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Vocapedia > War > Remembrance

 


 

 

Ingrid Rice (Irice)

Comment cartoon

British Columbia, Canada

Cagle

4 November 2010

 

Related > Veteran's Day

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Steve Nease

Comment cartoon

Ontario

Cagle

4 November 2010

 

Related > Veteran's Day

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Dave Brown

Political cartoon

The Independent

12 November 2007

 

Prime Minister Gordon Brown

with a Tony Blair-like poppy.

 

Related > Iraq war

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Description:

Australian infantry wearing Small Box Respirators (SBR).

The soldiers are from the 45th Battalion,

Australian 4th Division

at Garter Point, Ypres sector,

27 September 1917.

Source:

Australian War Memorial catalogue number E00825.

 

Date: 27 September 1917

Author: Photo by Captain Frank Hurley.

Wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Australian_infantry_small_box_respirators_Ypres_1917.jpg
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_War_I

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World War I / The Great War > trenches        UK

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2008/nov/09/
first-world-war-western-front

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2008/nov/05/
poetry-andrewmotion

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

forget

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

lest we forget

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

commemorate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

remember

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/comment/columnists/
simonheffer/8114634/Britains-long-slow-journey-to-remembrance.html

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/this-britain/dj-taylor-still-we-remember-2130678.html

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2006/nov/13/military.firstworldwar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

remember our dead

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/comment/columnists/simonheffer/
8114634/Britains-long-slow-journey-to-remembrance.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

remember        USA

 

https://www.npr.org/2019/11/11/
777635075/remembering-the-1st-veterans-memorialized-by-veterans-day

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

remembrance        UK

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/remembrance/ 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2013/nov/09/
remembrance-finding-our-lost-boys

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/comment/columnists/simonheffer/
8114634/Britains-long-slow-journey-to-remembrance.html

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2008/nov/09/
armistice-day-first-world-war

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Remembrance Day / Poppy Day / Remembrance Sunday        ULK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/uk/remembranceday

 

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/gallery/2020/nov/08/
remembrance-sunday-during-lockdown-in-pictures

 

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/picture/2015/nov/08/
martin-rowson-on-remembrance-sunday-cartoon

http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2015/nov/08/
remembrance-sunday-queen-leads-tributes-as-services-held-across-uk 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/gallery/2013/nov/10/
remembrance-sunday-cenotaph-london-in-pictures

http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2013/nov/10/
remembrance-sunday-tributes-cenotaph-queen

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/gallery/2011/nov/13/
remembrance-sunday-queen-cenotaph

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/nov/13/
first-world-war-british-library

http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2011/nov/10/
twitter-remembrance-day-service

 

https://www.theguardian.com/uk/gallery/2010/nov/14/
remembrance-day-ceremonies-uk

http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/alabaster/A653924

https://www.theguardian.com/education/2001/nov/08/
artsandhumanities.highereducation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

on Remembrance Sunday        UK

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/gallery/2008/nov/09/
firstworldwar-military?picture=339494620

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Remembrance Sunday services        2011        UK

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2011/nov/13/
remembrance-sunday-services-across-britain

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Boston Globe > Big Picture        USA

 

UK > Crosses commemorating

 

the British military casualties

in Afghanistan

in the Field of Remembrance

outside Westminster Abbey

in central London, Nov. 10, 2011.

 

http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2011/12/
afghanistan_november_2011.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

mark Remembrance Day        2010

 

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/australiaandthepacific/australia/8124932/
Last-British-veteran-of-WW1-refuses-to-mark-Remembrance-Day.html  - 11 November 2010

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Claude Choules

Last British veteran of WW1

refuses to mark Remembrance Day        2010

 

The last surviving British veteran

of the First World War

will not mark Remembrance Day today

because he wants

to forget the horrors of war,

his family has said.

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/australiaandthepacific/australia/8124932/
Last-British-veteran-of-WW1-refuses-to-mark-Remembrance-Day.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Remembrance Day poppies: a history        UK

 

The tradition of wearing a poppy

officially began in Britain two years

after the end of the First World War.

