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Vocapedia > Technology > Wearable devices / wearables, The Internet of things

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For Wearables, Design Leads Tech        NYT        18 March 2015

 

 

 

 

For Wearables, Design Leads Tech        Video        Molly Wood | The New York Times        18 March 2015

 

Wearables are leading a revolution

to combine design with ingenuity to make new products.

 

During development of Nike’s Fuelband, for example,

many details, from material to font, came from designers.

 

Produced by: Molly Wood, Rebekah Fergusson and Vanessa Perez

Read the story here: http://nyti.ms/1CwxN9X

Watch more videos at: http://nytimes.com/video

 

YouTube
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0wjs3adQ1Bc

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Connected Kitchen        NYT        22 November 2014

 

 

 

 

The Connected Kitchen        Video        Molly Wood | The New York Times        22 November 2014

 

If there’s a cooking trend,

chances are, there’s a product for the home cook.

 

The technology columnists Molly Wood and Farhad Manjoo

review their favorite new kitchen gadgets.

 

Produced by: Molly Wood and Shaleece Haas

Read the story here: http://nyti.ms/1F52Q8E

Watch more videos at: http://nytimes.com/video

 

YouTube
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RCuFQQV0Eq4&list=UUqnbDFdCpuN8CMEg0VuEBqA&index=6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LG G Watch Review: Smartwatch of the Distant Future        NYT        25 July 2014

 

 

 

 

LG G Watch Review: Smartwatch of the Distant Future | Molly Wood | The New York Times                25 July 2014

 

Molly Wood reviews LG’s new G watch,

which is powered by Android Wear,

Google’s new operating system for wearable devices.

 

Produced by: Rebekah Fergusson and Vanessa Perez

Read the story here: http://nyti.ms/1nwCNSy

Watch more videos at: http://nytimes.com/video

 

YouTube
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8YgclhtCSgE&list=PL4CGYNsoW2iCzzn4pZBJ58IZAAsSgng2V

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wearable Technology: Beyond the Wrist        NYT        7 March 2014

 

 

 

 

Wearable Technology: Beyond the Wrist | Molly Wood | The New York Times        7 March 2014

 

The Times's Molly Wood

explores why the makers of wearable devices

are so focused on people's wrists

and what the future may hold for fashionable tech.

 

YouTube
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mPzwIs2p36M&list=PL4CGYNsoW2iCzzn4pZBJ58IZAAsSgng2V

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

the 'internet of things'        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/jun/06/
internet-of-things-smart-home-smart-city

 

http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2015/may/28/
google-brillo-operating-system-internet-of-things

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/jan/26/
beware-internet-of-things-fridges

http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2014/jan/14/
how-google-home-nest-labs-acquisition

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

the 'internet of things'        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/alltechconsidered/2017/06/06/
531747037/the-internet-of-things-is-becoming-more-difficult-to-escape

http://www.npr.org/sections/alltechconsidered/2017/08/14/
541699733/our-homes-may-get-smarter-but-have-we-thought-it-through

http://www.npr.org/sections/alltechconsidered/2017/06/06/
531747037/the-internet-of-things-is-becoming-more-difficult-to-escape

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/alltechconsidered/2015/11/02/
454051683/what-happens-when-your-lights-appliances-are-connected-to-the-internet

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/06/
opinion/sunday/allison-arieff-the-internet-of-way-too-many-things.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/20/
technology/20arm.html

 

 

 

 

 

the 'internet of things' > smart contact lens prototype        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/technology/video/2014/jan/17/
google-tests-smart-contact-lens-prototype-diabetes-video

 

 

 

 

 

wearable tech        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/wearable-technology

 

http://www.theguardian.com/technology/audio/2016/mar/17/
the-future-of-wearable-tech-tech-weekly-podcast

 

 

 

 

 

wearable tech > clothes        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/fashion/fashion-blog/2014/jun/06/
wearable-tech-future-fashion-google-glass-mood-sweater

 

 

 

 

 

wearables        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2014/sep/09/
apple-watch-cupertino-investors

 

 

 

 

 

wearables        USA

http://www.npr.org/blogs/alltechconsidered/2014/05/02/
308754743/amid-the-device-hype-this-startup-is-taking-wearables-to-heart

 

 

 

 

 

wearable computers        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/19/
style/could-wearable-computers-be-as-harmful-as-cigarettes.html

 

 

 

 

