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Vocapedia > War > Arms / Weapons > Sea > Warships, aircraft carriers, submarines

 

 

 

British Warship Formidable

 

Date taken: 1941

 

Photographer: George Strock

 

Life Images

http://images.google.com/hosted/life/5cf77ddd39186a2f.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HMS Repulse, photographed in 1926.

 

Photograph: PA Archive

 

British second world war shipwrecks in Java Sea

destroyed by illegal scavenging

 

Exclusive:

3D mapping report of sea off Indonesia, seen by the Guardian,

shows large holes in the seabed where ships used to be

G

Wed 16 Nov 2016        14.41 GMT

First published on Wed 16 Nov 2016        13.45 GMT

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/nov/16/
british-second-world-war-ships-illegal-scavenging-java-sea

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

warship        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2017/jun/26/
inside-hms-queen-elizabeth-in-pictures

 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3047062/
Britain-s-surviving-warship-Gallipoli-brought-life-
100-years-bloody-campaign-haunted-Churchill-rest-life.html - 20 April 2015

 

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2007/jul/26/
military.immigrationpolicy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

warships        USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/08/23/
us/politics/warship-iran.html

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2018/03/02/
589876233/the-u-s-positions-warships-in-tense-asia-pacific-waters

 

 

 

 

warship > U.S.S. John C. Stennis        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/05/world/middleeast/
work-as-usual-for-uss-john-c-stennis-after-warning-by-iran.html

 

 

 

 

warship > USS Indianapolis        USA

http://www.npr.org/2015/07/26/
425904134/cost-of-war-veterans-remember-uss-indianapolis-shark-attacks

 

 

 

 

warship > USS Constitution        USA

 

The Constitution

was named by President George Washington

and won three major battles during the War of 1812,

where it earned its famous nickname, "Old Ironsides."

 

Reportedly,

a British sailor shouted

"Huzza! Her sides are made of iron!"

after cannonballs bounced off the ship

during the war.

 

The ship was retired

from active military service in 1855,

according to History.com.

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/07/24/
539022703/uss-constitution-sails-into-boston-harbor-once-again

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/07/24/
539022703/uss-constitution-sails-into-boston-harbor-once-again

 

 

 

 

His or Her Majesty's Ship, abbreviated HMS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/
Her_Majesty%27s_Ship

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/nov/16/
british-second-world-war-ships-illegal-scavenging-java-sea

 

 

 

 

surface warship > HMS Queen Elizabeth        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2017/aug/16/
hms-queen-elizabeth-uk-3bn-aircraft-carrier-portsmouth-theresa-may

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2017/jun/26/
inside-hms-queen-elizabeth-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson

and its strike group,

which includes a cruiser

and two destroyers        USA

http://www.npr.org/2017/04/11/
523399566/trumps-gunboat-diplomacy-in-asia-may-prove-quite-different-from-syria

 

 

 

 

amphibious assault ship

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/03/02/us-libya-usa-ships-idUSTRE72169F20110302

 

 

 

 

hell ship        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/jul/26/
nagasaki-man-who-walked-through-hell-jan-bras 

 

 

 

 

destroyer

 

 

 

 

airstrike        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2017/04/12/
523474541/survivors-describe-aftermath-of-u-s-airstrike-on-mosul

 

 

 

 

airstrike > fire 59 Tomahawk missiles

from the USS Porter and USS Ross destroyers        USA

http://www.npr.org/2017/04/06/
522948481/u-s-launches-airstrikes-against-syria-after-chemical-attack

 

 

 

 

guided missile destroyer > The USS Mustin        USA

http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/2006-07-08-missile-ship_x.htm

 

 

 

 

giant assault ship > America's floating fortress        UK

 

The USS Kearsarge

carries 1,000 marines

and boasts enough military hardware

to invade a small country.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2011/apr/01/
aboard-uss-kearsarge-off-libya 

 

 

 

 

giant assault ship

 

 

 

 

surface-to-air missiles

 

 

 

 

Tomahawk cruise missiles

 

 

 

 

the Navy's 7th Fleet        USA

http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/2006-07-08-
missile-ship_x.htm

 

 

 

 

U.S. Navy landing craft

 

 

 

 

board the hold of the U.S.S. Nashville

 

 

 