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/
politics/defence/8122070/Remembrance-Day-poppies-a-history.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

poppy, poppies        UK

 

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/this-britain/
d-j-taylor-still-we-remember-2130678.html 

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2010/nov/05/poppies-and-heroes-remembrance-day

 

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2007/nov/11/
comment.military 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2006/nov/12/
military.davidsmith

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

crosses and poppies        UK

 

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/this-britain/dj-taylor-still-we-remember-2130678.html

 

 

 

 

poppy        UK

 

 

 

 

wear a poppy

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/nov/08/
poppy-last-time-remembrance-harry-leslie-smith

 

 

 

 

poppy > John McCrae's Flanders Fields

In Flanders Fields - written by Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae in 1915

http://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/remembrance/poetry/wwone.shtml

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-15691951

 

 

 

 

poppy day / British Remembrance Day / 11 November

 

 

 

 

poppy week

 

 

 

 

World War I / The Great War > Armistice Day        11 November

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/gallery/2020/nov/11/
armistice-day-2020-in-pictures

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2008/nov/09/
armistice-day-first-world-war

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/
armistice-90-years-on-all-those-pals-of-mine-should-be-here-1012492.html

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/
belgium-marks-90th-anniversary-of-wwi-armistice-1013833.html

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2008/nov/09/
armistice-day-first-world-war

 

 

 

 

the Royal British Legion Wootton Bassett

Field of Remembrance        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2010/nov/09/prince-harry-afghanistan-remembrance-field

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/gallery/2010/nov/09/remembrance-field-afghanistan-soldiers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

fallen soldiers / fallen comrades / the fallen        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2010/oct/17/
editorial-afghanistan-friendly-fire

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

fallen warriors        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/05/29/
530597634/trump-honors-fallen-warriors-at-arlington-national-cemetery

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

lay / plant a cross

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The history of the Cenotaph        UK

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Cenotaph

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

march past the Cenotaph        UK

 

http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2013/nov/10/
remembrance-sunday-tributes-cenotaph-queen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

At the Cenotaph on Whitehall        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2011/nov/13/
remembrance-sunday-services-across-britain 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2008/nov/09/
firstworldwar-military 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2006/nov/12/military.davidsmith 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

at the Cenotaph        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/gallery/2020/nov/11/
armistice-day-2020-in-pictures

 

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/from-the-archive-blog/2020/nov/10/
the-funeral-of-the-unknown-warrior-november-920

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cenotaph ceremony

 

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/
home-news/remembrance-day-a-searing-silence-1006631.html

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2008/nov/09/firstworldwar-military 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/gallery/2008/nov/09/firstworldwar-military?picture=339494620 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2007/nov/11/iraq.iraq

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

a memorial service at the Cenotaph

 

 

 

 

the traditional Remembrance Sunday tributes

to  Britain's fallen servicemen and women

at the Cenotaph

https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2004/nov/15/military.hughmuir 

 

 

 

 

lay a wreath

at the Cenotaph in Whitehall

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2008/nov/09/firstworldwar-military

 

 

 

 

attend an Armistice Day commemoration ceremony

at The Cenotaph

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/gallery/2008/nov/11/firstworldwar?picture=339563745

 

 

 

 

Cenotaph > Sydney, Australia

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/gallery/2008/nov/11/firstworldwar?picture=339561581

 

 

 

 

the Shrine of Remembrance > Melbourne, Australia

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/gallery/2008/nov/11/firstworldwar?picture=339561583

 

 

 

 

two minute silence / observe the two minutes' silence

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/8123161/
A-quarter-email-during-two-minute-silence.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Last Viewing        StoryCorps        10 November 2014

 

 

 

 

The Last Viewing        Video        StoryCorps        10 November 2014

 

Allen Hoe served as a combat medic

during the Vietnam War,

and his two sons continue

his legacy of service.

 

His oldest son, Nainoa,

eventually became a first lieutenant infantry officer

with the Army's 3rd Battalion.

 

In January 2005,

while leading his men through Mosul, Iraq,

Nainoa was killed by sniper fire.

 

He was 27.

