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History > 19th century > USA > End to slavery

 

Abraham Lincoln / "Honest Abe"    1809-1865

 

16th President of the United States    1861-1865

 

 

 

 

Abraham Lincoln,

16th president of The United States.

Source

http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3a53289

Date: 1863 Nov. 8

Author: Alexander Gardner (1821-1882)

Wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Abraham_Lincoln_head_on_shoulders_photo_portrait.jpg
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abraham_Lincoln

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assassination of Abraham Lincoln

 

Execution of the Conspirators        July 7, 1865

 

On July 7, 1865,

four people were hanged

in Washington, D.C.,

for conspiring

with John Wilkes Booth

to assassinate

President Abraham Lincoln.

http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2014/07/07/us/ap-history.html

 

 

 

 

Execution of the four persons condemned as conspirators

(Mary E. Surratt, Lewis T. Powell, David E. Herold, and George A. Atzerodt),

July 7,1865.

 

Photographed by Alexander Gardner.

111-BA-2034.

NARA > LINCOLN'S ASSASSINATION

http://www.archives.gov/research/civil-war/photos/images/civil-war-201.jpg
http://www.archives.gov/research/civil-war/photos/index.html#lincoln

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.eastman.org/ne/str115/htmlsrc/lincoln_idx00001.html

http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/alhtml/alrb/stbdsd/00408600/001.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Wilkes Booth        1838-1865

 

President Lincoln's killer

 

Contrary

to what many believe,

Booth was not a madman,

according to Alford.

 

In fact,

he was politically motivated

to assassinate Lincoln.

 

"John Wilkes Booth

was one of those people

who thought

the best country

in the history of the world

was the United States

as it existed

before the Civil War,"

Alford says.

 

"And then

when Lincoln came along,

he was changing

that in fundamental ways."

 

Those ideological differences

include

increasing the power

of the federal government

and emancipating the slaves,

both things Booth

was vehemently against.

 

He was angered

that the government instituted

an income tax and the military draft,

and that the government

occasionally suspended

habeas corpus,

a legal protection against

unlawful imprisonment.

 

All these things,

Alford says,

agitated Booth.

http://www.npr.org/2015/04/15/
399579416/historian-john-wilkes-booth-not-a-deranged-lone-madman

 

 

http://www.npr.org/2015/04/15/
399579416/historian-john-wilkes-booth-not-a-deranged-lone-madman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Our nation’s martyr:

The death of President Lincoln

in Washington on April 15, 1865.

 

Credit Lithograph From Currier & Ives, via Library of Congress

 


‘Mourning Lincoln’ and ‘Lincoln’s Body’

Sunday Book Review        NYT        By JILL LEPORE        FEB. 4, 2015

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/08/books/review/mourning-lincoln-and-lincolns-body.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On the evening

of April 14, 1865,

while attending

a special performance

of the comedy,

"Our American Cousin,"

President Abraham Lincoln

was shot.

 

Accompanying him

at Ford's Theater that night

were his wife,

Mary Todd Lincoln,

a twenty-eight year-old officer

named Major Henry R. Rathbone,

and Rathbone's fiancee,

Clara Harris.

 

After the play was in progress,

a figure with a drawn derringer pistol

stepped into the presidential box,

aimed, and fired.

 

The president slumped forward.

 

The assassin,

John Wilkes Booth,

dropped the pistol

and waved a dagger.

 

Rathbone lunged at him,

and though slashed in the arm,

forced the killer to the railing.

 

Booth

leapt from the balcony

and caught the spur of his left boot

on a flag draped over the rail,

and shattered a bone in his leg

on landing.

 

Though injured,

he rushed out the back door,

and disappeared into the night

on horseback.

 

A doctor in the audience

immediately went upstairs

to the box.

 

The bullet had entered

through Lincoln's left ear

and lodged

behind his right eye.

 

He was paralyzed

and barely breathing.

 

He was carried

across Tenth Street,

to a boarding-house

opposite the theater,

but the doctors'

best efforts failed.

 

Nine hours later,

at 7:22 AM on April 15th,

Lincoln died.

http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/alhtml/alrintr.html

 

 

http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/alhtml/alrintr.html

 

 

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2015/04/15/
399813809/documents-show-global-outpouring-of-grief-over-lincolns-assassination

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/04/14/what-lincoln-left-behind/

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/08/
books/review/mourning-lincoln-and-lincolns-body.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1865/04/17/
news/the-effect-of-president-lincoln-s-death-on-national-affairs.html

http://www.nytimes.com/1865/04/15/
news/president-lincoln-shot-assassin-deed-done-ford-s-theatre-last-night-act.html

http://timesmachine.nytimes.com/browser/1865/04/15/P1

http://www.nytimes.com/learning/general/onthisday/big/0414.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assassination of Abraham Lincoln:

 

Selected Images

from the Collections

of the Library of Congress

 

http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/list/599_linc.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Abraham Lincoln    1809-1865

 

16th President of the United States    1861-1865

 

 

 

Abraham Lincoln with his son Tad.

