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History > 20th century > Cold War > USA > Vietnam war (1962-1975) > Timeline in pictures

 

 

 

Vietnam

Wounded Marine Gunnery Sgt. Jeremiah Purdie (C)

being led past stricken comrade

after fierce firefight for control of Hill 484

during the Vietnam war

 

Location: Vietnam

Date taken: 1966

 

Photographer: Larry Burrows    1926-1971

Life Images

http://images.google.com/hosted/life/l?imgurl=81efd1973e1b843b

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vietnam war        1962-1975

 

http://www.pbs.org/battlefieldvietnam/timeline/index.html

http://www.pbs.org/battlefieldvietnam/timeline/

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/1026782.stm

http://www.nytimes.com/newsletters/vietnam-67

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/11/15/
opinion/at-the-bloody-dawn-of-the-vietnam-war.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/12/us/
william-conrad-gibbons-dogged-writer-who-chronicled-vietnam-war-dies-at-88.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

L'intervention

américaine au Vietnam

a suivi la guerre

d'Indochine française

pour empêcher

l'emprise communiste

sur la péninsule.

 

Après Dien Bien Phu (1953)

et surtout à partir de 1963,

les Américains

menèrent une guerre

de plus en plus impopulaire

jusqu'à leur retrait en 1973.

 

La chute de Saigon (1975)

marqua leur départ définitif.

 

(...)

 

2,5 millions de morts

en une dizaine d'années

au Vietnam,

dont 58 000 Américains

jusqu'au retrait du contingent

en 1973.

Source : A Savoir, Libération, 12.2.2004

http://www.liberation.com/page.php?Article=178242

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/topic/subject/vietnam-war  

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/07/
opinion/the-30-years-war-in-vietnam.html

http://www.pbs.org/battlefieldvietnam/index.html

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/vietnam/trenches/mylai.html

http://memory.loc.gov/frd/cs/vntoc.html

https://www.archives.gov/research/catalog

 

 

https://www.npr.org/2019/02/20/
693790065/buffalo-springfield-for-what-its-worth-american-anthem

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2019/feb/03/
don-mccullin-giles-duley-photography-retrospective-tate-interview

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/27/
obituaries/charles-kettles-dies-at-89.html

 

 

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/20/
books/review/max-hastings-vietnam.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/06/
world/asia/vietnam-war-nuclear-weapons.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/28/
sunday-review/war-stories-weve-been-missing-for-50-years.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/16/
opinion/the-truth-behind-my-lai.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/15/
opinion/horst-faas-photography-vietnam-war.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/23/
opinion/how-south-vietnam-defeated-itself.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/13/
opinion/vietnam-antiwar-officers.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/09/
opinion/vietnam-war-tunnel-rat.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/02/
opinion/hue-prepared-for-a-holiday-then-the-war-came.html

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/02/02/
582370040/a-former-refugee-reflects-on-the-vietnam-war-and-starting-over-in-the-u-s

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/01/
world/asia/vietnam-execution-photo.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/12/
opinion/when-american-soldiers-met-vietnamese-cuisine.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/11/
opinion/three-journeys-to-khe-sanh.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/05/
opinion/soldiers-in-la-guerra.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/04/
opinion/beatles-of-vietnam.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/01/
opinion/was-america-duped-at-khe-sanh.html

 

 

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/29/
opinion/behind-the-phoenix-program.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/28/
opinion/chuck-hagel-vietnam-brother.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/23/
opinion/vietnam-tet-offensive.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/26/
opinion/bombing-the-ho-chi-minh-trail.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/21/
opinion/graduate-vietnam-movie.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/19/
opinion/vietcong-generals-atrocities.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/15/
opinion/the-kindergarten-marines.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/12/
opinion/bicycling-ho-chi-minh-trail.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/12/
opinion/america-cambodia-bomb.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/17/
opinion/women-journalists-vietnam.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/07/
opinion/thailand-vietnam-war.html

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/10/20/
opinion/sunday/march-on-the-pentagon-oral-history.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/06/
opinion/vietnam-draft.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/29/
opinion/ken-burns-vietnam-lessons.html

https://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2017/09/27/
in-her-own-words-photographing-the-vietnam-war/

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/26/
opinion/vietnam-tiger-force-atrocities.html

https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2017/sep/26/
the-vietnam-war-review-a-complex-story-made-immediately-comprehensible

https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2017/sep/25/
the-vietnam-war-terror-heartbreak-and-helicopters-ablaze-in-an-epic-documentary

http://www.npr.org/2017/09/21/
552575164/in-vietnam-war-ken-burns-wrestles-with-the-conflict-s-contradictions

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/20/
opinion/vietnam-children-reel-.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/15/
opinion/south-vietnam-had-an-antiwar-movement-too.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/15/
opinion/agent-orange-vietnam-effects.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/01/
arts/television/shot-by-shot-building-a-scene-
in-ken-burns-and-lynn-novicks-vietnam-epic.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/01/
arts/television/ken-burns-and-lynn-novick-tackle-the-vietnam-war.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/22/
opinion/vietnam-was-unwinnable.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/18/
opinion/whose-war-was-it.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/15/
opinion/vietnam-san-francisco-1967-summer.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/08/
opinion/south-vietnam-airborne.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/01/
opinion/vietnam-war-girls-women.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/28/
opinion/the-day-nixon-began-his-comeback.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/21/
opinion/what-it-was-like-to-be-drafted.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/18/
opinion/racism-vietnam-war.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/04/
books/review/hue-1968-vietnam-mark-bowden.html

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/jul/01/
ken-burns-america-foreign-policy

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/30/
opinion/second-world-war-vietnam.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/16/
opinion/a-lost-chance-for-peace-in-vietnam.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/13/
opinion/the-greatest-music-festival-in-history.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/09/
opinion/a-war-of-their-own.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/06/
opinion/vietnam-war-women-soldiers.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/02/
opinion/a-conscientious-objector-in-a-war-zone.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/30/
opinion/lyndon-johnson-vietnam-war.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/26/
opinion/sunday/david-and-goliath-in-vietnam.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/23/
opinion/vietnam-war-widows.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/19/
opinion/was-vietnam-winnable.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/09/
opinion/johnson-westmoreland-and-the-selling-of-vietnam.html