 

On Memorial Day that same year,

Allen traveled to Washington to honor Nainoa's memory,

and it was there that he had a chance encounter

a stranger that brought them both unforeseen comfort.

 

Funding provided by:

Corporation for Public Broadcasting

In partnership with POV.

Directed by: The Rauch Brothers

Art Direction: Bill Wray

Producers:

Lizzie Jacobs, Maya Millett & Mike Rauch

Animation: Tim Rauch

Audio Produced by:

Nadia Reiman, Katie Simon & Michael Garofalo

Music: Fredrik

Label: The Kora Records

Publisher: House of Hassle

 

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JLiiV2FWTJg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Memorial Day        USA

 

Memorial Day is a holiday

that has evolved dramatically

over the years.

 

Memorial Day observances

began after the Civil War

to honor the Union soldiers

who gave their lives in the conflict.

 

They were expanded

after World War I

to become a tribute

to the dead of all the nation’s wars.

https://www.nytimes.com/topic/subject/memorial-day

 

 

https://www.npr.org/2022/05/30/
1101997394/memorial-day-arlington-gold-star-family-commemorates

 

 

 

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/05/29/
530597634/trump-honors-fallen-warriors-at-arlington-national-cemetery

 

http://www.npr.org/2017/05/29/
530593106/asking-god-to-forgive-me-n-c-lawmaker-seeks-redemption-for-war-votes

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/27/us/politics/
obama-honoring-the-fallen-says-va-problems-must-be-faced.html

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/27/opinion/the-silence-of-memorial-day.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/30/opinion/30blight.html

 

http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2010/05/afghanistan_may_2010.html

 

http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2009/05/memorial_day_2009.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/05/26/us/politics/26wreath.html

 

http://www.usatoday.com/news/washington/2008-05-26-bush-memorialday_N.htm

 

http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2006-05-25-memorial-day-cover_x.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

        USA > Veterans Day - November 11        USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/11/10/
well/family/for-veterans-day-some-former-military-officers-reflect-on-lessons-from-their-parents.html

 

https://www.npr.org/2019/11/11/
777635075/remembering-the-1st-veterans-memorialized-by-veterans-day

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Corpus of news articles

 

War > Remembrance

 

 

 

Forgetting Why We Remember

 

May 29, 2011

The New York Times

By DAVID W. BLIGHT

 

MOST Americans know that Memorial Day is about honoring the nation’s war dead. It is also a holiday devoted to department store sales, half-marathons, picnics, baseball and auto racing. But where did it begin, who created it, and why?

At the end of the Civil War, Americans faced a formidable challenge: how to memorialize 625,000 dead soldiers, Northern and Southern. As Walt Whitman mused, it was “the dead, the dead, the dead — our dead — or South or North, ours all” that preoccupied the country. After all, if the same number of Americans per capita had died in Vietnam as died in the Civil War, four million names would be on the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, instead of 58,000.

Officially, in the North, Memorial Day emerged in 1868 when the Grand Army of the Republic, the Union veterans’ organization, called on communities to conduct grave-decorating ceremonies. On May 30, funereal events attracted thousands of people at hundreds of cemeteries in countless towns, cities and mere crossroads. By the 1870s, one could not live in an American town, North or South, and be unaware of the spring ritual.

But the practice of decorating graves — which gave rise to an alternative name, Decoration Day — didn’t start with the 1868 events, nor was it an exclusively Northern practice. In 1866 the Ladies’ Memorial Association of Columbus, Ga., chose April 26, the anniversary of Gen. Joseph Johnston’s final surrender to Gen. William T. Sherman, to commemorate fallen Confederate soldiers. Later, both May 10, the anniversary of Gen. Stonewall Jackson’s death, and June 3, the birthday of Jefferson Davis, were designated Confederate Memorial Day in different states.

Memorial Days were initially occasions of sacred bereavement, and from the war’s end to the early 20th century they helped forge national reconciliation around soldierly sacrifice, regardless of cause. In North and South, orators and participants frequently called Memorial Day an “American All Saints Day,” likening it to the European Catholic tradition of whole towns marching to churchyards to honor dead loved ones.

