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Vocapedia > Life and style, Family, Law > Divorce, separation

 

 

 


Illustration: iStockphoto

 

How A Divorce Can Boost Health Insurance Subsidies

by Michelle Andrews        NPR        January 28, 2014        10:56 AM

http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2014/01/28/
267585061/how-a-divorce-can-boost-health-insurance-subsidies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photograph: 100330.000000/Getty Images/Stock Illustration

 

What if I never get over him (or her) – you asked Google, here’s the answer

Wednesday 4 November 2015        08.00 GMT        Last modified on Wednesday 4 November 2015        08.01 GMT        G

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/nov/04/what-if-i-never-get-over-him-her-google-answer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

separation        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2014/jun/21/
wrong-to-use-children-as-weapon-divorce-separation

 

 

 

 

separate        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2014/mar/25/
gwyneth-paltrow-chris-martin-to-separate

 

 

 

 

love split

 

 

 

 

split        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/jun/01/
al-gore-tipper-announce-split

 

 

 

 

split        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/uk/2006/may/18/
media.pressandpublishing 

 

 

 

 

split up        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2014/sep/20/
when-parents-split-up-divorce-readers-stories

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2014/jun/21/
wrong-to-use-children-as-weapon-divorce-separation

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/mar/30/
divorce-children-parenting-conscious-uncoupling-gwyneth-paltrow-chris-martin

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2014/mar/25/
gwyneth-paltrow-chris-martin-to-separate

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2012/may/
11/42-ways-to-split-up

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/datablog/2010/jan/28/
divorce-rates-marriage-ons

 

http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2005/mar/14/
divorce.election2005

 

 

 

 

split up        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/14/
opinion/sunday/beyond-marriage.html

 

 

 

 

break up        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2014/sep/20/
when-parents-split-up-divorce-readers-stories

 

 

 

 

break up with N        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2013/oct/06/
getting-divorced-make-me-ill

 

 

 

 

breakups        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2016/feb/16/
why-relationship-breakups-hurt-brain-neuroscience

 

 

 

 

breakups        USA

http://www.npr.org/2014/02/24/
282105022/older-americans-breakups-are-causing-a-graying-divorce-trend

 

 

 

 

the breakup of her marriage        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2013/jan/26/
sharon-olds-american-poet-divorce

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joe Heller

Joe Heller has been the editorial cartoonist

for the Green Bay Press-Gazette since 1985,

before that he was the cartoonist for the West Bend News.

Cagle

May 18, 2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

estranged        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/17/nyregion/
mary-kennedy-estranged-wife-of-robert-kennedy-jr-found-dead.html

 

 

 

 

divorce lawyer        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2012/jan/11/
divorce-should-parents-stay-together

 

 

 

 

McCartney-Mills divorce > judgment in full        2008

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2008/mar/17/
mills.mccartney

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2008/mar/17/
divorce.law

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2008/mar/17/
law.divorce

 

 

 

 

Divorce, Separations and Annulments        USA

https://www.nytimes.com/topic/subject/divorce-separations-and-annulments

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/26/
opinion/l26custody.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/18/
opinion/18bettelheim.html

 

 

 

 

divorce > be at fault        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/06/22/
opinion/l22divorce.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/06/17/
opinion/17coontz.html

 

 

 

 

divorce        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/divorce

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/filmblog/2016/sep/20/
angelina-jolie-brad-pitt-marriage-hollywood-screen-by-the-sea

 

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2014/aug/30/
growing-up-under-the-divorce-cloud

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2014/jun/21/
wrong-to-use-children-as-weapon-divorce-separation

http://www.theguardian.com/science/2014/feb/13/
self-discovery-marriage-psychologist-suffocation-model

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2013/jan/26/
sharon-olds-american-poet-divorce

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2012/apr/22/
courts-chaos-diy-divorce

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2011/feb/09/
where-did-it-go-wrong

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2010/dec/14/
everything-you-need-know-divorce

