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History > 17th-20th century > English America, America, USA

 

Slavery > Rebellions, Abolitionists > Timeline in pictures

 

 

Ida B Wells        1862-1931

 

 

 

Ida B Wells        (1862–1931)

 

She was born into slavery in Mississippi

but freed during the American civil war.

 

As a pioneering journalist and editor,

she worked tirelessly to expose racial injustice.

 

She spent months travelling alone

around the American south

to investigate the horrors of lynching,

and campaigned against segregation.

 

In 1910,

she co-founded the National Association

for the Advancement of Colored People.

 

Eminent Victorians:

19th-century celebrity portraits – in pictures

 

As a new picture of Billy the Kid

goes on sale for $1m,

these photographs showcase

some of the most significant

people of the 19th century

to be captured on camera

G

Thu 21 Nov 2019    16.32 GMT

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2019/nov/21/
eminent-victorians-19th-century-celebrity-portraits-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

African-American

investigative

journalist,

educator,

and an early leader

in the civil rights

movement.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ida_B._Wells

 

 

 

She was born

into slavery

in Mississippi

but freed during

the American civil war.

 

As a pioneering

journalist and editor,

she worked tirelessly

to expose

racial injustice.

 

She spent months

travelling alone

around

the American south

to investigate

the horrors of lynching,

and campaigned

against segregation.

 

In 1910,

she co-founded

the National Association

for the Advancement

of Colored People.

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2019/nov/21/
eminent-victorians-19th-century-celebrity-portraits-in-pictures

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2019/nov/21/
eminent-victorians-19th-century-celebrity-portraits-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Harriet Tubman (born Araminta Ross)        1822-1913

 

 

 

Under a proposed redesign of the $20 bill,

Harriet Tubman would have replaced

Andrew Jackson.

 

Credit

Universal History Archive/Getty Images

 

Harriet Tubman $20 Bill Is Delayed Until Trump Leaves Office,

Mnuchin Says

NYT

May 22, 2019

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/22/
us/harriet-tubman-bill.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.npr.org/2019/11/01/
775148791/the-superhero-journey-of-harriet-tubman-now-on-film

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/22/
us/harriet-tubman-bill.html

 

https://www.npr.org/2019/05/22/
725801691/harriet-tubman-on-the-20-bill-not-during-the-trump-administration

 

 

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2016/may/03/
slave-rescuer-harriet-tubman-to-be-subject-of-hollywood-biopic

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2016/04/27/
475768129/nurse-spy-cook-how-harriet-tubman-found-freedom-through-food

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/apr/24/
harriet-tubman-20-bill-myths-freed-slaves-quotes

 

https://one.npr.org/?sharedMediaId=475161438:475161441 - April 21, 2016

 

 

 

 

https://www.npr.org/2013/03/06/
173624827/harriet-tubman-was-tough-and-tender

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Frederick Douglass    1818-1895

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wendell Phillips        1811-1884

 

one of the nation’s

most prominent

antislavery leaders

 

 

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/11/06/
the-abolitionists-epiphany/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sojourner Truth (Born Isabella Baumfree)        c 1797-1883

 

 

 

Born Isabella Baumfree in New York state,

the African American lived in slavery

until she escaped with her daughter in 1826.

 

She then took on

a white man in the courts

to be reunited with her son,

who has been illegally sold into slavery,

and won – the first victory of its kind.

 

Truth dedicated her life

to the abolition movement and women’s rights,

helping to liberate many slaves,

and is renowned for her “Ain’t I a woman?”

speech of 1851.

 

Eminent Victorians:

19th-century celebrity portraits – in pictures

 

As a new picture of Billy the Kid

goes on sale for $1m,

these photographs showcase

some of the most significant

people of the 19th century

to be captured on camera

G

Thu 21 Nov 2019    16.32 GMT

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2019/nov/21/
eminent-victorians-19th-century-celebrity-portraits-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Born Isabella Baumfree

in New York state,

the African American

lived in slavery

until she escaped

with her daughter

in 1826.

 

She then took on

a white man

in the courts

to be reunited

with her son,

who has been illegally

sold into slavery,

and won –

the first victory

of its kind.

 

Truth dedicated her life

to the abolition movement

and women’s rights,

helping to liberate

many slaves,

and is renowned

for her “Ain’t I a woman?”

speech of 1851.

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2019/nov/21/
eminent-victorians-19th-century-celebrity-portraits-in-pictures

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2019/nov/21/
eminent-victorians-19th-century-celebrity-portraits-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow    1807-1882

 

 

Longfellow,

a passionately

private man,

was,

just as passionately

and privately,

an abolitionist.

 

His best friend

was Charles Sumner,

for whom he wrote,

in 1842,

a slim volume called

“Poems on Slavery.”

