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Vocapedia > USA > Politics > White House > President, Government, Cabinet, Leadership

 

 

 

Matson

political cartoon

Cagle

10 April 2018

https://www.cagle.com/r-j-matson/2018/04/trump-fixer-upper

 

Donald J. Trump

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

President Bush and First Lady Laura Bush

wave to the crowd after the president's speech

at the 2004 Republican National Convention

at Madison Square Garden in New York.

 

Photograph: Todd Plitt

USA TODAY file

 

Report: NYPD eyed RNC-bound activists

AP        UT        25 March 2007

http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2007-03-25-nypd-convention_N.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cal Grondahl

political cartoon

Utah Standard Examiner

Cagle

16 December 2008

 

L to R

43rd US president George W. Bush,

Iraqi PM Nouri Maliki

Related

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/7782422.stm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

White House spokesman

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/02/23/
516945294/white-house-spokesman-predicts-more-federal-action-against-marijuana

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

presidential spokesman

 

https://www.nytimes.com/video/us/
100000005131085/the-back-story-on-trump-and-medicaid.html - June 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

White House communications director

 

http://www.npr.org/2017/07/31/
540631305/reports-scaramucci-out-as-white-house-communications-director

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

administration

 

https://www.npr.org/2020/11/17/
933848488/biden-administration-heres-who-has-been-nominated

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

White House staff

 

http://www.usatoday.com/news/washington/2006-04-19-
whitehouseshakeup_x.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

White House chief of staff

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA > White House Photos        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/gallery/2013/jan/04/
white-house-pictures 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

White House > security breach

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/27/
us/white-house-drone.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/30/
us/white-house-intruder-got-farther-than-first-reported-official-says.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

executive branch

 

https://www.npr.org/2019/05/11/
722106580/congress-showdown-with-the-executive-branch-here-s-what-you-need-to-know

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

presidency

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/20/
sunday-review/donald-trump-will-presidency-survive.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/12/
us/politics/how-federal-ethics-laws-will-apply-to-a-trump-presidency.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/07/
books/review/the-black-presidency-barack-obama-
and-the-politics-of-race-in-america-by-michael-eric-dyson.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA > President        UK / USA

 

https://www.loc.gov/rr/print/list/057_chron.html

 

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/12/23/
571722326/why-mental-health-is-a-poor-measure-of-a-president

http://www.npr.org/2017/08/20/
544735978/racial-issues-have-often-been-a-test-for-u-s-presidents-with-conflicted-feelings

http://www.npr.org/2017/08/18/
544523278/fathers-of-our-country-how-u-s-presidents-exercised-moral-leadership-in-crisis

http://www.npr.org/2017/04/28/
525875211/trump-the-president-who-hasn-t-stopped-being-a-businessman

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/04/13/
opinion/why-im-supporting-bernie-sanders.html

http://www.npr.org/2016/02/15/
466848438/why-president-how-the-u-s-named-its-leader

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/gallery/2009/jan/25/
barack-obama-white-house-pictures?picture=342286388

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

presidential authority

 

https://www.npr.org/2021/02/26/
971904219/syria-airstrikes-resurface-lawmakers-questions-over-presidential-authority

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

presidential power

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/congress-electoral-college-tally-live-updates/2021/01/08/
955043654/pelosi-asks-military-to-limit-trumps-nuclear-authority-heres-how-that-system-wor

 

https://www.npr.org/2020/06/09/
873495248/presidential-power

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

nuclear authority

ability to use nuclear weapons /

access the launch codes and order a nuclear strike

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/congress-electoral-college-tally-live-updates/2021/01/08/
955043654/pelosi-asks-military-to-limit-trumps-nuclear-authority-heres-how-that-system-wor

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

the president's legacy

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/15/us/
politics/obama-as-wartime-president-has-wrestled-with-protecting-nation-and-troops.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

economic legacy

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/01/
magazine/president-obama-weighs-his-economic-legacy.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

the president's record

 

http://www.npr.org/2016/01/12/
462857025/gov-nikki-haleys-republican-address-to-the-nation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

leadership

 

http://www.npr.org/2017/08/18/
544523278/fathers-of-our-country-how-u-s-presidents-exercised-moral-leadership-in-crisis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

be responsible for N    /    be accountable for N

 

https://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=jkfiF_tugU0 - 1 July 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

U.S. President George W. Bush's job-approval rating        UK / USA

 

http://www.usatoday.com/news/washington/2007-04-08-
bush-approval-rating_N.htm

 

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2006/apr/20/
usa.topstories3 

 

 

 

 

commander in chief

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/05/23/us/
politics/23obama.html

 

 

 

 

order a nuclear strike

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/11/
opinion/trump-korea-war-competence.html

 

 

 

