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grammaire anglaise > conjonctions

 

comparaison, concession, contraste, opposition, focalisation

 

 

although

 

 

though

 

 

even though

 

 

albeit

 

 

while

 

 

whilst

 

 

whereas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Guardian        p. 4        5 May 2007

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whereas

 

The results follow a study

by the National Foundation for Educational Research,

which showed that,

whereas comprehensive schools improved their pupils'

expected performance between 14 and 16,

grammar schools "performed slightly worse" than expected.

Grammars lag behind in new school tables,
IoS,
4.1.2004,
http://education.independent.co.uk/news/story.jsp?story=477917

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Although

 

Although the idea that social deprivation might influence health

had been around for more than a century,

publication in 1980 of Inequalities in Health (the « Black Report »)

was a turning point.

Sir Douglas Black: Medical scientist
whose report on the link between social deprivation and ill-health
was a turning point in attitudes to the problem,
T, Business pullout, p. 8, § 1.

 

 

 

 

 

Although he has received scant news

of the outside world over the last three years,

Anvar knew that Muslims in Britain

were having problems in the aftermath of 11 September.

My brother, the Taliban fighter from Burnley, GE/I, Friday Review pullout, I, p. 7, 22-3-2002.

 

 

 

 

 

Although the new money still leaves the US

at the bottom of the league table generosity,

UN officials said it marked a major shift

after decades of declining budgets.

Bush offers aid incentive to the poor,
GE,
p. 7,
23-3-2002
[début de §].

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

though

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appealing to Its Base,

ISIS Tempers Its Violence

in Muslim Countries

 

JULY 2, 2016

The New York Times

By RUKMINI CALLIMACHI

 

The first to be killed was a jogger, gunned down last September during his daily run in the leafy diplomatic quarter of Bangladesh’s capital, Dhaka. He was identified as a 50-year-old Italian aid worker, and the police say the men who murdered him had been given instructions to kill a white foreigner at random.

In October, a Japanese man was killed. In November, gunmen riding a motorcycle pulled alongside a Catholic priest in northern Bangladesh and opened fire, wounding him.

For the Islamic State terrorist group, which broadly advised operatives it sent to Europe to kill “anyone and everyone,” the group’s tactics in Bangladesh have seemed more controlled. In the past nine months, it has claimed 19 attacks in the South Asian country, nearly all of them targeted assassinations singling out religious minorities and foreigners. They included hacking to death a Hindu man, stabbing to death a Shiite preacher, murdering a Muslim villager who had been accused of converting to Christianity and sending suicide bombers into Shiite mosques.

For years, the Islamic State, also known as ISIS and ISIL, has pursued a campaign of wholesale slaughter in Syria and Iraq. And in the attacks the group has directed or indirectly inspired in Western countries — including the coordinated killings in Paris and Brussels and the mass shooting inside an Orlando, Fla., nightclub — the assailants killed at random.

But a closer look at the attack the Islamic State has claimed in Bangladesh — and at the fact that it has not claimed bombings attributed to it in Turkey, including the airport attack this past week — suggests a group that is tailoring its approach for different regions and for different target audiences.

“For I.S. to maintain support among its followers and prospects, it must take different considerations into account when planning an attack in a Muslim country versus non-Muslim countries,” argues Rita Katz, the director of the SITE Intelligence Group, which has tracked the group’s attacks in Bangladesh. “I.S. encourages the killing of random civilians in France, Belgium, America or other Western nations, but in a country like Turkey, I.S. must be sure that it isn’t killing Muslims — or at least make it look like it’s trying not to,” she wrote in an analysis recently published online.

The issue of killing Sunni civilians has been a main point of contention with Al Qaeda after the Islamic State broke away from the terror network several years ago. And it surfaced again in the past week.

After the triple suicide bombing at the Istanbul airport on Tuesday, a Qaeda official used Twitter to issue a stinging rebuke of the attack blamed on ISIS. “The Turkish people are Muslims, & their blood is sacred. A true mujahid would give his life up for them, not massacre them #IstanbulAttack,” wrote Abu Sulayman al-Muhajir, who has been described as an Australian member of Al Qaeda’s branch in Syria, according to a transcript provided by SITE.

The Islamic State’s uncharacteristic silence about the attacks in Turkey, when it tends to quickly claim bombings elsewhere, reflects the balancing act the terror group must undertake when carrying out violence in predominantly Muslim nations, analysts say.

Ms. Katz said the Islamic State “has shown comparable discretion when conducting attacks in other Muslim countries, focusing on government targets, perceived religious deviants and enemy factions, as opposed to random civilians.”

For example, when the terror group last month claimed its first bombing in Jordan, it made sure to identify its target as an American-Jordanian military base. In May, the Islamic State carried out a bombing on a Shiite mosque in Sunni-dominated Saudi Arabia. And in January, when it struck in Jakarta, Indonesia, the group took pains to frame the attack as one against tourists, not locals, Ms. Katz wrote.

That kind of hedging is more typical of Al Qaeda, which has called on its fighters to avoid operations that would cause mass casualties among Muslim civilians.

