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History > 20th century > WW2 > France, Canada, UK, USA > Normandy landings > D-day    6 June 1944

 


 

 

http://www.normandie44lamemoire.com/accueil/imagesaccueil/cartewagram.jpg - broken URL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Description: Naval Bombardments on D-Day

Source: Victory in the West vol.1 p.168 (HMSO 1962),

digitised by The National Archives (UK)

Post-Work: User:W.wolny

Licence: CrownCopyright

but usable due to List of UK government departments we can use

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Naval_Bombardments_on_D-Day.png

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

German prisoners of war captured

after the D-Day landings in Normandy

being guarded by American troops

at a camp in Nonant-le-Pin

in August 1944.

 

Photograph: U.S. National Archives, via Reuters

 

D-Day in Photos: Heroes of a More Certain Time

As the number of surviving veterans dwindles,

the old pillars of trans-Atlantic certainty

have begun to tremble.

The New York Times

June 6, 2019

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/06/
world/europe/d-day-commemoration.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Descriptif du document:

Deux femmes traversent la ville en ruines.

Elles portent leurs maigres possessions.

 

Au premier plan,

les vestiges des Bains Douches.

 

Mention obligatoire:

Conseil Régional de Basse-Normandie /

Archives Nationales du CANADA

Référence du document: p000011

Période du document: Seconde Guerre Mondiale

Date du document: 17 août 1944

Localité présente dans le document:

FALAISE 14700 Calvados  France

http://www.archivesnormandie39-45.org/specificPhoto.php?ref=p000011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Locals walking through ruins of the heavily bombed city of St. Lo.

 

Location: Saint Lo, Normandy, France

Date taken: August 1944

 

Photographer: Frank Scherschel

Life Images

http://images.google.com/hosted/life/641cfe9b18fa9776.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

American Army chaplin giving Eucharist & Last Rites to a wounded soldier

 

Location: Normandy, France

Date taken: August 1944

 

Photographer: Frank Scherschel

Life Images

http://images.google.com/hosted/life/580bae6eaac239c2.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

American soldiers guarding German prisoners

captured near the town of Le Gast

during the fight for the Normandy area.

 

Location: Normandy, France

Date taken: August 1944

Photographer: Frank Scherschel

http://images.google.com/hosted/life/fecad6e2891b05ba.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Descriptif du document:

Des parachutistes allemands morts dans une charrette.

 

Mention obligatoire:

Conseil Régional de Basse-Normandie / National Archives USA

Référence du document: p012371

Période du document: Seconde Guerre Mondiale

Date du document : Seconde guerre mondiale

http://www.archivesnormandie39-45.org/PhotosHD/p012371.jpg

http://www.archivesnormandie39-45.org/specificPhoto.php?ref=p012371

http://www.archivesnormandie39-45.org/index.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Group of American soldiers

looking at body of German soldier

amidst piles of equipment

after troop truck he was riding in

took a direct hit.

 

Location: Cherbourg, Normandy, France

Date taken: July 1944

 

Photographer: Bob Landry

Life Images

http://images.google.com/hosted/life/8c61e91b77b1d729.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Canadian troops patroling

after German forces were dislodged from Caen

in July 1944.

 

Credit National Archives of Canada, via Reuters

 

D-Day in Photos: Heroes of a More Certain Time

As the number of surviving veterans dwindles,

the old pillars of trans-Atlantic certainty

have begun to tremble.

NYT

June 6, 2019

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/06/
world/europe/d-day-commemoration.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Un couple d'habitants regarde un bulldozer canadien

déblayant les ruines de maisons détruites,

rue de Bayeux, à Caen.

 

En arrière-plan,

les deux clochers de l'abbaye aux Hommes

sont restés intacte malgré les bombardements alliées.

 

Mention obligatoire:

Conseil Régional de Basse-Normandie /

Archives Nationales du CANADA

Référence du document: p000006

Période du document: Seconde Guerre Mondiale

Date du document: 10 juillet 1944

Localité présente dans le document:

CAEN 14000 Calvados France

http://www.archivesnormandie39-45.org/PhotosHD/p000006.jpg

http://www.archivesnormandie39-45.org/specificPhoto.php?ref=p000006

http://www.archivesnormandie39-45.org/index.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Corpse of German soldier in ditch

alongside road to town of St. Mere-Eglise,

he was killed during 2nd day

of the allied invasion of Normandy.