 

http://www.theguardian.com/uk/2007/aug/30/
lifeandhealth.relationships 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/uk/2006/sep/01/
lifeandhealth.britishidentity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

divorce        USA

https://www.npr.org/sections/alltechconsidered/2018/01/04/
554564010/i-know-where-you-ve-been-digital-spying-and-divorce-in-the-smartphone-age

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/18/
fashion/weddings/11-questions-to-ask-before-getting-a-divorce.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/04/24/
fashion/weddings/never-too-old-to-hurt-from-parents-divorce.html

 

http://www.npr.org/2014/02/24/
282105022/older-americans-breakups-are-causing-a-graying-divorce-trend

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/02/19/
divorced-from-my-husband-and-my-faith/

http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2014/01/28/
267585061/how-a-divorce-can-boost-health-insurance-subsidies

 

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2013/oct/06/
getting-divorced-make-me-ill

 

http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2013/02/13/
when-divorce-is-a-family-affair

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/08/
world/europe/divorce-british-style-fault-finding-as-fine-art.html

 

 

 

 

divorce

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/mar/30/
divorce-children-parenting-conscious-uncoupling-gwyneth-paltrow-chris-martin

http://www.theguardian.com/money/2006/jun/18/
divorce.observercashsection 

 

 

 

 

divorce from N

 

 

 

 

divorce law        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/law/2012/sep/11/marital-assets-sperm

 

 

 

 

compulsory marriage mediation        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2011/feb/23/
divorcing-couples-marriage-mediation

 

 

 

 

divorce rates        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2013/jun/29/
divorcing-baby-boomers-go-it-alone

 

 

 

 

Divorce rates data, 1858 to now        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/datablog/2010/jan/28/
divorce-rates-marriage-ons
 

 

 

 

 

file for divorce        USA

http://www.usatoday.com/life/people/2007-11-24-
hogans-divorce_N.htm

 

 

 

 

divorce settlement

http://www.guardian.co.uk/law/2010/jul/22/
berezovsky-record-divorce-payout

 

 

 

 

divorce settlement        USA

http://www.usatoday.com/life/people/2007-03-29-
britney-divorce-settlement_N.htm

 

 

 

 

reach a divorce settlement        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/21/
business/media/murdochs-reach-divorce-settlement.html

http://www.usatoday.com/life/people/2007-03-29-
britney-divorce-settlement_N.htm

 

 

 

 

painful divorce

 

 

 

 

divorcee

 

 

 

 

divorced        USA

http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2006-10-31-
divorce-illness_x.htm

 

 

 

 

divorced fathers

 

 

 

 

post-divorce parenting

 

 

 

 

parental battles

 

 

 

 

contact disputes

 

 

 

 

celebrity divorce        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/uk/2006/oct/19/
thebeatles.arts 

 

 

 

 

divorce rate

 

 

 

 

twice-divorced star

 

 

 

 

dissolve

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal

by Zach Weinersmith

Gocomics

July 14, 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

custody        USA

http://www.npr.org/2014/02/26/
280758591/push-to-change-custody-laws-whats-best-for-kids

 

 

 

 

shared custody        USA

http://www.usatoday.com/life/people/2007-03-29-
britney-divorce-settlement_N.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last Kiss

by John Lustig

January 15, 2014

Gocomics

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Broken Heart Doctor        Modern Love        The New York Times        15 November 2013

 

 

 

 

Broken Heart Doctor | Modern Love | The New York Times        15 November 2013

 

After Thomas Hooven graduated from medical school,

his girlfriend of 12 years ended their relationship.

 

It was only three weeks before they planned to marry.

This video is by the animators of the feature films

"Waking Life" and "A Scanner Darkly".

