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History > 20th, early 21st century > USA > Timeline in pictures > Man on the Moon    20 July 1969

 

 

 

Apollo 11 lunar module, Eagle,

returning from the moon

to dock with command module Columbia,

21 July 1969

 

Photograph: Nasa

 

The Moon: a Celebration of Our Celestial Neighbour – in pictures

Marking the 50th anniversary of Neil Armstrong’s ‘small step’

and published to coincide with Royal Museums Greenwich’s

exhibition at the National Maritime Museum, a new book,

The Moon: a Celebration of Our Celestial Neighbour

explores people’s fascination

with Earth’s only natural satellite

G

Thu 18 Jul 2019    14.31 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/science/gallery/2019/jul/18/
the-moon-a-celebration-of-our-celestial-neighbour-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"This is a picture of my mother

holding the Washington News Paper

on Monday, July 21st 1969

stating 'The Eagle Has Landed Two Men Walk on the Moon'.

The photo was taken by my grandfather."

-- the original uploader

Date 21 July 1969(1969-07-21)

 

Source Originally uploaded by User:

Rufus330Ci on 23 January 2006

Author Jack Weir (1928-2005)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Land_on_the_Moon_7_21_1969-repair.jpg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When I asked my father, Don Baida,

to talk about this photo, here's what he said:

"As a photographer,

I knew that this was a once in a lifetime shot

that I didn't want to miss.

 

This was such a unique happening

- the first time someone stepped onto another world

- that I wanted to make sure my family was part of it."

 

My parents woke up three-year-old me,

and here I am on my mom' lap

watching history unfold.

 

Postcards From the Field        NASA

http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/366416main_1969_0720_sm_full.jpg

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/apollo/40th/postcards/index.html

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/apollo/40th/index.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hundreds of people

gathered outside the Zenith television showroom

at Fifth Avenue and 54th Street in Manhattan to watch

as Apollo 11 began its journey to the moon.

July 16, 1969.

 

Photograph:

Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

 

Looking Back at People Watching the Apollo 11 Mission

NYT

July 15, 2019

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/07/15/
science/moon-landing-watching-vintage-photos.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin

are seen standing near their Lunar Module.

 

US President Richard Nixon

had just spoken to the two astronauts by radio.

 

Aldrin,

a colonel in the United States Air Force,

is saluting the commander-in-chief.

 

The three astronauts

safely returned to Earth

on 24 July 1969.

 

Photograph: Nasa

 

Transmission: from the Sea of Tranquility to planet Earth

This month sees the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission,

landing the first man on the moon.

As the Observer’s science editor Robin McKie

looks ahead to the future of manned spaceflight,

we look back at how, in 1969,

mankind viewed that giant leap

G

July 6, 2019

https://www.theguardian.com/science/gallery/2019/jul/06/
transmission-from-the-sea-of-tranquility-to-planet-earth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

600 million people

watched Neil Armstrong walk on the moon.

 

In the U.S.,

94 percent of all people

watching television on July 20

watched the landing.

 

Photograph: CBS Photo Archive/Getty Images

 

The Apollo 11 Mission Was Also a Global Media Sensation

The satellites were finally ready

to beam images back to Earth in 1969.

And some 600 million people

watched the event live.

NYT

July 15, 2019

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/15/
business/media/apollo-11-television-media.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Buzz Aldrin during the Apollo 11 mission.

 

Photograph: REX/Shutterstock

 

From Ted Hughes to HG Wells:

Jeanette Winterson picks the best books about the moon

G

Sat 20 Jul 2019    06.01 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2019/jul/20/
moon-best-books-about-earths-satellite

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AS11-40-5875 (20 JULY 1969) ---

Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr.,

lunar module pilot of the first lunar landing mission,

poses for a photograph

beside the deployed United States flag

during an Apollo 11 Extravehicular Activity (EVA)

on the lunar surface.

 

The Lunar Module (LM) is on the left,

and the footprints of the astronauts

are clearly visible in the soil of the Moon.

 

Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong,

commander,

took this picture

with a 70mm Hasselblad lunar surface camera.

 

While astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin

descended in the LM, the "Eagle",

to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the Moon,

astronaut Michael Collins, command module pilot,

remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM)

"Columbia"

in lunar-orbit.

http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/apollo/apollo11/hires/as11_40_5875.jpg

http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/apollo/apollo11/html/as11_40_5875.html

http://history.nasa.gov/ap11ann/galleries.htm

http://history.nasa.gov/ap11ann/introduction.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AS11-40-5878 (20 July 1969) ---

A close-up view

of an astronaut's bootprint in the lunar soil,

photographed with a 70mm lunar surface camera

during the Apollo 11 extravehicular activity (EVA)

on the Moon.

 

While astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander,

and Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., lunar module pilot,

descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Eagle"

to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the Moon,

astronaut Michael Collins, command module pilot,

remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM)

"Columbia" in lunar orbit.

 

Nasa

http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/apollo/apollo11/html/as11_40_5878.html

http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/apollo/apollo11/hires/as11_40_5878.jpg

http://history.nasa.gov/ap11ann/galleries.htm

http://history.nasa.gov/ap11ann/introduction.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

People at the Time-Life Building in Rockefeller Center

watching as Neil Armstrong

took a giant leap into the history books.