 

Location: Ste. Mere-Eglise, Normandy, France

Date taken: June 7, 1944

 

Photographer: Bob Landry

Life Images

http://images.google.com/hosted/life/c3f91f2a6412da79.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Winston Churchill,

Second Army commandant Sir Miles Dempsey

and Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery

in the destroyed city of Caen,

after Allied forces stormed the Normandy beaches

on D-Day.

 

Photograph: -/AFP/Getty Images

 

 

Britain can’t be reborn

while we’re still lost in fantasies about the past

G

Sun 2 Jun 2019        09.00 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/jun/02/
britain-cant-be-reborn-while-while-were-still-lost-fantasies-about-past


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Major General Collins (C)

with captured German Admiral Hennecke

and Lt. General Dietrich von Schlieber

after Allied takeover of Cherbourg following D-Day.

 

Location: Cherbourg, Normandy, France

Date taken: June 1944

 

Photographer: Bob Landry

Life Images

http://images.google.com/hosted/life/ce974a8dc39b16da.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On the second day

of the Normandy invasion during WWII,

Gen. Omar Bradley,

Maj. Gen. Ralph Royce of the 9th Air Corps

and Bradley aide, major Hansen,

looking at map in envelope packet labeled "Bradley";

they are standing courtyard.

 

Location: Ste Mere-Eglise, Normandy, France

Date taken: June 7, 1944

 

Photographer: Bob Landry

Life Images

http://images.google.com/hosted/life/3e72c25d7d91414a.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An A-20 Havoc of the United States 9th Air Force

hitting enemy supply lines near Cherbourg, France,

in June 1944.

 

Credit Photo12/UIG, via Getty Images

 

D-Day in Photos: Heroes of a More Certain Time

As the number of surviving veterans dwindles,

the old pillars of trans-Atlantic certainty

have begun to tremble.

NYT

June 6, 2019

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/06/
world/europe/d-day-commemoration.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A memorial to a dead American soldier somewhere in Normandy, June 1944.

 

Credit U.S. Coast Guard, via Reuters

 

D-Day in Photos: Heroes of a More Certain Time

As the number of surviving veterans dwindles,

the old pillars of trans-Atlantic certainty

have begun to tremble.

NYT

June 6, 2019

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/06/
world/europe/d-day-commemoration.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A priest conducting Mass on Omaha Beach in June 1944.

 

Credit Robert Capa/International Center of Photography and Magnum Photos

 

D-Day in Photos: Heroes of a More Certain Time

As the number of surviving veterans dwindles,

the old pillars of trans-Atlantic certainty

have begun to tremble.

NYT

June 6, 2019

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/06/
world/europe/d-day-commemoration.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

American troops of the 16th Infantry Regiment,

injured while storming Omaha Beach,

waiting to be evacuated to a field hospital

on June 6.

 

Credit U.S. Army, via Reuters

 

D-Day in Photos: Heroes of a More Certain Time

As the number of surviving veterans dwindles,

the old pillars of trans-Atlantic certainty

have begun to tremble.

NYT

June 6, 2019

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/06/
world/europe/d-day-commemoration.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

American soldiers landing

on Omaha Beach, D-Day,

Normandy, France, 6 June 1944,

by Robert Capa

 

‘The water was cold,

and the beach still more than a hundred yards away.

The bullets tore holes in the water around me,

and I made for the nearest steel obstacle ...

It was still very early and very grey for good pictures,

but the grey water and the grey sky made the little men,

dodging under the surrealistic designs of Hitler’s

anti-invasion brain trust, very effective.’

 

Robert Capa, Slightly Out of Focus (1947)

 

Photograph:

Robert Capa/International Center of Photography/Magnum Photos

 

Nuns, guns and Beatles:

images of crossings by Magnum photographers

G

Tue 30 Oct 2018        07.00 GMT

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2018/oct/30/
nuns-guns-and-beatles-images-of-crossings-by-magnum-photographers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Omaha Beach

had some of the fiercest fighting of the invasion.

 

Pyle came ashore here the next day

and walked alone on the beach.

