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Vocapedia > USA > Politics > Presidential and Congressional elections > Results

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photograph 1:

Las Vegas, Nevada

A supporter at a Republican watch party reacts as results are announced

 

Photograph: David Becker/EPA

 

The US awaits election results – in pictures

Scenes from across the United States as voters headed to the polls

and Joe Biden and Donald Trump face off in a tense presidential election

G

Wed 4 Nov 2020    06.05 GMT

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/gallery/2020/nov/03/
americans-vote-in-2020-in-pictures

 

 

 

Photograph 2:

Las Vegas, Nevada

Loretta Oakes, a Trump supporter,

reacts while watching returns in favour of Biden

at a Republican election night party

 

Photograph: John Locher/AP

 

20 photographs of the week

Trump and Biden contest the US election, lockdown in London, an earthquake hits Turkey,

and rising cases of Covid-19: the most striking images from around the world

G

Sat 7 Nov 2020    06.00 GMT

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2020/nov/07/
20-photographs-of-the-week

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Results Are In

political cartoon

Patrick Chappatte        NYT        NOV. 9, 2016

https://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/09/
opinion/chappatte-on-pre-election-jitters.html

 

Donald Trump

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USA > election results        UK / USA

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/live-updates-2020-election-results/2020/11/08/
932755718/euphoria-residents-of-harris-ancestral-village-in-india-celebrate-her-win

 

https://apps.npr.org/elections20-interactive/ - November 2020

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/live-updates-2020-election-results/2020/11/07/
932474110/president-elect-biden-says-it-s-time-for-america-to-unite

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/live-updates-2020-election-results/2020/11/07/
932646213/harris-you-ushered-in-a-new-day-for-america

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/11/07/
us/politics/kamala-harris.htm

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/11/07/
us/politics/biden-election.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/ng-interactive/2020/nov/07/
us-election-2020-live-results-donald-trump-joe-biden-presidential-votes-pennsylvania-georgia-arizona-nevada

 

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/gallery/2020/nov/03/
americans-vote-in-2020-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/
upshot/election-2016-voting-precinct-maps.html

 

 

 

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2016/11/09/
501000839/heres-what-students-are-saying-about-the-election-results

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/09/
opinion/chappatte-on-pre-election-jitters.html

http://www.gocomics.com/scottstantis/2016/11/08

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/07/
opinion/chappatte-on-pre-election-jitters.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

too close to call

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/live-updates-2020-election-results/2020/11/07/
932275472/biden-widens-lead-in-white-house-race-as-contest-remains-too-close-to-call

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

media > call the election results

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ballotts > hand recount

 

https://www.npr.org/2020/11/13/
934592764/with-biden-ahead-georgia-begins-hand-recount-of-nearly-5-million-ballots

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Election results > Complete results > Interactive Map    1992-2008

 

http://elections.nytimes.com/2008/
results/president/map.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

be elected president

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/09/us/
politics/hillary-clinton-donald-trump-president.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

popular vote vs. electoral college

 

http://www.gocomics.com/claybennett/2016/11/27

http://www.npr.org/2016/11/22/
503052632/two-weeks-after-election-day-california-continues-counting-ballots

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/11/09/
501393501/shades-of-2000-clinton-surpasses-trump-in-popular-vote-tally

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

lose the popular vote

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

state-by-state results        2008

 

http://politics.nytimes.com/election-guide/2008/
results/votes/index.html

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/interactive/2008/feb/01/us
elections2008

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

win

 

https://www.npr.org/2020/11/07/
928803493/biden-wins-presidency-according-to-ap-edging-trump-in-turbulent-race

 

 

 

 

http://www.npr.org/2016/11/12/
501848636/7-reasons-donald-trump-won-the-presidential-election

http://www.npr.org/2016/11/09/
500743310/trump-wins-now-what

http://www.npr.org/2016/11/09/
501378673/how-trump-won-according-to-the-exit-polls

 

http://www.reuters.com/article/newsOne/idUSN0954927620080210

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

win the election

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/05/us/
politics/05elect.html

http://www.reuters.com/article/politicsNews/idUSTRE4A36V020081105

http://www.reuters.com/news/video?videoId=93299&newsChannel=politicsNews

http://www.reuters.com/news/video?videoId=93302&newsChannel=politicsNews

http://www.reuters.com/news/video?videoId=93293&newsChannel=politicsNews

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

win

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/live-updates-2020-election-results/2020/11/08/
932755718/euphoria-residents-of-harris-ancestral-village-in-india-celebrate-her-win

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/live-updates-2020-election-results/2020/11/07/
932545118/climate-activists-celebrate-biden-win

 

http://www.npr.org/2016/11/09/
501436007/watch-president-obama-to-speak-on-trump-win-clinton-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

sweep

 

https://www.reuters.com/article/politicsNews/idUSN04424541
20080210

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

victory

 

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2012/11/06/us/
politics/Election-Night-Photos.html

 

http://www.usatoday.com/news/politics/election2008/2008-11-09-
obama-history_N.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

tight victory

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/07/us/
politics/obama-headquarters.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

victor

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

claim victory

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

victory / acceptance speech

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/11/08/
us/politics/biden-victory-speech-takeaways.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/article/biden-speech-transcript.html

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/10/us/
politics/trump-speech-transcript.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

victorious

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/11/08/
501317627/financial-markets-plunge-amid-uncertainty-about-election-outcome

