Les anglonautes

About | Search | Grammar | Vocapedia | Learning | News podcasts | Videos | History | Arts | Science | Translate and listen

 Previous Home Up Next

 

History > 16th, 17th century > America > Timeline in pictures

 

 

 

Tee Yee Neen Ho Ga Row, Emperor of the Six Nations

by John Verelst.

Photograph: © Library and Archives Canada

John Verelst (vers 1648-1734)        vers 1710

C-092415

© Bibliothèque et Archives Canada /

Musée du portrait du Canada

 

Brave new world

Two remarkable exhibitions of portraits of Native Americans

by some of the first European settlers

reveal a great deal about the early days of imperial power.

But how much were these paintings mere colonial propaganda,

asks Linda Colley

The Guardian        Review        p. 12        21.4.2007

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2007/apr/21/art.history 

 

Related

http://www.museevirtuel-virtualmuseum.ca/edu/ViewLoit
Da.do;jsessionid=8EB65620709A52F27E2123DE99743660?method=preview&lang=FR&id=1785

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rice cultivation

is introduced into Carolina.

 

Slave importation increases dramatically        1694

 

 

https://www.thirteen.org/wnet/slavery/timeline/1694.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1671

 

Bacon's Rebellion

 

 

In Virginia,

black slaves

and black and white

indentured servants

band together

to participate

in Bacon's Rebellion

 

 

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/slavery/timeline/1676.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

on Sept. 8, 1664,

English soldiers took control

of the Dutch city of New Amsterdam,

on Manhattan Island.

 

They soon renamed it

after the Duke of York,

brother to King Charles II.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/08/opinion/the-source-of-new-yorks-greatness.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/08/
opinion/the-source-of-new-yorks-greatness.htmll

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1662

 

Virginia enacts a law

of hereditary slavery

meaning that a child born

to an enslaved mother

inherits her slave status

 

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/slavery/timeline/1662.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1657

 

The Flushing Remonstrance

 

 

The Flushing Remonstrance

is an important

historical document

that was signed

on December 27, 1657

in Flushing, Queens,

by a group

of English citizens

seeking to defend

religious freedom,

particularly the right

to practice religions

besides the official faith

of the New Netherland Colony,

the Dutch Reformed Church.

 

Many believe

that the Flushing Remonstrance,

in its promotion

of religious toleration,

served as a model

for the right

to religious freedom

granted by

the U.S. Constitution’s

Bill of Rights.

http://www.queenslibrary.org/irc/gallery/index.htm - broken link

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1641

 

Massachusetts Body of Liberties

 

 

One of the earliest

American assertions of rights,

the 1641 Massachusetts

Body of Liberties,

delineated rights

against everything

from banishment

to dismemberment

but subjected them

to regulation

by the legislature.

 

The community

could take these actions

only according to rules

known in advance

and equally applicable to all.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/28/
opinion/wayne-lapierres-unconstitutionalism.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/28/
opinion/wayne-lapierres-unconstitutionalism.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1641

 

Massachusetts

is the first colony to legalize slavery

 

https://www.thirteen.org/wnet/slavery/timeline/1641.html 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1636

 

Former Puritan leader

Roger Williams (1603-1683)

is expelled from Massachusetts

in 1636

 

 

http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/religion/rel01-2.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1630 onwards

 

20,000 Puritans

emigrate to America from England

 

 

http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/religion/rel01.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1620

 

Pilgrims arrive in Massachusetts

 

 

http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/religion/rel01.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1619

 

At Jamestown, Virginia,

approximately

20 captive Africans

are sold into slavery

in the British

North American colonies

 

 

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/slavery/timeline/1619.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How The New England Colonists Embraced The Slave Trade

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.npr.org/2016/06/21/
482874478/forgotten-history-how-the-new-england-colonists-embraced-the-slave-trade

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1606-1610

 

Jamestown, Virginia

 

We know little

about the identity

of the young woman

whose remains

were recently discovered

at Jamestown,

though the investigative team

— of which I am part —

calls her Jane.

 

We know that she was

one of 300 battered

and hungry settlers

who arrived in the colony

in mid-August 1609,

two years after it was founded,

aboard one of half a dozen ships

that had limped into Jamestown

after being caught at sea

in a hurricane.

 

The fleet

had been scattered,

the colony’s leaders

shipwrecked on Bermuda,

provisions brought

from England ruined,

and settlers injured.

 

To make matters worse,

the colony

was wholly unprepared

to support them.

 

From the very beginnings

of the Virginia colony,

the English had struggled

to feed themselves,

relying instead

on trading for corn

with local Indian peoples

or taking food by force.

 

By the summer of 1609,

the Indians

were no longer willing

to supply the increasing

numbers of colonists with food,

and by October

a full-scale war erupted.

 

Indian warriors

sealed off

Jamestown Island,

trapping hundreds

of men, women and children

within the palisade of the fort

on starvation rations

with little hope of relief

from outside.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/04/opinion/consuming-colonists.html

 

 

https://www.loc.gov/item/today-in-history/september-10/ 

https://www.loc.gov/item/today-in-history/may-14/ 

https://historynewsnetwork.org/article/36913 

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/04/
opinion/consuming-colonists.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/02/
science/evidence-of-cannibalism-found-at-jamestown-site.html

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/may/01/
jamestown-cannibals-skull-excavated

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jamestown, Virginia

— the first successful

English colony

in North America —

was a difficult place,

to say the least.

 

Most of the colonists

who arrived in 1607

died shortly thereafter.

http://www.npr.org/2015/07/28/425700788/bones-in-church-ruins-likely-the-remains-of-early-jamestowns-elite

 

 

http://www.npr.org/2015/07/28/
425700788/bones-in-church-ruins-likely-the-remains-of-early-jamestowns-elite

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1609

 

Henry Hudson

(c. 1560/70s – 1611?)

explores the Hudson river

 

 

https://www.loc.gov/rr/print/list/picamer/paDiscover.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/13/
arts/design/manhattan-virtual-tour-virus.html

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/gallery/2009/sep/08/henry-hudson-new-york

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/pictureshow/2009/09/manhattan.html    Sept. 2, 2009

 

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2009/08/29/nyregion/20090830-hudson-river-journey.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/30/nyregion/30hudson.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Portraits of Native Americans

by some of the first European settlers

 

First British paintings

of Native American chiefs

at National Portrait Gallery

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2007/apr/21/art.history

 

https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2007/mar/08/artnews.art 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John White    c. 1540 – c. 1593
 

British artist

who was first to capture

the wonder and mystery

of the New World

 

 

https://www.britishmuseum.org/
the_museum/exhibition_archive_pages/archive_a_new_world.aspx

https://www.lrb.co.uk/the-paper/v29/n07/peter-campbell/at-the-british-museum

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/brave-new-world-80243214/

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2007/mar/08/art.jonathanjones 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Related > Anglonautes > History

 

20th century > USA > Civil rights

 

 

17th, 18th, 19th century > America, USA > Timeline

 

 

 

home Up