 

Credit Bettmann Archive/Getty Images

 

The Man Who Told America the Truth About D-Day

NYT

June 5, 2019

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/05/
magazine/d-day-normandy-75th-ernie-pyle.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Landing on the coast of France

under heavy Nazi machine gun fire are these American soldiers,

shown just as they left the ramp of a Coast Guard landing boat.

 

CPhoM. Robert F. Sargent,

June 6, 1944.

26-G-2343.

 

Pictures of World War II

US National Archives

http://www.archives.gov/research/ww2/photos/images/ww2-99.jpg

http://www.archives.gov/research/ww2/photos/?template=print

 

Caption form Library of Congress :

This photograph shows troops from the First Infantry Division

wading ashore under heavy fire at the Normandy beach,

code-named OMAHA.

 

Here the first landings

resembled Churchill's worst nightmares,

as unexpectedly fierce German resistance

resulted in the deaths of many American soldiers.

 

The troops finally

accomplished their mission, however,

and casualties elsewhere on D-Day

were not as high as had been feared.

 

Robert Sargent. 

Taxis to Hell--and Back, 1944. 

Photographic print.

Prints and Photographs Division (219.2)

http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/churchill/images/wc0219_2-3g04731v.jpg

http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/churchill/wc-unity.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

American troops landing at dawn

on Omaha Beach in Normandy, France, on June 6, 1944.

 

Credit Robert Capa/

International Center of Photography and Magnum Photos

 

D-Day in Photos: Heroes of a More Certain Time

As the number of surviving veterans dwindles,

the old pillars of trans-Atlantic certainty

have begun to tremble.

NYT

June 6, 2019

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/06/
world/europe/d-day-commemoration.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commandos aboard a landing craft

on D-day, 6 June 1944.

 

Photograph: Getty

 

‘The sea around

was red with blood, but you had to keep going’:

D-day veterans attend their last big gathering

G

Sun 2 Jun 2019        06.03 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/jun/02/
dday-veterans-normandy-75th-anniversary-second-world-war

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Landing craft and Allied forces arriving at Normandy.

 

Credit Universal History Archive/UIG, via Getty Images

 

D-Day in Photos: Heroes of a More Certain Time

As the number of surviving veterans dwindles,

the old pillars of trans-Atlantic certainty

have begun to tremble.

NYT

June 6, 2019

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/06/
world/europe/d-day-commemoration.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Massive landing and deployment

of US troops, supplies and equipment

in the days following victorious D-Day action

on Omaha Beach;

 

barrage balloons guard against German aircraft

while scores of ships unload men & material.

Location: Normandy, France

Date taken: June 8, 1944

 

Life Images

http://images.google.com/hosted/life/c29508522f366e5a.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New York Times, June 6, 1944

 

Serial & Government Publications

Division (68A.1)

American Treasures of The Library of Congress

http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/treasures/trm086.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


6 June 1944

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

General Dwight D. Eisenhower

gives the order of the day,

"Full victory--nothing else"

to paratroopers somewhere in England,

just before they board their airplanes to participate

in the first assault in the invasion of the continent of Europe



Digital ID: (digital file from b&w film copy neg.) cph 3a26521

http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3a26521

Reproduction Number: LC-USZ62-25600 (b&w film copy neg.)

Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division

Washington, D.C. 20540 USA

http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

Anglonautes > downlad from LoC > TIFF > JPEG

http://loc.gov/pictures/resource/cph.3a26521/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.archives.gov/historical-docs/doc-content/images/ww2-eisenhower-d-day-order.pdf

http://blogs.usatoday.com/ondeadline/2008/06/d-day-veterans.html

added 6 June 2008

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

US troops jump into surf

from Coast Guard landing craft

during mock amphibious assault

along unidentified beach on North African coast

in preparation for invasion of the beaches of Normandy,

France.

 

Date taken: April 1944

 

Life Images

http://images.google.com/hosted/life/l?imgurl=5e458bb36952960b

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Erwin Rommel        1891-1944

 

Dubbed

the "Desert Fox"

for the skillful

military campaigns

he waged on behalf

of the German military

in North Africa,

Erwin Rommel earned

the grudging respect

of even his adversaries.