July 21, 1969.

 

Photograph:

Barton Silverman/The New York Times

 

Looking Back at People Watching the Apollo 11 Mission

NYT

July 15, 2019

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/07/15/science/moon-landing-watching-vintage-photos.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Eagle lunar module

and the Columbia command module undocked

while over the far side of the moon,

just before coming into view of Earth.

 

For 30 minutes

they glided

in close formation 68 miles (110km)

across the surface.

 

Collins remained alone

in his streamlined spacecraft,

seen here against the expanse

of the Sea of Fertility.

 

In a few minutes

he would manoeuvre

to leave Armstrong and Aldrin to their task

 

Photograph: Nasa

 

Moonfire: the Epic Journey of Apollo 11 – in pictures

Images from the 50th-anniversary edition

of Norman Mailer’s account of the Nasa mission

published by Taschen

G

Fri 19 Jul 2019    07.00 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/science/gallery/2019/jul/19/
moonfire-the-epic-journey-of-apollo-11-in-pictures-norman-mailer-moon-landing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Rev Ralph Abernathy, flanked by Hosea Williams,

stands on steps of a mockup of the lunar module

while demonstrating at the Apollo 11 moon launch.

 

Photograph: Bettmann/Corbis via Getty Images

 

'Whitey's on the moon':

why Apollo 11 looked so different to black America

 

The civil rights leader Ralph Abernathy

called Nasa’s moonshot ‘an inhuman priority’

while poor children went hungry

G

Sun 14 Jul 2019    06.00 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2019/jul/14/
apollo-11-civil-rights-black-america-moon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The prime crew of Apollo 11 pose

in April 1969

behind a model of the moon

that mapped

every major crater and mountain

known to date.

 

Left to right:

lunar module pilot Buzz Aldrin,

command module pilot Michael Collins

and mission commander Neil Armstrong

 

Photograph:

Ralph Morse/Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images/Taschen

 

Moonfire: the Epic Journey of Apollo 11 – in pictures

Images from the 50th-anniversary edition

of Norman Mailer’s account of the Nasa mission

published by Taschen

G

Fri 19 Jul 2019    07.00 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/science/gallery/2019/jul/19/
moonfire-the-epic-journey-of-apollo-11-in-pictures-norman-mailer-moon-landing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Astronauts Ted Freeman,

Buzz Aldrin (centre),

and Charlie Bassett

experience zero gravity

during a simulation flight in 1964.

 

Nasa used a stripped down KC135 aircraft,

affectionately known as the Vomit Comet,

that was flown in a series of parabolas to give the astronauts

about 30 seconds of either zero-G 1/6th-G near the top of each arc

 

Photograph:

Ralph Morse/Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images/ Taschen

 

Moonfire: the Epic Journey of Apollo 11 – in pictures

Images from the 50th-anniversary edition

of Norman Mailer’s account of the Nasa mission

published by Taschen

G

Fri 19 Jul 2019    07.00 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/science/gallery/2019/jul/19/
moonfire-the-epic-journey-of-apollo-11-in-pictures-norman-mailer-moon-landing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Katherine Johnson (born Creola Katherine Coleman)        1918-2020

 

 

 

Katherine Johnson

with an adding machine and a ‘celestial training device’

at her desk at Nasa’s Langley research centre in 1962.

 

Photograph:

Donaldson Collection/Getty Images

 

Katherine Johnson obituary

African-American mathematician

who played a key role in landing men on the moon

G

Mon 24 Feb 2020    18.38 GMT

Last modified on Mon 24 Feb 2020    18.55 GMT

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2020/feb/24/
katherine-johnson-obituary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wielding little more

than a pencil, a slide rule

and one of the finest

mathematical minds

in the country,

Mrs. Johnson (...) calculated

the precise trajectories

that would let Apollo 11 land

on the moon in 1969 and,

after Neil Armstrong’s

history-making moonwalk,

let it return to Earth.

 

A single error, she well knew,

could have dire consequences

for craft and crew.

 

Her impeccable calculations

had already helped plot

the successful flight

of Alan B. Shepard Jr.,

who became

the first American in space

when his Mercury spacecraft

went aloft in 1961.

 

The next year, she likewise helped

make it possible for John Glenn,

in the Mercury vessel Friendship 7,

to become the first American

to orbit the Earth.

 

Yet throughout Mrs. Johnson’s

33 years in NASA’s

Flight Research Division

— the office from which

the American space

program sprang —

and for decades afterward,

almost no one knew her name.

 

Mrs. Johnson

was one of several hundred

rigorously educated,

supremely capable

yet largely unheralded

women who,

well before the modern

feminist movement,

worked as NASA mathematicians.


But it was not only her sex

that kept her long marginalized

and long unsung:

 

Katherine Coleman Goble Johnson,

a West Virginia native

who began her scientific career

in the age of Jim Crow,

was also African-American.