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/03/28/
opinion/vietnam-leroy-photoessay.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/15/
opinion/what-i-saw-in-vietnam.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/07/
opinion/americas-case-of-tonkin-gulfitis.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/24/
opinion/lyndon-johnsons-vietnam.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/21/
opinion/bernard-fall-the-man-who-knew-the-war.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/07/
opinion/sunday/vietnam-the-war-that-killed-trust.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/31/
opinion/sunday/nixons-vietnam-treachery.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/11/15/
opinion/at-the-bloody-dawn-of-the-vietnam-war.html

http://www.npr.org/blogs/parallels/2015/05/02/
403597845/in-danang-where-u-s-troops-first-landed-memories-of-war-have-faded

http://www.npr.org/blogs/itsallpolitics/2015/05/01/
403507851/how-vietnam-put-picking-presidents-in-the-hands-of-the-people

http://www.npr.org/2015/05/01/
403093395/how-the-fall-of-saigon-turned-san-diego-into-a-home-for-refugees

http://www.npr.org/blogs/parallels/2015/05/01/
402572349/ask-the-vietnamese-about-war-and-they-think-china-not-the-u-s

http://www.npr.org/blogs/parallels/2015/04/30/
403082804/the-frightened-vietnamese-kid-who-became-a-u-s-army-general

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/30/
opinion/whose-vietnam-war.html

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/apr/30/vietnam-
war-first-person-stories

http://www.npr.org/2015/04/30/
403034599/vietnam-veterans-memorial-founder-monument-almost-never-got-built

http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2015/04/29/
lessons-40-years-after-the-fall-of-saigon

http://www.npr.org/2015/04/29/
402642421/40-years-after-the-vietnam-war-families-still-search-for-answers

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/28/
opinion/out-of-vietnam-adoptee-grateful-to-be-an-american.html

http://www.npr.org/2015/04/25/
402045128/international-guard-how-the-vietnam-war-changed-guard-service

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/27/arts/television/
vietnam-is-focus-of-tv-programs-during-fall-of-saigon-anniversary.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/26/
opinion/sunday/our-vietnam-war-never-ended.html

http://www.theguardian.com/news/2015/apr/22/
vietnam-40-years-on-how-communist-victory-gave-way-to-capitalist-corruption

http://www.theguardian.com/world/gallery/2015/feb/27/
finding-vietnams-war-children-in-pictures

http://www.theguardian.com/news/2015/apr/21/
40-years-on-from-fall-of-saigon-witnessing-end-of-vietnam-war

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/apr/14/
vietnam-40-years-war-your-stories-photographs-and-memories

http://www.theguardian.com/world/gallery/2015/feb/01/
laos-suffers-lethal-legacy-of-vietnam-war

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2015/jan/20/
jane-fonda-hanoi-jane-photo-was-a-huge-mistake

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/05/
movies/last-days-in-vietnam-looks-at-fall-of-saigon.html

 

http://www.theguardian.com/media/gallery/2013/oct/02/vietnam-war-ap-photographs

 

http://www.usatoday.com/news/washington/2006-11-17-lbj-tapes_x.htm

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2005/apr/28/usa.features11 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/1973/jan/15/usa.fromthearchive

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/1969/oct/16/usa.fromthearchive

 

https://www.theguardian.com/theguardian/1968/feb/02/fromthearchive

 

https://www.theguardian.com/century/year/0,6050,128377,00.html

http://www.time.com/time/archive/collections/0,21428,c_vietnam_war,00.shtml

http://www.theguardian.com/news/1971/mar/09/mainsection.martinwoollacott

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(...) the Vietnam War

is remembered

by different people

in very different ways.

 

Most Americans

remember it

as a war fought

between

1965 and 1975

that bogged down

their military

in a struggle

to prevent

the Communists

from marching

into Southeast Asia,

deeply dividing

Americans

as it did.

 

The French

remember their loss there

as a decade-long conflict,

fought from 1945 to 1954,

when they tried to hold on

to the Asian pearl

of their colonial empire

until losing it in a place

called Dien Bien Phu.

 

The Vietnamese,

in contrast, see the war

as a national liberation struggle,

or as a civil conflict,

depending on which side

they were on,

ending in victory in 1975

or one side

and tragedy for the other.

 

For the Vietnamese,

it was above all

a 30-year conflict

transforming

direct and indirect

forms of fighting

into a brutal conflagration,

one that would end up

claiming

over three million

Vietnamese lives.

 

The point is not

that one perspective

is better

or more accurate

than the other.

 

What’s important,

rather,

is to understand

how the colonial war,

the civil war

and the Cold War

intertwined to produce

such a deadly conflagration

by 1967.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/07/opinion/the-30-years-war-in-vietnam.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/07/
opinion/the-30-years-war-in-vietnam.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vietnam War Ended 40 Years Ago But Lives On For MIA Families        NYT        23 April 2015

 

 

 

 

Vietnam War Ended 40 Years Ago But Lives On For MIA Families        NYT        23 April 2015

 

The Vietnam War ended 40 years ago this month,

but for the families of 1,600 U.S. service members

who remain missing in action, it lives on.

 

KPBS reporter Susan Murphy talked to one MIA family

in San Diego about their search for closure.

 

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wShCJNT1z2E#t=82

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DICK CAVETT'S VIETNAM: The First "Television War"        PBS        24 April 2015

 

 

 

 

DICK CAVETT'S VIETNAM: The First "Television War" | PBS        24 April 2015

 

This April,

to commemorate the 40th anniversary

of the fall of Saigon (April 30, 1975)

and the end of America’s presence in Vietnam,

Dick Cavett’s Vietnam examines

the conflict and its impact on America

through the prism of interviews

conducted by the iconic host of “The Dick Cavett Show.”

