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Vocapedia > Health > Lifestyle > Eating and other causes > Obesity

 

 

 

Rachelle Williams, a 13-year-old from Georgia,

has Prader-Willi syndrome.

 

Photograph:

Stephanie Sinclair for The New York Times

 

‘Food Is a Death Sentence to These Kids’

NYT

JAN. 21, 2015

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/25/magazine/food-is-a-death-sentence-to-these-kids.html
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Why are we all getting fat?        Guardian Animations        21 August 2014

 

 

 

 

Why are we all getting fat?        Video        Guardian Animations        21 August 2014

 

As increasing numbers of us become obese,

food manufacturers want us to think it's our fault

– while aggressively marketing more junk

to satiate our new eating habits.

 

Politicians try to avoid a delicate and unpopular issue

while the diet industry gets rich on the misery it creates.

In this animation based

on Sarah Boseley's book The Shape We're In,

we ask: where do we go from here?

 

YouTube > Guardian

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GeWIEyTQsis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Illustration: Michael Kuo

 

What I’d Say to My Fat Son

NYT

MARCH 22, 2014

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/23/opinion/sunday/what-id-say-to-my-fat-son.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David Fitzsimmons

The Arizona Star

Cagle

29 May 2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

hunger        USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/11/
well/eat/how-to-stop-your-food-cravings.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

body mass index    BMI        USA

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/04/03/
522475728/carrying-some-extra-pounds-may-not-be-good-after-all

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

obesity        UK

 

http://www.theguardian.com/society/obesity

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/mar/22/
obesity-smoking-action-sugar-tax

 

http://www.theguardian.com/society/video/2014/aug/21/
obesity-in-the-uk-the-shape-were-in-video

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2014/aug/14/
excess-weight-linked-cancer-uk-obesity-researchers

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/jul/18/
food-is-a-drug-and-we-have-to-learn-to-say-no

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2014/jun/23/
truth-about-obesity-10-shocking-things-need-to-know

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2014/mar/15/
excess-weight-causes-eighth-hospital-admissions-women-over-50-obesity

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2014/mar/04/sugar-addictive-tax

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2014/jan/13/uk-obesity-worst-case-scenario-underestimate

 

http://www.theguardian.com/science/2013/sep/22/dieting-disaster-evolution-daniel-lieberman

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2013/sep/22/how-western-affluence-gives-cancer

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2013/aug/04/demon-drink-war-on-sugar

 

https://www.theguardian.com/news/2007/oct/31/uknews.health 

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2007/apr/13/genetics.frontpagenews 

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2007/apr/09/health.genderissues 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2005/apr/29/medicineandhealth.schoolmeals 

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2005/feb/22/mentalhealth.medicineandhealth 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2004/sep/01/medicineandhealth.publichealth 

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2004/jan/08/
medicineandhealth.sciencenews

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

obesity       USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/25/
opinion/coronavirus-race-obesity.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/23/
health/coronavirus-patients-risk.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/16/
health/coronavirus-obesity-higher-risk.html

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2020/04/18/
835563340/whos-hit-hardest-by-covid-19-why-obesity-stress-and-race-all-matter

 

 

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/09/
opinion/cost-diabetes-obesity-budget.html

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2018/02/26/
587985555/no-downturn-in-obesity-among-u-s-kids-report-finds

 

 

 

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/10/11/
557093908/obesity-in-children-and-teens-rose-sharply-worldwide-over-past-4-decades

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/14/
opinion/how-we-view-obesity.html

 

 

 

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2015/11/12/
455074815/are-junk-food-habits-driving-obesity-a-tale-of-two-studies

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2015/09/23/
442801737/obesity-maps-put-racial-differences-on-stark-display

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/25/
magazine/food-is-a-death-sentence-to-these-kids.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/16/
opinion/the-true-cost-of-a-burger.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/05/
opinion/bittman-some-progress-on-eating-and-health.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/26/
health/obesity-rate-for-young-children-plummets-43-in-a-decade.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/23/
opinion/sunday/should-obesity-be-a-disease.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/30/
science/obesity-takes-hold-early-in-life-study-finds.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/02/
opinion/bad-eating-habits-start-in-the-womb.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/05/nyregion/
calories-in-some-nyc-school-lunches-were-below-federal-requirements.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/06/06/
health/06obese.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

obesity-related cancers        USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/20/
well/eat/coronavirus-diet-metabolic-health.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

pancreatic cancer risks > obesity        USA

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/23/
well/pancreatic-cancer-risk.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Obesity Maps Put Racial Differences On Stark Display        USA        September 23, 2015

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2015/09/23/
442801737/obesity-maps-put-racial-differences-on-stark-display

 

 

 

 

obesity worldwide        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/03/
health/no-nation-has-lowered-obesity-rate-in-33-years.html

 

 

 

 

morbid obesity

 

The term morbid obesity

refers to patients

who are 50 - 100%

-- or 100 pounds above --

their ideal body weight.