 

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6m85l_UqM5I&list=PL4CGYNsoW2iBNhXVlrpCu0TUQSiKwl2BE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

heartache

 

 

 

 

heartbreak        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2015/02/12/
how-to-handle-heartbreak-on-valentines-day

 

 

 

 

heartbroken        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/poll/2010/nov/16/
prince-william-kate-middleton-engaged-monarchy

 

 

 

 

break up with N        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2012/may/11/42-
ways-to-split-up

 

 

 

 

break-up

 

 

 

 

marital break-up

 

 

 

 

break off engagement

 

 

 

 

drift apart

 

 

 

 

grow apart from N

 

 

 

 

be on the outs        USA

http://www.usatoday.com/life/people/2006-08-28-
springsteen-scialfa_x.htm

 

 

 

 

be on the rocks

 

 

 

 

on rocks

 

 

 

 

it's over

 

 

 

 

separate        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/jun/01/
al-gore-tipper-announce-split

 

 

 

 

leave        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2014/aug/30/
letter-to-my-husband-who-may-be-about-to-leave

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/culture/2010/feb/23/
cheryl-cole-leaves-ashley

 

 

 

 

leave a troubled marriage        USA

https://www.npr.org/2019/11/29/
783029904/a-mother-and-daughter-on-homelessness-humility-and-a-6-a-week-grocery-budget

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nick Mason, 34,

and his two children live with his parents in Hixson, Tenn.

Divorce pulled him from school for a $9-an-hour job.

 

Billy Weeks

for The New York Times

 

Low-Wage Workers Are Finding Poverty Harder to Escape

NYT

MARCH 16, 2014

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/17/
business/economy/low-wage-workers-finding-its-easier-to-fall-into-poverty-and-harder-to-get-out.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

jilt

 

 

 

 

dump

 

 

 

 

get dumped        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2015/oct/17/
why-do-i-keep-getting-dumped

 

 

 

 

ditch

 

 

 

 

his estranged wife / The estranged wife of N

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WuMo

by Wulff & Morgenthaler

Gocomics

April 13, 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tell-All PCs and Phones

Transforming Divorce

 

September 15, 2007

The New York Times

By BRAD STONE

 

The age-old business of breaking up has taken a decidedly Orwellian turn, with digital evidence like e-mail messages, traces of Web site visits and mobile telephone records now permeating many contentious divorce cases.

Spurned lovers steal each other’s BlackBerrys. Suspicious spouses hack into each other’s e-mail accounts. They load surveillance software onto the family PC, sometimes discovering shocking infidelities.

Divorce lawyers routinely set out to find every bit of private data about their clients’ adversaries, often hiring investigators with sophisticated digital forensic tools to snoop into household computers.

“In just about every case now, to some extent, there is some electronic evidence,” said Gaetano Ferro, president of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers, who also runs seminars on gathering electronic evidence. “It has completely changed our field.”

Privacy advocates have grown increasingly worried that digital tools are giving governments and powerful corporations the ability to peek into peoples’ lives as never before. But the real snoops are often much closer to home.

“Google and Yahoo may know everything, but they don’t really care about you,” said Jacalyn F. Barnett, a Manhattan-based divorce lawyer. “No one cares more about the things you do than the person that used to be married to you.”

Most of these stories do not end amicably. This year, a technology consultant from the Philadelphia area, who did not want his name used because he has a teenage son, strongly suspected his wife was having an affair. Instead of confronting her, the husband installed a $49 program called PC Pandora on her computer, a laptop he had purchased.

The program surreptitiously took snapshots of her screen every 15 seconds and e-mailed them to him. Soon he had a comprehensive overview of the sites she visited and the instant messages she was sending. Since the program captured her passwords, the husband was also able to get access to and print all the e-mail messages his wife had received and sent over the previous year.

What he discovered ended his marriage. For 11 months, he said, she had been seeing another man — the parent of one of their son’s classmates at a private school outside Philadelphia. The husband said they were not only arranging meetings but also posting explicit photos of themselves on the Web and soliciting sex with other couples.