But the ritual quickly became the tool of partisan memory as well, at least through the violent Reconstruction years. In the South, Memorial Day was a means of confronting the Confederacy’s defeat but without repudiating its cause. Some Southern orators stressed Christian notions of noble sacrifice. Others, however, used the ritual for Confederate vindication and renewed assertions of white supremacy. Blacks had a place in this Confederate narrative, but only as time-warped loyal slaves who were supposed to remain frozen in the past.

The Lost Cause tradition thrived in Confederate Memorial Day rhetoric; the Southern dead were honored as the true “patriots,” defenders of their homeland, sovereign rights, a natural racial order and a “cause” that had been overwhelmed by “numbers and resources” but never defeated on battlefields.

Yankee Memorial Day orations often righteously claimed the high ground of blood sacrifice to save the Union and destroy slavery. It was not uncommon for a speaker to honor the fallen of both sides, but still lay the war guilt on the “rebel dead.” Many a lonely widow or mother at these observances painfully endured expressions of joyous death on the altars of national survival.

Some events even stressed the Union dead as the source of a new egalitarian America, and a civic rather than a racial or ethnic definition of citizenship. In Wilmington, Del., in 1869, Memorial Day included a procession of Methodists, Baptists, Unitarians and Catholics; white Grand Army of the Republic posts in parade with a black post; and the “Mount Vernon Cornet Band (colored)” keeping step with the “Irish Nationalists with the harp and the sunburst flag of Erin.”

But for the earliest and most remarkable Memorial Day, we must return to where the war began. By the spring of 1865, after a long siege and prolonged bombardment, the beautiful port city of Charleston, S.C., lay in ruin and occupied by Union troops. Among the first soldiers to enter and march up Meeting Street singing liberation songs was the 21st United States Colored Infantry; their commander accepted the city’s official surrender.

Whites had largely abandoned the city, but thousands of blacks, mostly former slaves, had remained, and they conducted a series of commemorations to declare their sense of the meaning of the war.

The largest of these events, forgotten until I had some extraordinary luck in an archive at Harvard, took place on May 1, 1865. During the final year of the war, the Confederates had converted the city’s Washington Race Course and Jockey Club into an outdoor prison. Union captives were kept in horrible conditions in the interior of the track; at least 257 died of disease and were hastily buried in a mass grave behind the grandstand.

After the Confederate evacuation of Charleston black workmen went to the site, reburied the Union dead properly, and built a high fence around the cemetery. They whitewashed the fence and built an archway over an entrance on which they inscribed the words, “Martyrs of the Race Course.”

The symbolic power of this Low Country planter aristocracy’s bastion was not lost on the freedpeople, who then, in cooperation with white missionaries and teachers, staged a parade of 10,000 on the track. A New York Tribune correspondent witnessed the event, describing “a procession of friends and mourners as South Carolina and the United States never saw before.”

The procession was led by 3,000 black schoolchildren carrying armloads of roses and singing the Union marching song “John Brown’s Body.” Several hundred black women followed with baskets of flowers, wreaths and crosses. Then came black men marching in cadence, followed by contingents of Union infantrymen. Within the cemetery enclosure a black children’s choir sang “We’ll Rally Around the Flag,” the “Star-Spangled Banner” and spirituals before a series of black ministers read from the Bible.

After the dedication the crowd dispersed into the infield and did what many of us do on Memorial Day: enjoyed picnics, listened to speeches and watched soldiers drill. Among the full brigade of Union infantrymen participating were the famous 54th Massachusetts and the 34th and 104th United States Colored Troops, who performed a special double-columned march around the gravesite.

The war was over, and Memorial Day had been founded by African-Americans in a ritual of remembrance and consecration. The war, they had boldly announced, had been about the triumph of their emancipation over a slaveholders’ republic. They were themselves the true patriots.

Despite the size and some newspaper coverage of the event, its memory was suppressed by white Charlestonians in favor of their own version of the day. From 1876 on, after white Democrats took back control of South Carolina politics and the Lost Cause defined public memory and race relations, the day’s racecourse origin vanished.

