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Vocapedia > Race relations > UK, British empire > Black power, BLM, Blackness, Black British identity

 

 

 

Notting Hill Couple, London (1967)

 

Phillips’s image,

taken when mix-raced relationships

were still relatively taboo,

ended up on the cover of London Is The Place for Me,

a compilation of British calypso

 

Photograph:

Charlie Phillips (Born 1944) /

Charlie Phillips, Image Courtesy of Beetles+Huxley

 

Punks, prams and carparks:

British national identity – in pictures

G

Monday 1 August 2016    07.00 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2016/aug/01/
an-ideal-for-living-photography-exhibition-britain-class

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

coon, wog, nigger (racist)

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/stage/2009/feb/06/
lenny-henry-career-family-othello

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sooty    (racist)

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2009/jan/12/
prince-harry-racism

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

'the wrong colour'

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/the-northerner/2013/feb/11/
bradford-race-issues-school

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

African Liberation Day march through Handsworth in 1977.

 

The children of the Windrush generation were growing up,” said Burke,

“and their eyes were opening to a wider political agenda.

Everyone I knew was involved with the movement in some way.”

 

Photograph: Vanley Burke

 

Fightback: Vanley Burke's black Birmingham – in pictures

The Jamaica-born ‘godfather of black British photography’

spent the 70s and 80s documenting street protests in the city.

His work can be seen at Cardiff’s Diffusion festival until 31 May

G

Thursday 25 May 2017    07.00 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2017/may/25/
vanley-burke-birmingham-godfather-black-british-photography-jamaican-cardiff-diffusion-festival-#img-5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Untitled, from the series The Black House,

1973-1976

 

Photograph: Colin Jones/Courtesy Autograph

 

Beauty contests and Brixton fashion:

black Britain in the 1970s – in pictures

 

From the archive of arts agency Autograph,

these photos depict the lives of black Britons,

from sound systems to strident politics

G

Tue 21 Aug 2018    07.00 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2018/aug/21/
black-britain-in-the-1970s-autograph-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black Power leader Michael X

speaking at a rally in London in 1972.

 

Photograph: Popperfoto/Getty Images

 

The story of the British Black Panthers

through race, politics, love and power

O

Sunday 9 April 2017    07.00 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/apr/09/
british-black-panthers-drama-photography-exhibition

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

black

 

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/oct/31/
black-british-1800s-before-windrush

 

 

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/news/audio/2020/jul/31/
young-british-and-black-a-generation-rises-podcast

 

 

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/oct/03/
housing-crisis-why-worse-for-black-families-social-housing

 

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2017/aug/01/
met-police-using-force-against-disproportionately-large-number-of-black-people

 

 

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2012/mar/25/
dennis-morris-growing-up-black-photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

black people

 

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/gallery/2021/jul/30/
a-portrait-of-black-lives-in-suffolk-in-pictures

 

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2017/aug/01/
met-police-using-force-against-disproportionately-large-number-of-black-people

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

black lives

 

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/gallery/2021/jul/30/
a-portrait-of-black-lives-in-suffolk-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

black fatherhood

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2021/jul/29/
fathers-and-figures-renee-osubu-black-fatherhood

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

blackness

 

https://www.theguardian.com/education/2018/jul/07/
how-survive-as-black-man-at-oxford-university-michael-donkor

 

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2018/may/19/
meghan-markles-wedding-was-a-celebration-of-blackness

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UK's first black archbishop        2005

 

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2005/nov/30/
religion.uk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black Britons

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/jan/17/
forty-years-on-from-the-new-cross-fire-what-has-changed-for-black-britons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

black Britain in the 1970s

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2018/aug/21/
black-britain-in-the-1970s-autograph-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Celebrating Black NHS nurses through the decades – in pictures

 

The NHS is one of only two things

that hold Britain together as a community.

The second being the BBC.

During Covid-19

these two national treasures

have become our guiding strength.

Black people have been

an integral part of the NHS

since the 40s.

I am very proud to say

my mother worked for the NHS

for more than 35 years before she retired.

These institutions are worth fighting for.