 

At the start

of World War II,

Rommel was

largely responsible

for Adolf Hitler's

personal safety

as he sought to expand

his Nazi empire.

 

Despite

the tactical brilliance

Rommel displayed

in North Africa,

German advances there

were halted in 1943.

 

In January 1944,

Rommel was made

commander in chief

of all German armies

from the Netherlands

to the Loire River.

 

In France,

Rommel sought

to fortify Nazi territory

and prevent

an Allied invasion.

 

He was not successful.

 

On June 6, 1944,

while Rommel was in Germany

celebrating his wife's birthday,

the Allies landed at Normandy.

 

Soon after,

Rommel

was seriously wounded

when Allied aircraft

strafed his motorcar.

 

As a result,

he was forced to return

to Germany to recover.

 

While he was hospitalized,

a failed attempt

on Hitler's life was made.

 

Rommel,

a recent critic

of Hitler's leadership,

was implicated

in the plot.

 

Shortly thereafter,

two German soldiers

visited Rommel's

sickbed.

 

They offered him

the unpleasant choice

of committing suicide

by ingesting poison pills

or standing trial

in what would most likely be

a rigged and losing effort.

 

Rommel chose the poison.

https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/features/dday-featured-film/

 

 

https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/features/
dday-featured-film/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Timeline: The War in Europe, After D-Day

 

 

June 6, 1944:

 

An Allied force

of more than 150,000 troops,

5,000 ships

and 800 aircraft

assault 50 miles

of northern France's

Normandy coastline.

 

More than

4,000 Allied troops die,

and 6,000 are wounded,

but the Allies

succeed in breaching

Hitler's coastal defense

of France.

 

 

 

 

June 26, 1944:

 

The Allies capture

the French port

of Cherbourg;

the Germans are

on the retreat.

 

 

 

 

August 25, 1944:

 

Allied troops,

with the help

of the French resistance

led by Gen. Charles de Gaulle,

liberate Paris after four years

of German occupation.

 

 

 

 

Dec. 16, 1944:

 

The Battle of the Bulge,

the last German offensive

on the Western Front,

begins.

 

Hitler orders

a quarter-million troops

across Luxembourg

to push back

the Allied forces.

 

German troops

advance 50 miles

into the Allied lines,

creating a deadly "bulge"

into Allied defenses.

 

 

 

 

Jan. 16, 1945:

 

The Battle of the Bulge

ends with a defeat

and retreat for Germany

as its supplies grow short

and its forces are overcome

by Allied resistance.

 

 

 

 

Feb. 4, 1945:

 

U.S. President

Franklin Roosevelt,

British Prime Minister

Winston Churchill

and Soviet leader

Josef Stalin

meet at Yalta

in the Crimea.

 

The U.S. and Britain

agree to allow Stalin

to control Eastern Europe

after the war ends.

 

 

 

 

March 1945:

 

German forces

retreat into Germany

as U.S. troops

cross the Rhine

on the country's

Western Front.

 

 

 

 

April 30, 1945:

 

As Soviet forces

from the Eastern Front

encircle Berlin,

Hitler,

in a bombproof bunker,

poisons his mistress,

Eva Braun,

and shoots himself.

 

Their bodies

are hastily cremated

in a garden.

 

 

 

 

May 7, 1945:

 

U.S. Gen. Dwight Eisenhower

accepts Germany's

unconditional surrender

at Reims, France.

 

At midnight

on May 8, 1945,

the war in Europe

is officially over.

 

 

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=1922306

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


D-day landings on film:

Hollywood's

best second world war

tributes

 

As long as

there have been movies,

there have been war movies.

 

A sampler of films

featuring the D-day landings

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/jun/06/
d-day-landings-on-film-hollywoods-wwii-tributes

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/jun/06/
d-day-landings-on-film-hollywoods-wwii-tributes  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

D-day original newsreels:

a pick of the best footage

 

Although

the most dramatic scenes

of the invasion are lost,

a wealth

of original archive footage

is available online

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/jun/06/d-day-original-newsreels-pick-footage
 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/jun/06/d-day-original-newsreels-pick-footage
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Archive Video Of The D-Day Normandy Landings

 

British and American veterans are set to leave Portsmouth

and travel to Normandy for the 70th anniversary of the D-Day landings.