The husband, who like others in this article was reached through his lawyer, said the decision to invade his wife’s privacy was not an easy one. “If I were to tell you I have a pure ethical conscience over what I did, I’d be lying,” he said. But he also pointed to companies that have Internet policies giving them the right to read employee e-mail messages. “When you’re in a relationship like a marriage, which is emotional as well as, candidly, a business, I think you can look at it in the same way,” he said.

When considering invading their spouse’s privacy, husbands and wives cite an overriding desire to find out some secret. One woman described sensing last year that her husband, a Manhattan surgeon, was distant and overly obsessed with his BlackBerry.

She drew him a bubble bath on his birthday and then pounced on the device while he was in the tub. In his e-mail messages, she found evidence of an affair with a medical resident, including plans for them to meet that night.

A few weeks later, after the couple had tried to reconcile, the woman gained access to her husband’s America Online account (he had shared his password with her) and found messages from a mortgage company. It turned out he had purchased a $3 million Manhattan condominium, where he intended to continue his liaison.

“Every single time I looked at his e-mail I felt nervous,” the woman said. “But I did anyway because I wanted to know the truth.”

Being on the receiving end of electronic spying can be particularly disturbing. Jolene Barten-Bolender, a 45-year-old mother of three who lives in Dix Hills, N.Y., said that she was recently informed by AOL and Google, on the same day, that the passwords had been changed on two e-mail accounts she was using, suggesting that someone had gained access and was reading her messages. Last year, she discovered a Global Positioning System, or G.P.S., tracking device in a wheel well of the family car.

She suspects her husband of 24 years, whom she is divorcing.

“It makes me feel nauseous and totally violated,” Ms. Barten-Bolender said, speculating that he was trying to find out if she was seeing anyone. “Once anything is written down, you have to know it could be viewed by someone looking to invade or hurt you.”

Ms. Barten-Bolender’s husband and his lawyer declined to discuss her allegations.

Divorce lawyers say their files are filled with cases like these. Three-quarters of the cases of Nancy Chemtob, a divorce lawyer in Manhattan, now involve some kind of electronic communications. She says she routinely asks judges for court orders to seize and copy the hard drives in the computers of her clients’ spouses, particularly if there is an opportunity to glimpse a couple’s full financial picture, or a parent’s suitability to be the custodian of the children.

Lawyers must navigate a complex legal landscape governing the admissibility of this kind of electronic evidence. Different laws define when it is illegal to get access to information stored on a computer in the home, log into someone else’s e-mail account, or listen in on phone calls.

Divorce lawyers say, however, if the computer in question is shared by the whole family, or couples have revealed their passwords to each other, reading a spouse’s e-mail messages and introducing them as evidence in a divorce case is often allowed.

Lynne Z. Gold-Bikin, a Pennsylvania divorce lawyer, describes one client, a man, who believed his wife was engaging in secret online correspondence. He found e-mail messages to a lover in Australia that she had sent from a private AOL account on the family computer. Her lawyer then challenged the use of this evidence in court. Ms. Gold-Bikin’s client won the dispute and an advantageous settlement.

Lawyers say the only communications that are consistently protected in a spouse’s private e-mail account are the messages to and from the lawyers themselves, which are covered by lawyer-client privilege.

Perhaps for this reason, divorce lawyers as a group are among the most pessimistic when it comes to assessing the overall state of privacy in the digital age.

“I do not like to put things on e-mail,” said David Levy, a Chicago divorce lawyer. “There’s no way it’s private. Nothing is fully protected once you hit the send button.”

Ms. Chemtob added, “People have an expectation of privacy that is completely unrealistic.”

James Mulvaney agrees. A private investigator, Mr. Mulvaney now devotes much of his time to poking through the computer records of divorcing spouses, on behalf of divorce lawyers. One of his specialties is retrieving files, like bank records and e-mail messages to secret lovers, that a spouse has tried to delete.

“Every keystroke on your computer is there, forever and ever,” Mr. Mulvaney said.