 

Alternatively,

a BMI (body mass index) value

greater than 39

may be used

to diagnose morbid obesity.

http://health.nytimes.com/health/
guides/symptoms/morbid-obesity/overview.html - broken link

 

 

 

 

cartoons > Cagle > Obesity        USA        February 2011

http://cagle.com/news/OvercomingObesity/main.asp

 

 

 

 

child obesity / obesity in young

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2016/04/26/
475622225/plateau-but-no-decline-child-obesity-rates-hold-steady

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/11/
health/childhood-obesity-drops-in-new-york-and-philadelphia.html

 

 

 

 

childhood obesity        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/aug/18/
childhood-obesity-retailers-urge-mandatory-cuts-to-food-sugar-levels

 

http://www.theguardian.com/education/2014/apr/26/
school-meals-policy-epidemic-child-obesity-diet

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/shortcuts/2013/may/30/
chip-ban-obesity-crisis

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2013/jan/05/
childhood-obesity-fatty-sugary-foods

 

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2006/apr/22/
health.schools

 

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2005/apr/30/
publichealth.uknews

 

 

 

 

childhood obesity epidemic        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/16/
health/parents-denial-fuels-childhood-obesity-epidemic.html

 

 

 

 

youth obesity        USA

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/12/25/
stop-subsidizing-obesity/

 

 

 

 

obese teens        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2015/11/06/
455007824/surgery-helps-some-obese-teens-in-battle-to-get-fit

 

 

 

 

obesity epidemic        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2013/mar/20/
sugar-deadly-obesity-epidemic

 

 

 

 

obesity > cancer        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2014/aug/14/
excess-weight-linked-cancer-uk-obesity-researchers

 

 

 

 

Georgia Davis,

Britain's largest teenager /, "Britain's biggest teen"        UK    25 May 2012

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2012/may/25/
georgia-davis-what-support-was-she-getting

 

 

 

 

calories        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/05/nyregion/
calories-in-some-nyc-school-lunches-were-below-federal-requirements.html

 

 

 

 

overeat        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2016/01/29/
462838153/food-ads-make-us-eat-more-and-should-be-regulated

 

 

 

 

binge eating

 

 

 

 

 

sugar        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2014/mar/04/
sugar-addictive-tax

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2013/mar/20/
sugar-deadly-obesity-epidemic

 

 

 

 

sugar        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/09/13/
493739074/50-years-ago-sugar-industry-quietly-paid-scientists-to-point-blame-at-fat

 

 

 

 

fat children        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2006/nov/19/
health.medicineandhealth

 

 

 

 

fat        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/09/13/
493739074/50-years-ago-sugar-industry-quietly-paid-scientists-to-point-blame-at-fat

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/07/
opinion/sunday/yes-im-fat-its-ok-i-said-it.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/11/
opinion/roger-cohen-fat-britain.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/23/
opinion/sunday/what-id-say-to-my-fat-son.html?hp&rref=opinion&_r=0

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/03/05/
how-fat-may-harm-the-brain-and-how-exercise-may-help/

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/03/
opinion/our-imaginary-weight-problem.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/05/nyregion/
calories-in-some-nyc-school-lunches-were-below-federal-requirements.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/01/
magazine/tara-parker-pope-fat-trap.html

 

 

 

 

fat        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/society/the-shape-we-are-in-blog/2014/sep/10/
obesity-body-image

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/interactive/2013/feb/21/
do-you-know-what-size-you-are

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2012/jun/11/
why-our-food-is-making-us-fat

 

 

 

 

obese        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/uk/2006/oct/10/
politics.health

 

 

 

 

obese        USA

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/04/03/
522475728/carrying-some-extra-pounds-may-not-be-good-after-all

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2015/11/13/
455883665/cdc-more-women-than-men-are-obese-in-america-and-gap-is-widening

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/25/
opinion/sunday/nicholas-kristof-wheres-the-empathy.html

 

 

 

 

morbidly obese        USA

http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/weightloss/2007-04-10-
morbidly-obese_N.htm

 

 

 

 

obese people        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2014/may/28/
nice-database-weight-management-programmes

 

 

 

 

the obese        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2011/11/28/
should-legislation-protect-obese-people

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

bulimic        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/19/
magazine/19bruni-t.html

 

 

 

 

bulimia        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/society/bulimia

 