 

 

 

 

cartoons > cagle > Obama wins 2012

http://www.cagle.com/news/obama-wins-2012/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

celebrate

https://www.npr.org/sections/live-updates-2020-election-results/2020/11/07/
932497653/biden-supporters-celebrate-in-d-c-s-black-lives-matter-plaza

 

https://www.npr.org/2020/11/07/
932541010/from-jubilation-to-dismay-a-divided-nation-reacts-to-bidens-victory

 

 

 

 

cheer

https://www.npr.org/sections/live-updates-2020-election-results/2020/11/07/
932545118/climate-activists-celebrate-biden-win

 

 

 

 

be elected

http://www.usatoday.com/news/politics/election2008/
president.htm

 

 

 

 

be re-elected president of the United States

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/07/us/
politics/obama-romney-presidential-election-2012.html

 

 

 

 

second term

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/08/
opinion/an-invigorated-second-term-for-president-obama.html

 

 

 

 

clinch the presidency

http://www.npr.org/2016/11/09/
500716650/donald-trump-clinches-the-presidency-in-major-upset

 

 

 

 

 incumbent president

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/11/07/
us/politics/biden-election.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

loss

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/11/08/
us/trump-evangelicals-biden.html

 

https://www.npr.org/2020/11/07/
932203022/as-trumps-chances-fade-murdoch-s-fox-news-faces-wrath-and-tough-choices

 

http://www.npr.org/2016/11/09/
501436007/watch-president-obama-to-speak-on-trump-win-clinton-loss

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

concession speech

 

https://www.npr.org/2020/11/02/
929085584/how-to-lose-an-election-a-brief-history-of-the-presidential-concession-speech

 

http://www.npr.org/2016/11/08/
501205791/concession-speeches-capture-a-gracious-moment-in-election-season

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

concede

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/11/16/
opinion/trump-biden-concession.html

 

https://www.npr.org/2020/11/16/
934534951/obama-calls-trumps-refusal-to-concede-another-breach-of-basic-democratic-norms

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/live-updates-2020-election-results/2020/11/10/
933533575/biden-says-trumps-refusal-to-concede-wont-impede-transition

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/live-updates-2020-election-results/2020/11/07/
932062684/far-from-over-trump-refuses-to-concede-as-ap-others-call-election-for-biden

 

https://www.theguardian.com/news/audio/2020/oct/14/
us-election-2020-what-if-trump-refuses-to-concede-podcast

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

concede the White House race to N

 

http://www.npr.org/2016/11/09/
501425243/watch-live-hillary-clinton-concedes-presidential-race-to-donald-trump

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

presidential also-rans

http://www.npr.org/2016/11/11/
501213651/all-hail-the-presidential-also-rans

 

 

 

 

Results from the 2016 presidential, Senate and House Races.

http://www.npr.org/2016/11/09/
500743310/trump-wins-now-what

http://www.npr.org/2016/11/09/
500711970/republicans-keep-control-of-the-senate-as-democrats-largely-falter

http://www.npr.org/2016/11/06/
500939010/2016-house-election-results-for-congressional-races

 

 

 

 

 

Results

from the 2012 presidential, Senate and House Races.

Presidential Results

Senate Results

House Results

State Results

http://elections.nytimes.com/2012/
results/president

 

 

 

 

sheriff

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/11/09/
501388042/maricopa-sheriff-joe-apraio-loses-reelection-fight

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

US congressional election results        UK / USA

http://www.usatoday.com/news/politics/election2008/2008-11-05-
1a-cover_N.htm

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/interactive/2008/nov/04/us-
elections-congress

 

 

 

 

Complete results > Senate > Senate Map

http://elections.nytimes.com/2008/
results/senate/map.html

 

 

 

 

Complete results > Senate > House of Representatives Map

http://elections.nytimes.com/2008/
results/house/map.html

 

 

 

 

Senate races

http://www.npr.org/2016/11/09/
500711970/republicans-keep-control-of-the-senate-as-democrats-largely-falter

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/02/nyregion/
02senate.html

http://www.usatoday.com/news/politics/election2008/2008-10-30-
gop_N.htm

http://www.usatoday.com/news/politics/election2008/2008-10-26-
congress_N.htm

 

 

 

 

keep control of Senate

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/09/us/
politics/republican-senate.html

 

 

 

 

2008 Election Map calculator: Senate

http://elections.nytimes.com/2008/
congress/senate.html

 

 

 

 

Senate majority

 

 

 

 

seats in Congress

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/03/us/
politics/03cong.html

 

 

 

 

seats in the House

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Corpus of news articles

 

USA > Politics

 

Presidential and Congressional elections > Results

 

 

 

Donald Trump

Is Elected President

in Stunning Repudiation

of the Establishment

 

NOV. 9, 2016

The New York Times

By MATT FLEGENHEIMER

and MICHAEL BARBARO


Donald John Trump was elected the 45th president of the United States on Tuesday in a stunning culmination of an explosive, populist and polarizing campaign that took relentless aim at the institutions and long-held ideals of American democracy.

The surprise outcome, defying late polls that showed Hillary Clinton with a modest but persistent edge, threatened convulsions throughout the country and the world, where skeptics had watched with alarm as Mr. Trump’s unvarnished overtures to disillusioned voters took hold.