He had one bit of advice. “The only thing you can truly erase these things with is a specialty Smith & Wesson product,” he said. “Throw your computer into the air and play skeet with it.”

Tell-All PCs and Phones Transforming Divorce,
NYT,
15.9.2007,
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/09/15/business/15divorce.html

 

 

 

 

 

1.15pm

Divorce total lowest for 29 years

 

Thursday August 30, 2007
Guardian Unlimited
David Batty and agencies


The number of divorces in England and Wales has fallen to a 29-year low, government figures showed today.

Last year 132,562 couples got divorced - the lowest since 1977 when there were 129,053 divorces, according to the Office for National Statistics (ONS).

This was the third year in succession that the number of divorces fell, with a fall of 6.5% between 2005 and 2006.

The divorce rate also fell to its lowest level for 22 years to 12.2 for every thousand married men and women. The rate fell by 7% between 2005 and 2006.

The highest divorce rate was found among people in their late 20s, with 26 divorces per thousand married men aged 25-29 and 27.3 per thousand women in the same age group.

But the average age of people divorcing was higher - 40.9 for women and 43.4 for men.

The number of second-time divorcees has also doubled in last 25 years. Last year a fifth of divorcees had already had a previous marriage dissolved, compared to just over a tenth in 1981.

The average duration of failed marriages remained unchanged from the previous year at 11.6 years.

But the sharp fall in the number of divorces in England and Wales last year was offset by rising numbers in Scotland and Northern Ireland.

Across the UK, the number of divorces fell by 4.5% to 148,141 in 2006 from 155,052 in 2005.

The number of divorces in Scotland rose by nearly 20% from 10,940 in 2005 to 13,014 last year.

The ONS said the sharp rise could be due to the reduction in the period of time couples are required to be separated prior to obtaining a divorce, which came into effect in May 2006.

Under the Family Law (Scotland) Act 2006, couples who mutually agree to divorce can do so after just one year apart instead of two. Contested cases can now go ahead after two years, rather than five.

In Northern Ireland the number of divorces rose by 8.6% to 2,565 last year - compared to 2,362 in 2005.

    Divorce total lowest for 29 years, G, 30.8.2007,
    http://lifeandhealth.guardian.co.uk/relationships/story/0,,2159134,00.html

 

 

 

 

 

Amid bitter divorce,

wall goes up in Brooklyn couple's house

 

Updated 1/19/2007
5:20 PM ET
USA Today
By Nahal Toosi, Associated Press

 

NEW YORK — Like two Cold War adversaries, Chana and Simon Taub are separated by a wall — one that was built straight down the middle of their home to keep the bickering spouses apart.

Neither one wanted to move out of their beloved Brooklyn house, and so, in one of the strangest divorce battles the city has ever seen, a white drywall partition was erected a few weeks ago on orders from a judge.

The divorce case, which has been staggering through the courts for nearly two years, has been dubbed Brooklyn's "War of the Roses," after the 1989 movie starring Michael Douglas and Kathleen Turner as a battling couple.

Aside from the wall, the Taub version of the story has some other farcical elements: Chana says her husband of more than 20 years has bugged her phones. Simon says his wife owns too many shoes.

It's not as if the Taubs have no place else to go. For one thing, they own a place two doors down. But for reasons that include stubbornness, spite and their love of the home, both insist on staying in this particular house in Borough Park, a heavily Orthodox Jewish neighborhood.

"It's my house. And emotionally, in my age, I want to be in my house!" says Simon, 57, who was the one who requested the wall. He calls his wife a gold-digger.

Chana, 57, who claims her husband abused her, says she has as much right to stay as he does, if not more. "I need a house to live in and money to live on!" she says. "I worked very hard, like a horse, like a slave for him."

In New York City, it is not unusual for couples to fight over a house or refuse to move out during divorce proceedings. Judges sometimes ask couples to set boundaries, such as letting a spouse have access to the study during a certain part of the day.

But an actual wall? That's a new one, says Barry Berkman, a New York divorce lawyer.