 

Dick Cavett’s Vietnam,

airing nationally Monday, April 27, 2015

from 10-11 p.m. ET on PBS (check local listings),

is part of a special block of programming

related to the Vietnam War.

 

“While I started out to do an entertaining talk show,

you couldn’t keep Vietnam out of the conversation,”

says Dick Cavett in a new interview in the documentary.

 

Joining Cavett are a mix of actor/entertainers

(Woody Allen, Warren Beatty, Jane Fonda, Groucho Marx and Paul Newman),

politicians (Senators Barry Goldwater, Wayne Morse, Edmund Muskie,

and Vice President Hubert Humphrey), sports figures (Muhammad Ali) and more.

 

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wwEdaeWUyas 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Secretary of State Henry Alfred Kissinger

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bui Tin        1927-2018

 

(...) North Vietnamese colonel

who had a prominent role

in the Vietnam War’s

final moments

but later fled the country

and became an unlikely critic

of its ruling Communist Party

 

(...)

 

Colonel Tin personally

accepted the surrender

of South Vietnam in 1975.

 

He was also present

at the battle of Dien Bien Phu

in 1954,

when Vietnamese

revolutionaries

defeated French troops

to secure their country’s

independence.

 

Though Colonel Tin

was a high-ranking

army officer

and a onetime disciple

of Ho Chi Minh,

the founding president,

he went into exile

in France in 1990.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/13/
obituaries/bui-tin-vietnam-dead.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/13/
obituaries/bui-tin-vietnam-dead.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Melvin Robert Laird Jr.        1922-2016

 

(...) as President

Richard M. Nixon’s

first secretary of defense

(Melvin laird)

quietly challenged

the administration’s

hawkish military policies

during the war in Vietnam,

prompting deep suspicion

— and even spying —

between the White House

and the Pentagon

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/17/us/melvin-laird-died.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/17/us/
melvin-laird-died.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Roger Hilsman Jr.        1919-2014

 

foreign policy adviser

in the Kennedy administration

who helped draft a cable

giving tacit American support

to a coup against

President Ngo Dinh Diem

of South Vietnam

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/11/us/
politics/roger-hilsman-adviser-to-kennedy-on-vietnam-dies-at-94.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/11/
us/politics/roger-hilsman-adviser-to-kennedy-on-vietnam-dies-at-94.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vo Nguyen Giap    1911 (some sources say 1912) - 2013

 

relentless and charismatic

North Vietnamese general

whose campaigns drove

both France

and the United States

out of Vietnam

 

(...)

 

General Giap

was among

the last survivors

of a generation

of Communist

revolutionaries

who in the decades

after World War II

freed Vietnam

of colonial rule

and fought

a superpower

to a stalemate.

 

(...)

 

To his American

adversaries,

however,

from the early 1960s

to the mid-1970s,

he was perhaps

second only

to his mentor,

Ho Chi Minh,

as the face of a tenacious,

implacable enemy.

 

And to historians,

his willingness

to sustain

staggering losses

against superior

American firepower

was a large reason the war

dragged on

as long as it did,

costing more than

2.5 million lives

— 58,000 of them American —

sapping the United States Treasury

and Washington’s

political will to fight,

and bitterly

dividing the country

in an argument

about America’s

role in the world

that still echoes today.

 

(...)

 

About 94,000 French troops

died in the war

to keep Vietnam,

and the struggle

for independence killed,

by conservative estimates,

about 300,000

Vietnamese fighters.

 

In the American war,

about 2.5 million North

and South Vietnamese died

out of a total population

of 32 million.

 

America lost

about 58,000 service members.

www.nytimes.com/2013/10/05/world/asia/gen-vo-nguyen-giap-dies.html

 

 

www.nytimes.com/2013/10/05/
world/asia/gen-vo-nguyen-giap-dies.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

William Wallace Momyer Jr.        1916-2012

 

celebrated

World War II fighter pilot

who helped plot

postwar tactics

for the Air Force

and commanded

aerial combat

and bombing operations

during the early years

of the Vietnam War

 

(...)

 

During the Tet offensive

in 1968,

when North Vietnamese forces

attacked South Vietnam’s

cities and military bases,

General Momyer’s

high-flying

B-52 Stratofortresses

pounded enemy troops

at Khe Sanh

with 100,000 tons

of explosives.

 

The operation,

dubbed Niagara,

inflicted heavy losses

on the North Vietnamese,

who eventually

broke off the attack.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/03/us/
gen-william-w-momyer-celebrated-pilot-dies-at-95.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/03/us/
gen-william-w-momyer-celebrated-pilot-dies-at-95.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nicholas deBelleville Katzenbach        1922-2012

 

Nicholas deB. Katzenbach (...)

helped shape

the political history

of the 1960s,

facing down

segregationists,

riding herd on historic

civil rights legislation

and helping to map

Vietnam War strategy

as a central player

in both the Kennedy

and Johnson

administrations

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/10/us/nicholas-katzenbach-1960s-political-shaper-dies-at-90.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/10/us/
nicholas-katzenbach-1960s-political-shaper-dies-at-90.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stanley Burnet Resor        1917-2012

 

as secretary of the Army

from 1965 to 1971,

Stanley Burnet Resor oversaw

the troop buildup in Vietnam,

investigated

the massacre of civilians

by American soldiers at My Lai

and laid the groundwork

for the all-volunteer Army

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/20/us/
stanley-r-resor-vietnam-war-army-chief-dies-at-94.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/20/us/
stanley-r-resor-vietnam-war-army-chief-dies-at-94.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Franklin Baker Jr.        1945-2011

 

John F. Baker Jr.

received the Medal of Honor

for saving eight fellow soldiers

during the Vietnam War

while under heavy fire

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/31/us/john-f-baker-jr-who-saved-8-gis-in-1966-dies-at-66.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/31/us/
john-f-baker-jr-who-saved-8-gis-in-1966-dies-at-66.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara    1916-2009

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vietnam's President Thieu resigns > Fall of Saigon - April 1975

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

23 January 1973

 

Nixon announces Vietnam peace deal

 

 

The US president,

Richard Nixon,

appears

on national television

to announce

"peace with honour"

in Vietnam.