 

chief executive

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/20/
opinion/20tue1.html

 

 

 

 

sitting president

http://www.npr.org/2017/04/28/
525930318/trump-to-be-first-sitting-president-since-reagan-to-address-nra

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/11/us/
politics/obama-hiroshima-visit.html

 

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/04/04/
us-usa-election-obama-analysis-idUSTRE7330NY20110404

 

 

 

 

lame-duck president

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/03/
opinion/03mon1.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/02/04/
opinion/04mon1.html

http://www.cagle.com/news/BushLameDuck/main.asp

 

 

 

 

president-elect        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2008/dec/18/
obama-time-person-of-year

 

 

 

 

presidential tradition > weekly address

https://www.npr.org/2021/02/06/
964889898/biden-revives-presidential-tradition-releasing-first-weekly-address

 

 

 

 

weekly radio address

President Bush's 2007 Radio Addresses

http://www.usatoday.com/news/washington/2007-12-29-
bush-address_N.htm

 

 

 

 

seal of the President of the United States

https://www.gocomics.com/stevebenson/2016/12/06 

 

 

 

 

Kennedy counselor > Theodore Chaikin Sorensen    1928-2010

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/01/us/
01sorensen.html

http://www.nytimes.com/packages/html/us/20101101
_sorensen.html

 

 

 

 

political adviser

 

 

 

 

top adviser to the president

 

 

 

 

chief political adviser

to President George W. Bush > Karl Rove    1994-2007

https://www.nytimes.com/topic/person/karl-rove  

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/04/us/
politics/04rove.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/13/
washington/13cnd-rove.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

power

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/10/
opinion/are-there-limits-to-trumps-power.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

emergency / special powers

 

https://www.npr.org/2019/02/15/
695203852/many-presidents-have-declared-emergencies-but-not-like-trump-has

 

https://www.npr.org/2019/02/15/
695012728/trump-expected-to-declare-national-emergency-to-help-fund-southern-border-wall

 

https://www.npr.org/2019/02/11/
693128901/if-trump-declares-an-emergency-to-build-the-wall-congress-can-block-him

 

https://www.npr.org/2019/01/07/
682965555/fact-check-can-trump-use-emergency-powers-to-build-the-wall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

powerful

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

powerless

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

executive power / powers

 

http://www.npr.org/2017/08/03/
541190032/trump-puts-his-signature-and-his-view-on-sanctions-law-following-presidential-tr

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/06/
opinion/executive-power-run-amok.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/01/us/
politics/obama-sets-the-stage-for-curbing-emissions.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/23/us/
politics/shift-on-executive-powers-let-obama-bypass-congress.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

separation of powers

 

http://www.usatoday.com/news/washington/2006-07-24-
lawyers-bush_x.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

power broker

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

war powers authority

 

http://www.npr.org/2015/04/07/
398065156/debate-has-the-president-exceeded-his-war-powers-authority

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

executive privilege

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/01/17/
578634802/bannon-and-trump-white-house-
raising-questions-about-executive-privilege-lawyers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Library of Congress

United States presidents and first ladies > Portraits gallery

https://www.loc.gov/rr/print/list/057_chron.html  

 

 

 

 

First Lady 

https://www.loc.gov/rr/print/list/057_chron.html  

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/02/us/
politics/melania-trump-first-lady.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/17/us/
a-first-lady-at-50-finding-her-own-path.html

 

 

 

 

Presidents of the United States

Selected Images From the Collections of the Library of Congress

https://www.loc.gov/rr/print/list/057_intr.html 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

term

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/15/us/
politics/obama-as-wartime-president-has-wrestled-with-protecting-nation-and-troops.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/06/us/
politics/clinton-delivers-stirring-plea-for-obama-second-term.html

 

 

 

 

second / new term

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/23/us/
politics/obama-speech-leaves-gop-stark-choices.html

http://fivethirtyeight.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/01/19/
for-second-term-presidents-a-shorter-honeymoon/

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/08/
opinion/an-invigorated-second-term-for-president-obama.html

 

 

 

 

 

cartoons > cagle > Obama second term        2013

https://www.cagle.com/news/obama-second-term/ 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

State of the Union speech

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

deliver a statement

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

outline plans for N

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/07/
us/politics/obama-fannie-mae-freddie-mac.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

propose

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/07/
us/politics/obama-fannie-mae-freddie-mac.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

bill

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2014/01/17/
263511534/obama-signs-trillion-dollar-federal-spending-bill

 

 

 

 

sign

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/
news-wrap-signing-farm-bill-obama-praises-bipartisan-compromise/

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2014/01/17/
263511534/obama-signs-trillion-dollar-federal-spending-bill

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/04/
us/politics/obama-signs-defense-bill-with-conditions.html

 

 

 