 

Alexander Gardner, via Library of Congress

 

Remains from Lincoln’s Last Day

The Opinion Pages | Contributing Op-Ed Writer        NYT        APRIL 10, 2015

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/10/opinion/remains-from-lincolns-last-day.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Abraham Lincoln and his second son Thomas (Tad),

photographed on 5 February 1865.

 

Photograph: Alexander Gardner

 

Early American photography – in pictures

G

Friday 2 March 2018

https://www.theguardian.com/culture/gallery/2018/mar/02/
early-american-photography-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.whitehouse.gov/history/presidents/al16.html

https://www.nytimes.com/topic/person/abraham-lincoln

http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2002713085/

http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/gadd/

http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/gadd/gainvi.html

http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/treasures/trt039.html

http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/gadd/

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/lincolns/filmmore/fr.html

http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/eyewitness/html.php?section=13

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/06/
books/review/six-encounters-with-lincoln-elizabeth-brown-pryor.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/20/
opinion/campaign-stops/the-man-the-founders-feared.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/04/
opinion/what-did-lincoln-really-think-of-jefferson.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/15/us/
politics/abraham-lincoln-the-one-president-all-of-them-want-to-be-more-like.html

http://www.npr.org/blogs/npr-history-dept/2015/04/14/
399495324/lincolns-private-side-friend-poet-jokester

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/04/14/
what-lincoln-left-behind/

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/04/13/
lincoln-on-stage/

http://www.bostonglobe.com/news/bigpicture/2015/04/10/
memories-abraham-lincoln/

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/10/
opinion/remains-from-lincolns-last-day.html

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/04/07/
lincolns-triumphant-visit-to-richmond/

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/30/
arts/design/yales-beinecke-library-buys-vast-collection-of-lincoln-photos.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/20/
arts/design/lincoln-and-the-jews-explores-bonds-with-a-nations-growing-minority.html

 

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/11/07/
how-lincoln-won-the-soldier-vote/

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2014/02/17/
277059262/what-honest-abes-appetite-tells-us-about-his-life

 

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/12/04/the-interminable-everlasting-lincolns-part-3/

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/12/03/the-interminable-everlasting-lincolns-part-2/

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/12/01/the-interminable-everlasting-lincolns-prologue/

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/08/01/a-mothers-letter-to-lincoln/

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/17/books/review/lincolns-tragic-pragmatism-by-john-burt.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/01/opinion/the-emancipation-of-abe-lincoln.html

 

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/12/04/lincoln-colonization-and-the-sound-of-silence/

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/11/29/steven-spielberg-historian/

http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2010/11/24/opinion/20101125_LincolnBeard.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/23/us/lecompton-kansas-promotes-role-in-lincolns-rise.html

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/07/20/lincoln-in-july/

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/04/us/richard-n-current-civil-war-historian-dies-at-100.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2011/03/04/opinion/20110304_Lincoln_Inauguration.html

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/03/03/lincoln-addresses-the-nation/

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/02/15/bayonets-in-buffalo/

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2011/02/10/opinion/20110211_Lincoln_Train.html

 

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/11/24/lincoln-a-beard-is-born/

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/11/23/the-sound-of-lincolns-silence/

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/11/22/lincoln-speaks/

http://www.npr.org/2010/10/11/
130489804/lincolns-evolving-thoughts-on-slavery-and-freedom

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/09/arts/design/09lincoln.html

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/11/12/lincolns-mailbag/

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/11/10/how-and-where-lincoln-won/

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/11/07/lincoln-wins-now-what/

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/11/05/hearing-the-returns-with-mr-lincoln/

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/11/05/a-lincoln-photograph-and-a-mystery/

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/10/30/will-lincoln-prevail/

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/19/opinion/19gates.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/02/14/arts/design/14linc.html

 

http://documents.nytimes.com/walt-whitman-and-abraham-lincoln

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Slavery is abolished        AMENDMENT XIII        1865

 

Passed by Congress January 31, 1865.

Ratified December 6, 1865.



Section 1.

Neither slavery

nor involuntary servitude,

except as a punishment for crime

whereof the party shall have been duly convicted,

shall exist within the United States,

or any place subject to their jurisdiction.

 

Section 2.

Congress shall have power to enforce

this article by appropriate legislation.

http://www.archives.gov/national_archives_experience/charters/constitution_amendments_11-27.html

 

 

http://www.archives.gov/national_archives_experience/
charters/constitution_amendments_11-27.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Civil War        Gettysburg address        November 19, 1863

 

At the end

of the Battle of Gettysburg,

more than 51,000

Confederate and Union soldiers

were wounded, missing, or dead.

 

Many of those who died were laid

in makeshift graves along the battlefield.

Pennsylvania Governor Andrew Curtin

commissioned David Wills, an attorney,

to purchase land for a proper burial site

for the deceased Union soldiers.

Wills acquired 17 acres for the cemetery,

which was planned and designed

by landscape architect William Saunders.

 

The cemetery was dedicated

on November 19, 1863.

