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Vocapedia > Space > Rockets, satellites, spacecraft

 

 

 

Cover of LIFE magazine dated 11-18-1957 w. log

 featuring picture of scientist Wernher von Braun

w. model of moon rocket he designed.

 

Location: US

Date taken: November 18, 1957

 

Photographer: Ralph Crane

Life Images

http://images.google.com/hosted/life/55e6c8d622d8cb1d.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

rocket        USA

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2018/02/06/
583627592/watch-live-spacex-attempts-launch-of-powerful-falcon-heavy-rocket

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2018/02/05/
582464054/spacex-set-to-launch-worlds-most-powerful-rocket

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/15/
science/space/15nasa.html

 

 

 

 

http://www.usatoday.com/tech/science/space/2007-10-10-
iss-russia-blastoff_N.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

pioneering rocket scientist > Yvonne Brill

 

in the early 1970s

(she) invented

a propulsion system

to help keep

communications satellites

from slipping

out of their orbits

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/31/
science/space/yvonne-brill-rocket-scientist-dies-at-88.html

 

 

 

 

rocket scientist > Robert Collins Truax        1917-2010

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/30/us/
30truax.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

German engineer Werner von Braun        1912-1977

 

(...) a key developer

of the Nazis' V2 missile,

later recruited

during the cold war

to help the US

win the space race.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/cifamerica/2010/nov/15/secondworldwar-international-criminal-justice

 

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2011/jun/24/
nazis-run-gerald-steinacher-review 

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/cifamerica/2010/nov/15/
secondworldwar-international-criminal-justice 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2007/dec/03/
germany.kateconnolly 

 

https://www.npr.org/2019/10/23/
772742561/the-dark-side-of-the-moon

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/18/us/18haeussermann.html

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/cifamerica/2010/nov/15/
secondworldwar-international-criminal-justice 

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/magazine/4443934.stm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

expendable booster

 

 

 

 

velocity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

launch

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2018/02/06/
583627592/watch-live-spacex-attempts-launch-of-powerful-falcon-heavy-rocket

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?
v=Z8NjByuNcDA&index=9&list=UUqnbDFdCpuN8CMEg0VuEBqA

 

 

 

 

launch

 

 

 

 

vulture-free launch

http://www.usatoday.com/tech/science/space/2006-06-07-
nasa-vulture-plan_x.htm

 

 

 

 

countdown to launch

 

 

 

 

count down

 

 

 

 

during launch

 

 

 

 

at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station

 

 

 

 

postpone / scrub        USA

http://www.usatoday.com/tech/science/space/2006-07-02-
shuttle-launch_x.htm

 

 

 

 

launchpad / launch pad        USA

http://www.usatoday.com/tech/science/space/2006-05-18-
shuttle-launch-pad_x.htm

 

 

 

 

blast off / blast-off / blastoff        UK / USA

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2006/jul/04/
spaceexploration.internationalnews2 

http://www.usatoday.com/tech/science/space/2006-01-19-
new-horizons-launch_x.htm

 

 

 

 

blast off from + N

 

 

 

 

lift off / liftoff        USA

https://www.youtube.com/watch?
v=Z8NjByuNcDA&index=9&list=UUqnbDFdCpuN8CMEg0VuEBqA

http://www.usatoday.com/tech/science/space/2007-10-10-
iss-russia-blastoff_N.htm

 

 

 

 

take off / take-off

 

 

 

 

aeronautics company

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

reach

 

 

 

 

land / touch down        USA

http://www.usatoday.com/tech/science/space/2006-07-17-
discovery-landing_x.htm

 

 

 

 

landing

 

 

 

 

crash

 

 

 

 

crashland        UK

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2004/oct/19/
spaceexploration.science 

 

 

 

 

touch down on N

 

 

 

 

speed

 

 

 

 

parachute

 

 

 

 

the craft's parachutes

 

 

 

 

the planet's surface

 

 

 

 

journey

 

 

 

 

250-million-mile journey to Mars

 

 

 

 

module

 

 

 

 

solar arrays

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

payload

 

 

 

 

satellite        USA

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/02/26/
science/mev-1-northrop-grumman-space-junk.html

 

https://www.npr.org/2019/10/23/
772024008/itty-bitty-satellites-take-on-big-time-science-missions

 

http://www.npr.org/2016/11/18/
499576593/new-weather-satellite-provides-forecasts-for-the-final-frontier

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/07/
science/space/satellite-will-fall-to-earth-but-no-ones-sure-where.html

 

 

 

 

communication satellites        USA

https://www.npr.org/2019/11/11/
778219787/as-spacex-launches-dozens-of-satellites-at-a-time-some-fear-an-orbital-traffic-j

 

 

 

 

CubeSats        USA

 

Tiny satellites

are taking on a big-time role

in space exploration.

CubeSats are small,

only about twice the size

of a Rubik's Cube.

As the name suggests,

they're cube-shaped,

4 inches on each side,

and weigh in at about 3 pounds.

 

But with the miniaturization

of electronics,

it's become possible

to pack a sophisticated mission

into a tiny package.

CubeSats have been around

since 1999.

https://www.npr.org/2019/10/23/
772024008/itty-bitty-satellites-take-on-big-time-science-missions

 

 

 

 

space market >  small satellites        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/17/
technology/start-ups-aim-to-conquer-space-market.html

 

 

 

 

dead satellite        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/23/
science/space/23satellite.html

 

 

 

 

space junk        USA

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/02/26/
science/mev-1-northrop-grumman-space-junk.html

 

 

 

 

wayward satellites        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/28/us/
dale-gardner-astronaut-who-helped-corral-wayward-satellites-dies-at-65.html

 

 

 

 

dock    USA

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/02/26/
science/mev-1-northrop-grumman-space-junk.html

 

 

 

 

fall to Earth        USA

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/07/
science/space/satellite-will-fall-to-earth-but-no-ones-sure-where.html

 

 

 

 

The Soviet Union launches Sputnik,

the first man-made satellite        USA        Oct. 4, 1957

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/14/
science/space/14stever.html

 

 

 

 

Global Positioning System    GPS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Global_Positioning_System

 

 

 

 

satellite cluster

 

 

 

 

dish

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

April 27, 1962

 

On This Day

 

From The Times archive

 

The first British satellite was launched

by an American rocket to measure

the intensity of the Sun's

radiation and cosmic rays

 

BRITAINíS first satellite, the UK 1 was successfully launched into orbit from Cape Canaveral, Florida, today by an American Delta rocket. Two hours after it was launched scientists at Cape Canaveral confirmed that telemetry was being received from the spacecraft which was apparently in orbit.

It will, however, be some time before it can be definitely confirmed that the UK 1 has achieved the planned elliptical orbit which will take it as far north as Gretna Green and as far south as New Zealand at altitudes ranging from 200 to 600 miles.

The scientific purpose of UK 1 is to study the properties and behaviour of the ionosphere, the radio reflecting layer, which begins about 35 miles above the earth.

The satellite, which, it is hoped, will send back information to earth for a year, was to be tracked by stations around the world, including the Department of Scientific and Industrial Researchís installations at Winkfield, Berkshire; Sembawang, Singapore; and Port Stanley in the Falkland Islands.

In the ionosphere, where the atmosphere is tenuous, incoming high-energy radiations from the sun collide with molecules of air and atoms, leaving positively charged atoms or ions. The ionosphere filters out dangerous sun radiation and at the same time acts as a mirror to radio waves making international communication possible.

On This Day - April 27, 1962,
Times,
27.4.1962,
http://www.newsint-archive.co.uk/pages/main.asp

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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