 

sign a presidential memorandum

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/06/17/us/
politics/17gays.html

 

 

 

 

sign a bill into law

http://www.npr.org/2017/08/02/
540660414/hfr-trump-signs-russia-sanctions-into-law-amid-putin-retaliation

 

 

 

 

 sign into law

a decision by Congress

http://www.npr.org/sections/alltechconsidered/2017/03/28/
521813464/as-congress-repeals-internet-privacy-rules-putting-your-options-in-perspective

 

 

 

 

sign into law

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rE3OFAAnHaI

 

 

 

 

 

sign into law a stop-gap spending bill

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

signing statements -

reserving the right to revise, interpret or disregard

laws on national security and constitutional grounds

http://www.usatoday.com/news/washington/2006-07-24-lawyers-bush_x.htm

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/04/
us/politics/obama-signs-defense-bill-with-conditions.html

 

http://www.usatoday.com/news/washington/2006-07-24-
lawyers-bush_x.htm

 

 

 

 

have the constitutional power to V

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/04/
us/politics/obama-signs-defense-bill-with-conditions.html

 

 

 

 

enact

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/18/
us/politics/18obama.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

presidential

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/19/
opinion/can-president-trump-be-presidential.html

 

 

 

 

presidential power

http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2014/01/29/
presidential-power-vs-congressional-inertia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

presidential appointments

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/27/
opinion/a-unanimous-supreme-court-a-blow-to-presidential-appointments.html

 

 

 

 

presidential appointments

to the Supreme Court

 

The Appointment Clause

of the Constitution

(Article II, Section 2, clause 2)

states the President "shall nominate,

and by and with the Advice

and Consent of the Senate,

shall appoint ...

Judges of the supreme Court."

 

That "advice and consent" role

has meant different things in U.S. history.

 

In the early days of the republic,

nominees to the court

got a passing glance.

 

The Senate acted speedily,

within about a week,

from the date of nomination to a vote.

 

But there was

a marked difference after 1967,

the year Thurgood Marshall

was nominated to be the first

black Supreme Court justice.

 

Post-1967,

the median wait time

for a presidential nominee

has ballooned

to more than two months.

(Current members of the court

faced an average of 71 days.

That includes Antonin Scalia,

who died at the age of 79

on Saturday.)

 

And it's very possible,

if not probable,

that Obama's nominee

to replace Scalia

— and he is pledging to do fulfill

his "constitutional responsibilities" to do so

— will break the record for the longest

wait for a vote in history.

 

The fight to replace Scalia

could be historic,

possibly resulting

in the longest vacancy on the court

since it went to nine justices in 1869.

http://www.npr.org/2016/02/14/
466723547/7-things-to-know-about-presidential-appointments-to-the-supreme-court

 

http://www.npr.org/2016/02/14/
466723547/7-things-to-know-about-presidential-appointments-to-the-supreme-court

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

recess appointments

 

http://www.usatoday.com/news/washington/2007-04-05-
bush-recess-option_N.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The President's Daily Brief./ daily intelligence briefing

 

http://www.npr.org/2016/12/13/
505348507/what-exactly-is-the-presidents-daily-brief-and-why-is-it-important

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

overhaul

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/03/11/us/
politics/11web-educ.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Camp David, Maryland

 

https://www.npr.org/2017/12/23/
571750761/for-president-trump-no-christmas-at-camp-david

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

at Camp David

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Air Force One

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Air Force One is actually not a single plane;

in fact, it is a radio call sign used

for any plane that happens to carry the president.

 

There are two 747-200s,

designated VC-25As by the Air Force,

that carry the president

unless he travels to a place

where the runway is too short,

in which case he switches to a smaller plane.

 

Those 747-200s,

with tail codes 28000 and 29000,

were commissioned by Ronald Reagan

and delivered in 1990

under the first President George Bush,

when the Soviet Union was still around

and White House aides used beepers.

 

The big communications innovation at the time

was a fax machine that the president’s staff could use

to keep in touch with the ground.

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/19/
us/politics/air-force-one-a-cherished-perk-awaiting-an-upgrade.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Boeing 757-200 / Air Force One        USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/02/05/
us/politics/biden-air-force-one.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Boeing VC-25 / Air Force One        USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/02/05/
us/politics/biden-air-force-one.html

 

http://archives.cnn.com/2002/US/02/15/
airforce.one/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

customized Boeing 747-200B jumbo jet / Air Force One

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/19/
us/politics/air-force-one-a-cherished-perk-awaiting-an-upgrade.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Boeing 757 / Air Force Two        USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/02/05/
us/politics/biden-air-force-one.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marine One

 

http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2007-03-03-
enterprise-usat_N.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

the Beast - the presidential limousine

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/03/
us/one-day-in-an-elevator-with-obama-then-out-of-a-job.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

