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History > 20th century > Cold War > USA > Vietnam war (1962-1975) > Tet offensive    Jan. 31, 1968 - Feb. 25, 1968

 

 

 

A woman mourns over the body of her husband

after identifying him by his teeth and covering his head

with her conical hat.

 

The man’s body was found with 47 others

in a mass grave near Hue on 11 April 1969.

 

The victims were believed to be killed

during the insurgent occupation of Hue

as part of the Tet offensive

 

Photograph: Horst Faas/AP

 

Vietnam: The Real War – in pictures

G

Wednesday 22 April 2015        11.13 BST

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2015/apr/22/
vietnam-the-real-war-a-photographic-history-by-the-associated-press-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mass Graves In Hue, Vietnam

 

Grieving widow crying

over plastic bag containing remains of husband

recently found in mass grave

- killed in Feb. 1968 Vietnam war Tet offensive.

 

Location: Hue, Vietnam

Date taken: April 1969

 

Photographer: Larry Burrows

Life Images

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eddie Adams        USA        1933-2004

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gen Nguyen Ngoc Loan, South Vietnamese chief of the national police,

fires his pistol into the head of suspected Vietcong official Nguyen Van Lem

on a Saigon street early on in the Tet offensive, on 1 February 1968.

 

Photographer Eddie Adams reported that after the shooting,

Loan approached him and said:

“They killed many of my people, and yours too,”

then walked away.

 

This photograph received the 1969 Pulitzer prize

for spot news photography

 

Photograph: Eddie Adams/AP

 

Vietnam: The Real War – in pictures        Wednesday 22 April 2015        11.13 BST        G

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2015/apr/22/
vietnam-the-real-war-a-photographic-history-by-the-associated-press-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(1 of 3) South Vietnamese forces escort

suspected Viet Cong officer Nguyen Van Lem (also known as Bay Lop)

on a Saigon street Feb. 1, 1968, early in the Tet Offensive.

 

(2 of 3) South Vietnamese General Nguyen Ngoc Loan,

chief of the national police,

fires his pistol into the head

of suspected Viet Cong officer Nguyen Van Lem

on a Saigon street, on Feb. 1, 1968.

 

(3 of 3) South Vietnamese General Nguyen Ngoc Loan holsters his gun

after executing suspected Viet Cong officer Nguyen Van Lem

whose body lies on a Saigon street Feb. 1, 1968,

early in the Tet Offensive.

 

AP Photos/Eddie Adams

 

Boston Globe > Big Picture

Vietnam, 35 years later        7 May 2010

http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2010/05/vietnam_35_years_later.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

US soldiers tormenting a civilian in the old city of Hue

during the offensive, Tet, Hue (1968)

 

He began photographing war,

once saying he ‘used to chase wars

like a drunk chasing a can of lager’.

 

His photos of American soldiers in Vietnam

remain his most famous

 

Don McCullin: 'photography isn't looking, it's feeling' – in pictures

G

Tuesday 17 May 2016        08.09 BST

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2016/may/17/
don-mccullin-greatest-photos-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tet offensive        Jan. 30/31, 1968 - Feb. 25, 1968

 

 

When the Tet offensive

ignited South Vietnam on Jan. 30, 1968,

American forces were taken by surprise.

 

Every one of the country’s 44 provinces

was hit in a stunning, coordinated attack

that changed the course of the war.

 

With so many American

resources in Vietnam

focused on intelligence-gathering,

why was the United States

so clueless?

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/23/
opinion/vietnam-tet-offensive.html

 

 

 

At 3 o'clock

in the morning of Jan. 31, 1968,

North Vietnamese and Vietcong forces

launched a wave of simultaneous attacks

on South Vietnamese and American forces

in major cities, towns and military bases

throughout South Vietnam.

 

The fighting, the heaviest

and most sustained of the Vietnam War,

coincided with the Lunar New Year, or Tet,

and it has been called the Tet offensive

ever since.

 

It was a military turning point in the war,

but it was far more than that

in its painful demonstration

of the limits of American power in Asia

and in the psychological impact

it was to have on Americans at home.

http://www.nytimes.com/1988/01/31/world/tet-offensive-turning-point-in-vietnam-war.html

 

 

 

On Jan. 30, 1968,

during a cease-fire in honor

of the Vietnamese New Year

(called Tet Nguyen Dan),

more than 80,000

North Vietnamese

and Vietcong troops

hit military bases and cities

throughout South Vietnam

in what would be called

the Tet offensive.

 

For the Communists,

things went wrong

from the start.