 

The World War Two veterans

have journeyed from across the UK and the US

ahead of a series of memorial events to be held this week.

 

Some of the former servicemen are returning

to the beaches of northern France

for the first time in 70 years.

 

Here you can see archive video footage

of the landings on June 6th 1944.

http://news.sky.com/story/1274178/vet... - broken URL

 

YouTube > SkyNews        2 June 2014

https://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=0wg5x5WaZPo 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

D-Day Landings (1944).

 

A Day that Shook the World.

On June 6 1944,

Allied troops begin their invasion of Europe

with the D-Day landings in Normandy.

It was the start of the final phase of WW2.

 

A Day That Shook The World is the classic series

that recalls the days of the 20th century that proved

to be era-defining and pivotal in the course of modern history.

 

YouTube > British Pathé > D-Day Landings (1944)        13 April 2014

https://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=-ShxO7QoSiA 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

D-Day Beach Landing (1944).

 

This footage is of British troops jumping out

of their landing craft and wading

to the Normandy beach.

 

A poignant moment is at 0.29 seconds

where a man can be seen with a wedding ring

on patting the back of his comrade.


All 90,000 British Pathe reels can be viewed for free

on http://www.britishpathe.com

 

YouTube > Pathé > War Archives        21 December 2011

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-U_RC-SrV-Q

Anglonautes > Note: check if sound is original or was added later

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

D-Day Greatest Combined Operation In World's History (1944)

 

Title reads: "D-day - Greatest Combined Operation in World's History".

 

YouTube > British Pathé        13 April 2014

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rNtfjndy_1o

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

D-day: memories from the frontline

 

First-hand accounts

of D-day and its aftermath

taken from stories submitted

by veterans and relatives

to Guardian Witness

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/jun/05/-sp-d-day-memories-from-the-front-line

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/jun/05/
-sp-d-day-memories-from-the-front-line 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Memories From Normandy

 

 

Beginning

on June 6, 1944,

more than

150,000 Allied troops

landed on a broad

stretch of beaches

on the coast

of Normandy,

in German-held

France.

 

Entrenched

behind concrete

walls and bunkers

were more than 50,000

German soldiers.

 

Seventy years later,

four veterans

of the largest amphibious

invasion in history

recall their experiences.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/06/opinion/memories-from-normandy.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/06/opinion/memories-from-normandy.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

D-Day 70th anniversary:

 

Ministry of Defence

releases

rare aerial photographs

showing planning

– and chaos –

of ‘largest single

military operation

in the history

of warfare’

 

 

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/dday-70th-anniversary-ministry-of-defence-releases-
rare-aerial-photographs-showing-planning--and-chaos--of-largest-single-military-operation-
in-the-history-of-warfare-9486134.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Life Magazine

 

After D-Day:

Rare Photos From the First Show

for US Troops in Normandy

 

 

http://time.com/3879977/
d-day-rare-photos-show-for-american-troops-normandy-1944/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Life Magazine

 

The Ruins of Normandy:

Color Photos From France, 1944

 

 

http://time.com/3880091/
after-d-day-unpublished-color-photos-from-normandy-summer-1944/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

D-day        6 June 1944

 

http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/today/jun06.html

http://www.loc.gov/folklife/vets/stories/

http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/treasures/tr11c.html#wwii

http://www.loc.gov/vets/stories/ex-war-dday.html

http://www.loc.gov/vets/stories/onthebeach.html

http://www.loc.gov/vets/stories/beyondthebeach.html

http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/today/jun06.html

http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/treasures/trm086.html

 

 

http://www.atlas-historique.net/1914-1945/cartes/Overlord.html

http://news.bbc.co.uk/onthisday/hi/dates/stories/june/6/newsid_3499000/3499352.stm

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/3736351.stm

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/dday/

https://www.pbsamerica.co.uk/series/d-day-medics-eagles-of-mercy

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/12/
magazine/world-war-ii-d-day-artist.html

 

https://www.npr.org/2019/06/06/
730126155/at-98-d-day-veteran-medic-returns-to-normandy-to-remember-a-generations-sacrific

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/jun/06/
haunted-me-for-rest-of-my-life-veterans-recall-d-day-landings