 

The main speaker

for the event

was Edward Everett,

one of the nation’s

foremost orators.

 

President Lincoln

was also invited to speak

“as Chief Executive of the nation,

formally [to] set apart these grounds

to their sacred use

by a few appropriate remarks.”

 

At the ceremony,

Everett spoke

for more than 2 hours;

Lincoln spoke

for 2 minutes.

 

President Lincoln

had given his brief speech

a lot of thought.

 

He saw meaning in the fact

that the Union victory at Gettysburg

coincided with the nation’s birthday;

 

but rather than focus

on the specific battle in his remarks,

he wanted to present a broad statement

about the larger significance of the war.

 

He invoked

the Declaration of Independence,

and its principles of liberty and equality,

and he spoke of “a new birth of freedom”

for the nation.

 

In his brief address,

he continued to reshape the aims

of the war for the American people

—transforming it from a war for Union

to a war for Union and freedom.

 

Although Lincoln

expressed disappointment

in the speech initially,

it has come to be regarded as one

of the most elegant

and eloquent speeches

in U.S. history.

http://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?flash=true&doc=36

 

 

http://myloc.gov/exhibitions/gettysburgaddress/pages/default.aspx

http://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?flash=true&doc=36

http://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?doc=36&page=transcript

 

 

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/11/17/lincolns-sound-bite-have-faith-in-democracy/

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/18/opinion/lincoln-at-gettysburg-long-ago.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Abraham Lincoln

 

The Emancipation Proclamation        January 1, 1863

 

 

The Emancipation Proclamation,

which Abraham Lincoln

signed on Jan. 1, 1863,

was primarily

a military tool.

 

When he issued it

in preliminary form

in September 1862,

it was meant to be

a warning to the South:

give up,

or your slaves

will be set free.

 

And, once in place,

emancipation did just

what Lincoln wanted

— it drew untold

thousands of freed slaves

to the advancing Union armies,

depleting

the Southern work force

and providing the North

with much-needed

cheap labor.

 

But it also created

an immense

humanitarian crisis

in which hundreds

of thousands

of former slaves

died from disease,

malnutrition

and poverty.

 

Emancipation did,

of course,

free the slaves

in the Confederacy.

 

But Lincoln

can no longer

be portrayed

as the hero

in this story.

 

Despite his efforts

to end slavery,

his emancipation policies

failed to consider

the human cost

of liberation.

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/01/05/dying-for-freedom/

 

 

http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/alhtml/almintr.html

http://www.yale.edu/lawweb/avalon/emancipa.htm

http://www.archives.gov/exhibit_hall/
featured_documents/emancipation_proclamation/index.html

 

 

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/12/20/images-of-emancipation/

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/01/05/dying-for-freedom/

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/01/opinion/how-many-slaves-work-for-you.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/01/opinion/the-emancipation-of-abe-lincoln.html

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/12/31/
abraham-lincoln-and-the-emancipation-proclamation/

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/09/27/emancipation-in-indiana/

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/09/21/lincolns-great-gamble/

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/09/21/freedom-and-restraint/

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/09/19/emancipations-price/

http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/09/05/
lincolns-draft-of-emancipation-proclamation-coming-to-schomburg-center-in-harlem/

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/08/16/lincolns-panama-plan/

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/07/23/lincolns-plan-emerges/

http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/06/27/
copy-of-emancipation-proclamation-sells-for-nearly-2-1-million/

 

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/07/20/lincoln-in-july/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Abraham Lincoln        End to slavery        September 23, 1862

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/1862/oct/06/mainsection.fromthearchive

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/1862/oct/05/usa.fromthearchive

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

April 16, 1862

 

President Abraham Lincoln

signs a bill ending slavery

in the District of Columbia

 

http://www.archives.gov/exhibit_hall/featured_documents/dc_emancipation_act/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1860

 

Abraham Lincoln is elected to the presidency

 

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/slavery/timeline/1860.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In 1838,

as a 28-year-old state legislator,

Abraham Lincoln

delivered an address

at the Young Men’s

Lyceum of Springfield, Ill.

 

The speech was given

in the aftermath

of the lynching

of a mixed-race boatman

and the killing

of an abolitionist

newspaper editor.

 

Lincoln warned

that a “mobocratic spirit”

and “wild and furious passions”

posed a threat

to republican institutions.

 

He also alerted people

to the danger of individuals

— “an Alexander,

a Caesar or a Napoleon?” —

who, in their search

for glory and power,

might pose a threat

to American

self-government.

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/20/opinion/campaign-stops/the-man-the-founders-feared.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/20/
opinion/campaign-stops/the-man-the-founders-feared.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Related > Anglonautes > History / Historical documents

 

17th, 18th, 19th, 20th century

America, USA > Slavery, Racism, Civil war, Abraham Lincoln

 

 

20th century > 1920s-1970s > Civil rights era

 

 

18th, 19th century > USA

 

 

19th century > USA > Emancipation Proclamation - 1863

 

 

United Kingdom > Slavery

 

 

 

 

 

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slavery, eugenics,

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