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2018/apr/28/
bulimia-hidden-in-men-pig-out-puke-after-gym-diagnosis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

weight

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

excess weight        UK

 

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2014/mar/15/
excess-weight-causes-eighth-hospital-admissions-women-over-50-obesity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

weigh too much        USA

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/03/
opinion/our-imaginary-weight-problem.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(be) overweight        UK

 

https://www.theguardian.com/news/audio/2020/jul/30/
how-did-britain-get-so-overweight-podcast

 

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/04/03/
522475728/carrying-some-extra-pounds-may-not-be-good-after-all

 

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2015/mar/30/
parents-of-obese-children-unable-to-recognise-child-is-overweight

 

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2014/aug/14/
excess-weight-linked-cancer-uk-obesity-researchers

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2014/jul/31/
belly-abdominal-fat-type-2-diabetes

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2014/may/28/
nice-database-weight-management-programmes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

overweight people        UK

 

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2014/may/28/
nice-database-weight-management-programmes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

the overweight        UK

 

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2007/mar/25/
health.medicineandhealth 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/money/2006/oct/07/
lifeinsurance.healthandwellbeing 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

lose weight

 

 

 

 

get fit

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2015/11/06/
455007824/surgery-helps-some-obese-teens-in-battle-to-get-fit

 

 

 

 

555-pound boy        USA

http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/weightloss/
2009-07-20-obesityboy_N.htm

 

 

 

 

couch potatoes        UK

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2007/mar/20/
health.medicineandhealth

 

 

 

 

gastric surgery        UK

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2012/jun/01/
gastric-surgery-first-person-experience

 

 

 

 

school snacks        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/13/
health/research/study-links-healthy-weight-in-children-
with-tough-snack-and-sugary-drinks-laws.html

 

 

 

 

cartoons > Cagle > War on soda        USA        May-June 2012

http://www.cagle.com/news/sodabanned/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dave Granlund

Politicalcartoons.com

Cagle

21 June 2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dave Granlund

Politicalcartoons.com

Cagle

 1 June 2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By RJ Matson

The St. Louis Post Dispatch

Cagle

17 November 2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Study Links

Healthier Weight in Children

With Strict Laws on School Snacks

 

August 13, 2012

The New York Times

By SABRINA TAVERNISE

 

Adolescents in states with strict laws regulating the sale of snacks and sugary drinks in public schools gained less weight over a three-year period than those living in states with no such laws, a new study has found.

The study, published Monday in Pediatrics, found a strong association between healthier weight and tough state laws regulating food in vending machines, snack bars and other venues that were not part of the regular school meal programs. Such snacks and drinks are known as competitive foods, because they compete with school breakfasts and lunches.

The conclusions are likely to further stoke the debate over what will help reduce obesity rates, which have been rising drastically in the United States since the 1980s. So far, very little has proved effective and rates have remained stubbornly high. About a fifth of American children are obese, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Public health experts have urged local and state governments to remove competitive foods from schools, and in recent years states have started to pass laws that restrict their sale, either banning them outright or setting limits on the amount of sugar, fat or calories they contain.

The study tracked weight changes for 6,300 students in 40 states between 2004 and 2007, following them from fifth to eighth grade. They used the results to compare weight change over time in states with no laws regulating such food against those in states with strong laws and those with weak laws.

Researchers used a legal database to analyze state laws. Strong laws were defined as those that set out detailed nutrition standards. Laws were weak if they merely offered recommendations about foods for sale, for example, saying they should be healthy but not providing specific guidelines.

The study stopped short of saying the stronger laws were directly responsible for the better outcomes. It concluded only that such outcomes tended to happen in states with stronger laws, but that the outcomes were not necessarily the result of those laws. However, researchers added that they controlled for a number of factors that would have influenced outcomes.

Still, the correlation was substantial, researchers said, suggesting that the laws might be a factor. Students who lived in states with strong laws throughout the entire three-year period gained an average of 0.44 fewer body mass index units, or roughly 2.25 fewer pounds for a 5-foot-tall child, than adolescents in states with no policies.

The study also found that obese fifth graders who lived in states with stronger laws were more likely to reach a healthy weight by the eighth grade than those living in states with no laws. Students exposed to weaker laws, however, had weight gains that were not different from those of students in states with no laws at all.

The authors argued that the study offered evidence that local policies could be effective tools.

“Competitive-food laws can have an effect on obesity rates if the laws are specific, required and consistent,” said Daniel Taber, a fellow at the Institute for Health Research and Policy at the University of Chicago, who was one of the authors of the study.

Still, many states have no laws at all regulating the sale of such foods, and the group that helped finance the study, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, argued that the results made the case for a strong national standard for snacks and beverages in schools. The United States Department of Agriculture has been developing new standards for some time, but they have yet to emerge.