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/06/
world/europe/d-day-commemoration.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/05/
world/europe/d-day-normandy-commemoration.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/05/
us/world-war-2-history-research-archives-.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/05/
magazine/d-day-normandy-75th-ernie-pyle.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/jun/05/
d-day-veterans-and-world-leaders-arrive-in-portsmouth-to-vast-security

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/jun/05/
d-day-key-facts-on-the-largest-military-operation-ever-attempted

 

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/jun/05/
britain-d-day-commemoration-trump-brexit-war

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/jun/03/
d-day-75th-anniversary-interviews

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/jun/02/
dday-veterans-normandy-75th-anniversary-second-world-war

 

 

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2018/oct/30/
nuns-guns-and-beatles-images-of-crossings-by-magnum-photographers

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/07/04/
624354851/how-a-high-schooler-helped-reunite-twins-74-years-after-their-world-war-ii-death

 

 

 

 

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=317683244&ft=1&f=

 

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=318203689&ft=1&f=

 

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=317708617&ft=1&f=

 

 

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/22/
us/walter-d-ehlers-honored-for-role-in-normandy-attack-dies-at-92.html 

 

 

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/picture/2013/jun/06/photography-secondworldwar

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/21/books/rape-by-american-soldiers-in-world-war-ii-france.html

 

http://www.npr.org/2012/07/28/157443099/before-the-d-day-invasion-double-talk-and-deceit

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/02/nyregion/02dday.html

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009/sep/10/normandy-landings-second-world-war

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/06/06/world/europe/06iht-troops.html

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4682519

http://www.reuters.com/article/newsOne/idUKTRE5546YD20090606

http://blogs.usatoday.com/ondeadline/2008/06/d-day-veterans.html

http://www.time.com/time/covers/1101040531/then_now/intro.html

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/secondworldwar/dday/0,14564,1216111,00.html

http://www.guardian.co.uk/secondworldwar/story/0,14058,1226533,00.html

http://www.guardian.co.uk/secondworldwar/0,14058,1085469,00.html

 

http://www.theguardian.com/theguardian/2014/jun/07/archive-1944-europes-hour

http://www.guardian.co.uk/secondworldwar/archive/0,14058,1085470,00.html

http://www.guardian.co.uk/secondworldwar/story/0,14058,1226579,00.html

http://www.guardian.co.uk/secondworldwar/story/0,14058,1218905,00.html

https://www.theguardian.com/century/year/0,6050,128358,00.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6 June 1944

 

Pegasus bridge raid

 

 

On 6 June 1944,

gliders landed

in the dead of night

to begin the liberation

of France.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/jun/01/
d-day-first-heroes-pegasus-bridge-raid-70th-anniversary
 

 

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/worldwars/wwtwo/ff7_pegasus.shtml

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ww2peopleswar/stories/04/a3656504.shtml

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/jun/01/
d-day-first-heroes-pegasus-bridge-raid-70th-anniversary
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

D-Day landing        Maps

 

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/
second-world-war-commemorative-booklets
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

D-day landings scenes in 1944

and now – interactive - 1 June 2014

 

 

Peter Macdiarmid

has taken photographs

of locations

in France and England

to match

with archive images

taken before,

during and after

the D-day landings.

 

The Allied invasion

to liberate

mainland Europe

from Nazi occupation

during the second

world war

took place

on 6 June 1944.

 

Operation Overlord

was the largest

seaborne invasion

in military history,

with more than

156,000 Allied troops

storming

the beaches of France.

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/ng-interactive/2014/jun/01/d-day-landings-scenes-in-1944-and-now-interactive

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/ng-interactive/2014/jun/01/
d-day-landings-scenes-in-1944-and-now-interactive 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bernard Law Montgomery    1887-1976

 

 

Bernard Law Montgomery,

commonly referred to

as "Monty,"

initially earned distinction

during World War II

due to his highly

effective leadership

of the British Eighth Army

in North Africa.

 

There, Montgomery

was the first Allied general

to inflict a decisive defeat

upon the Axis forces

when he drove them

from their positions

at El Alamein

in northern Egypt.