In reality, though [ = but ], Al Qaeda, like ISIS, continues to kill large numbers of Muslims in its attacks. But that has not stopped the two groups from arguing about it.
 

Appealing to Its Base, ISIS Tempers Its Violence in Muslim Countries,
NYT,
July 2, 2016,
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/03/
world/middleeast/isis-muslim-countries-bangladesh.html

 

 

 

 

 

In the new movie Youth,

an elderly, retired composer-conductor is called upon

to conduct for the first time in years.

He's an Englishman named Fred Ballinger

— and the request is from Queen Elizabeth II.

It seems Ballinger's composition Simple Songs,

written when he was a much younger man,

is the only thing the Queen's husband, Prince Phillip, will listen to.

That premise necessarily makes a few demands of the film.

Someone had to play Ballinger convincingly, which Michael Caine does.

More importantly, though [ = but ],

someone had to compose a piece of music

that could plausibly account for Prince Phillip's fictitious fondness,

and for Ballinger's fictitious fame.

That job was handed to David Lang.

The Pulitzer Prize-winning composer spoke with NPR's Robert Siegel

about the curious task of writing music fit for royalty,

from the perspective of an artist well past his glory days.

Hear their conversation at the audio link, and read an edited version below.


'We Use Music To Understand Where We Are': David Lang On The Music Of 'Youth'
Updated December 4, 20159:27 PM ET,
http://www.npr.org/sections/deceptivecadence/2015/12/04/
458372792/we-use-music-to-understand-where-we-are-david-lang-on-the-music-of-youth

 

 

 

 

 

In the years since I’d done this simple act in church,

I have prayed at home and in hospital waiting rooms.

I have prayed for my daughter to live, for the bad news to not be true,

for strength in the face of adversity.

I have prayed with more desperation than a person should feel.

I have prayed in vain.

This prayer, though [ = but ], was different.

It was a prayer from my girlhood,

a prayer for peace and comfort and guidance. It was a prayer of gratitude.

It was a prayer that needed to be done in church,

in a place where candles flicker and statues of saints look down from on high;

where sometimes, out of nowhere, the spiritually confused can still come inside

and kneel and feel their words might rise up and be heard.

    A Prayer at Christmas, NYT, 24.12.2012,
    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/25/opinion/a-prayer-at-christmas.html

 

 

 

 

 

The draughtsman uses an optical device constructed as a frame.

Recent publications by David Hockney have suggested that artists

after and during the Renaissance resorted

to all sorts of optical equipment

in order to improve the artificiality of their medium.

The notion of the frame as a filmic device,

and also as a drawing device,

is related very significantly to the notion of a frame-up.

Though [ = but ] we imagine the draughtsman rules the roost

and governs the action, he's in fact slowly,

scene by scene, being framed.

So the notion of the subject matter of the film

- to frame somebody, that is, to put them up

as a victim of a conspiracy of some description -

is also relative to the way the film itself is very self-consciously framed.

The form and the content should ideally be brought closely together.

Murder he drew:
The Draughtsman's Contract, about killings in a country house, is famous for being utterly baffling.
It's perfectly simple, says director Peter Greenaway. It's all about the colour green - and wigs,
G/G2, p. 8, 1.8.2003.

 

 

 

 

 

Though [ = bien que, même si ] Mars has long intrigued humans,

especially those who dream of extraterrestrial life,

it has repeatedly humbled anyone rich and venturesome enough

to send metallic proxies across millions of miles of space

to try to learn its secrets.

(...)

The lander, though small [ = quoique ],

(about a yard wide when folded for travel through space),

is loaded with sensors, cameras, test chambers, a microscope, a rock grinder

and a sampling arm that in theory can dig down five feet into the Martian soil.

Three Spaceships Heading on Journeys to Mars, NYT/Le Monde, p. 6, 8/9.6.2003.

Première occurrence : début de l'article.

 

 

 

 

 

Mr Arafat warned the Palestinian "forces"

-fighters belonging mainly to his Fatah faction

and to the Islamist Hamas and Islamic Jihad movements-

not to give "pretexts" that would aid Mr Sharon's designs.

They heeded his counsel, partially.

Though [ = bien que, alors que ] they agreed

to end attacks on civilians in Israel

and firing on Jewish settlements from Palestinian-controlled areas,

they did not agree to end armed actions

in defence of Palestinians towns and villages still under occupation.

The beginning of the end of the Palestinian uprising?, E, p. 49, 29.9.2001.

 

 

 

 

 

All we see is the pain Szpilman feels

as he hides in an apartment where he must stay perfectly silent

- even though [ = alors que ] there is a piano in the room.

His desire, his need, to play is etched on Brody's face.

Later, though [ = quoique ] starving and emaciated,

he plays at last.

Visions of Hell, GE2/Review, p. IV, 10.1.2003.

 

 

 

 

 

She was a popular actress in both silent films and talkies,

though [ = même si ] she never attained the heights

of such stars as Mary Pickford or Clara Bow.

Mary Brian:
Popular actress typecast as the 'Perpetual Ingénue',
I, p. 14, 7.1.2003.

