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History > 20th century > USA > Civil rights > Martin Luther King Jr. (1929-1968) > Vietnam speech    April 4, 1967

 

 

 

Dr. King writes notes before delivering his “Beyond Vietnam” speech

at Riverside Church. 1967.

 

Photograph:

The Estate of John C. Goodwin

 

What Martin Luther King Jr. Meant to New York

By John Leland        NYT        Jan. 11, 2018

https://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2018/01/11
/what-martin-luther-king-jr-meant-to-new-york/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

April 4, 1967

 

Martin Lurther King

delivers his first public

antiwar speech,

Beyond Vietnam,”

at New York’s

Riverside Church

http://mlk-kpp01.stanford.edu/index.php/encyclopedia/chronologyentry/1967_04_04/

 

 

 

On April 4, 1967,

exactly one year

before his assassination,

the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

stepped up to the lectern

at the Riverside Church

in Manhattan.

 

The United States

had been in active combat

in Vietnam for two years

and tens of thousands of people

had been killed, including some

10,000 American troops.

 

The political establishment

— from left to right —

backed the war,

and more than 400,000

American service members

were in Vietnam,

their lives on the line.

 

Many of King’s strongest allies

urged him to remain silent

about the war

or at least to soft-pedal

any criticism.

 

They knew that if he told

the whole truth

about the unjust

and disastrous war

he would be falsely

labeled a Communist,

suffer retaliation

and severe backlash,

alienate supporters

and threaten

the fragile progress

of the civil rights movement.

 

King rejected

all the well-meaning advice

and said,

“I come to this magnificent

house of worship tonight

because my conscience

leaves me no other choice.”

 

Quoting a statement

by the Clergy and Laymen

Concerned About Vietnam,

he said, “A time comes

when silence is betrayal”

and added,

“that time has come for us

in relation to Vietnam.”

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/19/
opinion/sunday/martin-luther-king-palestine-israel.html

 

 

 

Dr. King

delivered the address,

known variously

as “Beyond Vietnam”

and “A Time to Break Silence,”

at Riverside Church

in Manhattan on April 4, 1967.

 

“A time comes

when silence is betrayal,”

he said.

 

“And that time

has come for us

in relation to Vietnam.”

 

He added:

“If we continue, there will be

no doubt in my mind

and in the mind of the world

that we have

no honorable intentions

in Vietnam.

 

If we do not stop

our war against

the people of Vietnam

immediately,

the world will be left

with no other alternative

than to see this

as some horrible, clumsy

and deadly game

we have decided to play.”

 

The speech,

which articulated

what was then a relatively

unpopular position,

touched off a firestorm.

 

In an editorial titled

“Dr. King’s

Disservice to His Cause,”

Life magazine called it

“a demagogic slander

that sounded like a script

for Radio Hanoi.”

 

The National Association

for the Advancement

of Colored People

described the address

as “a serious tactical error.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/22/us/
vincent-harding-civil-rights-author-and-associate-of-dr-king-dies-at-82.html

 

 

https://kinginstitute.stanford.edu/encyclopedia/beyond-vietnam  

https://kinginstitute.stanford.edu/encyclopedia/vietnam-war

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/19/
opinion/sunday/martin-luther-king-palestine-israel.html

 

 

 

 

https://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2018/01/11/
what-martin-luther-king-jr-meant-to-new-york/

 

 

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/05/
opinion/dr-king-on-the-vietnam-war.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/04/
opinion/when-martin-luther-king-came-out-against-vietnam.html

 

https://www.npr.org/2017/04/04/
522632447/50-years-ago-mlk-delivers-a-speech-with-dark-vision-of-the-world

 

 

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/22/
us/vincent-harding-civil-rights-author-and-associate-of-dr-king-dies-at-82.html

 

 

 

 

https://www.npr.org/templates/story/
story.php?storyId=125355148 - March 30, 2010

 

 

 

 

https://www.npr.org/templates/story/
story.php?storyId=101240393 - - February 27, 2009

 

 

 

 

https://www.npr.org/templates/story/
story.php?storyId=18116049 - January 15, 2008

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Related > Anglonautes > History > USA

 

James Earl Ray    1928-1998

 

 

Martin Luther King Jr.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

"I have a dream"    August 28,1963

 

 

Coretta Scott King    1927-2006

 

 

21st, 20th century > Kennedy dynasty

 

 

20th century > USA > Civil rights

 

 

17th, 18th, 19th, 20th century

English America, America, USA

Racism, Slavery,

Abolition, Civil war,

Abraham Lincoln,

Reconstruction

 

 

17th, 18th, 19th century

English America, America, USA

 

 

British Empire, UK > India > 20th century

 

 

British empire, UK > slavery

 

 

 

 

 

Related > Anglonautes > Vocapedia

 

slavery, eugenics,

race relations, racial divide, racism,

segregation, civil rights

apartheid

 

 

religion / faith,

abuse, sexual abuse, violence, extremism,

secularism, atheism

 

 

Federal Bureau of Investigation (F.B.I.)

 

 

 

 

 

Anglonautes > Arts > Photography > Photographers > 20th century > USA

 

Doy Gorton

 

 

Danny Lyon

 

 

Fred Baldwin    1929-2021

 

 

Matt Herron    1931-2020

 

 

Daniel James Charles    1938-2017

 

 

Ernest C. Withers    1922-2007

 

 

Leonard Freed    1929-2006

 

 

Gordon Parks    1912-2006

 

 

James "Spider" Martin    1939-2003

 

 

Grey Villet    1927-2000

 

 

Ed Clark    1911-2000

 

 

Robert W. Kelley    1920-1991

 

 

 

 

Related

 

New York Times > Disunion: The Civil War

 

Disunion revisits and reconsiders

America’s most perilous period

— using contemporary accounts,

diaries, images

and historical assessments to follow

the Civil War as it unfolded.

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/
opinion/disunion.html 

 

 

 

 

New York Times > Civil war timeline

 

This timeline tracks the posts

by contributors to the Disunion series.

Contemporary accounts, diaries, images

and historical assessments

follow the Civil War as it unfolded.

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/
opinion/disunion.html 

 

 

 

 

Slavery and the Making of America > Timeline

https://www.thirteen.org/wnet/slavery/timeline/index.html

 

 

 

 

Library of Congress

The African American Odyssey:

A Quest for Full Citizenship

http://international.loc.gov/ammem/aaohtml/exhibit/aointro.html

 

 

 

 

Martin Luther King, Jr. Research and Education Institute

Major King Events Chronology: 1929-1968

https://kinginstitute.stanford.edu/king-resources/
major-king-events-chronology-1929-1968 

 

 

 

 

The Speeches of Martin Luther King Jr.

Remembering Key Addresses, Sermons by the Civil Rights Leader

https://www.npr.org/news/specials/march40th/speeches.html

 

 

 

 

Speeches of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

https://www.nps.gov/malu/learn/education/otherresources.htm 

 

 

 

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