The triumph for Mr. Trump, 70, a real estate developer-turned-reality television star with no government experience, was a powerful rejection of the establishment forces that had assembled against him, from the world of business to government, and the consensus they had forged on everything from trade to immigration.

The results amounted to a repudiation, not only of Mrs. Clinton, but of President Obama, whose legacy is suddenly imperiled. And it was a decisive demonstration of power by a largely overlooked coalition of mostly blue-collar white and working-class voters who felt that the promise of the United States had slipped their grasp amid decades of globalization and multiculturalism.

In Mr. Trump, a thrice-married Manhattanite who lives in a marble-wrapped three-story penthouse apartment on Fifth Avenue, they found an improbable champion.

“The forgotten men and women of our country will be forgotten no longer,” Mr. Trump told supporters around 3 a.m. on Wednesday at a rally in New York City, just after Mrs. Clinton called to concede.

In a departure from a blistering campaign in which he repeatedly stoked division, Mr. Trump sought to do something he had conspicuously avoided as a candidate: Appeal for unity.

“Now it’s time for America to bind the wounds of division,” he said. “It is time for us to come together as one united people. It’s time.”

That, he added, “is so important to me.”

He offered unusually warm words for Mrs. Clinton, who he has suggested should be in jail, saying she was owed “a major debt of gratitude for her service to our country.”

Bolstered by Mr. Trump’s strong showing, Republicans retained control of the Senate. Only one Republican-controlled seat, in Illinois, fell to Democrats early in the evening. And Senator Richard Burr of North Carolina, a Republican, easily won re-election in a race that had been among the country’s most competitive. A handful of other Republican incumbents facing difficult races were running better than expected.

Mr. Trump’s win — stretching across the battleground states of Florida, North Carolina, Ohio and Pennsylvania — seemed likely to set off financial jitters and immediate unease among international allies, many of which were startled when Mr. Trump in his campaign cast doubt on the necessity of America’s military commitments abroad and its allegiance to international economic partnerships.

From the moment he entered the campaign, with a shocking set of claims that Mexican immigrants were rapists and criminals, Mr. Trump was widely underestimated as a candidate, first by his opponents for the Republican nomination and later by Mrs. Clinton, his Democratic rival. His rise was largely missed by polling organizations and data analysts. And an air of improbability trailed his campaign, to the detriment of those who dismissed his angry message, his improvisational style and his appeal to disillusioned voters.

He suggested remedies that raised questions of constitutionality, like a ban on Muslims entering the United States.

He threatened opponents, promising lawsuits against news organizations that covered him critically and women who accused him of sexual assault. At times, he simply lied.

But Mr. Trump’s unfiltered rallies and unshakable self-regard attracted a zealous following, fusing unsubtle identity politics with an economic populism that often defied party doctrine.

His rallies — furious, entertaining, heavy on name-calling and nationalist overtones — became the nexus of a political movement, with daily promises of sweeping victory, in the election and otherwise, and an insistence that the country’s political machinery was “rigged” against Mr. Trump and those who admired him.

He seemed to embody the success and grandeur that so many of his followers felt was missing from their own lives — and from the country itself. And he scoffed at the poll-driven word-parsing ways of modern politics, calling them a waste of time and money. Instead, he relied on his gut.

At his victory party at the New York Hilton Midtown, where a raucous crowd indulged in a cash bar and wore hats bearing his ubiquitous campaign slogan “Make America Great Again,” voters expressed gratification that their voices had, at last, been heard.

“He was talking to people who weren’t being spoken to,” said Joseph Gravagna, 37, a marketing company owner from Rockland County, N.Y. “That’s how I knew he was going to win.”

For Mrs. Clinton, the defeat signaled an astonishing end to a political dynasty that has colored Democratic politics for a generation. Eight years after losing to President Obama in the Democratic primary — and 16 years after leaving the White House for the United States Senate, as President Bill Clinton exited office — she had seemed positioned to carry on two legacies: her husband’s and the president’s.

Her shocking loss was a devastating turn for the sprawling world of Clinton aides and strategists who believed they had built an electoral machine that would swamp Mr. Trump’s ragtag band of loyal operatives and family members, many of whom had no experience running a national campaign.

On Tuesday night, stricken Clinton aides who believed that Mr. Trump had no mathematical path to victory, anxiously paced the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center as states in which they were confident of victory, like Florida and North Carolina, either fell to Mr. Trump or seemed in danger of tipping his way.

Mrs. Clinton watched the grim results roll in from a suite at the nearby Peninsula Hotel, surrounded by her family, friends and advisers who had the day before celebrated her candidacy with a champagne toast on her campaign plane.

But over and over, Mrs. Clinton’s weaknesses as a candidate were exposed. She failed to excite voters hungry for change. She struggled to build trust with Americans who were baffled by her decision to use a private email server as secretary of state. And she strained to make a persuasive case for herself as a champion of the economically downtrodden after delivering perfunctory paid speeches that earned her millions of dollars.

The returns Tuesday also amounted to a historic rebuke of the Democratic Party from the white blue-collar voters who had formed the party base from the presidency of Franklin D. Roosevelt to Mr. Clinton’s. Yet Mrs. Clinton and her advisers had taken for granted that states like Michigan and Wisconsin would stick with a Democratic nominee, and that she could repeat Mr. Obama’s strategy of mobilizing the party’s ascendant liberal coalition rather than pursuing a more moderate course like her husband did 24 years ago.