 

fitness devices / free phone apps        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/19/
technology/personaltech/review-lg-lifeband-touch-and-samsung-gear-fit.html

 

 

 

 

 

Apple > Watch / Smartwatch        USA

http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2015/apr/28/
apple-watch-review-smartwatch-iphone-taptic-siri

http://www.npr.org/blogs/alltechconsidered/2015/04/24/
401714750/will-apples-newest-gadget-ignite-a-smart-watch-movement

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/20/technology/personaltech/
changing-tactics-apple-promotes-watch-as-a-luxury-item.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/17/your-money/
banking-on-apple-watch-will-be-limited-for-now.html

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xr5FDmtCoH4

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/09/technology/personaltech/
dear-diary-my-week-wearing-an-apple-watch.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/09/technology/personaltech/
apple-watch-bliss-but-only-after-a-steep-learning-curve.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/10/
technology/apple-watch-event.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/10/
technology/personaltech/apple-watch-displays-your-digital-world-at-a-glance.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/11/technology/
with-new-apple-products-a-privacy-challenge.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/10/technology/personaltech/
apple-is-back-better-than-ever.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Google > the 'internet of things'        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2014/jan/14/
how-google-home-nest-labs-acquisition

 

 

 

 

 

Google Project Glass

 

Google goggles / Augmented reality glasses        2012-2014

 

eyeglasses that will project

information, entertainment

and (...) advertisements

onto the lenses

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/google-glass 

 

 

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/06/01/
google-glass-enters-the-operating-room/

http://www.npr.org/blogs/itsallpolitics/2014/03/17/
290714189/google-glass-coming-soon-to-a-campaign-trail-near-you

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/26/
opinion/sunday/google-glass-may-be-hands-free-but-not-brain-free.html

http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2013/apr/30/
google-glass-pictures-online

http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2013/mar/09/
google-glass-geek-aesthetics-fashion

http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2013/mar/06/
google-glass-threat-to-our-privacy

http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2013/jan/21/
sergey-brin-google-glass-new-york-subway

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2012/apr/05/
google-project-glass-digital-goggles

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/23/
technology/google-glasses-will-be-powered-by-android.html

http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/02/21/
google-to-sell-terminator-style-glasses-by-years-end/

 

 

 

 

 

 'wearable screens' > Google smartwatch        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2014/jul/11/
google-smartwatches-review-lg-g-watch-samsung-gear-live-android-wear

http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2014/may/27/
google-summer-launch-g-watch

 

 

 

 

 

Google Glass > operating room        USA

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/06/01/
google-glass-enters-the-operating-room/

 

 

 

 

 

Google Glass: first look review        2 July 2013

http://www.youtube.com/watch?
v=9A5wbCSiKNo&list=PL42DBB6601168427B&index=42

 

 

 

 

 

smart furniture        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2014/oct/19/
robots-revolutionising-our-world

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nicholas Felton: A Quantified Life        NYT        21 August 2014

 

 

 

 

Nicholas Felton: A Quantified Life | The New York Times        21 August 2014

 

Nicholas Felton,

an information designer who used to work at Facebook,

has tracked almost every aspect of his life,

from the miles he’s walked to the average length

of his personal conversations.

 

Produced by: Axel Gerdau

Read the story here: http://nyti.ms/1rkzEJv

Watch more videos at: http://nytimes.com/video 

 

YouTube
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QvAFp5j7nRI&list=UUqnbDFdCpuN8CMEg0VuEBqA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

digital lives        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/05/
opinion/sunday/seth-stephens-davidowitz-days-of-our-digital-lives.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Could Wearable Computers

Be as Harmful as Cigarettes?

 

MARCH 18, 2015

The New York Times

Nick Bilton

 

In 1946, a new advertising campaign appeared in magazines with a picture of a doctor in a lab coat holding a cigarette and the slogan, “More doctors smoke Camels than any other cigarette.” No, this wasn’t a spoof. Back then, doctors were not aware that smoking could cause cancer, heart disease and lung disease.

In a similar vein, some researchers and consumers are now asking whether wearable computers will be considered harmful in several decades’ time.

We have long suspected that cellphones, which give off low levels of radiation, could lead to brain tumors, cancer, disturbed blood rhythms and other health problems, if held too close to the body for extended periods.

Yet here we are in 2015, with companies like Apple and Samsung encouraging us to buy gadgets that we should attach to our bodies all day long.