 

Statements

issued simultaneously

in Washington and Hanoi

confirmed the peace deal

was signed in Paris

at 1230 local time,

bringing to an end

America's

longest war.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/onthisday/hi/dates/stories/january/23/newsid_2506000/2506549.stm

 

 

http://news.bbc.co.uk/onthisday/hi/dates/stories/january/23/
newsid_2506000/2506549.stm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

15 January 1973

 

Nixon orders ceasefire in Vietnam

 

 

President Nixon

orders a halt

to American bombing

in North Vietnam

following peace talks

in Paris.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/onthisday/hi/dates/stories/january/15/newsid_2530000/2530549.stm

 

 

http://news.bbc.co.uk/onthisday/hi/dates/stories/january/15/
newsid_2530000/2530549.stm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black and white soldiers > Segregation

 

 

 

Black soldiers at Camp McDermott

stand by a barbed-wire fence intended to segregate their living quarters

from those of white soldiers.

 

Oct. 10, 1970.

 

Credit

Brent Procter/Overseas Weekly Collection/Hoover Institution Library and Archives

 

Forgotten Images of the Vietnam War

Made for the Americans Who Fought In It

NYT

Aug. 30, 2018

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/30/
lens/forgotten-images-vietnam-war.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Agent Orange

 

 

 

Planes spraying Agent Orange 20 miles southeast of Saigon in 1970.

 

Credit Dick Swanson/The LIFE Images Collection, via Getty Images

 

The Forgotten Victims of Agent Orange

Viet Thanh Nguyen and Richard Hughes

SEPT. 15, 2017        NYT        VIETNAM '67

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/15/opinion/agent-orange-vietnam-effects.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/15/
opinion/agent-orange-vietnam-effects.html

 

 

 

 

Agent Orange

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Xuan Loc, about 100 kilometers north of Saigon.

South Vietnam. April 13, 1970.

 

Hiroji Kubota/Magnum Photos

 

Hiroji Kubota, Photographer        By Misha Erwitt        NYT        Nov. 18, 2015

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/11/18/hiroji-kubota-photographer/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Tuàn (on the right) had gone to get medicine and food

from American soldiers when this image was taken.

 

Shortly afterwards,

he and his family were forced to flee.

 

They were fired at by the North Vietnamese Army,

and his mother was badly injured.

 

Photograph: Bob Shirley

 

Finding Vietnam's war children – in pictures

In 1969, at the height of the Vietnam war,

US medic Bob Shirley photographed

a group of local children.

 

Nearly 50 years later

photographer Reed Young caught up with them,

and found out what happened next

 

Reed Young and Bob Shirley

G

Friday 27 February 2015        16.30 GMT

http://www.theguardian.com/world/gallery/2015/feb/27/finding-vietnams-war-children-in-pictures 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Battle for Hamburger Hill        May 1969

 

 

 

A US paratrooper,

wounded in the battle for Hamburger Hill,

grimaces in pain as he awaits medical evacuation

at base camp near the Laotian border on 19 May 1969

 

Photograph: Hugh Van Es/AP

 

Vietnam: The Real War – in pictures

G

Wednesday 22 April 2015        11.13 BST

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2015/apr/22/vietnam-
the-real-war-a-photographic-history-by-the-associated-press-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vietnam: Draw Down - Hamburger Hill        PBS        Aired: 05/26/2010

 

 

 

 

Vietnam: Draw Down - Hamburger Hill        Aired: 05/26/2010        06:49        Rating: TV-G

 

May, 1969 The Battle of Hamburger Hill,

fought in the thick jungle

of the mountainous A Shau Valley in South Vietnam,

was an attempt to seize a heavily fortified enemy base camp.

Ultimately the hill was seized, but the battle waged on many days,

with many wounded and killed.

 

Veterans recall the haunting memories of the fight. (Part 2/7)

 

PBS

http://video.pbs.org/video/1500485810/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Battle of Hamburger Hill,

fought in the thick jungle

of the mountainous

A Shau Valley

in South Vietnam,

was an attempt to seize

a heavily fortified enemy

base camp.

 

Ultimately

the hill was seized,

but the battle waged on

many days,

with many wounded

and killed.

http://video.pbs.org/video/1500485810/

 

 

http://video.pbs.org/video/1500485810/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

General William C. Westmoreland    1914-2005

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

South Vietnamese soldier

crouched next to badly bleeding woman

while awaiting medical aid

during an attack by the Viet Cong.

 

Location: Saigon, Vietnam

Date taken: 1968

 

Photographer: Larry Burrows

Life Images

http://images.google.com/hosted/life/l?imgurl=f5c1bcd70abe8526

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A US paratrooper guides a medevac helicopter down

to pick up soldiers injured during a five-day patrol

in Vietnam in April 1968.

 

Photograph: AP/Art Greenspon

 

Vietnam 40 years on:

how a communist victory gave way to capitalist corruption

G

Wednesday 22 April 2015        06.00 BST

http://www.theguardian.com/news/2015/apr/22/
vietnam-40-years-on-how-communist-victory-gave-way-to-capitalist-corruption

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A refugee faces questioning by a U.S. Marine.

March 1968.

 

Credit

Brent Procter/Overseas Weekly Collection/Hoover Institution Library and Archives

 

Forgotten Images of the Vietnam War

Made for the Americans Who Fought In It

NYT

Aug. 30, 2018

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/30/
lens/forgotten-images-vietnam-war.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(...) on Feb. 25, 1969, (...),

as a young lieutenant

in the Navy SEALs,

(Bob Kerrey) led his squad

into the Vietnamese village

of Thanh Phong.