 

 

 

 

 

Unfortunately, though [ = but ],

the aura that draws all eyes to her,

as she clinks her teacup back

on to the saucer in a swanky hotel,

is absent from her music.

‘I worry about how these girls are sexualised at such a young age’,
GE/G2,
p. IV,
29-3-2002.

 

 

 

 

 

His own home is guarded by electronic gates.

An old house, it is decorated in a modern style

with wooden laminate floors

and iron-framed glass-topped dining table.

The back garden, though [ = but ], is the real gem.

Plumber gets his fingers burnt, GE, p. 16, 23-3-2002.

 

 

 

 

 

Victim of a male-created sex industry though [ = même si ] she was,

Lovelace co-operated in the imposture

of being a sexually liberated woman,

to a public willing, for the time, to be gullible.

Linda Lovelace obituary, T, p. 33, 24-4-2002.

 

 

 

 

 

Fine goal though [ = même si ]  it was,

Ljunberg’s strike in the Cup final

was not stamped with his traditional hallmark.

Stamp of the Swede, T, Sport pullout, p. 1, 6-5-2002.

 

 

 

 

 

Though [ = même si ]  her office was yesterday insisting

that Lady Thatcher was « desperate »

to fulfil her public commitments

– including promoting her new book, Statecraft –

and would consider whether she could attend signings

and literary festivals as planned,

aides said she would do « exactly what the doctor orders ».

The lady is not for talking : Ill health forces Thatcher out of public life,
GE, p. 1, 23-3-2002
[début de §].

 

 

 

 

 

Though [ = alors que, même si ]

workers managed to restore some electricity lines yesterday,

during the half-hour time-out in Mr Arafat’s quarantine,

the lights died down four times.

Hungry, thirsty, but Arafat taunts Israel from remains of his empire,
GE, p. 3, 1-4-2002
[début de §].

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Albeit

 

Both pretenders have claimed

the scalp of Rooster Booster this season,

albeit in muddling events

which did not bring out the best in the champion.

    Falcon out to rule the roost in Kingwell, G, p. 22, 17.2.2004.

 

 

 

 

 

He lost by 314 to 33 votes – albeit with a telling 27 further abstentions.

    Rebel MPs plot Blair challenge, GE, p. 1, 23-3-2002.

 

 

 

 

 

SNCF confirmed unequivocally to me as well

that this train did run, albeit slightly late.

    On the trail of a French ghost train, O, Cash pullout, p. 9, 28-4-2002.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whilst

 

"I think he's [Blair] got to consider his position.

If I was in his position, I would certainly do it.

"Whilst I cannot turn back the clock,

I think there would have been a very different debate at that time

if we had known about the state of the intelligence.

I would not have voted for war

if I was confident that Iraq did not have weapons of mass destruction.

"I don't think the prime minister's integrity should be called into question,

but Tony Blair has made mistakes and it is a serious matter

because it undermined the credibility of the government."

The loyal, the let-down, the critical and the regretful:
Labour MPs apply their benchmark to the Butler findings
and the prime minister's position, G, 15.7.2004,
http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2004/jul/15/uk.butler8 

 

 

 

 

 

At least 10 people in Viet Nam have been arrested

and some sentenced to long prison terms for using the Internet

whilst criticising the government or sharing information

with overseas Vietnamese groups. 

Viet Nam: Help free Le Chi Quang, imprisoned for internet use,
Amnesty International web frontpage, 9.12.2003,
    http://web.amnesty.org/pages/vnm-261103-action-eng

 

 

 

 

 

The stock market. Whilst it has tended to offer better returns

over the long term than traditional savings acccounts,

we all know markets can fall as well as rise.

    Play FTSE and keep your socks on, NS&I ad, TI, p. 7, 7-3-2002.

 

 

 

 

 

As a member of the Territorial Army Medical Services

you’ll get the opportunity to learn new skills

at the Centre For Defence Medicine

whilst enjoying some high-energy activities.

TA ad,
DM,
p. 51,
14.3.2002.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

While

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

While not exactly one-hit wonders,

Cutting Crew never recaptured

the heights of this first success

and split up after three studio albums.

Kevin MacMichael: Guitarist with Cutting Crew,
I,
p. 14,
7.1.2003.

 

 

 

 

 

Lauching our celebration of 40 years of Bond,

Shawn Levy reveals 007’s slickest trick of all :

changing with the times

while [ tout en ] remaining exactly the same.

Oh, James…,
GE2,
p. II,
13.9.2002.

 

 

 

 

 

Since 1995,

the number of vehicles on our roads has grown by 15 per cent

while the population has risen by just three per cent.

Carnival spirit rules the day,
M,
p. 4,
2-5-2002.

 

 

 

 

 

While there has been a significant increase

in the casting of black actors,

backstage and office areas of theatres

remain almost wholly white.

Is British drama racist ?,
GE/G2,
p. 9,
17-04-2002.

 

 

 

 

 

Last night, the Home Office said that

while some powers introduced

under anti-terror and other laws infringed privacy,

safeguards were in place to ensure

the correct balance between civil liberties and security.

UK singled out for criticism over protection of privacy,
GE,
p. 2,
5.9.2002.