zimmerman had racially profiled Mr. Martin, and he demanded to know what evidence the state had for the statement that “Zimmerman confronted Martin and a struggle ensued.”

“Do you know who started the fight?” Mr. O’Mara asked Mr. Gilbreath.

“Do I know?” Mr. Gilbreath said. “No.”

Mr. O’Mara then asked Mr. Gilbreath if the state had any evidence to contradict Mr. Zimmerman’s statement to the police that he had been making his way back to his car when he was punched by Mr. Martin. Mr. Zimmerman told investigators he shot Mr. Martin in self-defense after Mr. Martin banged his head on concrete, covered his nose and mouth and reached for his gun.

Mr. Gilbreath responded, “No.”

While on the stand, Mr. Zimmerman was sharply questioned by Bernardo de la Rionda, an assistant state attorney.

“Do you agree that you changed your story?” Mr. de la Rionda asked, referring to the five separate statements that Mr. Zimmerman gave the police about the shooting.

“Absolutely not, “ Mr. Zimmerman replied in a firm voice.

 

Serge F. Kovaleski reported from Sanford,

and Jennifer Preston from New York.

‘I Am Sorry,’ Zimmerman Says as Bail Set at $150,000,
NYT, 20.4.2012,
https://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/21/
us/george-zimmerman-bail-hearing.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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U.S. Supreme Court, State Supreme Courts

 

 

justice, law > USA

 

 

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prison, jail > USA

 

 

justice > courtroom artists / miscarriage of justice > UK, USA

 

 

 

 

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