 

On the heels

of his North Africa success,

Montgomery took part

in the Allied invasion

of Sicily,

and worked closely

with U.S. General

Dwight Eisenhower

planning and implementing

the D-Day invasion of France.

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/dday/peopleevents/p_montgomery.html

 

 

https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/features/dday-featured-film/  

 

https://www.history.com/topics/british-history/bernard-law-montgomery  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dwight David "Ike" Eisenhower    1890-1969

 

34th President of the United States

from 1953 until 1961.

 

 

He was a five-star general

in the United States Army

during World War II

and served

as Supreme Commander

of the Allied Forces

in Europe;

 

he had responsibility

for planning and supervising

the invasion of North Africa

in Operation Torch in 1942–43

and the successful invasion

of France and Germany

in 1944–45

from the Western Front.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dwight_D._Eisenhower

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.npr.org/2014/05/31/
317642127/if-d-day-failed-eisenhower-was-ready-to-take-the-blame
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The part played

by meteorologists

in the planning

of the 1944 landings

on the Normandy beaches

http://www.theguardian.com/news/2014/may/26/weatherwatch-forecasts-d-day-landings

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/news/2014/may/26/weatherwatch-forecasts-d-day-landings

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Atlantic Wall

 

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atlantic_Wall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preparing for the Invasion
 


Almost immediately

after France

fell to the Nazis in 1940,

the Allies planned

a cross-Channel assault

on the German

occupying forces.

 

At the Quebec Conference

in August 1943,

Winston Churchill

and Franklin Roosevelt

reaffirmed the plan,

which was code-named

Overlord.

 

Although Churchill acceded

begrudgingly to the operation,

historians note that the British

still harbored persistent doubts

about whether Overlord

would succeed.

 

The decision to mount

the invasion was cemented

at the Teheran Conference

held in November

and December 1943.

 

Joseph Stalin,

on his first trip

outside the Soviet Union

since 1912,

pressed

Roosevelt and Churchill

for details about the plan,

particularly the identity

of the Supreme Commander

of Overlord.

 

Churchill and Roosevelt

told Stalin

that the invasion

"would be possible"

by August 1, 1944,

but that no decision

had yet been made

to name

a Supreme Commander.

 

To this latter point,

Stalin pointedly rejoined,

"Then nothing will come

of these operations.

Who carries the moral

and technical responsibility

for this operation?"

 

Churchill

and Roosevelt

acknowledged

the need to name

the commander

without further delay.

 

Shortly after

the conference ended,

Roosevelt appointed

Gen. Dwight David

Eisenhower

to that position.

 

By May 1944,

2,876,000 Allied troops

were amassed

in southern England.

 

While awaiting

deployment orders,

they prepared

for the assault

by practicing

with live ammunition.

 

The largest armada

in history,

made up of more

than 4,000 American,

British,

and Canadian ships,

lay in wait.

 

More than 1,200 planes

stood ready to deliver

seasoned airborne troops

behind enemy lines,

to silence

German ground resistance

as best they could,

and to dominate the skies

over the impending

battle theater.

 

Against a tense backdrop

of uncertain weather forecasts,

disagreements in strategy,

and related timing dilemmas

predicated on the need

for optimal tidal conditions,

Eisenhower

decided before dawn

on June 5 to proceed

with Overlord.

 

Later that same afternoon,

he scribbled a note

intended for release,

accepting responsibility

for the decision

to launch the invasion

and full blame should the effort

to create a beachhead

on the Normandy coast fail.

http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/d-day-memo/

 

 

https://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/d-day-memo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

D-Day, 70 years on:

 

'We watched an American destroyer

slowly demolished by shore batteries'

 

Seventy years ago,

the Observer vividly

covered the Normandy landings.

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/jun/01/d-day-70-years-on-observer-normany-landings

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/jun/01/
d-day-70-years-on-observer-normany-landings

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Remembering D-Day

 

Boston Globe        Pictures

 

66th anniversary

of the successful 1944

Allied invasion of France

 

 

http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2010/06/remembering_d-day_66_years_ago.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World War II        Black soldiers

 

almost four times

as many black soldiers

as whites

were executed in Europe

after military courts-martial,

even though blacks made up

less than 10 percent

of the troops

 

(...)