 

By the time they withdrew,

20 civilians

had been slaughtered,

including 13 children,

according to survivors.

 

(...)

 

Kerrey

was awarded a Bronze Star

after his unit falsely reported

that it had killed

21 Vietcong guerrillas.

 

For more than 30 years

he kept silent

until The New York Times

and CBS News

were about to publish

a joint investigation in 2001.

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/08/
opinion/senator-bob-kerreys-vietnam-dilemma.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/20/
opinion/bob-kerrey-and-the-american-tragedy-of-vietnam.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/08/
opinion/senator-bob-kerreys-vietnam-dilemma.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mi Lai massacre        March 16, 1968

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tet offensive - Jan. 31, 1968 - Feb. 25, 1968

 

 

 

An American soldier awaiting transportation

away from the front line

in Hue, Vietnam, in February 1968.

 

CreditDon McCullin/courtesy of Glitterati Editions

 

Beyond the Myth of the War Photographer

In “Shooting War,”

the psychiatrist Anthony Feinstein

explores the complexity

of photographers’ day-to-day work

covering conflict and human depravity.

NYT

Dec. 18, 2018

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/18/
lens/shooting-war-photograper.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Saigon

 

Viet Cong dead

after an attack on the perimeter of Tan Son Nhut Air Base.

Source: Vietnam Center and Archive

1 Feb. 1968

Description: ASVG-S-1031-65/AGA68 RVN

 

Photo by:$

SP5 Edgar Price Pictorial A.V. Plt. 69th Sig. Bn. (A)

Wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Deadvietcong2.jpg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vietnam_War

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Phoenix Program

 

In late December 1967,

the government

of South Vietnam

announced

a reorganization

of its war effort

against the country’s

Communist insurgency.

 

 

Effective immediately,

all South Vietnamese

counterinsurgency activities

became part of a new program

known as Phuong Hoang,

a reference to a magical bird

associated

with royalty and power

in Vietnamese and Chinese

cultural traditions.

 

In response

to the South Vietnamese move,

American officials in Vietnam

began referring to their own

counterinsurgency

coordination efforts

by the name that they deemed

the closest Western analogue

to the mythical creature:

Phoenix.

 

The Phoenix program

would become

one of the most

controversial aspects

of America’s war

in Vietnam.

 

Sponsored by the C.I.A.,

Phoenix used

paramilitary teams

to target undercover

Communist operatives

in villages

throughout South Vietnam.

 

Witnesses claimed

that members

of the program’s teams

and their American advisers

routinely carried out torture,

murders and assassinations,

accusations

that American officials

denied.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/29/
opinion/behind-the-phoenix-program.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/29/
opinion/behind-the-phoenix-program.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Records show

that members of Tiger Force

shot or stabbed

at least 81 civilians

in violation of military law.

 

But based

on The Blade’s interviews

with former soldiers

and Vietnamese civilians,

the platoon is believed

to have killed

hundreds of unarmed villagers

in the Central Highlands

between May and November

of 1967.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/26/
opinion/vietnam-tiger-force-atrocities.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/26/
opinion/vietnam-tiger-force-atrocities.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

November 1967        Battles of Dak To

 

 

 

Paratroopers from the 173rd Airborne Brigade

filing past bodies of fellow soldiers killed in the Battle of Dak To.

 

Credit Al Chang/Associated Press

 

The Secret History of a Vietnam War Airstrike Gone Terribly Wrong

NYT

Jan. 31, 2019

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/31/
magazine/vietnam-war-airstrike-dak-to.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In some of the heaviest fighting

seen in the Central Highlands area,

heavy casualties

are sustained by both sides

in bloody battles around Dak To,

about 280 miles north of Saigon

near the Cambodian border.

https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/battle-of-dak-to-begins

 

 

https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/battle-of-dak-to-begins

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/31/
magazine/vietnam-war-airstrike-dak-to.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1967        Summer

 

rapid escalation

of (US) involvement in Vietnam

 

 

(in the summer)

there were some

500,000 American troops

in the country

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/13/
opinion/the-greatest-music-festival-in-history.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/13/
opinion/the-greatest-music-festival-in-history.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On June 19, 1967,

American forces

engaged in a bloody fight

for the Can Giuoc District

of Long An Province,

leaving 38 Americans

and 250 Vietcong dead,

and hundreds more

wounded.

 

By mid-June of 1967,

40,000 men were receiving

their draft notices

every month

to serve in a war

that had already cost

billions of dollars

and 15,000 American lives.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/13/
opinion/the-greatest-music-festival-in-history.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/13/
opinion/the-greatest-music-festival-in-history.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June and July, 1967

 

Tiger Force’s killing

of women and children

 

 

http://www.toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/section?Category=SRTIGERFORCE

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2003/12/28/
national/28TIGE.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

'Pennsylvania'

 

secret talks

between Washington and Hanoi (...)

began in June 1967

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/16/
opinion/a-lost-chance-for-peace-in-vietnam.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/16/
opinion/a-lost-chance-for-peace-in-vietnam.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

May 1967

 

Maj. Charles S. Kettles,

an Army helicopter

commander

in the Vietnam War

led an extraordinary

rescue operation

that saved

the lives of dozens

of airborne troops

who had been ambushed

by North Vietnamese soldiers

in May 1967.

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/27/
obituaries/charles-kettles-dies-at-89.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/27/
obituaries/charles-kettles-dies-at-89.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operation Prairie IV        April 20, 1967-May 17, 1967

 

 

 

A Marine held a wounded comrade while under fire

during Operation Prairie in 1967.

 

Dotation Catherine Leroy, via Contact Press Images

 

In Her Own Words, Photographing the Vietnam War

Sep. 27, 2017        NYT        By Elizabeth Herman

https://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2017/09/27/in-her-own-words-photographing-the-vietnam-war/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

operation conducted

by the United States Marine Corps

in the area around

Con Thien, South Vietnam

known as Leatherneck Square

 

 

https://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2017/09/27/
in-her-own-words-photographing-the-vietnam-war/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operation Junction City        February - March - April 1967

 

 

 

American soldiers of 2nd Batt, 503rd Airborne Inf., 173rd Airborne Div.

gear up for a long range patrol during Operation Junction City.