 

on board a landing craft of the U.S.S. Nashville

 

 

 

 

 

aboard

 

 

 

 

boat

 

 

 

 

sailor

 

 

 

 

marines        USA

http://www.usatoday.com/news/offbeat/2007-03-28-
marines_N.htm

 

 

 

 

hands        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2011/jan/02/
alan-bleasdale-uboat-sinking-laconia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

submarine        USA

https://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/01/27/
civil-war-submarines/

 

 

 

 

nuclear submarine        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/16/us/
eugene-p-wilkinson-94-dies-steered-first-nuclear-submarine.html

 

 

 

 

berth

http://uk.reuters.com/article/2011/04/09/uk-britain-
shooting-astute-idUKTRE7372ZN20110409

 

 

 

 

submarine fleet

 

 

 

 

navy

 

 

 

 

blue navy

 

 

 

 

Royal Navy        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/uk/royal-navy

 

https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2004/jan/21/
military.jamesmeek   

 

 

 

 

naval vessel

 

 

 

 

territorial waters

 

 

 

 

steer

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/16/us/
eugene-p-wilkinson-94-dies-steered-first-nuclear-submarine.html

 

 

 

 

command

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/16/us/
eugene-p-wilkinson-94-dies-steered-first-nuclear-submarine.html

 

 

 

 

the USS Intrepid,

the historic aircraft carrier

 

 

 

 

aircraft carrier        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2007/jul/26/
military.immigrationpolicy 

 

 

 

 

aircraft carrier        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/09/world/middleeast/iraq.html  

 

http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2006-12-05-intrepid_x.htm

 

 

 

 

flight deck        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/11/world/middleeast/iraq.html

 

 

 

 

 

weapon handlers        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2014/08/13/
the-strengths-and-limits-of-air-power-6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

shipwreck / wreck

 

 

 

 

wreckage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A leviathan battleship is launched

 

February 12 1906

 

From the Guardian archive

 

February 12 1906

The Guardian

 

The special circumstances which have attended the building of the battleship Dreadnought brought to her launch today an atmosphere of excitement and expectation. The great gangs of men, roaring their chanties and waving their arms when she entered the sea, formed the right background for the ceremonial finish.

The bow towered 30ft overhead and 20ft below the platform. The Dreadnought's bow had the usual ram formation. The forecastle is cut away at each side, bearing out the theory that the first pair of 12in guns will be mounted and two other pairs a little aft on the upper deck, the cut-away allowing them to be fired ahead.

A huge slice, 12in deep seemed gouged out of the hull right from bow to stern. This is the space on which the protecting belt of armour will be riveted. The sharp lines of the bow towered overhead, the perspective ran swiftly aft to the cup-like bulge amidships.

Tremendous preparation had been made to ensure a safe delivery to the sea. The massive cradle which held the ship in position was built of huge logs and held in position by huge iron clamps riveted into the ship's side. The ways were partly greased with margarine.

Very quietly, the King arrived at the appointed hour, leaning heavily on his stick. His Majesty did not look in his usual health, and it was obvious that the effort of speaking with his officers entailed considerable fatigue. Immediately the King was seen there was a loud roar of welcome, the workmen hammering their tools. The King walked into the little stall and grasped the flower-decked bottle of wine. The wine trickled down the grey bows.

The enormous bulk that seemed as immovable as a cathedral made a sudden perceptible little spring backwards and, as it seemed, upwards.

This changed at once to a sliding motion, and before the mind had conceived what had happened one was looking down on another great field of faces where a second before had stood this vast grey structure. The ship diminished sharply before one's eyes. There came a roar of hurrahs, the first sounds of the band playing "God save the King", tugs blowing their horns, the perfume of spilt wine and of flowers.

The sunlight showed the king and his admirals saluting Britain's greatest battleship, the waves flecking her monstrous sides.

 

[ HMS Dreadnought, the first of a revolutionary

but financially ruinous breed of battleship,

was powered by steam turbines,

with a top speed of 21 knots,

and carried 10 12in guns ]

From the Guardian archive > February 12 1906 >
A leviathan battleship is launched,
G,
Republished 12.2.2007, p. 30,
http://digital.guardian.co.uk/guardian/2007/02/12/pages/ber30.shtml

 

 

 

 

 

Shipwreck Teaches Students

About History

 

July 9, 2007

Filed at 3:40 a.m. ET

The New York Times

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

 

ON THE JAMES RIVER, Va. (AP) -- Five 13-year-olds in life jackets crowded inside the cabin of a small research boat and stared at a bank of computer monitors.