 

There were about

700,000 black soldiers

in the United States forces

in World War II

out of a total

of more than 10 million

men and women who served.

http://www.nytimes.com/1993/02/07/us/
when-black-soldiers-were-hanged-a-war-s-footnote.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/21/
books/rape-by-american-soldiers-in-world-war-ii-france.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1993/02/07/us/
when-black-soldiers-were-hanged-a-war-s-footnote.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Robert Capa        1913-1954

 

On 3 December 1938

Picture Post introduced

'The Greatest War Photographer

in the World: Robert Capa'

with a spread of 26 photographs

taken during the Spanish Civil War.

 

But the 'greatest war photographer'

hated war.

 

Born Andre Friedmann

to Jewish parents

in Budapest in 1913,

he studied

political science

at the Deutsche

Hochschule für Politik

in Berlin.

 

Driven out

of the country

by the threat

of a Nazi regime,

he settled

in Paris in 1933.

 

He was represented

by Alliance Photo

and met the journalist

and photographer

Gerda Taro.

 

Together,

they invented the 'famous'

American photographer

Robert Capa

and began

to sell his prints

under that name.

 

He met Pablo Picasso

and Ernest Hemingway,

and formed friendships

with fellow photographers

David 'Chim' Seymour

and Henri Cartier-Bresson.
 

 

From 1936 onwards,

Capa's coverage

of the Spanish Civil War

appeared regularly.

 

His picture

of a Loyalist soldier

who had just been

fatally wounded

earned him

his international reputation

and became

a powerful symbol of war.

 

After his companion,

Gerda Taro,

was killed in Spain,

Capa travelled to China in 1938

and emigrated to New York

a year later.

 

As a correspondent

in Europe,

he photographed

the Second World War,

covering the landing

of American troops

on Omaha beach on D-Day,

the liberation of Paris

and the Battle of the Bulge.

 

In 1947

Capa founded

Magnum Photos

with Henri Cartier-Bresson,

David Seymour,

George Rodger

and William Vandivert.

 

On 25 May 1954

he was photographing

for Life in Thai-Binh,

Indochina,

when he stepped

on a landmine

and was killed.

 

The French army

awarded him

the Croix de Guerre with Palm

post-humously.

 

The Robert Capa

Gold Medal Award

was established in 1955

to reward exceptional

professional merit.

http://www.magnumphotos.com/C.aspx?VP=XSpecific_MAG.Biography_VPage&AID=2K7O3R14TSPQ

 

 

http://www.magnumphotos.com/C.aspx?VP
=XSpecific_MAG.Biography_VPage&AID=2K7O3R14TSPQ

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/05/
us/world-war-2-history-research-archives-.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2018/oct/30/
nuns-guns-and-beatles-images-of-crossings-by-magnum-photographers

 

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2014/apr/03/
robert-capa-second-world-war-photography

http://blogs.mediapart.fr/blog/michel-puech/240514/
il-y-60-ans-mourait-le-photographe-robert-capa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Related > Anglonautes > History

 

20th century > 1939-1945 > World War II

 

 

 

 

 

Related > Anglonautes

 

advertisements > WW2 > USA

 

photos > wars > WW2

 

 

 

 

 

Related > Anglonautes > Vocapedia

 

genocide, war,

weapons, espionage, torture

 

 

 

 

 

Related

 

The Guardian > D-Day

https://www.theguardian.com/world/d-day 

 

 

The Guardian > D-day 70 years on: share your stories        2014

https://witness.theguardian.com/assignment/
53884eeae4b0bd8f35189225?INTCMP=mic_231930 

 

 

The Guardian > Series > D-day: 60 years on        2004

https://www.theguardian.com/world/series/d-day-60-years-on

 

 

Le Monde > « La Tondue de Chartres » :

une autre histoire derrière l’image

L’histoire de ce cliché

pris par Robert Capa le 16 août 1944

rappelle l’épuration sauvage

qui entache l’idéal de justice d’après-guerre.

https://www.lemonde.fr/culture/article/2019/03/24/
la-tondue-de-chartres-une-autre-histoire-derriere-l-image
_5440539_3246.html

 

 

 

 

 

Related > Anglonautes > Vocapedia

 

genocide, war,

weapons, espionage, torture