While there is no definitive research on the health effects of wearable computers (the Apple Watch isn’t even on store shelves yet), we can hypothesize a bit from existing research on cellphone radiation.

The most definitive and arguably unbiased results in this area come from the International Agency for Research on Cancer, a panel within the World Health Organization that consisted of 31 scientists from 14 countries.

After dissecting dozens of peer-reviewed studies on cellphone safety, the panel concluded in 2011 that cellphones were “possibly carcinogenic,” and that the devices could be as harmful as certain dry cleaning chemicals and pesticides. (Note that the group hedged their findings with the word “possibly.”)

The W.H.O. panel concluded that the farther away a device is from one’s head, the less harmful — so texting or surfing the Web will not be as dangerous as making calls, with a cellphone inches from the brain. (This is why there were serious concerns about Google Glass when it was first announced, and why we’ve been told to use hands-free devices when talking on cellphones.)

A longitudinal study by Dr. Lennart Hardell, a professor of oncology and cancer epidemiology at the University Hospital in Orebro, Sweden, concluded that talking on a mobile or cordless phone for extended periods could triple the risk of a certain kind of brain cancer.

There is, of course, antithetical research. But some of this was partly funded by cellphone companies or trade groups.

One example is the international Interphone study, which was published in 2010, and did not find strong links between mobile phones and an increased risk of brain tumors.

Another study in the British Medical Journal, which measured cellphone subscription data, rather than actual use, said there was no proof of increased cancer. Yet even here, the Danish team behind the report did acknowledge that a “small to moderate increase” in cancer risk among heavy cellphone users could not be ruled out.

But what does all this research tell the Apple faithful who want to rush out and buy an Apple Watch, or the Google and Windows fanatics who are eager to own an alternative smartwatch.

Joseph Mercola, a physician who focuses on alternative medicine and has written extensively about the potential harmful effects of cellphones on the human body, said that as long as a wearable does not have a 3G connection built into it, the harmful effects are minimal, if any.

“The radiation really comes from the 3G connection on a cellphone, so devices like the Jawbone Up and Apple Watch should be O.K.,” Dr. Mercola said in a phone interview. “But if you’re buying a watch with a cellular chip built in, then you’ve got a cellphone attached to your wrist.” And that, he said, is a bad idea.

(The Apple Watch uses Bluetooth and Wi-Fi to receive data, and researchers say there is no proven harm from those frequencies on the human body. Wearables with 3G or 4G connections built in, including the Samsung Gear S, could be more harmful, though that has not been proved. Apple declined to comment for this article, and Samsung could not be reached for comment.)

Researchers have also raised concerns about having powerful batteries so close to the body for extended periods of time. Some reports over the last several decades have questioned whether being too close to power lines could cause leukemia (though other research has also negated this).

So what should consumers do? Perhaps we can look at how researchers themselves handle their smartphones.

While Dr. Mercola is a vocal proponent of cellphone safety, he told me to call him on his cell when I emailed about an interview. When I asked him whether he was being hypocritical, he replied that technology is a fact of life, and he uses it with caution. As an example, he said he was using a Bluetooth headset during our call.

In the same respect, people who are concerned about the possible side effects of a smartwatch should avoid placing it close to their brain (besides, it looks a little strange).

But there are some people who may be more vulnerable to the dangers of these devices: children.

While researchers debate about how harmful cellphones and wearable computers actually are, most agree that children should exercise caution.

In an email, Dr. Hardell sent me research illustrating that a child’s skull is thinner and smaller than an adult’s, which means that their brain tissues are more exposed to certain types of radiation, specifically the kind that emanates from a cellphone.

Children should limit how much time they spend talking on a cellphone, doctors say. And if they have a wearable device, they should take it off at night, so it does not end up under their pillow, near their brains. Doctors also warn that women who are pregnant should be extra careful with all of these technologies.

But what about adults? After researching this column, talking to experts and poring over dozens of scientific papers, I have realized the dangers of cellphones when use for extended periods, and as a result I have stopped holding my phone next to my head and instead use a headset during phone calls.

That being said, when it comes to wearable computers, I’ll still buy the Apple Watch, but I won’t let it go anywhere near my head. And I definitely won’t let any children I know play with it for extended periods of time.

Could Wearable Computers Be as Harmful as Cigarettes?,
NYT,
MARCH 18, 2015,
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/19/style/
could-wearable-computers-be-as-harmful-as-cigarettes.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The New York Times > Technology

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