But not until these voters were offered a Republican who ran as an unapologetic populist, railing against foreign trade deals and illegal immigration, did they move so drastically away from their ancestral political home.

To the surprise of many on the left, white voters who had helped elect the nation’s first black president, appeared more reluctant to line up behind a white woman.

From Pennsylvania to Wisconsin, industrial towns once full of union voters who for decades offered their votes to Democratic presidential candidates, even in the party’s lean years, shifted to Mr. Trump’s Republican Party. One county in the Mahoning Valley of Ohio, Trumbull, went to Mr. Trump by a six-point margin. Four years ago, Mr. Obama won there by 22 points.

Mrs. Clinton’s loss was especially crushing to millions who had cheered her march toward history as, they hoped, the nation’s first female president. For supporters, the election often felt like a referendum on gender progress: an opportunity to elevate a woman to the nation’s top job and to repudiate a man whose remarkably boorish behavior toward women had assumed center stage during much of the campaign.

Mr. Trump boasted, in a 2005 video released last month, about using his public profile to commit sexual assault. He suggested that female political rivals lacked a presidential “look.” He ranked women on a scale of one to 10, even holding forth on the desirability of his own daughter — the kind of throwback male behavior that many in the country assumed would disqualify a candidate for high office.

On Tuesday, the public’s verdict was rendered.

Uncertainty abounds as Mr. Trump prepares to take office. His campaign featured a shape-shifting list of policy proposals, often seeming to change hour to hour. His staff was in constant turmoil, with Mr. Trump’s children serving critical campaign roles and a rotating cast of advisers alternately seeking access to Mr. Trump’s ear, losing it and, often, regaining it, depending on the day.

Even Mr. Trump’s full embrace of the Republican Party came exceedingly late in life, leaving members of both parties unsure about what he truly believes. He has donated heavily to both parties and has long described his politics as the transactional reality of a businessman.

Mr. Trump’s dozens of business entanglements — many of them in foreign countries — will follow him into the Oval Office, raising questions about potential conflicts of interest. His refusal to release his tax returns, and his acknowledgment that he did not pay federal income taxes for years, has left the American people with considerable gaps in their understanding of the financial dealings.

But this they do know: Mr. Trump will thoroughly reimagine the tone, standards and expectations of the presidency, molding it in his own self-aggrandizing image.

He is set to take the oath of office on Jan. 20.

 

Correction: November 10, 2016

An article on Wednesday about the election of Donald Trump as president of the United States carried an erroneous byline in some editions. The article was by Matt Flegenheimer and Michael Barbaro — not by Patrick Healy and Jonathan Martin.

Amy Chozick, Ashley Parker, Patrick Healy and Jonathan Martin contributed reporting.

Find out what you need to know about the 2016 presidential race today, and get politics news updates via Facebook, Twitter and the Morning Briefing newsletter.

A version of this article appears in print on November 9, 2016, on page A1 of the New York edition with the headline: Trump Triumphs.

Donald Trump Is Elected President in Stunning Repudiation of the Establishment,
NYT,
NOV. 9, 2016,
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/09/us/
politics/hillary-clinton-donald-trump-president.html

 

 

 

 

 

2 Close House Races Decided;

4 Still Up in Air

 

November 8, 2008

Filed at 2:41 a.m. ET

The New York Times

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

 

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) -- The Democrats have gained another foot soldier in Congress: Democrat Frank Kratovil has won an open seat in the U.S. House from Maryland's 1st District.

He claimed a seat held for 18 years by the GOP, beating Republican Andy Harris by about 2,000 votes.

Meanwhile in Washington state's 8th Congressional District, Republican U.S. Rep. Dave Reichert (RY-kert) has beaten back a challenge from Democrat Darcy Burner for a second time. With 80 percent of the vote counted Reichert leads by 8,000 votes, 51 percent to 49. Burner conceded Friday night.

The victories give Democrats some 256 House seats, to 175 for the GOP. Democrats have picked up 20 seats. Four House races -- in Alaska, California, Virginia and Ohio -- are still too close to call.

2 Close House Races Decided; 4 Still Up in Air,
NYT, 8.11.2008,
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/washington/AP-US-House-Close-Races.html

 

 

 

 

 

Obama Sweeps to Victory

as First Black President

 

November 5, 2008
Filed at 2:23 a.m. ET
The New York Times
By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

 

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Barack Obama swept to victory as the nation's first black president Tuesday night in an electoral college landslide that overcame racial barriers as old as America itself. ''Change has come,'' he told a jubilant hometown Chicago crowd estimated at nearly a quarter-million people.

The son of a black father from Kenya and a white mother from Kansas, the Democratic senator from Illinois sealed his historic triumph by defeating Republican Sen. John McCain in a string of wins in hard-fought battleground states -- Ohio, Florida, Iowa and more. He captured Virginia and Indiana, too, the first candidate of his party in 44 years to win either.

Obama's election capped a meteoric rise -- from mere state senator to president-elect in four years.

Spontaneous celebrations erupted from Atlanta to New York and Philadelphia as word of Obama's victory spread. A big crowd filled Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House.

In his first speech as victor, to an enormous throng at Grant Park in Chicago, Obama catalogued the challenges ahead. ''The greatest of a lifetime,'' he said, ''two wars, a planet in peril, the worst financial crisis in a century.''