 

Location: Vietnam

Date taken: March 1967

 

Photographer: Co Rentmeester

Life Images

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In one of the largest

air-mobile assaults ever,

240 helicopters

sweep over Tay Ninh province,

beginning Operation Junction City.

 

The goal of Junction City

is to destroy Vietcong bases

and the Vietcong military

headquarters for South Vietnam,

all of which are located

in War Zone C,

north of Saigon.

 

Some 30,000 U.S. troops

take part in the mission,

joined by 5,000 men

of the South Vietnamese Army.

 

After 72 days,

Junction City ends.

 

American forces

succeed in capturing

large quantities of stores,

equipment and weapons,

but there are no large,

decisive battles.

http://www.pbs.org/battlefieldvietnam/timeline/index2.html

 

 

http://www.pbs.org/battlefieldvietnam/timeline/index2.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

January 1967

 

the First and 25th

Infantry Divisions

of the United States Army

began Operation Cedar Falls,

their all-out offensive against

the Communist strongholds

of the “Iron Triangle”

northwest of Saigon

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/17/opinion/as-the-earth-shook-they-stood-firm.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/17/
opinion/as-the-earth-shook-they-stood-firm.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1967

 

Historians,

veterans and journalists

recall 1967 in Vietnam,

a year that changed the war

and changed America.

 

 

 

 

Paul Szep

[Vietnam Specters],

India ink with scraping out on scratchboard, 1967.

Published in The Boston Globe, 1967

 

Caroline and Erwin Swann Collection of Caricature and Cartoon

Library of Congress

Prints and Photographs Division

http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/swann/craws/images/05883r.jpg

http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/swann/craws/craws-exhibit.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/column/vietnam-67

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/07/
opinion/the-first-televised-war.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/04/
opinion/when-martin-luther-king-came-out-against-vietnam.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/31/
opinion/in-the-air-over-vietnam.html

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/03/28/
opinion/vietnam-leroy-photoessay.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/21/
opinion/a-frontline-nurse-for-the-vietcong.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/17/
opinion/the-long-history-of-the-vietnam-novel.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/15/
opinion/what-i-saw-in-vietnam.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/10/
opinion/pacification-through-the-barrel-of-a-gun.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/07/
opinion/americas-case-of-tonkin-gulfitis.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/03/
opinion/the-feud-that-sank-saigon.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1966

 

Inside a Hanoi Prison

 

 

http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/eyewitness/html.php?section=8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

July 1966

 

Operation Hastings

 

 The mission was to block

North Vietnamese troops

from infiltrating

the demilitarized zone

between the Communist-led North

and the American-backed South.

 

After three days

of fighting and severe casualties,

American commanders

ordered a withdrawal.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/23/us/john-j-mcginty-iii-war-hero-dies-at-73.html

 

 

http://www.pbs.org/battlefieldvietnam/timeline/index1.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Hastings

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/23/us/
john-j-mcginty-iii-war-hero-dies-at-73.html

 

http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2010/05/vietnam_35_years_later.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vietnam

Marines recovering dead comrade

while under fire during N. Vietnamese/US mil. conflict over DMZ,

w. photog. Catherine LeRoy w. cameras in rear: S. Vietnam.

 

Location: Vietnam

Date taken: 1966

 

Photographer: Larry Burrows

Life Images

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

American Marines

aid a wounded comrade

during intense battle for Hill 484

as part of Operation Prairie

being conducted near the DMZ

during the Vietnam War.

 

Location: Vietnam

Date taken: October 1966

 

Photographer: Larry Burrows

Life Images

http://images.google.com/hosted/life/l?imgurl=581dfff283dda8f6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

January 1966

 

US assault on a Vietcong stronghold at Bao Trai

 

 

 

Women and children crouch in a muddy canal

as they take cover from intense Vietcong fire

on 1 January 1966.

 

Paratroopers

of the 173rd Airborne Brigade (background)

escorted the civilians through a series of firefights

during the US assault

on a Vietcong stronghold at Bao Trai,

about 20 miles west of Saigon

 

Photograph: Horst Faas/AP

 

Vietnam: The Real War – in pictures

G

Wednesday 22 April 2015        11.13 BST

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2015/apr/22/vietnam-
the-real-war-a-photographic-history-by-the-associated-press-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Route Nine Defensive-Vietnam

 

No date

 

Photographer: Larry Burrows

Life Images

http://images.google.com/hosted/life/l?imgurl=5e841ff2ad0749b6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

November 1965

 

Battle of Ia Drang

 

 

The Battle of Ia Drang

was the first major battle

between the United States Army

and the North Vietnamese Army-NVA

(People's Army of Vietnam-PAVN),

part of the Pleiku Campaign

conducted early

in the Vietnam War.

 

It comprised

two main engagements.

 

The first involved

the 1st Battalion,

7th Cavalry Regiment

and supporting units,

and took place

November 14–16, 1965

at LZ X-Ray,

located at the eastern foot

of the Chu Pong massif

in the central highlands

of Vietnam.

 

The second engagement

involved the 2nd Battalion,

7th Cavalry Regiment

plus supporting units,

and took place

on November 17 at LZ Albany,

farther north

in the Ia Drang Valley.

 

It is notable for being the first

large scale helicopter air assault

and also the first use

of B-52 strategic bombers

in a tactical support role.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Ia_Drang

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A wounded American soldier returning to the X-ray landing zone

in the Ia Drang Valley, South Vietnam, November 15, 1965.

 

Neil Sheehan/The New York Times

 

At the Bloody Dawn of the Vietnam War

NYT        NOV. 13, 2015

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/11/15/opinion/at-the-bloody-dawn-of-the-vietnam-war.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A wounded American soldier in Vietnam in 1965.