 

Some Vietcong units

attacked prematurely,

without the backing

of regular troops as planned.

 

Suicide squads,

like one that penetrated

the United States Embassy

in Saigon,

were quickly wiped out.

 

Despite some successes

— the North Vietnamese

entered the city of Hue

and held it for three weeks —

the offensive

was a military disaster.

 

The hoped-for uprisings

never took place,

and some 40,000

Communist fighters

were killed or wounded.

 

The Vietcong

never regained the strength

it had before Tet.

 

But the fierceness of the assault

illustrated Hanoi’s

determination to win

and shook the American public

and leadership.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/05/world/asia/gen-vo-nguyen-giap-dies.html

 

 

 

The offensive may have failed

to spark a popular uprising

across South Vietnam,

as North Vietnam’s Communist

leadership had hoped,

but it did constitute a huge,

well-executed surprise attack

that laid bare the claims

of the American military commander,

Gen. William Westmoreland,

that nearly a half-million

United States troops

and the South Vietnamese Army

had the upper hand

and that victory

was only a matter of time.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/04/
books/review/hue-1968-vietnam-mark-bowden.html

 

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/03/11/
592301682/the-night-in-1968-when-a-nation-watched-an-american-presidency-crumble

 

https://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=4HVEm2PvXoc - NPR - 9 March 2018

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/02/02/
582370040/a-former-refugee-reflects-on-the-vietnam-war-and-starting-over-in-the-u-s

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/01/29/
580811124/military-victory-but-political-defeat-the-tet-offensive-50-years-later

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/23/
opinion/vietnam-tet-offensive.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/04/
books/review/hue-1968-vietnam-mark-bowden.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/16/
opinion/a-lost-chance-for-peace-in-vietnam.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/05/world/asia/
gen-vo-nguyen-giap-dies.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/03/us/
gen-william-w-momyer-celebrated-pilot-dies-at-95.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1988/01/31/
world/tet-offensive-turning-point-in-vietnam-war.html

 

http://news.bbc.co.uk/onthisday/hi/dates/stories/january/31/newsid_2648000/2648951.stm

 

http://www.nytimes.com/books/97/01/26/reviews/970126.26wickert.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1983/11/08/arts/tv-the-tet-offensive-in-vietnam.html

 

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/716609.stm

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=1036550

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=18551391

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=106775685

http://ww.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=18045569

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Battle of Hue

 

The significance of Hue

— a gruesome, 24-day battle —

is summed up by Bowden

as the moment

when many Americans

stopped believing

their government’s

rhetoric about the war.

 

Indeed,

one month after the battle,

President Lyndon B. Johnson

announced that he would not

run for re-election,

and Westmoreland

was dumped

shortly thereafter.

 

Sadly, it took another

agonizing seven years

and tens of thousands

more casualties for America

to extract itself from Vietnam.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/04/
books/review/hue-1968-vietnam-mark-bowden.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/04/
books/review/hue-1968-vietnam-mark-bowden.html

https://www.npr.org/2017/06/12/
532242775/hue-1968-revisits-an-american-turning-point-in-the-war-in-vietnam

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

William Wallace Momyer Jr.        1916-2012

 

celebrated

World War II fighter pilot

who helped plot postwar

tactics for the Air Force

and commanded aerial combat

and bombing operations

during the early years

of the Vietnam War

 

(...)

 

During the Tet offensive in 1968,

when North Vietnamese forces

attacked South Vietnam’s cities

and military bases,

General Momyer’s

high-flying B-52 Stratofortresses

pounded enemy troops at Khe Sanh

with 100,000 tons of explosives.

 

The operation dubbed Niagara,

inflicted heavy losses

on the North Vietnamese,

who eventually broke off the attack.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/03/us/gen-william-w-momyer-celebrated-pilot-dies-at-95.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/03/us/
gen-william-w-momyer-celebrated-pilot-dies-at-95.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anglonautes > History

 

USA > 20th century > Vietnam War (1962-1975)

 

 

 

 

 

Anglonautes > Arts > Photography

 

war photography

 

 

 

 

 

Related > Anglonautes > Vocapedia

 

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boxing

Cassius Marcellus Clay Jr. / Muhammad Ali    1942-2016

 

 

 

 

 

Related

 

New York Times > General Vang Pao    1929-2011

a charismatic Laotian general

who commanded a secret army of his mountain people

in a long, losing campaign against Communist insurgents,

then achieved almost kinglike status as their leader-in-exile

in the United States

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/08/world/asia/08vangpao.html