He added, ''There are many who won't agree with every decision or policy I make as president, and we know that government can't solve every problem. But I will always be honest with you about the challenges we face.''

McCain called his former rival to concede defeat -- and the end of his own 10-year quest for the White House. ''The American people have spoken, and spoken clearly,'' McCain told disappointed supporters in Arizona.

President Bush added his congratulations from the White House, where his tenure runs out on Jan. 20. ''May God bless whoever wins tonight,'' he had told dinner guests earlier.

Obama, in his speech, invoked the words of Lincoln, recalled Martin Luther King Jr., and seemed to echo John F. Kennedy.

''So let us summon a new spirit of patriotism, of service and responsibility where each of us resolves to pitch in and work harder,'' he said.

He and his running mate, Sen. Joseph Biden of Delaware, will take their oaths of office as president and vice president on Jan. 20, 2009. McCain remains in the Senate.

Sarah Palin, McCain's running mate, returns to Alaska as governor after a tumultuous debut on the national stage.

He will move into the Oval Office as leader of a country that is almost certainly in recession, and fighting two long wars, one in Iraq, the other in Afghanistan.

The popular vote was close -- 51.7 percent to 47 percent with 84 percent of all U.S. precincts tallied -- but not the count in the Electoral College, where it mattered most.

There, Obama's audacious decision to contest McCain in states that hadn't gone Democratic in years paid rich dividends.

Shortly after 2 a.m. the East, The Associated Press count showed Obama with 349 electoral votes, well over the 270 needed for victory. McCain had 144 after winning states that comprised the normal Republican base, including Texas and most of the South.

Interviews with voters suggested that almost six in 10 women were backing Obama nationwide, while men leaned his way by a narrow margin. Just over half of whites supported McCain, giving him a slim advantage in a group that Bush carried overwhelmingly in 2004.

The results of the AP survey were based on a preliminary partial sample of nearly 10,000 voters in Election Day polls and in telephone interviews over the past week for early voters. Obama has said his first order of presidential business will be to tackle the economy. He has also pledged to withdraw most U.S. combat troops from Iraq within 16 months.

In Washington, the Democratic leaders of Congress celebrated.

''It is not a mandate for a party or ideology but a mandate for change,'' said Senate Majority leader Harry Reid of Nevada.

Said Speaker Nancy Pelosi of California: ''Tonight the American people have called for a new direction. They have called for change in America.''

Democrats also acclaimed Senate successes by former Gov. Mark Warner in Virginia, Rep. Tom Udall in New Mexico and Rep. Mark Udall in Colorado. All won seats left open by Republican retirements.

In New Hampshire, former Gov. Jeanne Shaheen defeated Republican Sen. John Sununu in a rematch of their 2002 race, and Sen. Elizabeth Dole fell to Democrat Kay Hagan in North Carolina.

Biden won a new term in Delaware, a seat he will resign before he is sworn in as vice president.

The Senate's Republican leader, Mitch McConnell, survived a scare in Kentucky, and in Georgia Sen. Saxby Chambliss hoped to avoid a December runoff.

The Democrats piled up gains in the House, as well.

They defeated seven Republican incumbents, including 22-year veteran Chris Shays in Connecticut, and picked up nine more seats where GOP lawmakers had retired.

At least three Democrats lost their seats, including Florida Rep. Tim Mahoney, turned out of office after admitting to two extramarital affairs while serving his first term in Florida. In Louisiana, Democratic Rep. Don Cazayoux lost the seat he had won in a special election six months ago.

The resurgent Democrats also elected a governor in one of the nation's traditional bellwether states when Missouri Attorney General Jay Nixon won his race.

An estimated 187 million voters were registered, and in an indication of interest in the battle for the White House, 40 million or so had already voted as Election Day dawned.

Obama sought election as one of the youngest presidents, and one of the least experienced in national political affairs.

That wasn't what set the Illinois senator apart, though -- neither from his rivals nor from the other men who had served as president since the nation's founding more than two centuries ago. A black man, he confronted a previously unbreakable barrier as he campaigned on twin themes of change and hope in uncertain times.

McCain, a prisoner of war during Vietnam, a generation older than his rival at 72, was making his second try for the White House, following his defeat in the battle for the GOP nomination in 2000.

A conservative, he stressed his maverick's streak. And although a Republican, he did what he could to separate himself from an unpopular president.

For the most part, the two presidential candidates and their running mates, Biden and Republican Gov. Sarah Palin of Alaska, spent weeks campaigning in states that went for Bush four years ago.

McCain and Obama each won contested nominations -- the Democrat outdistancing former first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton -- and promptly set out to claim the mantle of change.

Obama won California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, the District of Columbia, Florida, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Virginia, Vermont, Washington and Wisconsin.

McCain had Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Idaho, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, West Virginia and Wyoming.

He also won at least four of Nebraska's five electoral votes, with the other one in doubt.

    Obama Sweeps to Victory as First Black President, NYT, 5.11.2008,
    http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/washington/AP-Election-Rdp.html

 

 

 

 

 

Democrats Head

for Bigger House Majority

 

November 4, 2008
Filed at 1:01 p.m. ET
The New York Times
By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

 

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The Democratic lawmaker in charge of increasing the party's majority in the House says he's confident of solid gains, even though there has been a tightening in several races.