 

Peter Arnett/Associated Press

 

Will the Vietnam War Ever Go Away?

NYT

APRIL 24, 2015

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/25/opinion/will-the-vietnam-war-ever-go-away.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Battle of An Ninh        September 1965

 

 

 

Bodies of US paratroopers lie near a command post

during the battle of An Ninh, 18 September 1965.

 

The paratroopers,

of the 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division,

were hit by heavy fire from guerrillas

that began as soon as the first elements of the unit

landed.

 

The dead and wounded

were later evacuated to An Khe,

where the 101st was based.

 

The battle was one of the first of the war

between major units of US forces and the Vietcong

 

Photograph: Henri Huet/AP

 

Vietnam: The Real War – in pictures

G

Wednesday 22 April 2015    11.13 BST

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2015/apr/22/
vietnam-the-real-war-a-photographic-history-by-the-associated-press-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

March 2, 1965

 

Operation "Rolling Thunder" Begins

 

 

Johnson approves

Rolling Thunder in February,

believing that a program

of limited bombing

in North Vietnam

will deter support

for Vietcong.

 

Rolling Thunder

continues for three years

and eight months,

involving 305,380 raids

and 634,000 tons

of bombs.

 

Results include:

 

818 pilots killed

and hundreds more captured;

 

182,000 civilians killed

in North Vietnam.

http://www.pbs.org/opb/thesixties/timeline/timeline_text.html

 

 

http://www.pbs.org/opb/thesixties/timeline/timeline_text.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The first American

combat troops

to arrive in Vietnam

landed in the coastal city

of Danang (...).

 

The 2,000 Marines

had the job of protecting

the nearby U.S. air base.

 

It took the members

of the 9th Marine

Expeditionary Brigade

almost an entire day

to bring their men and materiel

ashore that day in March 1965.

 

(...)

 

The number

of U.S. servicemen in country

eventually would reach

more than half a million.

 

But 10 years

after that beach landing (...)

North Vietnamese tanks

rolled into Saigon,

bringing an end

to the Vietnam War,

which the Vietnamese call

the "American War."

 

More than

57,000 Americans

died fighting that war;

 

Vietnamese losses

on both side

were far greater

 — by some estimates,

as many as 2 million.

 

Danang,

where the combat troops

first landed,

saw more than

its fair share of death.

http://www.npr.org/blogs/parallels/2015/05/02/
403597845/in-danang-where-u-s-troops-first-landed-memories-of-war-have-faded

 

 

http://www.npr.org/blogs/parallels/2015/05/02/
403597845/in-danang-where-u-s-troops-first-landed-memories-of-war-have-faded

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

insurgency against

the South Vietnamese

government

and their American allies.

 

Viet Cong's

underground tunnel network

in South Vietnam.

 

 

The vast tunnel network

became a key base and shelter

for Viet Cong guerrillas

and North Vietnamese units

during the war

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04kxnbt

 

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04kxnbt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Terrified Vietnamese mother running w. her injured child

during a fight between US and Viet Cong forces near Cape Batangan.

 

Location: Cape Batangan, Vietnam

Date taken: November 1965

 

Photographer: Paul Schutzer

Life Images

http://images.google.com/hosted/life/l?imgurl=fa01dda4bba0d9c5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Civilians huddling after an attack by South Vietnamese forces

in Dong Xoai in 1965.

 

Credit Horst Faas/Associated Press, via PBS

 

Ken Burns and Lynn Novick Tackle the Vietnam War

SEPT. 1, 2017        NYT        By JENNIFER SCHUESSLER

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/01/
arts/television/ken-burns-and-lynn-novick-tackle-the-vietnam-war.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A South Vietnamese stretcher-bearer

wears a face mask to protect himself from the smell

as he passes the bodies of US and South Vietnamese soldiers killed

fighting the Vietcong in the Michelin rubber plantation,

27 November 1965.

 

More than 100 bodies were recovered

after the Vietcong overran South Vietnam’s

7th Regiment, 5th Division,

killing most of the regiment and several US advisers.

 

The plantation,

situated midway between Saigon and the Cambodian border,

was the scene of frequent fighting throughout the war

 

Photograph: Horst Faas/AP

 

Vietnam: The Real War – in pictures

G

Wednesday 22 April 2015        11.13 BST

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2015/apr/22/vietnam-
the-real-war-a-photographic-history-by-the-associated-press-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Vietnamese litter bearer wears a face mask to keep out the smell

as he passes the bodies of U.S. and Vietnamese soldiers

killed in fighting against the Viet Cong

at the Michelin rubber plantation,

about 45 miles northeast of Saigon, Nov. 27, 1965.

 

More than 100 bodies were recovered

after a human wave assault by guerrillas.

 

AP Photo/Horst Faas

 

Boston Globe > Big Picture

Vietnam, 35 years later        7 May 2010

http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2010/05/vietnam_35_years_later.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

US army helicopters

provide covering fire for South Vietnamese troops

as they attack a Vietcong camp

near the Vietnam-Cambodia border in March 1965.

 

Photograph: AP/Horst Faas

 

 Vietnam 40 years on:

how a communist victory gave way to capitalist corruption

 

After the military victory,

Vietnam’s socialist model began to collapse.

 

Cut off by US-led trade embargos and denied reconstruction aid,

it plunged into poverty.

