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History > 20th, early 21st century > USA > Timeline in pictures > U.S. Presidents

 

Lyndon Baines Johnson (1908-1973)

 

36th President of the United States    1963-1969


 

 

 

Description: Lyndon B. Johnson

taking the oath of office on Air Force One

following the assassination of John F. Kennedy,

Dallas, Texas.

 

Left to right:

Mac Kilduff

(holding dictating machine),

Judge Sarah T. Hughes, Jack Valenti,

Congressman Albert Thomas, Marie Fehmer (behind Thomas),

Lady Bird Johnson, Dallas Police Chief Jesse Curry,

President Lyndon B. Johnson,

Evelyn Lincoln (eyeglasses only visible above LBJ's shoulder),

Congressman Homer Thornberry (in shadow, partially obscured by LBJ),

Roy Kellerman (partially obscured by Thornberry),

Lem Johns (partially obscured by Mrs. Kennedy),

Jacqueline Kennedy, Pamela Tunure (behind Brooks),

Congressman Jack Brooks, Bill Moyers (mostly obscured by Brooks)

 

Date: November 22, 1963

 

Photograph: Cecil Stoughton,

White House Press Office (WHPO)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Lyndon_B._Johnson_taking_the_oath_of_office%2C_November_1963.jpg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lyndon_B._Johnson

Source

http://photolab.lbjlib.utexas.edu/detail.asp?id=18319

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photograph: Cecil Stoughton/The White House


Mr. Valenti, left rear,

watched as Lyndon B. Johnson

took the presidential oath of office

aboard Air Force One at Love Field in Dallas, Tex.,

just two hours after John F. Kennedy was shot.

 

Jack Valenti, 85, Dies; Confidant of a President and Stars

NYT

27.4.2007

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/04/27/movies/27valenti.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 President Lyndon Johnson

with Robert McNamara, right,

and Dean Rusk in 1967.

 

Credit Hulton Archive/Getty Images

 

VIETNAM '67

A Lost Chance for Peace in Vietnam

NYT

JUNE 16, 2017

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/16/opinion/a-lost-chance-for-peace-in-vietnam.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lyndon Baines Johnson    1908-1973

 

36th President of the United States    1963-1969

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/topic/person/lyndon-b-johnson

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2019/apr/21/
robert-caro-interview-working-lbj-more-facts-you-collect-closer-to-the-truth

 

 

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/06/
world/asia/vietnam-war-nuclear-weapons.html

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/04/11/
601419987/50-years-ago-president-johnson-signed-the-fair-housing-act

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/03/11/
592301682/the-night-in-1968-when-a-nation-watched-an-american-presidency-crumble

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/01/31/
579821758/lbj-shares-the-spotlight-finally-in-building-the-great-society

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/24/
opinion/korea-spy-ship-pueblo.html

 

 

 

 

http://www.npr.org/2017/10/06/
542487124/president-johnson-s-crime-commission-report-50-years-later

 

http://www.npr.org/2017/08/20/
544735978/racial-issues-have-often-been-a-test-for-u-s-presidents-with-conflicted-feelings

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/30/
opinion/lyndon-johnson-vietnam-war.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/24/
opinion/lyndon-johnsons-vietnam.html

 

 

 

 

https://www.npr.org/2015/10/03/
445339838/the-unintended-consequences-of-the-1965-immigration-act

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/08/us/
politics/richard-boone-johnson-aide-on-poverty-dies-at-86.html

http://www.nytimes.com/video/us/
100000002714476/legacy-of-lbj.html

www.nytimes.com/2014/01/05/
business/50-years-later-war-on-poverty-is-a-mixed-bag.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/07/
books/lady-bird-johnson-an-oral-history-by-michael-l-gillette.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/06/
books/review/the-passage-of-power-robert-caros-new-lbj-book.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/19/us/politics/19shriver.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/07/education/07sugarman.html

http://www.historychannel.com/speeches/archive/speech_325.html

 

http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/lbj1964stateoftheunion.htm

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/23/weekinreview/23baker.html

http://www.nytimes.com/imagepages/2009/08/23/weekinreview/23baker-ready-2.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jan. 23, 1968

 

North Korea's

capture of the USS Pueblo

 

 

Near the end

of Lyndon Johnson’s

presidency,

North Korea undertook

an extraordinary gamble

against the United States,

attacking and capturing

a Navy spy ship,

the Pueblo.

 

Six gunboats

and two jets

pounced on the Pueblo

off North Korea’s

rugged eastern coast

as it tried to pinpoint radar

and other military

installations.

 

One American sailor died

in the Jan. 23, 1968, attack;

82 others were imprisoned.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/24/
opinion/korea-spy-ship-pueblo.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/24/
opinion/korea-spy-ship-pueblo.html

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/01/23/
580076540/looking-at-the-saga-of-the-uss-pueblo-50-years-later

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Immigration and Nationality Act        Oct. 3, 1965

 

 

 

Lyndon Johnson

signing the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965

on Liberty Island in New York Harbor.

 

The legislation ended ethnic quotas

and included a family reunification clause.