Maryland Rep. Chris Van Hollen says he's cautious because so many House races are being fought in GOP-leaning districts, so he's not predicting the 20-plus seat gains that others see. Van Hollen says that a 10 to 15 seat gain would be a solid win.

He says to expect a big night for Democrats if they pick up a GOP seat in Indiana, where polls close at 7 p.m.

But if endangered Democratic incumbents lose battles in Pennsylvania and New Hampshire, Democratic gains would be more limited.

All 435 House seats are up for grabs tonight. Democrats currently hold a 36-seat edge.

    Democrats Head for Bigger House Majority, NYT, 4.11.2008,
    http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/washington/AP-House-Rdp.html

 

 

 

 

 

Republicans Scrambling

to Save Seats in Congress

 

November 3, 2008
The New York Times
By CARL HULSE

 

WASHINGTON — Outspent and under siege in a hostile political climate, Congressional Republicans scrambled this weekend to save embattled incumbents in an effort to hold down expected Democratic gains in the House and Senate on Tuesday.

With the election imminent, Senate Republicans threw their remaining resources into protecting endangered lawmakers in Georgia, Minnesota, Mississippi, New Hampshire, North Carolina and Oregon, while House Republicans were forced to put money into what should be secure Republican territory in Idaho, Indiana, Kentucky, Virginia and Wyoming.

Sensing an extraordinary opportunity to expand their numbers in both the House and Senate, Democrats were spending freely on television advertising across the campaign map. Senate Democrats were active in nine states where Republicans are running for re-election; House Democrats, meanwhile, bought advertising in 63 districts, twice the number of districts where Republicans bought advertisements and helped candidates.

“We are deep in the red areas,” Representative Chris Van Hollen of Maryland, chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, said on Sunday. “We are competing now in districts George Bush carried by large margins in 2004.”

What seems especially striking about this year’s Congressional races is that Democrats appear to have solidified their gains from the 2006 midterm elections and are pushing beyond their traditional urban turf into what once were safe Republican strongholds, creating a struggle for the suburbs.

Trying to capitalize on economic uncertainty, House Democrats are taking aim at vacant seats and incumbents in suburban and even more outlying areas — the traditional foundation of Republican power in the House. With many of the most contested House races occurring in Republican-held districts that extend beyond cities in states like Florida, Michigan, Minnesota and Ohio, Democrats said expected victories would give them suburban dominance.

The same is true for Senate Democratic candidates, who are seeking to nail down swing counties outside urban centers and move the party toward a 60-vote majority. That majority could overcome a filibuster, if party leaders could hold the votes together.

Among open House seats Democrats say they have a good chance of capturing include those being vacated by Representatives Ralph Regula and Deborah Pryce in Ohio, Jim Ramstad in Minnesota, Jerry Weller in Illinois and Rick Renzi in Arizona.

On the list of incumbents Democrats believe they can defeat are Representatives John R. Kuhl Jr. in New York, Joe Knollenberg in Michigan, Tom Feeney and Ric Keller in Florida, Don Young in Alaska, Robin Hayes in North Carolina and Bill Sali in Idaho.

Democrats say they have been able to peel away suburbanites by emphasizing Republican culpability for the economic decline, a point they say House Republicans helped make themselves by initially balking at the $700 billion bailout and sending the markets into a tailspin that depleted retirement and college savings accounts.

“Suburban voters are angry that their quality of life and standard of living is under attack,” said Representative Rahm Emanuel of Illinois, chairman of the House Democratic Caucus and a leading advocate of Democrats trying to broaden their appeal in the suburbs.

The partisan spending gap was stark. As of last week, Senate Democrats had spent more than $67 million against Republican candidates, compared with $33.7 million in advertising by Republicans. In the House, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee had spent $73 million, compared with just over $20 million for the National Republican Congressional Committee, according to campaign finance reports.

Most of the House Republican money was spent on behalf of incumbents or in districts where a Republican is retiring, emphasizing how much the party was playing defense. By contrast, House Democrats spent most of their money in the last month going after Republican seats in Colorado, Nebraska, Washington, West Virginia and elsewhere. On Sunday, Democrats prepared one last radio advertisement to begin running Monday in an effort to claim the seat of Thomas M. Reynolds, a Republican retiring from his upstate New York district near Buffalo.

“That kind of says it all,” said Representative Thomas M. Davis III, a retiring Virginia Republican whose own suburban seat is likely to go Democratic on Tuesday. Mr. Davis said Republicans simply faced too many disadvantages heading into Election Day, including a higher number of retirements in the House and Senate, an unpopular president and an economic collapse.

“You like to see a fair fight,” said Mr. Davis, a former chairman of the Republican Congressional campaign committee, “but basically we are playing basketball in our street shoes and long pants, and the Democrats have on their uniforms and Chuck Taylors.”

Neither of the national Senate campaign arms was advertising in Colorado, New Mexico or Virginia, indicating that Republicans were virtually ceding those states, where members of their party are retiring, to the Democrats. Senate Democrats were also optimistic about the prospects of unseating Senator John E. Sununu in New Hampshire and Senator Ted Stevens in Alaska, where Mr. Stevens campaigned despite being newly convicted on felony ethics charges.