G

Sun 15 Nov 2020    08.30 GMT

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2020/nov/15/
celebrating-black-nhs-nurses-through-the-decades-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

west London cafe > the Mangrove, Notting Hil

a symbol of black urban resistance

 

The Mangrove

was established in 1968 by Frank Crichlow,

an entrepreneur from Trinidad

who became a community activist

and symbol of black urban resistance

in the face of police persecution.

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2018/sep/15/
remembering-the-mangrove-notting-hill-caribbean-haven

 

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2018/sep/15/
remembering-the-mangrove-notting-hill-caribbean-haven

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black English

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/
routesofenglish/storysofar/programme3_4.shtml

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Voice

 

https://www.voice-online.co.uk/ 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

black feminist politics

 

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2018/feb/01/
women-1980s-diane-abbott-black-women-radical-feminism

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Britain's black power movement / British black power

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/mar/25/
british-black-power-stars-of-bbc-documentary-reflect-on-uk-activism

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/apr/09/
british-black-panthers-drama-photography-exhibition

 

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/dec/27/
britain-black-power-movement-risk-forgotten-historians

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Britain's black power movement

 

Darcus Howe

one of the most significant black activists

in Britain

 

https://www.theguardian.com/profile/darcus-howe  

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/dec/27/
britain-black-power-movement-risk-forgotten-historians

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Britain's black power movement

 

Mangrove Nine:

the court challenge

against police racism in Notting Hill

 

http://www.theguardian.com/law/2010/nov/29/
mangrove-nine-40th-anniversary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

British Black Panthers

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/apr/09/
british-black-panthers-drama-photography-exhibition

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John La Rose    1927-2006

 

intellectual, trades unionist, campaigner, poet
 

https://www.theguardian.com/news/2006/mar/04/
guardianobituaries.socialexclusion

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

black Britain

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2018/aug/07/
they-wanted-to-jail-us-all-black-panthers-photographer-neil-kenlock-looks-back

 

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2008/feb/24/race

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

black British identity

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2017/may/05/
eddie-chambers-black-british-identity-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

black British films

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2020/jun/19/
from-pressure-to-the-last-tree-10-of-the-best-black-british-films

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Britain’s rich history of black literature

 

https://www.theguardian.com/news/audio/2021/dec/27/
revisited-britains-rich-history-of-black-literature-podcast

 

https://www.theguardian.com/news/audio/2021/oct/18/
britains-rich-history-of-black-literature-podcast

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fightback: Vanley Burke's black Birmingham – in pictures

 

The Jamaica-born

‘godfather of black British photography’

spent the 70s and 80s

documenting street protests in the city.

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2017/may/25/
vanley-burke-birmingham-godfather-black-british-photography-
jamaican-cardiff-diffusion-festival-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

timeline > Black history

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/ng-interactive/2020/jul/11/
black-history-timeline

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black History Month

 

https://www.theguardian.com/uk/blackhistorymonth

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/oct/01/
barnardos-black-history-victorian-archive-children-photos-testimonials

 

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2008/oct/11/
blackhistorymonth-race1 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black Lives Matter

 

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/gallery/2016/aug/05/
black-lives-matter-uk-rally-in-three-cities-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black Lives Matter,

racism in football

and representation in sports media

 

https://www.theguardian.com/football/audio/2020/jun/10/
black-lives-matter-racism-in-football-and-representation-
in-sports-media-football-weekly-special

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Corpus of news articles

 

UK > Black power, BLM,

 

Blackness, Black British identity

 

 

 

Racism Charges

Put a Sport on Edge

 

December 21, 2011

The New York Times

By JERÉ LONGMAN

 

John Terry, captain of England’s national soccer team and the powerful club Chelsea, faces a criminal charge over accusations that he made a racial slur during an October match, apparently becoming the first player to be prosecuted for remarks said on the field.

The accusation against Terry, which he denied, represents an escalation in the attempt to stem the persistent and widespread problem of racism in European soccer.