Some experts argue that a real reduction in the obesity rate will come only when many more local governments adopt tough policies to change the food environment. Still others say that school is such a small part of a child’s day that healthier options will make little difference when coupled with a home environment with a lot of unhealthy choices.

Study Links Healthier Weight in Children With Strict Laws on School Snacks,
NYT,
13.8.2012,
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/13/
health/research/study-links-healthy-weight-in-children-
with-tough-snack-and-sugary-drinks-laws.html

 

 

 

 

 

Obesity Rates Climb in Most States

 

August 27, 2007

Filed at 4:30 p.m. ET

The New York Times

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

 

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Loosen the belt buckle another notch: Obesity rates continued to climb in 31 states last year, and no state showed a decline.

Mississippi became the first state to crack the 30 percent barrier for adults considered to be obese. West Virginia and Alabama were just behind, according to the Trust for America's Health, a research group that focuses on disease prevention.

Colorado continued its reign as the leanest state in the nation with an obesity rate projected at 17.6 percent.

This year's report, for the first time, looked at rates of overweight children ages 10 to 17. The District of Columbia had the highest percentage -- 22.8 percent. Utah had the lowest -- 8.5 percent.

Health officials say the latest state rankings provide evidence that the nation has a public health crisis on its hands.

Unfortunately, we're treating it like a mere inconvenience instead of the emergency that it is,'' said Dr. James Marks, senior vice president at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, a philanthropy devoted to improving health care.

Officials at the Trust for America's Health want the government to play a larger role in preventing obesity. People who are overweight are at an increased risk for diabetes, heart problems and other chronic diseases that contribute to greater health care costs.

''It's one of those issues where everyone believes this is an epidemic, but it's not getting the level of political and policymaker attention that it ought to,'' said Jeffrey Levi, the organization's executive director. ''As every candidate for president talks about health care reform and controlling health care cost costs, if we don't home in on this issue, none of their proposals are going to be affordable.''

At the same time, many believe weight is a personal choice and responsibility. Levi doesn't dispute that notion, but he said society can help people make good choices.

''If we want kids to eat healthier food, we have to invest the money for school nutrition programs so that school lunches are healthier,'' he said. ''If we want people to be more physically active, then there have to be safe places to be active. That's not just a class issue. We've designed suburban communities where there are no sidewalks for anybody to go out and take a walk.''

To measure obesity rates, Trust for America's Health compares data from 2003-2005 with 2004-2006. It combines information from three years to improve the accuracy of projections. The data come from a survey of height and weight taken over the telephone. Because the information comes from a personal estimate, some believe it is conservative.

Indeed, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released a study last year noting a national obesity rate of about 32 percent -- a higher rate than was cited for any of the states in the Trust for America's Health report. The CDC's estimate came from weighing people rather than relying on telephone interviews, officials explained.

Generally, anyone with a body mass index greater than 30 is considered obese. The index is a ratio that takes into account height and weight. The overweight range is 25 to 29.9. Normal is 18.5 to 24.9. People with a large amount of lean muscle mass, such as athletes, can show a large body mass index without having an unhealthy level of fat.

A lack of exercise is a huge factor in obesity rates. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found last year that more than 22 percent of Americans did not engage in any physical activity in the past month. The percentage is greater than 30 percent in four states: Mississippi, Louisiana, Kentucky and Tennessee.

Meanwhile, Minnesotans led the way when it came to exercise. An estimated 15.4 percent of the state's residents did not engage an any physical exercise -- the best rate in the nation. Still, the state ranked 28th overall when it came to the percentage of obese adults.

Another factor in obesity rates is poverty. The five poorest states were all in the top 10 when it came to obesity rates. An exception to that rule was the District of Columbia and New Mexico. Both had high poverty rates, but also one of the lower obesity rates among adults.

Poverty can lead to less safe neighborhoods, which deter children from playing. It can lead to fewer grocery stores offering fruits and vegetables, and it can lead to greater reliance on fast food, officials said.

''It seems the cheapest foods are the worst ones for you,'' Marks said.

Officials said the report is not designed to stigmatize states with high obesity rates but to stir them into action.

''These are the states where the urgency is the greatest. They need not to wait for others to lead. They need to become the leaders,'' Marks said. ''It's the only way that they can restore the health of their children and their families. It's the only way that they can improve their economic competitiveness.''

------

On the Net:

Trust for America's Health: http://healthyamericans.org

Obesity Rates Climb in Most States,
NYT,
27.8.2007,
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/us/AP-Obesity-Rankings.html - broken URL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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