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History > 20th century > USA > Civil rights > Martin Luther King Jr. (1929-1968) > MLK's funeral    April 9, 1968

 

 

 

The funeral procession for the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

in Atlanta on April 9, 1968.

 

He was assassinated

at a Memphis hotel five days earlier.

 

Photograph:

Don Hogan Charles/The New York Times

 

Don Hogan Charles,

Lauded Photographer of Civil Rights Era,

Dies at 79

NYT

DEC. 25, 2017

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/25/
obituaries/don-hogan-charles-dead.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s wooden casket passing by

during his funeral procession in Atlanta in April 1968.

 

Phottograph: Doris Derby

 

Doris Derby, Civil Rights Era Photographer, Dies at 82

She was an artist who was studying anthropology

when she became an activist in the civil rights movement

and a rare woman to document Black life in photos.

NYT

Published April 6, 2022    Updated April 7, 2022

https://www.nytimes.com/2022/04/06/
arts/doris-derby-dead.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mourners at the funeral of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

in Atlanta in 1968.

 

Photograph: John Shearer

 

John Shearer, Who Photographed Tumultuous 1960s, Dies at 72

Mr. Shearer joined the staff

of Look magazine at the age of 20,

becoming one of the few black photographers

at a major national publication.

NYT

June 27, 2019

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/27/
arts/john-shearer-dead.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From left,

at the 1968 funeral for Dr. King:

his father, the Rev. Martin Luther King Sr.;

his mother, Alberta Williams King;

his wife, Coretta Scott King;

his brother, the Rev. A.D. King;

and the singer Harry Belafonte.

 

Photograph:

Don Hogan Charles/The New York Times

 

Don Hogan Charles,

Lauded Photographer of Civil Rights Era,

Dies at 79

NYT

DEC. 25, 2017

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/25/
obituaries/don-hogan-charles-dead.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The body of Martin Luther King lying in state in Memphis, Tennessee.

Pictured nearest the coffin are (left to right)

Revd Ralph Abernathy, Bernard Lee, Andrew Young

 

Photograph: Keystone/Hulton

 

06.04.1968        Martin Luther King is killed; Harlem reacts

WJ Weatherby, the Guardian

The Guardian        G2        pp. 16-17

3.4.2006 > Full text

 

Harlem

— the accepted capital of Negro America —

had lost its King today.

Adam Clayton Powell carries on like its king

and Stokely Carmichael sometimes speaks with a regal “we”,

but their following is small compared with that of “Martin”,

as everyone called him.

 

Harlem has seen the big men come and go;

only Martin seemed to have the trick of survival.

 

He was never treated here

with quite the awe Negro Alabama or Negro Mississippi

showed him.

 

They rarely touched the hem of his garment

as he walked by, as some did in the deep south.

 

That’s not the hip Harlem way.

 

But even those who were not impressed

by his religion or his politics were impressed

by his staying power in the white strongholds.

 

Today it is as though a rock of ages has crumbled away:

the world of Harlem seems even more insecure

now that it knows not even Martin could survive any longer.

 

Seventh Avenue, the main boulevard,

looks like a street in mourning on this grey day,

and for a white man it is about as safe

as a street in Vietnam.

 

Mayor John Lindsay,

usually among the more acceptable of white people,

found it too dangerous to show himself

and finally drove around in a car.

 

White cab drivers wouldn’t take you up

there this morningafter the bars closed.

It simply wasn’t safe unless you had a Negro passport.

 

Not even if you were big and well dressed

and therefore could be mistaken for a cop

 

This is a day

when even one’s Harlem friends

look the other way or act

as though their grief is private;

they have lost someone related to them

but not to you.

 

It is pointless to recall the days

of seeing Martin on so many marches since the 50s;

all occasions he survived.

 

Memories of shared moments now

do not speak as loudly as your white face.

 

You pass the corner of Seventh Avenue and 125th Street,

where Malcolm X used to preach.

 

Malcolm, dead Malcolm, is the only one they speak of now

with the same respect they always accorded the live Martin.

 

Malcolm, Martin — twin martyrs now,

and our dream must be of what might have happened.

 

With both gone,

no alliance seems possible in the movement,

and Harlem, as usual,

seems to be grieving for what might have been.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Related > Anglonautes > History > USA

 

James Earl Ray    1928-1998

 

 

Martin Luther King Jr.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

"I have a dream"    August 28,1963

 

 

Coretta Scott King    1927-2006

 

 

21st, 20th century > Kennedy dynasty

 

 

20th century > USA > Civil rights

 

 

17th, 18th, 19th, 20th century

English America, America, USA

Racism, Slavery,

Abolition, Civil war,

Abraham Lincoln,

Reconstruction

 

 

17th, 18th, 19th century

English America, America, USA

 

 

British Empire, UK > India > 20th century

 

 

British empire, UK > slavery

 

 

 

 

 

Related > Anglonautes > Vocapedia

 

slavery, eugenics,

race relations, racial divide, racism,

segregation, civil rights

apartheid

 

 

religion / faith,

abuse, sexual abuse, violence, extremism,

secularism, atheism

 

 

Federal Bureau of Investigation (F.B.I.)

 

 

 

 

 

Anglonautes > Arts > Photography > Photographers >

20th century > USA > Civil rights

 

Doy Gorton

 

 

Danny Lyon

 

 

Doris Derby    1939-2022

 

 

Steve Schapiro    1934-2022

 

 

Fred Baldwin    1929-2021

 

 

Matt Herron    1931-2020

 

 

Don Hogan Charles (born Daniel James Charles)    1938-2017

 

 

Ernest C. Withers    1922-2007

 

 

Leonard Freed    1929-2006

 

 

Gordon Parks    1912-2006

 

 

James "Spider" Martin    1939-2003

 

 

Grey Villet    1927-2000

 

 

Ed Clark    1911-2000

 

 

Robert W. Kelley    1920-1991

 

 

 

 

Related

 

New York Times > Disunion: The Civil War

 

Disunion revisits and reconsiders

America’s most perilous period

— using contemporary accounts,

diaries, images

and historical assessments to follow

the Civil War as it unfolded.

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/
opinion/disunion.html 

 

 

 

 

New York Times > Civil war timeline

 

This timeline tracks the posts

by contributors to the Disunion series.

Contemporary accounts, diaries, images

and historical assessments

follow the Civil War as it unfolded.

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/
opinion/disunion.html 

 

 

 

 

Slavery and the Making of America > Timeline

https://www.thirteen.org/wnet/slavery/timeline/index.html

 

 

 

 

Library of Congress

The African American Odyssey:

A Quest for Full Citizenship

http://international.loc.gov/ammem/aaohtml/exhibit/aointro.html

 

 

 

 

Martin Luther King, Jr. Research and Education Institute

Major King Events Chronology: 1929-1968

https://kinginstitute.stanford.edu/king-resources/
major-king-events-chronology-1929-1968 

 

 

 

 

The Speeches of Martin Luther King Jr.

Remembering Key Addresses, Sermons by the Civil Rights Leader

https://www.npr.org/news/specials/march40th/speeches.html

 

 

 

 

Speeches of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

https://www.nps.gov/malu/learn/education/otherresources.htm 

 

 

 

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