On Tuesday, the Uruguayan forward Luis Suárez, who plays for Liverpool of the English Premier League, was suspended for eight matches and fined about $63,000 for making abusive remarks in an October game toward Patrice Evra, a black defender from France who plays for Manchester United.

On Wednesday, the Crown Prosecution Service, the agency responsible for laying criminal charges, said it had charged Terry.

Antiracism officials said they were encouraged by the actions taken against Terry and Suárez. But they cautioned that international soccer had lately sent mixed messages about discrimination despite a campaign over the past five years to reduce racial smears made on the field and in the stands. Fans in some European countries have been known to throw bananas and peanuts, and direct monkey chants, toward black players.

Sepp Blatter, the embattled president of FIFA, soccer’s world governing body, was widely criticized last month after trying to minimize the extent of racism on the field and suggesting that any player who felt affronted should settle the matter with a postgame handshake.

The Terry and Suárez cases represent “a very important step that sends two messages,” said Lord Herman Ouseley, chairman of the London-based antidiscrimination organization called Kick It Out. “If you are inclined to behave like that, you are not going to get away with it,” he said. “And it’s encouraging to black players, who have often felt, ‘Why bother, it’s a waste of time.’ Most thought nothing would come out of these allegations.”

At the same time, Ouseley said in a telephone interview that he would withhold judgment on English soccer’s long-term determination to stamp out racism until Terry’s case played out through the judiciary and Suárez decided whether to appeal his ban by England’s soccer federation, known as the Football Association. He has 14 days to file an appeal.

“We will have to wait and see whether there is consistency and durability in application of a high standard of conduct, backed by strong investigation and discipline with penalties, or whether this is a one-off, and we go back to leniency and complacency,” Ouseley said.

The English Premier League is considered the world’s best club competition and features many of the top international players. Two-thirds are foreign-born. Racial sensitivity in the league has increased substantially in recent years, and the atmosphere is considered far more embracing than leagues in Spain and Italy. Yet, the Terry and Suárez cases indicate that English officials are still troubled by some abusive on-the-field behavior.

Terry, who is 31, appears to be the first player to face a criminal charge of racism, said Ouseley and Howard Holmes, founder of another London-based antidiscrimination group called Football Unites, Racism Divides.

“I can’t find any other case where the police were involved,” Holmes said in a telephone interview. “There have been a number of instances that have gone to court, but they’ve been fan-based.”

Terry, who is white, is accused of making a racist remark during an October match toward Anton Ferdinand, a black defender who plays for Queens Park Rangers, a London rival of Chelsea.

A hearing for Terry is scheduled for Feb. 1. He is charged with violating Britain’s Crime and Disorder Act (of) 1998, which focuses on antisocial behavior. If found guilty, the maximum fine he faces is about $4,000, but a conviction could cost Terry the captaincy of his club and national team, his reputation and his ability to earn endorsement money.

“I am satisfied there is sufficient evidence for a realistic prospect of conviction and it is in the public interest to prosecute this case,” Alison Saunders, London’s chief crown prosecutor, said in a statement.

Terry has denied the charge, saying the context of his remarks was misunderstood. He said in a statement Wednesday, “I have never aimed a racist remark at anyone and count people from all races and creeds among my closest friends.”

According to The Guardian newspaper of London, Ferdinand did not immediately realize what Terry had said to him during the October match. Rather, Ferdinand grew concerned later when the encounter between the two players drew widespread attention on social media sites. He later saw footage of the confrontation that had been posted on the Internet.

Terry has said that he thought Ferdinand was accusing him of making a racial slur during their encounter and responded to Ferdinand by saying he would never use such a term.

The situation is complicated because Ferdinand’s brother, Rio, is a partner of Terry’s in central defense for England’s national team. And it was Rio Ferdinand who scathingly challenged Blatter’s suggestions last month that players should resolve racial tensions with handshakes. Via Twitter, Rio Ferdinand, who plays with Evra for Manchester United, called Blatter’s remarks “condescending” and “almost laughable.”

Blatter was widely ridiculed and Hugh Robertson, the British sports minister, urged him to resign. Blatter declined to step down but said he regretted his remarks and promised “zero tolerance” of racist behavior in soccer. A FIFA campaign against racism began at the 2006 World Cup in Germany.