Indeed, 51 years later, the president of the Ladies’ Memorial Association of Charleston received an inquiry from a United Daughters of the Confederacy official in New Orleans asking if it was true that blacks had engaged in such a burial rite in 1865; the story had apparently migrated westward in community memory. Mrs. S. C. Beckwith, leader of the association, responded tersely, “I regret that I was unable to gather any official information in answer to this.”

Beckwith may or may not have known about the 1865 event; her own “official” story had become quite different and had no place for the former slaves’ march on their masters’ racecourse. In the struggle over memory and meaning in any society, some stories just get lost while others attain mainstream recognition.

AS we mark the Civil War’s sesquicentennial, we might reflect on Frederick Douglass’s words in an 1878 Memorial Day speech in New York City, in which he unwittingly gave voice to the forgotten Charleston marchers.

He said the war was not a struggle of mere “sectional character,” but a “war of ideas, a battle of principles.” It was “a war between the old and the new, slavery and freedom, barbarism and civilization ... and in dead earnest for something beyond the battlefield.” With or against Douglass, we still debate the “something” that the Civil War dead represent.

The old racetrack is gone, but an oval roadway survives on the site in Hampton Park, named for Wade Hampton, former Confederate general and the governor of South Carolina after the end of Reconstruction. The old gravesite of the Martyrs of the Race Course is gone too; they were reinterred in the 1880s at a national cemetery in Beaufort, S.C.

But the event is no longer forgotten. Last year I had the great honor of helping a coalition of Charlestonians, including the mayor, Joseph P. Riley, dedicate a marker to this first Memorial Day by a reflecting pool in Hampton Park.

By their labor, their words, their songs and their solemn parade on their former owners’ racecourse, black Charlestonians created for themselves, and for us, the Independence Day of a Second American Revolution.

 

David W. Blight, a professor of history

and the director of the Gilder Lehrman Center

for the Study of Slavery, Resistance and Abolition at Yale,

is the author of the forthcoming

“American Oracle: The Civil War in the Civil Rights Era.”

Forgetting Why We Remember,
NYT,
29.5.2011,
https://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/30/
opinion/30blight.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Related > Anglonautes > Vocapedia

Conflicts, Genocides, Mass killings, Refugees, Reporters, Terrorism, Wars

 

genocide, war,

weapons, arms sales,

espionage, torture

 

 

conflicts, wars > civilians > migrants, refugees

 

 

past > memories, remembrance

 

 

past > remembrance > USA > Memorial Day

 

 

USA > Native Americans > mass killings

 

 

terrorism, global terrorism, militant groups,

intelligence, surveillance

 

 

 

military justice > USA

 

 

journalism > journalist, reporter

 

 

journalism > source

 

 

photojournalism, photojournalist

 

 

 

 

 

Related > Anglonautes > History > Wars

 

21st century > 2001-2020

USA > Afghanistan war

 

 

21st century > 2003-2011

Iraq, UK, USA > Iraq War

 

 

20th century > 1990-1991

USA, Iraq, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia

Persian Gulf war

 

 

20th century > late 1940s - late 1980s

Asia, Europe, Americas

Cold war

 

 

20th century > 1962-1975

USA, Vietnam

Cold War > Vietnam War

 

 

Japan, USA > WW2

Hiroshima and Nagasaki - August 1945

 

 

20th century > WW2 (1939-1945)

UK, British empire

 

 

20th century > WW2 (1939-1945)

USA

 

 

20th century > 1939-1945 > World War 2

Germany, Europe >

Adolf Hitler, Nazi era,

Antisemitism, Holocaust / Shoah

 

 

20th century > WW1 (1914-1918)

USA

 

 

20th century > WW1 (1914-1918)

UK, British empire

 

 

19th-17th century

England, United Kingdom, British Empire

 

 

17th, 18th, 19th, 20th century

English America, America, USA

Racism, Slavery, Abolition,

Civil war (1861-1865),

Abraham Lincoln

 

 

 

 

 

Related > Anglonautes > Arts > Photography, Photojournalism

 

war photographers

 

 

 

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