Suddenly, a dark gray mass appeared on one of the screens -- a sonar image of the wreckage of the Civil War-era frigate USS Cumberland.

As members of the Cumberland Club, the kids studied artifacts from the ship, then helped researchers beam sonar to the bottom of the James River near the coal piers in Newport News to check on the condition of the ship itself.

The U.S. Navy and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration hold the summer enrichment program, which gives students a hands-on feel for what it's like to be historians, archaeologists and marine scientists.

''It was fun to be able to do things that are important that kids don't usually get to do,'' said Jazmine Brooks of Norfolk, who'll be in eighth grade in the fall.

The Cumberland Club, now in its second year, is free to the middle school students and funded by a grant. To be selected, students wrote essays on ''Why is history important?''

Before their river outing, the 18 students spent a week studying and going to the naval museum and The USS Monitor Center at The Mariners' Museum in Newport News to learn about conservation and archaeology techniques and the history of the Cumberland.

The ship, launched in 1842, sailed to a number of Mediterranean ports, served in the Gulf of Mexico during the Mexican-American War and patrolled the coast of Africa to suppress the slave trade.

The Cumberland was anchored off Newport News on March 8, 1862, when the CSS Virginia arrived to attack a Union blockade. The Virginia pushed her iron ram into the Cumberland's side and the ship began to sink, its gun crews continuing to fire. About 100 men died.

The fight demonstrated the superiority of armored, steam-powered ships over traditional wooden sailing ships.

The next day, the Virginia and the Monitor fought a battle that ended in a standoff. The Virginia had torn off most of its iron spar when it backed away from the Cumberland, and some historians think the Monitor was spared from further damage because the spar could have penetrated the hull below its armor.

Today, the Cumberland's wreckage is protected by law. The Cumberland Club students got to handle some artifacts that belong to the Hampton Roads Naval Museum.

On one afternoon, the students looked for damage as they turned over the pieces in their gloved hands, then photographed the items for the museum's records and wrote reports describing the objects and recommending how to conserve them.

Most of the items were fairly easy to identify: a door hinge, a pulley, a spike.

Cameron Parsons and David Hart, 13-year-olds from Virginia Beach, weren't sure what they had been given. It looked like two small pieces of wood held together by three rivets. One rivet was inscribed ''Philada.''

''That's cool,'' said Michael V. Taylor, the museum's preservation officer. ''I have no idea what it is.''

David, using a magnifying glass, spotted on the ''Philada'' rivet what looked like an engraving of the scales of justice. Maybe the artifact was associated with the ship's legal officer, Taylor told the boys.

They may get to find out for sure. NOAA's Office of Ocean Exploration is providing $1,000 for enhanced restoration for Cumberland artifacts, and the Cumberland Club voted to use the money in part to conserve the ''Philada'' piece.

Cameron said he enjoyed studying the artifacts ''because we're finding real stuff, not recreation stuff that adults set up for us.''

''And it's fun to see stuff that people used like a really long time ago,'' David added.

The following week, in late June, the students spent a day aboard the Bay Hydrographer, a 56-foot NOAA research vessel. They helped researchers use side scan and multibeam sonar to scan the Cumberland wreckage, as well as the nearby wrecks of the Confederate ship CSS Florida, which accidentally sank on Nov. 28, 1864, and a third, unknown ship.

James S. Schmidt, contract archaeologist with the underwater archaeology branch of The Naval Historical Center, will crunch the data collected.

Taylor believes the program will have a lasting impression on the students.

While many kids spend their summers hanging out, Taylor said, ''Cumberland kids get to say, `I went out on an archaeological expedition with The Naval Historical Center on a NOAA boat and we went to the wrecks of the Cumberland and the Confederate Florida. You know, they're important wrecks and important cultural resources.'''

------

On the Net:

Hampton Roads Naval Museum:

http://www.hrnm.navy.mil

Shipwreck Teaches Students About History,
NYT,
9.7.2007,
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/us/AP-Cumberland-Club.html
- broken link

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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