The widespread reaction against Blatter’s remarks in England, as well as the social media response to the Terry incident, undoubtedly influenced the Suárez suspension and the decision to prosecute Terry, said Holmes, the antidiscrimination official.

“We can’t adopt a holier-than-thou attitude and, when it’s in our backyard, wash our hands of it,” Holmes said.

Suárez, the Liverpool forward, was accused of using a racial term 10 times against Evra in an October match against Manchester United. Suárez has said that he did not realize that language that was acceptable in his native Uruguay was considered racist in England.

“I understand the point about cultural differences,” Gordon Taylor, chief executive of the union for England’s professional soccer players, told British reporters Wednesday. “But if you come to this country, all players have to abide by not just the laws of the game, but the laws of the land as well.”

Liverpool has vigorously defended Suárez. During warm-ups for their match against Wigan on Wednesday, his teammates wore white T-shirts with an image of Suárez on the front and his name and his number, 7, on the back.
 

Rob Hughes contributed reporting from London.

Racism Charges Put a Sport on Edge,
NYT,
21.12.2011,
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/22/sports/soccer/
in-england-star-players-accused-of-racist-comments.html

 

 

 

 

 

April 22, 1968

 

Enoch Powell dismissed

for 'racialist' speech

 

From the Guardian archive

 

Monday April 22, 1968

Guardian

Ian Aitken

 

Mr Heath last night dismissed Mr Enoch Powell from the Shadow Cabinet. It became clear that the members of Mr Heath's Shadow Cabinet were unanimous that Mr Powell would have to go. Several Front Bench members let it be known that they would resign if Mr Powell remained. Two of the leading figures in the drama appear to have been Mr Maudling, deputy leader of the party, and Mr Hogg, chief home affairs spokesman. Both are understood to have been appalled by Mr Powell's inflammatory speech.

Certainly there were intensive consultations between members of the Shadow Cabinet and between many of them and Mr Heath. By the end of the afternoon it must have been apparent that Mr Heath would receive the full support of his colleagues if he dismissed Mr Powell. It was emphasised, however, that the decision to dismiss Mr Powell belonged to Mr Heath personally. He appears to have spent most of the day at Broadstairs brooding on the situation created by Mr Powell's highly emotive speech on the Race elations Bill, and to have telephoned Mr Powell at Wolverhampton at about 9pm.

A statement issued by Mr Heath said: "I have told Mr Powell that I consider the speech he made in Birmingham yesterday to have been racialist in tone and liable to exacerbate racial tensions. This is unacceptable from one of the leaders of the Conservative Party."

Friends of Mr Heath insisted that this was a decision which could not be delayed once it had been reached. The sense of relief expressed by several of My Heath's colleagues late last night underlined this point.

But there is no doubt that a major factor in making up Mr Heath's mind was the certainty of a further 24 hours of unfavourable press comment - even from normally Conservative newspapers.

Mr Powell is certain to receive the impassioned support of Right-wing Tories for his expression of views on the race question which are widely popular among sections of the electorate. As one Tory MP put it last night, with an eye to public opinion: "You could call him Mr National Opinion Powell."

[Powell said Commonwealth immigration policy must be "mad, literally mad", adding: "It is like watching a nation busily engaged in heaping up its own funeral pyre" and "Like the Roman, I seem to see the River Tiber foaming with much blood."]

From the Guardian archive,
Enoch Powell dismissed for 'racialist' speech,
April 22, 1968,
G,
Republished 22.4.2006,
https://www.theguardian.com/news/1968/apr/22/
mainsection.ianaitken 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Related > Anglonautes > Vocapedia

 

UK > race relations > Black people, white people

 

 

economy > slavery > 21st century

 

 

slavery, eugenics,

race relations,

racial divide, racism,

segregation, civil rights,

apartheid

 

 

immigration > UK

 

 

 

 

 

Related > Anglonautes > History

 

British Empire > Slavery

 

 

British Empire, England > 19th-17th century

 

 

 

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