 

Sumner,

a brash

and aggressive

politician,

delivered

stirring speeches

attacking

slave owners;

 

Longfellow,

a gentler soul,

wrote

verses mourning

the plight of slaves,

poems “so mild,”

he wrote,

“that even

a slaveholder

might read them

without losing

his appetite

for breakfast.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/19/opinion/19Lepore.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/19/
opinion/19Lepore.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Charles Sumner        1811-1874

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Sumner

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/19/
opinion/19Lepore.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Abraham Lincoln        February 12, 1809 - April 15, 1865

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jan. 31, 1865

 

The thirteenth amendment

to the U.S. Constitution

abolishes slavery

throughout the country

 

 

ON Jan. 31, 1865,

Congress passed

the 13th Amendment,

banning slavery

in America.

 

It was

an achievement

that abolitionists

had spent decades

fighting for

— and one for which

their movement

has been lauded

ever since.

 

But before

abolitionism succeeded,

it failed.

 

As a pre-Civil War

movement,

it was a flop.

 

Antislavery

congressmen

were able

to push through

their amendment

because of the absence

of the pro-slavery South,

and the complicated

politics

of the Civil War.

 

Abolitionism’s

surprise victory

has misled generations

about how change

gets made.

 

(...)

 

It’s hard to accept

just how unpopular

abolitionism was

before the Civil War.

 

The abolitionist

Liberty Party

never won a majority

in a single county,

anywhere in America,

in any presidential race.

 

(...)

 

In 1860

the premier

antislavery

newspaper,

The Liberator,

had a circulation

of under 3,000,

in a nation

of 31 million.

 

Even among Northerners

who wanted to stop

the spread of slavery,

the idea of banning

it altogether

seemed fanatical.

 

On the eve

of the Civil War,

America’s greatest sage,

Ralph Waldo Emerson,

predicted that slavery

might end one day,

but “we shall not live

to see it.”

 

In a deeply

racist society,

where most

white Americans,

South and North,

valued sectional unity

above equal rights,

“abolitionist”

was usually

a dirty word.

 

One man

who campaigned

for Abraham Lincoln

in 1860

complained:

“I have bee

denounced

as impudent,

foppish,

immature,

and worse than all,

an Abolitionist.”

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/01/30/was-abolitionism-a-failure/

 

 

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/slavery/timeline/1865.html

 

http://www.loc.gov/rr/program/bib/ourdocs/13thamendment.html

 

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/01/30/was-abolitionism-a-failure/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1863

 

Lincoln issues

the Emancipation

Proclamation,

freeing all slaves

in areas of rebellion

 

Lincoln puts forth

a reconstruction plan

offering amnesty

to white Southerners

who take loyalty oaths

and accept

the abolition

of slavery.

 

State government

can be formed

in those states

where at least

10 percent of voters

comply with

these terms.

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/slavery/timeline/1863.html

 

 

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/slavery/timeline/1863.html

 

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/09/21/freedom-and-restraint/

 

http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/american_originals_iv/
sections/preliminary_emancipation_proclamation.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1862

 

Congress

abolishes slavery

in Washington, D.C.,

and the territories

 

 

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/slavery/timeline/1862.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Brown        1800-1859

 

On October 16, 1859,

John Brown

led 21 men

on a raid

of the federal arsenal

at Harpers Ferry,

Virginia.

 

His plan

to arm slaves

with the weapons

he and his men

seized

from the arsenal

was thwarted

by local farmers,

militiamen,

and Marines led

by Robert E. Lee.

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/4p1550.html

 

 

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/4p1550.html

http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/aaohtml/exhibit/aopart3b.html

 

 

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/02/09/
in-camp-reading-les-miserables/

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/28/
arts/design/28brown.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Compromise of 1850

admits

California to the Union

as a free state,

allows the slave states

of New Mexico and Utah

to be decided

by popular sovereignty,

and bans slave trade

in D.C.

 

 

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/slavery/timeline/1850.html

 

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/4p2951.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black Abolitionists

 

 

http://www.npr.org/blogs/npr-history-dept/2015/02/
26/388993874/how-black-abolitionists-changed-a-nation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1848

 

Anti-slavery groups

organize

the Free Soil Party,

a group opposed

to the westward

expansion of slavery

from which

the Republican Party

will later be born

 

 

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/slavery/timeline/1848.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1837

 

New York City

hosts the first National

Anti-Slavery Society Convention

 

 

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/slavery/timeline/1837.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1831

 

Nat Turner,

an enslaved

Baptist preacher

believing himself

divinely inspired,

leads

a violent rebellion

in Southampton,

Virginia.

 

At least 57 whites

are killed

 

 

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/slavery/timeline/1831.html

 

 

http://international.loc.gov/ammem/aaohtml/exhibit/aopart1.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1829

 

In Boston,

Massachusetts,

David Walker

publishes

his widely read

vociferous

condemnation

of slavery,

AN APPEAL

TO THE COLORED CITIZENS

OF THE WORLD

 

 

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/slavery/timeline/1829.html

 

 

http://international.loc.gov/ammem/aaohtml/exhibit/aopart1.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Denmark Vesey        1767-1822

 

black abolitionist

who was executed

in 1822

for leading

a failed slave rebellion

(Charleston, S.C.)