US government

https://www.usa.gov/

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/01/
us/politics/congress-shutdown-debate.html

 

 

 

 

government based on the rule of law

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/08/
opinion/after-mr-trumps-din-the-quiet-grandeur-of-the-courts.html

 

 

 

 

Government Accountability Office

http://www.npr.org/2017/03/28/
521823473/gao-agrees-to-review-costs-of-trumps-trips-to-mar-a-lago

 

http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2007-10-10-boot-camps_N.htm

 

http://www.usatoday.com/news/washington/2006-10-28-economic-disaster_x.htm

http://www.usatoday.com/news/washington/2006-09-06-disaster-response_x.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

cabinet

 

https://www.jacobinmag.com/2020/12/
david-dayen-american-prospect-joe-biden-cabinet - 8 December 2020

 

 

 

 

http://www.npr.org/2016/11/10/
501606327/who-might-be-in-donald-trumps-cabinet-plus-more-about-the-transition

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/11/
opinion/make-the-cabinet-more-effective.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

cabinet meeting

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

cabinet room

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/03/08/
591742988/in-the-white-house-cabinet-room-parallels-to-apprentice-boardroom

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

cabinet departments

 

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/01/08/us/
politics/women-in-the-obama-administration.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interior Department / Department of the Interior

 

https://theintercept.com/2020/12/29/
deb-haaland-interior-native/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Justice Department > Attorney General

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/12/
us/justice-dept-seeks-to-curtail-stiff-drug-sentences.html

 

https://www.justice.gov/opa/speech/
attorney-general-eric-holder-delivers-remarks-annual-meeting-american-bar-associations 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Justice Department white paper

 

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/08/10/
us/politics/10obama-surveillance-documents.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2013/02/05/
what-standards-must-be-met-for-the-us-to-kill-an-american-citizen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA > U.S. Department of State > Secretary of State        UK / USA

 

https://www.state.gov/

 

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2021/jan/14/
mike-pompeo-lashes-out-reign-ends

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/11/22/
us/politics/biden-antony-blinken-secretary-of-state.html

 

 

 

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2017/12/27/
573799686/for-rex-tillerson-a-rocky-first-year-as-trumps-secretary-of-state

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2017/08/30/
547298214/are-trumps-foreign-policy-stumbles-first-year-growing-pains-or-a-reason-for-worr

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/02/02/
513077136/tillerson-takes-the-helm-at-the-state-department-promising-respect-and-honesty

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/01/
us/politics/rex-tillerson-secretary-of-state-confirmed.html

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/12/
us/politics/rex-tillerson-secretary-of-state-trump.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

at the State Department

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/02/02/
513077136/tillerson-takes-the-helm-at-the-state-department-promising-respect-and-honesty

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Defense secretary / secretary of defense

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/07/24/
631742060/examining-where-jim-mattis-stands-in-the-trump-administration

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/12/01/
502784038/trump-nominates-gen-james-mattis-as-his-defense-secretary

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/05/31/world/asia/
31military.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Energy secretary

 

https://www.gocomics.com/nickanderson/2016/12/14 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/13/us/
politics/rick-perry-energy-secretary-trump.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Secretary of Education / Education scretary

 

https://www.npr.org/2021/01/07/
954725906/devos-resigns-as-education-secretary-says-impressionable-children-are-watching

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/biden-transition-updates/2020/12/22/
949114642/biden-to-pick-connecticut-schools-chief-miguel-cardona-as-education-secretary

 

https://www.gocomics.com/jeffdanziger/2017/01/20 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/04/28/
education/28spellings.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

health secretary / secretary of health and human services

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/10/
us/politics/tom-price-health-and-human-services.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Labor secretary

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/coronavirus-live-updates/2021/05/08/
995065486/getting-women-back-to-work-is-key-to-a-strong-recovery-labor-secretary-says

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Treasury Secretary

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/02/13/
515084616/steven-mnuchin-confirmed-as-treasury-secretary

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/itsallpolitics/2015/10/08/
446707186/treasury-secretary-keeps-up-pressure-to-raise-debt-limit

 

http://www.usatoday.com/news/washington/2006-05-30-
snow_x.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

step down

 

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2014/09/25/
351363171/eric-holder-to-step-down-as-attorney-general

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

resign

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/congress-electoral-college-tally-live-updates/2021/01/07/
954518782/law-enforcement-and-social-media-identifying-u-s-capitol-mob-members

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/congress-electoral-college-tally-live-updates/2021/01/07/
954495552/transportation-secretary-elaine-chao-to-resign-citing-violence-at-capitol

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Texas Secretary of State

 

https://www.sos.state.tx.us/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Guardian        p. 2        30 August 2004

Huge protest against Bush on eve of party meeting

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2004/aug/30/
usa.uselections2004 

 

Masks:

Donald Rumsfeld (L)

and 43rd U.S. president George W. Bush (R).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

immunity

 

The Constitution and the Supreme Court

both say a president is largely immune

from civil lawsuits.