Democrats said they saw themselves with the advantage in Minnesota, North Carolina and Oregon, giving them a reasonable chance at claiming eight seats and enlarging their Senate majority to 59 if they hold their current seats.

If Democrats swept those races, it could leave the potential 60th vote to break filibusters resting on the outcome in Georgia, Mississippi or Kentucky, where Senator Mitch McConnell, the Republican leader, is in a competitive race with Bruce Lunsford, a businessman. Polls show Democrats trailing but within striking distance in all three races, with the final results potentially hinging on the presidential race and turnout among Democratically inclined black voters.

In Mississippi, which has not sent a freshman Democrat to the Senate since John C. Stennis was elected in 1947, Senator Roger Wicker, a Republican appointed last year to fill the seat left vacant by Trent Lott’s resignation, is in a tight race with former Gov. Ronnie Musgrove, a Democrat.

“We feel we have a lot of momentum,” said Senator Charles E. Schumer of New York, chairman of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee, “but we are ever mindful that getting to 60 is an extremely difficult thing to do because we are in so many red states.”

Republicans privately acknowledged that there was little hope for some of their candidates, including Senator Elizabeth Dole of North Carolina. But Republicans have not given up on the idea of unseating Senator Mary L. Landrieu in Louisiana, a state where Senator John McCain was running well against Senator Barack Obama in the presidential race. A victory over Ms. Landrieu by John Kennedy, the state treasurer, would be a significant moral victory for Republicans, and they pointed to internal polls that show a close race.

In Louisiana, North Carolina and Oregon, Republicans were trying to energize voters with the threat of Democratic dominance in Washington, running advertisements that warn voters about “complete liberal control of government.”

“We agree with Chuck Schumer that this is a tectonic election,” said Rebecca Fisher, spokeswoman for the National Republican Senatorial Committee. “And if Democrats get their way, this country will shift so far left it will take generations to get back on track.”

Both parties were focusing substantial final energies on the Senate race in Minnesota, where Senator Norm Coleman, the Republican, was in a heated clash with his Democratic challenger, Al Franken, a former comedian and radio talk show host.

The race remained close as Mr. Coleman was named in a last-minute lawsuit in Texas alleging that a businessman had funneled $75,000 to him through his wife’s business. Mr. Coleman, who has filed an unfair campaign practices complaint accusing Mr. Franken of broadcasting falsehoods in his advertisements, denied any impropriety, but the lawsuit led to a flurry of news accounts only days before the election.

In Kentucky, Mr. McConnell enlisted hundreds of volunteers to knock on doors and to make phone calls in the remaining hours. He was to embark on a fly-around of the state’s cities Monday in his effort to repel the serious challenge from Mr. Lunsford, who brought in one of Kentucky’s favorite daughters, the actress Ashley Judd, to campaign on his behalf in the closing days.

Strategists for both parties said it seemed increasingly possible that the full Senate picture might not even be settled Tuesday, given that a third-party candidate could cause both Senator Saxby Chambliss, Republican of Georgia, and his Democratic opponent, Jim Martin, to fall short of 50 percent of the vote, forcing a runoff on Dec. 2.

Party operatives also warned that Tuesday was likely to produce some surprises, considering the strong resentment toward Congress that has been reflected in polls for months. They predicted upsets of some House incumbents not thought to be in trouble.

Republicans said they believed some top Democratic targets, like Representative Dave Reichert of Washington and Christopher Shays of Connecticut, would be able to hang on because they, and others, had run strong campaigns built on their individual images and records.

“Republican candidates who have established their own personal brand, and have framed their respective races around creating a clear choice, will succeed on Election Day despite the turbulent political environment,” said Ken Spain, a spokesman for the National Republican Congressional Committee.

One problem for House Republicans was that freshmen lawmakers who gave Democrats control of the House after the 2006 elections were faring much better than party leaders had expected. Some, like Representative Kirsten Gillibrand, who represents the Hudson Valley in New York, became prime Republican targets virtually from the moment they were elected but are now favored to win second terms after raising formidable sums of money and cultivating moderate voting records that insulated them from attack.

Representative John Yarmuth of Kentucky, the president of the Democrats’ 2006 freshman class, said only two of its members were in serious trouble: Representative Nick Lampson of Texas, who represents a heavily Republican district south of Houston, and Representative Tim Mahoney of Florida, who has been entangled in a scandal over extramarital affairs.

Mr. Yarmuth credited House Democratic leaders with pursuing an agenda that gave the freshmen substantial achievements to promote back home, especially a generous new education benefit for veterans that counterbalanced the Democrats’ opposition to the war in Iraq

“I think that was a trademark of this last Congress that created a moderate image that we were pro-military, pro-troops,” Mr. Yarmuth said.



David M. Herszenhorn contributed reporting.

Republicans Scrambling to Save Seats in Congress, NYT, 3.11.2008,
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/03/us/politics/03cong.html

 

 

 

 

 

Democrats Headed

Toward Big Gains in House, Senate

 

October 25, 2008

Filed at 4:21 a.m. ET

The New York Times

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
 

 

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Democrats are on track for sizable gains in both houses of Congress on Nov. 4, according to strategists in both parties, although only improbable Southern victories can produce the 60-vote Senate majority they covet to help them pass priority legislation.

A poor economy, President Bush's unpopularity, a lopsided advantage in fundraising and Barack Obama's robust organizational effort in key states are all aiding Democrats in the final days of the congressional campaign.