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/26/opinion/abolitionist-or-terrorist.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/26/
opinion/abolitionist-or-terrorist.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1820

 

Missouri Compromise

 

 

In an effort

to preserve

the balance of power

in Congress

between

slave and free states,

the Missouri Compromise

was passed in 1820

admitting Missouri

as a slave state

and Maine

as a free state.

 

Furthermore,

with the exception

of Missouri,

this law prohibited

slavery

in the Louisiana Territory

north of the 36° 30´

latitude line.

 

In 1854,

the Missouri Compromise

was repealed

by the Kansas-Nebraska Act.

 

Three years later

the Missouri Compromise

was declared

unconstitutional

by the Supreme Court

in the Dred Scott decision,

which ruled that Congress

did not have the authority

to prohibit slavery

in the territories.

http://www.loc.gov/rr/program/bib/ourdocs/Missouri.html

 

 

http://www.loc.gov/rr/program/bib/ourdocs/Missouri.html

 

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/slavery/timeline/1820.html

 

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part3/3h511.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1817

 

The American Colonization Society

is founded to help free blacks

resettle in Africa

 

 

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/slavery/timeline/1817.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1811

 

(...) in January of 1811,

a group

of enslaved people

on a plantation

on the outskirts

of New Orleans

rose up,

armed themselves

and began

a long march

toward the city.

 

Hundreds

would join them

along the way.

 

Their goal:

to free every slave

they found

and then seize

the Crescent City.

 

The rebellion

came to be known

as the German Coast

Uprising

and it's believed

to be the largest

slave rebellion

in United States history.

https://www.npr.org/2019/11/09/µ
777810796/hundreds-march-in-reenactment-of-a-historic-but-long-forgotten-slave-rebellion

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.npr.org/2019/11/09/µ
777810796/hundreds-march-in-reenactment-of-a-historic-but-long-forgotten-slave-rebellion

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1808

 

The U.S. bans

international slave trading

 

 

on January 1st, 1808,

the U.S. officially banned

the importation of slaves.

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/
story.php?storyId=17988106 - January 10, 2008

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part3/3h92.html

 

 

http://www.npr.org/2015/07/18/
423803204/remembering-new-orleans-overlooked-ties-to-slavery

 

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/
story.php?storyId=17988106 - January 10, 2008

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1787

 

The Northwest Ordinance

forbids slavery,

except as

criminal punishment,

in the Northwest Territory

(later Ohio, Indiana, Illinois,

Michigan, and Wisconsin).

 

Residents

of the territory

are required

to return

fugitive slaves

 

 

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/slavery/timeline/1787.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pennsylvania’s

Gradual Abolition Act of 1780

 

The act began

dismantling slavery,

eventually releasing

people from bondage

after their 28th birthdays.

 

Under the law,

any slave

who entered

Pennsylvania

with an owner

and lived in the state

for longer

than six months

would be set free

automatically.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/16/opinion/george-washington-slave-catcher.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/16/
opinion/george-washington-slave-catcher.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1739

 

Slaves in Stono,

South Carolina,

rebel,

sacking and burning

an armory

and killing whites.

 

The colonial militia

puts an end

to the rebellion

before slaves

are able

to reach freedom

in Florida

 

 

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/slavery/timeline/1739.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1781

 

Mum Bett

and another

Massachusetts slave

successfully sue

their master

for freedom

 

 

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/slavery/timeline/1781.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1731

 

The Spanish

reverse

a 1730 decision

and declare

that slaves fleeing

to Florida

from Carolina

will not be sold

or returned

 

 

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/slavery/timeline/1731.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1712

 

An alleged

slave revolt

in New York City

leads to violent

outbreaks.

 

Nine whites

are killed

and eighteen slaves

are executed

 

 

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/slavery/timeline/1712.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1671

 

Bacon's Rebellion

 

 

In Virginia,

black slaves

and black and white

indentured servants

band together

to participate

in Bacon's Rebellion

 

 

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/slavery/timeline/1676.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Related > Anglonautes > History / Historical documents

 

17th, 18th, 19th, 20th century > America, USA

Slavery, Racism, Civil war, Abraham Lincoln

 

 

20th century > 1920s-1970s > Civil rights era

 

 

19th century > USA > Emancipation Proclamation - 1863

 

 

United Kingdom > Slavery

 

 

 

 

 

Related > Anglonautes > Vocapedia

 

slavery, eugenics,

race relations, racism, civil rights,

apartheid

 

 

 

 

 

Related

 

The Guardian > Slavery

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/aug/13/
us-slavery-400-years-virginia-point-comfort