 

The chief executive

does critical work leading the nation,

the logic goes,

and shouldn't be bedeviled

by ordinary civil lawsuits.

http://www.npr.org/2017/03/28/
521841986/trump-lawyers-claim-immunity-in-sex-harassment-suit-just-as-bill-clinton-did

 

 

http://www.npr.org/2017/03/28/
521841986/trump-lawyers-claim-immunity-in-sex-harassment-suit-just-as-bill-clinton-did

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

poll

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/26/us/
politics/obamas-approval-rating-matches-two-year-low-poll-shows.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

approval rating

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/26/
us/politics/obamas-approval-rating-matches-two-year-low-poll-shows.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

George W. Bush Presidential Library

 

https://www.nytimes.com/topic/organization/
george-w-bush-presidential-library  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

American politics and pop culture

 

http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2009/07/24/
fashion/20090726-celeb-slideshow_index.html
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Corpus of news articles

 

USA > Politics > White House

 

President, Government, Leadership

 

 

 

BOOKS

Presidential Words

In a Speechifying Season,
a Look At How the Writer's Job
Has Changed

 

By ROBERT K. LANDERS

April 12, 2008; Page W8

White House Ghosts
By Robert Schlesinger
Simon & Schuster, 581 pages, $30


The eight hours Richard Goodwin spent writing the speech one March day in 1965 were "the finest moments of my life in politics," and the address itself, delivered in the chamber of the House of Representatives that very night -- leading to the passage of the Voting Rights Act -- was perhaps the high point of Lyndon B. Johnson's presidency. "It is not just Negroes, but it is all of us, who must overcome the crippling legacy of bigotry and injustice. And we . . . shall . . . overcome," Johnson said, making the black protest anthem his own rallying cry.

After the moving speech, reporters were told that Johnson himself had composed it and was responsible, in particular, for the inclusion of its most memorable phrase. But the speech and the phrase were, in reality, Mr. Goodwin's work. After a year of close collaboration with the president, he had drawn on his own knowledge of the man -- "not merely his views, but his manner of expression, patterns of reasoning, the natural cadences of his speech," Mr. Goodwin recalled in his 1988 memoir. The speechwriter had sought "to heighten and polish -- illuminate, as it were -- his inward beliefs and natural idiom, to attain . . . an authenticity of expression." Though Mr. Goodwin's hands were on the typewriter, "the document was pure Johnson."

The longstanding tradition back then was that the presidential speechwriter should remain largely out of public sight, his existence almost a secret shame, intimating, as a speechwriter for President Carter once put it, that the nation's chief executive was "too lazy or too stupid to decide for himself what he is going to say." President-elect John F. Kennedy, with his Inaugural Address in nearly final form, even pretended to be writing a first draft of it in longhand so as to give a leading reporter the impression that he, Kennedy, and not Theodore Sorensen or anyone else, was the author. But in recent decades, Washington journalist Robert Schlesinger observes in "White House Ghosts," the phantoms -- "for better or worse" -- have become far more visible.

Mr. Schlesinger, who interviewed more than 90 speechwriters and other White House aides, has written an evenhanded account of the speechwriting for presidents, from Franklin Delano Roosevelt to George Walker Bush, with a chapter devoted to each presidency. His episodic history is fluent, well researched and richly detailed.

Raymond Moley, one of FDR's speechwriters during his first term, saw himself as more than a wordsmith, and rightly so. "My job from the beginning . . . was to sift proposals for him, discuss facts and ideas with him, and help him crystallize his own policy," Moley wrote in 1939. Implicit in this conception of the speechwriter's job, notes Mr. Schlesinger, was the idea "that policies and words are inextricably linked -- the former cannot be conjured in the absence of the latter." Moley, Sam Rosenman and other Roosevelt speechwriters were advisers as well as wordsmiths. But the job "has evolved," Mr. Schlesinger notes, "as television eclipsed radio as the nation's medium, as the White House staff grew from a handful to a sprawling group of specialized cadres, and, of course, as each president has dealt with it in his own way."

In Carol Gelderman's earlier study of presidential speechwriting -- the incisive and concise (221 pages) "All the Presidents' Words" (1997) -- she identified the Nixon administration as the one where the decisive break occurred. President Nixon "established the first formally structured White House speechwriting office, called the Writing and Research Department," its ranks fluctuating from 12 to 50, part of what Nixon called the "PR group." But, said Ms. Gelderman, an English professor at the University of New Orleans, "the writers rarely assumed a consultative role in policy matters. Unlike their predecessors from Rosenman to [LBJ's Harry] McPherson, Nixon's writers had no regular access to the Oval Office." Indeed, the reclusive Nixon wrote some speeches virtually on his own. Mr. Schlesinger's account bears Ms. Gelderman out.