 

In old age,

Mrs. Johnson became

the most celebrated

of the small cadre

of black women

— perhaps three dozen —

who at midcentury served

as mathematicians

for the space agency

and its predecessor,

the National Advisory

Committee for Aeronautics.

 

Their story was told

in the 2016 Hollywood film

“Hidden Figures,”

based on Margot Lee Shetterly’s

nonfiction book of the same title,

published that year.

 

The movie starred

Taraji P. Henson

as Mrs. Johnson,

the film’s central figure.

It also starred

Octavia Spencer

and Janelle Monáe

as her real-life colleagues

Dorothy Vaughan

and Mary Jackson.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/02/24/
science/katherine-johnson-dead.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/02/24/
science/katherine-johnson-dead.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

July 20, 1969

 

"That's one small step for man

but one giant leap for mankind."

 

https://history.nasa.gov/ap11ann/introduction.htm

http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2009/07/remembering_apollo_11.html

http://news.bbc.co.uk/onthisday/hi/dates/stories/july/21/
newsid_2635000/2635845.stm

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2019/jul/20/
apollo-11-moon-landing-trump-buzz-aldrin

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/20/
science/apollo-11-television.html

 

https://www.npr.org/2019/07/19/
741866451/hollywood-shoots-the-moon-117-years-of-lunar-landings-at-the-movies

 

https://www.npr.org/2019/07/19/
743076259/how-a-10-year-old-boy-helped-apollo-11-return-to-earth

 

https://www.theguardian.com/global/2019/jul/19/
apollo-women-man-walk-on-the-moon

 

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2019/jul/19/
a-thrill-ran-through-me-your-moon-landing-memories-apollo-11

 

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2019/jul/19/
apollo-11-moon-landings-america-kathleen-alcott

 

https://www.theguardian.com/science/gallery/2019/jul/19/
moonfire-the-epic-journey-of-apollo-11-in-pictures-norman-mailer-moon-landing

 

https://www.npr.org/2019/07/18/
739934923/meet-john-houbolt-he-figured-out-how-to-go-to-the-moon-but-few-were-listening

 

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/07/18/
science/apollo-11-moon-landing-photos-ul.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2019/jul/18/
we-had-15-seconds-of-fuel-left-buzz-aldrin-on-the-nervy-moon-landing

 

https://www.theguardian.com/science/gallery/2019/jul/18/
the-moon-a-celebration-of-our-celestial-neighbour-in-pictures

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/jul/18/
arizona-apollo-astronauts-moon-training-practice

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/16/
science/michael-collins-apollo-11.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/16/
us/ed-dwight-was-set-to-be-the-first-black-astronaut-heres-why-that-never-happened.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/15/
business/media/apollo-11-television-media.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2019/jul/14/
apollo-11-civil-rights-black-america-moon

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/11/
science/moon-apollo-11-archaeology-preservation.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/06/
science/neil-armstrong-moon-rocks.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/science/gallery/2019/jul/06/
transmission-from-the-sea-of-tranquility-to-planet-earth

 

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/video/2017/jul/03/
buzz-aldrin-faces-trump-speech-space-video

 

https://www.npr.org/2019/06/12/
731660780/one-giant-leap-explores-the-herculean-effort-behind-the-1969-moon-landing

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2019/feb/25/
apollo-11-review-eye-opening-documentary-is-a-five-star-triumph

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/08/
us/oscar-carl-holderer-german-born-rocket-expert-dies-at-95.html 

 

https://www.archives.gov/publications/prologue/2003/summer/20-july-1969.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/science/1969/jul/21/
spaceexploration.archive1

 

https://www.theguardian.com/gnmeducationcentre/from-the-archive-blog/2019/jul/19/
man-walks-on-the-moon-21-july-1969

 

http://www.time.com/time/80days/690720.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

21-27 December 1968

 

Apollo 8

 

First human journey to another world

 

 

 

 

The crew of Apollo 8

was armed with still and movie cameras

to photograph the Moon;

but the most enduring image of their mission

is this photograph of their own home,

planet Earth.

 

According to Anders,

the astronauts saw the horizon vertically

—not horizontally—

with the lunar surface to the right.
 

 

National Archives,

Records of the U.S. Information Agency

[306-PSD-68-4049c]

http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/eyewitness/html.php?section=25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.archives.gov/exhibits/
eyewitness/html.php?section=25

 

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/12/21/
679282476/1968-when-apollo-8-first-orbited-the-moon-and-saw-the-earth-rise-in-space

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Related > Anglonautes > History > 20th century

 

Science > Aeronautics > Katherine Johnson    1918-2020

 

 

late 1940s - late 1980s

Cold war
 

 

20th century > 1962-1975

Cold War > Vietnam War > USA

 

 

Civil rights

 

 

after WW2 > Germany, USA > Operation Paperclip

 

 

20th, early 21st century > USA > Timeline in pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

Related > Anglonautes > Vocapedia

 

Moon

 

 

Moon > Apollo 11

First lunar landing

20 July 1969

 

 

Moon > Apollo 10

Testing the Lunar Module in lunar orbit

10-18 May 1969

 

 

Moon > Apollo 8

First human journey to another world

21-27 December 1968

 

 

space, astronomy

 

 

 

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