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grammaire anglaise > adverbes > syntaxe et sens

 

place et portée de l'adverbe (adv)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Guardian        Weekend        p. 4            25.3.2006

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Guardian        p. 10        14.10.2005

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Guardian        p. 17        14.10.2005

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1 - so far porte ici sur le GN

the most embarrassing security breach,

et non sur le GV (au prétérit passif).

 

Lorsque so far porte sur le GV,

il déclenche le present perfect.

Voir Marqueurs du present perfect

 

 

1 -    It was another bad day at the office for Microsoft yesterday.

Seventy-two hours after being forced to explain

yet another serious hole in its Windows operating system,

the software giant was hit by the most embarrassing security breach so far

when portions of the secret blueprint for Windows were leaked over the internet.   

    Ghost plagues Microsoft machine:
   
New blow to software giant as secret Windows blueprint leaked, G, 14.2.2004,
    http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/story/0,3604,1148153,00.html

 

 

 

 

 

2 - L'adverbe especially porte sur relevant.

Il se place donc avant cet adjectif.

 

Obama Invokes Gandhi,

Whose Ideal Eludes Modern India

 

November 6, 2010
The New York Times
By JIM YARDLEY

 

NEW DELHI — Not long after Barack Obama was elected president, the United States Embassy in India printed a postcard showing him sitting in his old Senate office beneath framed photographs of his political heroes: the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Abraham Lincoln and the great Indian apostle of peace, democracy and nonviolent protest, Mohandas K. Gandhi.

The postcard was a trinket of public diplomacy, a souvenir of the new president’s affinity for India. Now that Mr. Obama is visiting India for the first time, on a trip pitched as a jobs mission, his fascination with Gandhi is influencing his itinerary and his message as he tries to win over India’s skeptical political class.

(...)


To Gopalkrishna Gandhi, a grandson of Gandhi, the fact that his grandfather inspired the American president demonstrated the continued vibrancy of Gandhi’s message. If he bemoaned the corruption and money contaminating Indian politics, he said Gandhi’s spirit could still be found among the Indian civil society groups helping the poor and protecting the environment.

“Today, the need for a practical idealism is recognized throughout the world,” he said.

The word practical seemed especially relevant.

    Obama Invokes Gandhi, Whose Ideal Eludes Modern India, NYT, 6.11.2010,
    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/07/world/asia/07gandhi.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

Only prime minister Brown

can win an EU referendum

I supported Blair for two elections.

But now he has become a liability

    Headline, G, 21.6.2004,
    http://politics.guardian.co.uk/eu/comment/0,9236,1243681,00.html

 

 

 

 

 

The hyperbole of the religious pulpit allows for all-embracing and eschatological language, but these men are meant to be practical political leaders. When Blair, in his opposition days, invented the phrase "tough on crime, tough on the causes of crime", he knew that crime could never be totally eliminated. The task is to reduce and restrain it by a variety of methods. Violence and terrorism are no different. Like poverty, they will always be with us. At best they can only be diminished and contained. Yet now, with the arrogance of power, we have the Bush/Blair roadshow promising in sub-Churchillian tones to vanquish terrorism as though it were a clearly defined enemy like Nazi Germany.

    A war that can never be won:
   
Terrorism is a technique, not an enemy state that can be defeated,
    G, 22.11.2003,
    http://www.guardian.co.uk/comment/story/0,3604,1090724,00.html

 

 

 

 

 

I cannot yet say exactly what the arrangements for a debate in the House will be,

but I am sure that there will be a proper opportunity for Members

to debate the inquiry's findings.

     Hansard, 14.1.2004,
    http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm200304/cmhansrd/cm040114/debtext/40114-02.htm#40114-02_dpthd0

 

 

 

 

 

The world is too fat. Too bad

        Sub, The shape of things to come, E, 13.12.2003.

 

Déplacer l'adverbe changerait le sens de l'énoncé.

Enoncé théorique : ??? The world too is fat.

 

 

 

 

 

Beagle 2 almost certainly landed on Mars.

But it has been stubbornly silent.

    To boldly go in search of comets and Mars secrets, G, 3.1.2004,
     http://www.guardian.co.uk/spacedocumentary/story/0,2763,1115284,00.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Voir aussi > Anglonautes > Grammaire

 

Syntaxe > SVO > portée de l'adverbe