Speechwriters had little involvement in the making of policy and only limited access to the president in most of the administrations that followed Nixon's, even that of the "Great Communicator." "For eight years," writes Mr. Schlesinger, "Ronald Reagan's speechwriters had had diminishing access to a president who was remote from even his closest aides. [But he] had presented a clear ideology and style so they had gotten his voice even though they might go months without seeing him." Between the ideological conservatives writing Reagan's speeches and the more pragmatic senior staffers in his inner circle, there was continuing tension -- tension that was constructive during the first term, in Mr. Schlesinger's view, but, with some different people involved, destructive during the second.

Reagan appreciated the importance of speeches to a successful presidency, but George Herbert Walker Bush, Jimmy Carter, and Gerald Ford were less concerned with the words they proclaimed, Mr. Schlesinger reports. Mr. Bush disdained "high-flying" rhetoric and never even practiced delivering his speeches beforehand. Mr. Carter "didn't much like the idea of using [speechwriters], ever," one of his wordsmiths recalled. President Ford "rarely faced up to the fact that making a major address is one of the most important things a President does," said his chief speechwriter, Robert Hartmann. Journalist John Hersey, shadowing Ford for a week in 1975 much as he had shadowed Harry Truman in 1950, found himself "profoundly disturbed by what seemed to me the aimlessness of the speechwriting session" that Ford had with his writers in advance of an address at the University of Notre Dame. Hersey contrasted it with a speechwriting session of Truman's, "at which most of his principal advisers, including Dean Acheson, were present, and during which policy was really and carefully shaped through its articulation."

Presidential speeches are important not only as a means of educating and persuading the public but also, according to Mr. Schlesinger's father, the late historian Arthur Schlesinger Jr., "as a means of forcing decisions, crystallizing policies, and imposing discipline" within the executive branch.

During the presidency of Bill Clinton, there was something of a return to the older tradition of involving speechwriters in the making of policy, the author says. "There was more crossover between the speechwriters and policy aides than in any presidency since [LBJ's]. . . . Clinton preferred to work on speeches with aides who could answer substantive questions about policy." But Clinton also often preferred to ad lib his remarks rather than stick to his prepared speech, and he spoke so often that, in effect, he devalued his own words. In a typical year, by one count, he spoke in public 550 times, compared with Reagan's 320 times and Truman's 88.

Unlike his father and despite his own oft-derided propensity for verbal gaffes, George W. Bush has recognized the importance of speeches, notes Mr. Schlesinger. "He put a great deal of time and energy into speech preparation and faith in his speechwriters." As some of Bush's speeches illustrate, particularly in the aftermath of the Sept. 11 terror attacks, a president's words do matter.

By departing from the older tradition, recent presidents seem to have inadvertently denied themselves the power of speechwriting to clarify their own thinking and aid in the making of policy. Arthur Schlesinger, to whom his son has dedicated "White House Ghosts," said he fully agreed with Carol Gelderman on "the necessity of 'uniting important policymaking and speechwriting functions in one trusted adviser.' " Robert Schlesinger refrains from endorsing that prescription, but his extensive study seems to provide further support for it.
 


Mr. Landers is a writer in Arlington, Va.,

and the author of "An Honest Writer:

The Life and Times of James T. Farrell" (Encounter).

Presidential Words,
WSJ,
12.4.2008,
https://www.wsj.com/articles/SB120795568431409207

 

 

 

 

 

March 31 1981

 

Reagan stable after shooting

 

From The Guardian archive

 

March 31 1981

The Guardian

 

President Reagan was last night recovering in hospital after a successful two-hour operation to remove a single bullet from his left lung following an assassination attempt outside the Hilton Hotel in the centre of Washington.

Dr Dennis O'Leary, a spokesman for the George Washington University Hospital, said the President was awake and in a "stable condition." He said there had been no serious danger to the President's life. Dr O'Leary said the bullet had ricocheted off his seventh rib. But he assured the American people that the 70-year-old President was in "excellent" condition and in good physical shape.

Three other men were seriously wounded in the shooting. They were the President's 40-year-old press secretary, Mr James Brady, a Washington policeman, and a secret service agent. Dr O'Leary said a bullet had passed through Mr Brady's brain and he had experienced severe brain injury.

According to the doctors, Mr Reagan had been given a blood transfusion on his arrival at the hospital and before going into surgery. The bullet was found lodged in the tissue of the lung and was easily removed because there was no abdominal bleeding. The doctors suggested that Mr Reagan could be up and about again within a fortnight.

