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History > 20th century > USA > Civil rights era > Segregationists    1940s-1960s

 

 

 

Gov. Alabama, George C. Wallace,

conducting racist political campaign.

 

Location: Cambridge, MD, US

Date taken: May 1964

 

Photographer: Stan Wayman

Life Images

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edgar Ray Killen > 'Mississippi Burning' trial        2005

 

guilty of manslaughter

in the deaths

of three young and idealistic

civil rights workers

 

(...)

 

the disappearance

of the three men,

Andrew Goodman, 20,

Michael Schwerner, 24,

and James Earl Chaney, 21,

on June 21, 1964,

drew the national news media

and hundreds of searchers

to Neshoba County,

while Mississippi officials

said publicly

that the disappearance

was a hoax

intended to draw attention.

 

When the three bodies

- two white, one black -

were found under

15 feet of earth

on a nearby farm,

the nation's horror

helped galvanize

the civil rights movement.

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/06/22/national/22civil.html

 

 

http://www.cnn.com/2005/LAW/06/13/miss.killings/index.html

http://www.usatoday.com/news/opinion/editorials/2005-06-23-
opinionline_x.htm

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/06/22/
national/22civil.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Governor George C. Wallace        1919-1998

 

 

 

George Wallace at a 1970 rally for governor in Arab, Ala.

 

Credit D. Gorton

 

Photographing the White South in the Turbulence of the 1960s

Doy Gorton, a son of the Mississippi Delta

who joined the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee,

returned to Mississippi to embark on a project

photographing his fellow white Southerners.

 

NYT        Sept. 13, 2018

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/13/
lens/photographing-the-white-south-in-the-turbulence-of-the-1960s.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 George C. Wallace,

addressing a campaign rally in 1968.

 

Credit Howard Sochurek/The LIFE Images Collection, Getty Images

 

What Donald Trump Owes George Wallace

By DAN T. CARTER        NYT        JAN. 8, 2016

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/10/opinion/campaign-stops/what-donald-trump-owes-george-wallace.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After pledging,

‘‘Segregation now!

Segregation tomorrow!

Segregation forever!’’

in his 1963 inaugural address,

Alabama Governor George Wallace

gained national notoriety

by standing at the entrance

to the University of Alabama

to denounce the enrollment

of two African American students.

 

Martin Luther King

described Wallace

as ‘‘perhaps the most dangerous

racist in America today’’

(King, ‘‘Interview’’).

 

In a 1965 interview King said:

‘‘I am not sure that he believes

all the poison that he preaches,’’

King said in 1965,

‘‘but he is artful enough

to convince others that he does’’

(King, ‘‘Interview’’).

 

Wallace was born

on 25 August 1919,

in Clio, Alabama.

 

The son of a farmer,

he worked his way

through the University of Alabama,

earning his law degree in 1942.

 

After a brief time in the Air Force,

Wallace returned to Alabama

to work as the state’s

assistant attorney general.

 

He was elected

to the state legislature in 1947,

and served as a district judge

from 1953 to 1959.

 

In his early political career

he maintained

a moderate stance on integration;

but after losing his first

gubernatorial campaign

to a candidate who was endorsed

by the Ku Klux Klan,

Wallace became an outspoken

defender of segregation.

 

In 1962

Wallace won the governorship

on a segregationist platform,

receiving the largest vote

of any gubernatorial candidate

in Alabama’s history until that time.

http://mlk-kpp01.stanford.edu/kingweb/about_king/encyclopedia/wallace_george.htm

 

 

http://mlk-kpp01.stanford.edu/kingweb/about_king/encyclopedia/wallace_george.htm

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/13/
lens/photographing-the-white-south-in-the-turbulence-of-the-1960s.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/10/
opinion/campaign-stops/what-donald-trump-owes-george-wallace.html

 

http://www.npr.org/2013/06/11/
190387908/a-daughters-struggle-to-overcome-a-legacy-of-segregation

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/10/us/
nicholas-katzenbach-1960s-political-shaper-dies-at-90.html

 

http://www.theguardian.com/news/2005/oct/18/
guardianobituaries.usa

 

http://www.npr.org/2003/06/11/1294680/
wallace-in-the-schoolhouse-door

http://www.cnn.com/US/9809/14/
wallace.obit/

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/politics/daily/sept98/
wallace.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1966

 

Ernest Avants

and two fellow Ku Klux Klansman

abduct and kill Ben Chester White,

a black farmhand,

in the hope

that the heinousness of the crime

would lure

the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

to Natchez, Miss.

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/21/us/
21kornblum.html

http://abcnews.go.com/2020/story?id=2826063&page=4

http://www.nytimes.com/2004/06/17/us/
ernest-avants-72-plotter-against-dr-king.html

http://abcnews.go.com/2020/story?id=2826063&page=4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Selma-to-Montgomery Voting Rights March

 

George C. Wallace        1965

 

http://www.alabamamoments.state.al.us/sec59.html

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/wallace/peopleevents/pande05.html

http://www.archives.state.al.us/govs_list/g_wallac.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June 1964

 

 

Michael Schwerner,

James Chaney

and Andrew Goodman,

three civil-rights campaigners

beaten and shot dead

by Ku Klux Klan members

in Philadelphia, Mississippi

 

 

http://www.npr.org/blogs/codeswitch/2014/06/19/
323343703/still-learning-from-pearl-harbor-of-the-civil-rights-movement

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/16/us/
cartha-d-deloach-no-3-in-fbi-is-dead-at-92.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/05/22/us/
22mayor.html

 

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2007/apr/11/usa.
suzannegoldenberg1 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1998/03/18/us/mississippi-
reveals-dark-secrets-of-a-racist-time.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Ku Klux Klan's May 2, 1964,

abduction and slayings

of Henry Hezekiah Dee

and Charles Eddie Moore

 

 

Klansman James Seale

 

 

http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2007-01-24
-miss-deputy-arrest_x.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll"

is a topical song written by

the American musician Bob Dylan.

 

Recorded

on October 23, 1963,

the song was released

on Dylan's 1964 album

'The Times They Are a-Changin'

and gives a generally factual account

of the killing of 51-year-old

barmaid Hattie Carroll

by the wealthy young tobacco farmer

from Charles County, Maryland,

William Devereux "Billy" Zantzinger

(whom the song calls

"William Zanzinger"),

and his subsequent sentence

to six months in a county jail.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lonesome_Death_of_Hattie_Carroll

 

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lonesome_Death_of_Hattie_Carroll

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alabama Governor George C. Wallace        1963

 

 

 

Gov. Alabama, George C. Wallace,

conducting racist political campaign.

 

Location: Cambridge, MD, US

Date taken: May 1964

 

Photographer: Stan Wayman

Life Images

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/wallace/

http://www.columbia.edu/itc/history/brinkley/3651/
photos/sixties/wallace_george.htm

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/news/2005/oct/18/
guardianobituaries.usa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

George C. Wallace (L)

by Richard Avedon (R)

Avedon obituary        The Guardian        2.10.2004

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Birmingham church bombing        George C. Wallace       1963

 

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/media/clarion/kc_birmingham.html

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2004/nov/30/usa.schoolsworldwide

 

http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2003-09-14-bombings-pain_x.htm

 

http://archives.cnn.com/2000/LAW/05/17/bomb.timeline/

http://www.cnn.com/2000/LAW/05/17/bomb.02/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

White segregationist demonstrators protesting

in Little Rock, Arkansas, in 1959.

 

Photograph:

Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images

 

The secret history of Trumpism        G        16 August 2016

https://www.theguardian.com/news/2016/aug/16/secret-history-trumpism-donald-trump

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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