 

¨Photograph: Corbis, via Getty Images

 

The Surprising Origin of Our Modern Nation of Immigrants

The landmark 1965 immigration law prioritized family ties,

but originally as a way to keep America white.

NYT

June 13, 2020

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/13/
sunday-review/immigration-history-us.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Immigration and Nationality Act,

signed at the foot

of the Statue of Liberty

on Oct. 3, 1965,

abolished the national

origin quota system,

under which immigrants

were chosen on the basis

of their race and ancestry.

 

The quotas set aside

tens of thousands

of visas each year

for immigrants from Northern

and Western Europe,

while many countries in Asia,

Africa, and the Middle East

were allocated barely

100 slots each.

 

It was a blatantly

discriminatory system.

 

Under the new law,

immigrants were to be selected

on the basis

of their family connections

in the United States

and the skills and training

they could offer,

with all nationalities

treated more or less equally.

 

Fifty years after its passage,

it is clear

the law definitively altered

the complexion

of the U.S. population.

 

In 1965,

the immigrant share

of the population

was at an all-time low.

 

Eighty-five percent

of the population was white,

and 7 out of 8 immigrants

were coming from Europe.

 

By 2010,

the share of the U.S. population

born overseas had tripled,

and 9 out of 10 immigrants

were coming from outside Europe.

https://www.npr.org/2015/10/03/
445339838/the-unintended-consequences-of-the-1965-immigration-act

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/13/
sunday-review/immigration-history-us.html

 

https://www.npr.org/2015/10/03/
445339838/the-unintended-consequences-of-the-1965-immigration-act

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

March 2, 1965

 

Operation "Rolling Thunder" Begins

 

 

Johnson approves Rolling Thunder

in February,

believing that a program

of limited bombing

in North Vietnam

will deter support for Vietcong.

 

Rolling Thunder

continues for three years

and eight months,

involving 305,380 raids

and 634,000 tons of bombs.

 

Results include:

 

818 pilots killed

and hundreds more

captured;

 

182,000 civilians killed

in North Vietnam.

http://www.pbs.org/opb/thesixties/timeline/timeline_text.html

 

 

http://www.pbs.org/opb/thesixties/timeline/timeline_text.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Voting Rights Act    6 August 1965

 

 

Marches from Selma to Montgomery > "Bloody Sunday"    7 March 1965

 

 

Civil Rights Act    2 July 1964

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

August 5, 1964

 

Gulf of Tonkin Resolution,

also called

Tonkin Gulf Resolution

 

 

resolution put

before the U.S. Congress

by President Lyndon Johnson

on Aug. 5, 1964,

assertedly in reaction

to two allegedly

unprovoked attacks

by North Vietnamese

torpedo boats

on the destroyers

Maddox and C. Turner Joy

of the U.S. Seventh Fleet

in the Gulf of Tonkin

on August 2

and August 4,

respectively.

 

Its stated purpose

was to approve and support

the determination of the president,

as commander in chief,

in taking all necessary measures

to repel any armed attack

against the forces

of the United States

and to prevent further aggression.

 

It also declared

that the maintenance

of international

peace and security

in Southeast Asia

was vital

to American interests

and to world peace.

 

Both houses of Congress

passed the resolution

on August 7,

the House of Representatives

by 414 votes to nil,

and the Senate

by a vote of 88 to 2.

 

The resolution served

as the principal

constitutional authorization

for the subsequent

vast escalation

of the United States’

military involvement

in the Vietnam War.

 

Several years later,

as the American public

became increasingly

disillusioned

with the Vietnam War,

many congressmen

came to see the resolution

as giving the president

a blanket power to wage war,

and the resolution

was repealed in 1970.

 

In 1995

Vo Nguyen Giap,

who had been

North Vietnam’s military commander

during the Vietnam War,

acknowledged

the August 2 attack on the Maddox

but denied

that the Vietnamese had launched

another attack on August 4,

as the Johnson

administration had claimed

at the time.

http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/249172/Gulf-of-Tonkin-Resolution

 

 

http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/249172/Gulf-of-Tonkin-Resolution

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anglonautes > History > 20th century

 

Cold War > USA > Vietnam War    1962-1975

 

 

Cold War / холодная война

 

 

Voting Rights Act    6 August 1965

 

 

Marches from Selma to Montgomery > "Bloody Sunday"    7 March 1965

 

 

Civil Rights Act    2 July 1964

 

 

Civil rights

 

 

John Fitzgerald Kennedy    1917-November 22,1963

 

 

20th, early 21st century > USA > Timeline in pictures

 

 

18th, 19th century > Timeline in pictures

 

 

 

 

 

Anglonautes > Arts > Photography > Photographers > 20th century > USA

 

Fred Baldwin

 

 

Doy Gorton

 

 

Danny Lyon

 

 

Matt Herron    1931-2020

 

 

Don Hogan Charles (born Daniel James Charles)    1938-2017

 

 

Ernest C. Withers    1922-2007

 

 

Leonard Freed    1929-2006

 

 

Gordon Parks    1912-2006

 

 

James "Spider" Martin    1939-2003

 

 

Grey Villet    1927-2000

 

 

Ed Clark    1911-2000

 

 

Robert W. Kelley    1920-1991

 

 

 

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