The doctor said that Mr Reagan had sailed through the operation" for a man of his age. But he warned that an operation of the kind he had been through causes "stress" to the body, though in Mr Reagan's case, because of his good physical condition, the doctor did not seem unduly concerned.

The White House said the President was in good spirits as he was wheeled into surgery . He told Senator Paul Laxalt, "Don't worry about me, I'll make it." A doctor said the President had told Mrs Reagan, "Honey, I forgot to duck", and that he looked up at assembled aides and said, "Who's minding the store?" and that he joked with surgeons, "Please tell me you're Republicans."

The Secretary of State, Mr Alexander Haig, took control of the government soon after the incident, awaiting the arrival in Washington of the vice-president, Mr George Bush,

Speaking from the White House, Mr Haig said he had been in touch with America's friends and allies abroad.

Mr Haig looked shaken as he read the statement in a broken voice, saying that no defence alert had been taken. In the pandemonium outside the Washington Hilton after the shooting, secret service men wrestled the assailant to the ground. He was named as John Warnock Hinckley, aged 25, of Evergreen, Colorado. The secret service said that Hinckley seemed to have acted alone.

From The Guardian archive >
March 31 1981 > Reagan stable after shooting,
G, Republished 31.3.2007, p. 36,
http://digital.guardian.co.uk/guardian/2007/03/31/pages/ber36.shtml

 

 

 

 

 

From The Times Archive

 

On This Day - May 18, 1976

 

After the Watergate scandal,
Jimmy Carter’s position
as a Washington outsider
became an electoral asset,
and he received more than 50 per cent
of the popular vote in the 1977 election

 

MR JIMMY CARTER’S campaign technique has improved since the primary season opened in New Hampshire last February. He now carries the aura of a man who might very well be President next January, instead of seeming simply one of a large number of candidates claiming that the wind of victory was in his sails.

He treats the topics he discusses seriously, balancing specific proposals with his now familiar oath of sincerity which still sounds sincere, even though he has been swearing it in public several times a day for nearly 18 months.

At a rally in a Veterans of Foreign Wars hall in a working class suburb of Baltimore on Friday night, the effects of this balance in his oratory were striking. He started to talk about the need for honesty in government and the hall fell silent. Everyone listened. This is the thing which disturbs everyone in America, the long-latent suspicion that every politician in Washington was corrupt, which exploded with Watergate’s demonstration that the suspicion was often justified.

He said that the important thing was for the candidate to keep the confidence of the electors. “I would far rather lose the election, I would rather lose my life, than betray your confidence”, he said. Enough people have heard him and believed him to bring him to the brink of victory.

From The Times Archive,
On This Day - May 18, 1976,
18.5.2005,
http://www.newsint-archive.co.uk/pages/main.asp - broken URL

 

 

 

 

 

From The Times Archive

 

On This Day - July 20, 1974

 

A resolution submitted
to the House Judiciary Committee
sought to impeach President Richard Nixon
over the Watergate scandal.

Two weeks later Nixon
became the first US president to resign.

 

A FOUR-PART draft resolution impeaching President Nixon for alleged “high crimes and misdemeanours” ranging from obstruction of justice over the Watergate affair to personal tax fraud was presented to the House Judiciary Committee today. The devastating case was presented by Mr John Doar, chief committee counsel to the 38 members who will have to vote whether to submit a full bill of particulars to the full House. A vote is expected within a week.

Mr Doar was quoted by members as saying “reasonable men acting reasonably would find the President guilty”. Mr Nixon was cited by Mr Doar for:

1. Being “personally and directly responsible” for the cover-up of the Watergate break-in which had been done on his “behalf”. Specifically, he was accused of suborning perjury, paying hush money, destroying evidence, and interfering with the legal investigations.

2. “Massive and persistent” abuse of his powers through the break-in at Dr Ellsberg’s psychiatrists’ office, unlawful wiretapping and abuse of government agencies like the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Central Intelligence Agency and the Internal Revenue Service.

3. Contempt of Congress through his refusal to supply subpoenaed evidence.

4. Fraud in his income taxes, through claiming over $450,000 deductions for a fraudulent gift of his pre-Presidential papers to the nation.

From The Times Archive,
On This Day - July 20, 1974,
The Times,
20.7.2005,
http://www.newsint-archive.co.uk/pages/main.asp - broken URL

 

 

 

 

November 23, 1963

 

A tragedy for the world

 

From The Guardian archive

 

Saturday November 23, 1963

Guardian

 

President Kennedy was in Texas to gather support for his Civil Rights programme. Like Lincoln before him, it has cost him his life. He believed in it and he fought for it.