 

Now its economy is booming – but so is inequality and corruption

 G

Wednesday 22 April 2015        06.00 BST

http://www.theguardian.com/news/2015/apr/22/vietnam-
40-years-on-how-communist-victory-gave-way-to-capitalist-corruption

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Vietnam.... A Marine from 1st Battalion, 3rd Marines,

moves a Viet Cong suspect to the rear

during a search and clear operation

held by the battalion 15 miles west of Da Nang Air Base

 

08/03/1965

 

Source NARA

 

Author US Marine Corps /PFC G. Durbin

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Vietcongsuspect.jpg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vietnam_War

Primary source > NARA

ARC Identifier 532431 / Local Identifier 127-N-A185020

http://arcweb.archives.gov/arc/action/ExternalIdSearch?id=532431

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Route Nine Defensive-Vietnam

 

No date

 

Photographer: Larry Burrows

Life Images

http://images.google.com/hosted/life/l?imgurl=59c02024df1238d3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Route Nine Defensive-Vietnam

 

No date

 

Photographer: Larry Burrows

Life Images

http://images.google.com/hosted/life/l?imgurl=ee50902cba2bb314

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Route Nine Defensive-Vietnam

 

no date

 

Photographer: Larry Burrows

Life Images

http://images.google.com/hosted/life/l?imgurl=b4c44ce6393ac2e2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After a while, senseless brutality

became little more than a mere spectator sport.

 

We found this young woman--in her  early 20s at most--

lying on the road as we swept it for mines. 

 

It was the first thing in the morning, barely after sunup,

but a group of South Vietnamese soldiers

and a few civilians had already gathered around. 

 

She had been shot at point blank range

sometime during the night. 

 

It was alleged

that she was a Viet Cong sympathizer

and had been stripped of her clothing

as a further embarrassment to her family. 

 

Someone else had covered her over in plastic

but as we arrived,

the soldiers had removed part of it

and were having a good laugh. 

 

It was hard to believe someone

as young and innocent looking as she could be the enemy

but we soon learned that we could never be sure who to trust.

 

Steven Curtis. The Vietnam I remember > The enemy. 

 

added 26.9.2004.

http://www.stevencurtis.com/vietnam/Stories/enemy.htm

http://www.stevencurtis.com/vietnam/author.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

August 5, 1964

 

Gulf of Tonkin Resolution

 

 

Gulf of Tonkin Resolution,

also called

Tonkin Gulf Resolution,

resolution put

before the U.S. Congress

by President Lyndon Johnson

on Aug. 5, 1964,

assertedly in reaction

to two allegedly

unprovoked attacks

by North Vietnamese

torpedo boats

on the destroyers

Maddox and C. Turner Joy

of the U.S. Seventh Fleet

in the Gulf of Tonkin

on August 2 and August 4,

respectively.

 

Its stated purpose

was to approve and support

the determination of the president,

as commander in chief,

in taking all necessary measures

to repel any armed attack

against the forces

of the United States

and to prevent

further aggression.

 

It also declared

that the maintenance

of international

peace and security

in Southeast Asia was vital

to American interests

and to world peace.

 

Both houses of Congress

passed the resolution

on August 7,

the House of Representatives

by 414 votes to nil,

and the Senate

by a vote of 88 to 2.

 

The resolution served

as the principal

constitutional authorization

for the subsequent

vast escalation

of the United States’

military involvement

in the Vietnam War.

 

Several years later,

as the American public

became increasingly

disillusioned

with the Vietnam War,

many congressmen

came to see the resolution

as giving the president

a blanket power to wage war,

and the resolution

was repealed in 1970.

 

In 1995 Vo Nguyen Giap,

who had been

North Vietnam’s

military commander

during the Vietnam War,

acknowledged the August 2

attack on the Maddox

but denied that the Vietnamese

had launched another attack

on August 4,

as the Johnson administration

had claimed at the time.

http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/249172/Gulf-of-Tonkin-Resolution

 

 

http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/249172/Gulf-of-Tonkin-Resolution

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

November 1, 1963

 

With Washington's tacit approval (...)

(President) (Ngo Dinh) Diem (1901-1963)

and his brother were captured

and later killed

 

 

Diem's brother,

Ngo Dinh Nhu (1910-1963),

had raided the Buddhist

pagodas of South Vietnam,

claiming that they had

harbored the Communists

that were creating

the political instability.

 

The result

was massive protests

on the streets of Saigon

that led Buddhist monks

to self-immolation.

 

The pictures

of the monks engulfed in flames

made world headlines and caused

considerable consternation

in Washington.

 

By late September,

the Buddhist protest had created

such dislocation in the south

that the Kennedy administration

supported a coup.

 

In 1963,

some of Diem's

own generals

in the Army

of the Republic of Vietnam (ARVN)

approached

the American Embassy in Saigon

with plans to overthrow Diem.

 

With Washington's

tacit approval,

on November 1, 1963,

Diem and his brother

were captured

and later killed.

 

Three weeks later,

President Kennedy

was assassinated

on the streets of Dallas.

http://www.pbs.org/battlefieldvietnam/history/

 

 

http://www.pbs.org/battlefieldvietnam/history/

https://www.jfklibrary.org/JFK/JFK-in-History/
Vietnam-Diem-and-the-Buddhist-Crisis.aspx 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/11/us/
politics/roger-hilsman-adviser-to-kennedy-on-vietnam-dies-at-94.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Buddhist protests

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

War In S. Vietnam

Servicemen lined up respectfully

near coffins and military air transport

during services for American dead

at Tan Son Nhut Airfield.

 

Location: Vietnam

Date taken: 1962

 

Photographer: Larry Burrows

Life Images

http://www.gstatic.com/hostedimg/8bd91f6ec83011cb_large

http://images.google.com/hosted/life/8bd91f6ec83011cb.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Agent orange > Operation Ranchhand begins - Early 1962

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anglonautes > History

 

USA > 20th century > Vietnam War (1962-1975)

 

 

 

 

 

Anglonautes > Arts > Photography

 

war photography

 

 

 

 

 

Related > Anglonautes > Vocapedia

 

genocide, war,

weapons, espionage, torture

 

 

conflicts, wars > civilians > migrants, refugees

 

 

boxing

Cassius Marcellus Clay Jr. / Muhammad Ali    1942-2016

 

 

 

 

 

Related

 

New York Times > General Vang Pao    1929-2011

 

a charismatic Laotian general

who commanded

a secret army of his mountain people

in a long, losing campaign

against Communist insurgents,

then achieved almost kinglike status

as their leader-in-exile in the United States

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/08/world/asia/
08vangpao.html