The wall separates the living room from the staircase on the bottom floor of the Taubs' richly decorated, wood-paneled home, a three-story brown-brick rowhouse whose market value has been put at $923,000 by the city.

She gets the top floor, where the bedrooms are situated, along with the kitchen on the second floor. He gets the living room on the first floor and the dining room on the second floor. So that they don't run into each other on the second floor, the door between the dining room and the kitchen is barricaded on both sides.

One of the couple's children is staying with Dad; three others are staying with Mom.

Chana says that for two decades she served Simon like a virtual slave, putting up with physical and mental abuse that grew more severe over the years. She says she had to flush the toilet after him, and put on his socks and shoes for him. He became so violent by mid-2005 that she filed for divorce, she says.

Simon denies ever laying a hand on Chana, and says he gave her a luxurious lifestyle. But he says his sweater manufacturing company went bankrupt in the late 1990s, and he suffered a second heart attack in 2005 that only worsened their financial problems. He says she wants a divorce to squeeze what money he has left.

Chana says she doesn't want much from her husband, mainly just alimony, child support and a fair share of property.

In August 2005, a judge said Simon, whom Chana had forced out of the house, could move back in after building a wall. Chana appealed. An appeals court eventually allowed the wall, calling it a novel concept. The wall went up in December, and Simon moved back in.

At one point during the transition, someone said Chana had 300 pairs of shoes trapped on Simon's side. Chana claims that is a lie Simon cooked up to make her look like the Imelda Marcos of the Orthodox Jewish community.

"I am not interested in shoes," she says.

Simon retorts: "Maybe it was 299. I didn't count it."

Chana says that since Simon has returned, he has been monitoring her via video cameras. Simon says the surveillance goes both ways, and points to cameras on her side, though Chana claims she does not control those. Chana says Simon has bugged her phones. Simon says that's crazy — he doesn't care who she talks to.

Kimberly Flemke, a couples therapist in Philadelphia, says when spouses go so far as to refuse to leave a house while divorcing, it often means neither is ready to move on.

"It's clear that if they're going to go this length, there's still far too much connection," she says. "I would hope they'd both go to therapy."

    Amid bitter divorce, wall goes up in Brooklyn couple's house, UT, 19.1.2007,
    http://www.usatoday.com/news/offbeat/2007-01-19-warofroses_x.htm

 

 

 

 

 

On This Day - May 25, 1968

From The Times Archives

 

Mr Justice Faulks told the Divorce Court

that enduring silence from a spouse

was sometimes worse

than being given a black eye

 

BEING “sent to Coventry” by one’s spouse was worse than being given a black eye, though a black eye was a much more commonplace cruelty allegation than silences, Mr Justice Faulks said in the Divorce Court yesterday.

The Judge granted a decree nisi to Mr Edward James Barnes, aged 62, because of cruelty. Mr Barnes alleged that his wife, Elizabeth Cora, aged 72, had frequently “sent him to Coventry”.

Mrs Barnes, who still shares the same flat as her husband at Sloane Avenue Mansions, Chelsea, denied being cruel.

The Judge described the case as “much sadder than most”. The couple were married in August 1951, for comfort and companionship, he said. Mr Barnes has been married previously.

Mr Barnes occupied one bedroom and got all his meals out. Mrs Barnes had the rest of the flat — knowing no one and regarding life as being in prison.

Early during the marriage Mrs Barnes would go into fits of temper and not speak to her husband for a week at a time. He was depressed by his wife’s inexplicable silences. A doctor whose help he sought considered her “obsessional”.

In 1966 they went on separate holidays because they could find no one to look after their cat. When Mr Barnes returned, Mrs Barnes asked him whom he had taken with him. When he said he was alone, she disbelieved him and “sent him to Coventry” for two months. On an earlier occasion he had been “sent to Coventry” for 13 weeks.

From The Times Archives > On This Day - May 25, 1968,
The Times, 25.5.2005.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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