The best memorial to him would be a more rapid acceptance of it in the South and in Northern communities where the subtler forms of segregation and discrimination are practised and, for that matter, in every country where equal rights and opportunities are not accorded without regard to race or religion.

Civil rights became the foremost part of his domestic programme. He had to move carefully; both because haste could so easily bring bloodshed, and because he was opposed by the Southern wing of his own party.

His platform in the 1960 Presidential campaign came out boldly for the Negro's right to share school benches and polling booths with whites, and for the Federal Government's duty to enforce this. He was backed in this by Lyndon Johnson, himself a Southerner and now President.

To the world, he will be remembered as the President who helped to bring the thaw in the cold war. The real change came only after Cuba.

That crisis, taking the world to the edge of a nuclear war, left its mark on both him and Mr Khrushchev. Kennedy certainly - and Mr Khrushchev probably - knew that a false move by either of them could have been catastrophic.

Although, in a conventional sense, the Americans won the encounter, there was no crowing in the White House. The President recognised how frightening were the consequences of misunderstandings. But he worked for improvement, as did Mr Khrushchev, and it came. He leaves in this a monument - but one on to which his successors must build.

President Kennedy respected his allies and worked with them. His last visit to this country was during a lightning tour of Europe - part triumphal and part persuasive - in which he sought to reassure people and Governments that the United States was as deeply committed as ever to the defence of Western Europe.

But he will be remembered for his youth and friendliness. "The torch has been passed to a new generation of Americans," he said.

To people in many other countries it was gladdening to see leading the greatest of Western nations a young man, though one matured by war and years of public service.

He and Mrs Kennedy made the White House what it has hardly ever been before - a place where artists and thinkers of all nations and creeds were welcomed. He was a true liberal, a thinker himself no less than a man of action, and a courageous leader.

From the Guardian archive > November 23, 1963 >
A tragedy for the world, G, Republished 23.11.2006,
https://www.theguardian.com/world/1963/nov/23/usa.
mainsection 

 

 

 

 

 

President Kennedy assassinated

 

November 22, 1963

Alistair Cooke, New York

 

President John Fitzgerald Kennedy, the 35th President of the United States, was shot during a motorcade drive through downtown Dallas at 1pm (6pm British time) this afternoon. He died in the emergency room of the Parkland Memorial Hospital 32 minutes after the attack. He was 46. He is the third president to be assassinated in office since Lincoln, and the first since President McKinley in 1901.

Police held as chief suspect Lee Oswald, said to be a self-styled Communist who once renounced US citizenship and unsuccessfully sought to become a Russian citizen. The chairman of a Fair Play for Cuba committee, he was arrested in a cinema after a policeman had been killed.

The new President is the Vice-President, Lyndon Baines Johnson, a 55-year-old native Texan, who took the oath of office in Dallas at five minutes to four at the hands of a woman judge, and later arrived in Washington with the body of the dead President.

This is being written in the numbed interval between the first shock and the harried attempt to reconstruct a sequence of fact from an hour of tumult. However, this is the first assassination of a world figure that took place in the age of television, and every network and station in the country took up the plotting of the appalling story. It begins to form a grisly pattern, contradicted by a grisly preface: the projection on television screens of a happy crowd and a grinning President only a few seconds before the gunshots.

The President was almost at the end of his two-day tour of Texas. He was to make a luncheon speech in the Dallas Trade Mart building and his motor procession had another mile to go. He had had the warmest welcome of his trip from a great crowd at the airport.

The cries a personal touch were so engaging that Mrs Kennedy took the lead and walked from the ramp of the presidential plane to a fence that held the crowd in. She was followed by the President, and they seized hands and forearms and smiled at the people.

The Secret Service and police were relieved to get them into their car, where Mrs Kennedy sat between the President and John B Connally, the governor of Texas. Dallas police had instituted the most stringent security in the city's history: they wanted no repetition of the disgraceful brawl that humiliated Adlai Stevenson when he attended a United Nations rally on October 24. The motorcade was going along slowly but smoothly when three muffled shots, which the crowd first mistook for fireworks, cracked through the cheers.

President Kennedy assassinated, Alistair Cooke, New York,
November 22, 1963,
The Guardian > Archives, G, p. 30, 23.11.2005,
http://digital.guardian.co.uk/guardian/2005/11/23/pages/ber30.shtml

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Related > Anglonautes > Vocapedia

 

politics / legislation > Congress > Senate > Impeachment

 

 

U.S. Constitution > U.S. Supreme Court

 

 

U.S. Constitution > U.S. Supreme Court > Justices

 

 

federal justice, Justice Department prosecutor, Attorney General

 

 

federal justice > appeal courts

 

 

politics > USA

 

 

politics > world > countries, foreign policy,

Arab Spring, Middle East, diplomacy, U.N.

 

 

 

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