''I don't think anybody realized it was going to be this tough'' for Republicans, Sen. John Ensign, chairman of the party's senatorial campaign committee said recently. ''We're dealing with an unpopular president (and) we have a financial crisis,'' he added.

''You've got Republican incumbent members of the Congress'' trying to run away from Bush's economic policies, said Maryland Rep. Chris Van Hollen, who chairs the House Democratic campaign committee. ''And they can't run fast enough. I think it will catch up with many of them.''

Speaker Nancy Pelosi of California predicted recently that Democrats would win at least 14 House seats in Republican hands.

But numerous strategists in both parties agreed a gain of at least 20 seems likely and a dozen or more GOP-held seats are in doubt. Only a handful of Democratic House seats appear in any sort of jeopardy. They spoke only on condition of anonymity, saying they were relying on confidential polling data.

In the Senate, as in the House, only the magnitude of the Democratic gains is in doubt.

New York Sen. Chuck Schumer, head of the Democratic committee, said his party would have to win seats in ''deeply red states'' to amass a 60-seat majority, but added, ''We're close.''

Obama's methodical voter registration efforts in the primary season and his current get-out-the-vote efforts are aiding Democratic candidates in several Southern races. They start with North Carolina, where GOP Sen. Elizabeth Dole trails in the polls, and include Georgia and Mississippi, where Sens. Saxby Chambliss and Roger Wicker respectively are in unexpectedly close races.

''Overall, I think Obama will help us in the South because, first, his economic message resonates with Southerners, both white and black, and obviously there will be an increased African-American turnout,'' Schumer said.

Also in a close race is the Republican leader, Sen. Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, although that is not a state where Obama has made much of an effort.

Compounding Republican woes, the same economy that has soured voters on their candidates is causing some of the nation's wealthiest conservative donors to stay on the campaign sidelines.

Freedom's Watch, a conservative group that once looked poised to spend tens of millions of dollars to help elect Republicans, had spent roughly $3 million as of midweek. Its largest single contributor is Sheldon Adelson, a billionaire with gambling interests in the United States and China.

Democrats hold a 51-49 majority in the current Senate, counting two independents who vote with them. In the House, Democrats have 235 seats to 199 for Republicans, with one vacancy.

It has long been apparent that Democrats would retain control of both houses of Congress, and in recent weeks, the party's leaders have mounted a concerted drive to push their Senate majority to 60. That's the number needed to overcome a filibuster, the technique of killing legislation by preventing a final vote. If Obama were to win the White House, it would be the Republicans' last toehold in power.

In reality, Ensign noted this week that even if Democrats merely draw close to 60 seats, they will find it easier to pick up a Republican or two on individual bills and move ahead with portions of their agenda that might otherwise be stalled.

Democrats are overwhelmingly favored to pick up seats in Virginia, New Mexico and Colorado where Republicans are retiring.

Additionally, GOP Sens. John Sununu of New Hampshire, Norm Coleman of Minnesota and Gordon Smith of Oregon are in jeopardy. So, too, Alaska Sen. Ted Stevens, whose fate may rest on the outcome of his corruption trial, now in the hands of a jury in a courthouse a few blocks from the Capitol.

Even if they win all four of those races -- a tall order -- Democrats would be two seats shy of 60 and looking South to get them.

In the House, Democrats are so flush with cash that they have spent nearly $1 million to capture a seat centered on Maryland's Eastern Shore that has been in Republican hands for two decades.

It is one of 27 races where the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee has spent $1 million or more -- a total that the counterpart Republican group has yet to match anywhere.

''We've had to hold most of our resources for the final two weeks and that's beginning to make a difference,'' said Rep. Tom Cole of Oklahoma, chairman of the GOP House committee.

Cole declined to make an overall prediction. ''A lot depends on what happens presidentially in the next 10 days. We're very closely tied with John McCain and we got a lot of open seats and a strong financial disadvantage,'' he said. He predicted the party's Republican presidential candidate would mount a strong finish and help other candidates on the ballot.

Still, the party's campaign committee recently pulled back from plans to advertise on behalf of incumbents in Michigan, Florida, Colorado and Minnesota who face competitive challenges.

For its part, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee recently invested in a race in the Lincoln, Neb., area held by Republican Rep. Lee Terry. Obama has a dozen or more paid staff as well as volunteers there hoping to win one electoral vote.

Democrats express confidence they will pick up at least two and possibly three Republican-held New York seats where incumbents decided against running again and at least one each in Illinois, Virginia, Ohio, New Mexico and Arizona. There are additional opportunities in at least a half-dozen other states.

Republican incumbents in greatest jeopardy include Reps. Don Young in Alaska, Tom Feeney and Ric Keller in Florida, Joe Knollenberg and Tim Walberg in Michigan, Marilyn Musgrave in Colorado, Jon Porter in Nevada and Robin Hayes in North Carolina.

Among the few Democrats in close races are Reps. Nick Lampson in Texas, who is in a solidly Republican district; Tim Mahoney in Florida, who recently admitted to having two extramarital affairs; Carol Shea-Porter in New Hampshire and Paul Kanjorski in Pennsylvania.

Democrats Headed Toward Big Gains in House, Senate,
NYT,
25.10.2008,
http://www.nytimes.com/
aponline/washington/AP-Congress-Stakes.html - broken URL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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