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History > 20th century > USA > Civil rights era > Timeline in pictures

 

Late 1960s - 1970s

 

Black Power movement - Black Panther Party for Self-Defense - Black Liberation Army - Move

 

 

 

 

Jailed for 46 years over police deaths        G        20 July 2018

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/
watch?time_continue=231&v=0ORtv-4wX-k

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution        2015

 

 

 

 

The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution (2015) - Documentary HD

DIRECTOR/WRITER: Stanley Nelson

YouTube > Movieclips Film Festivals & Indie Films

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BXbYLdpD6h0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black Panthers Revisited        NYT        23 January 2015

 

 

 

 

Black Panthers Revisited | Op-Docs | The New York Times        23 January 2015

 

This short documentary explores

what we can learn from the Black Panther party

in confronting police violence 50 years later.

 

This is part of a series of videos

produced by Independent filmmakers,

who are supported in part

by the nonprofit Sundance Institute.

 

Produced by: Stanley Nelson and Laurens Grant

Read the story here: http://nyti.ms/1BMFR57

Watch more videos at: http://nytimes.com/video

 

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qGZpDt6OYnI

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black Power movement > Stokely Carmichael, Angela Davis, Eldridge Cleaver

 

 

 

The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975 - Movie Trailer (2011) HD

 


THE BLACK POWER MIXTAPE 1967-1975

mobilizes a treasure trove of 16mm material

shot by Swedish filmmakers,

after languishing in a basement of a TV station for 30 years,

into an irresistible mosaic of images, music, and narration

chronicling the evolution one of our nation's

most indelible turning points,

the Black Power movement.

 

Featuring candid interviews

with the movement's

most explosive revolutionary minds,

including Angela Davis, Bobby Seale,

Stokely Carmichael, and Kathleen Cleaver,

the film explores the community,

people and radical ideas of the movement.

 

Music by Questlove and Om'Mas Keith,

and commentary from and modern voices

including

Erykah Badu, Harry Belafonte,

Talib Kweli, and Melvin Van Peebles

give the historical footage a fresh sound and make

 

THE BLACK POWER MIXTAPE 1967-75

an exhilarating, unprecedented account

of an American revolution.
 

MOVIECLIPS Trailers

YouTube >  MOVIECLIPS Trailers        11 August 2011

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jFWHNpfjByQ

 

Related

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2011/oct/08/black-power-mixtape-danny-glover

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2011/oct/08/
black-power-mixtape-danny-glover

 

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2007/nov/08/
usa.gender

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Children walking by Panther graffiti.

 

Stephen Shames/Long Shot Factory

 

[ Undated ]

 

Review: ‘The Black Panthers’ Captures a Militant Movement’s Soul and Swagger

The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution

NYT

SEPT. 1, 2015

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/02/
movies/review-the-black-panthers-captures-a-militant-movements-soul-and-swagger.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Move

 

 

 

The arrest of Delbert Africa of Move on 8 August 1978.

 

Photograph: Jim G Domke,

Philadelphia Inquirer

 

A siege. A bomb. 48 dogs.

And the black commune that would not surrender

 

Forty years ago,

Philadelphia erupted

in one of the most dramatic

shoot-outs of the black liberation struggle.

 

Ed Pilkington tells the surreal story of the Move 9

– and what happened to them next

G

Tue 31 Jul 2018        09.00 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/jul/31/
a-siege-a-bomb-48-dogs-and-the-black-commune-that-would-not-surrender

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Move members

hold sawed-off shotguns and automatic weapons

as they stand in front of their barricaded headquarters.

 

Photograph: AP

 

Forty years ago,

Philadelphia erupted

in one of the most dramatic

shoot-outs of the black liberation struggle.

 

Ed Pilkington tells the surreal story of the Move 9

– and what happened to them next

G

Tue 31 Jul 2018        09.00 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/jul/31/
a-siege-a-bomb-48-dogs-and-the-black-commune-that-would-not-surrender

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Members of Move gather in front of their house.

They were arrested 40 years ago during a police siege.

 

Photograph: Leif Skoogfors/Corbis via Getty Images

 

Forty years ago,

Philadelphia erupted

in one of the most dramatic

shoot-outs of the black liberation struggle.

 

Ed Pilkington tells the surreal story of the Move 9

– and what happened to them next

G

Tue 31 Jul 2018        09.00 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/jul/31/
a-siege-a-bomb-48-dogs-and-the-black-commune-that-would-not-surrender

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Janine Africa preaching to the crowd

in front of the barricaded Move house

in the Powelton Village section of Philadelphia.

 

Photograph:

Leif Skoogfors/Corbis via Getty Images

 

Forty years ago,

Philadelphia erupted

in one of the most dramatic

shoot-outs of the black liberation struggle.

 

Ed Pilkington tells the surreal story of the Move 9

– and what happened to them next

G

Tue 31 Jul 2018        09.00 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/jul/31/
a-siege-a-bomb-48-dogs-and-the-black-commune-that-would-not-surrender

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Move 9 women freed after 40 years in jail

over Philadelphia police siege - May 2019

 

 

For 40 years,

Janine Phillips Africa

had a technique

for coping

with being cooped up

in a prison cell

for a crime she says

she did not commit.

 

She would avoid

birthdays,

Christmas,

New Year

and any other events

that emphasized

time passing

while she was not free.

 

“The years

are not my focus,”

she wrote in a letter

to the Guardian.

 

“I keep my mind

on my health

and the things

I need to do

day by day.”

 

On Saturday

she could finally

begin accepting

the passage of time.

 

She and her

cellmate and sister

in the black

liberation struggle,

Janet Holloway Africa,

were released from

SCI Cambridge Springs

in Pennsylvania,

after a long struggle

for parole.

 

The release

of Janine, 63,

and Janet, 68,

marks a key moment

in the history

of the Move 9,

the group

of African American

black power

and environmental

campaigners

who were imprisoned

after a police siege

of their home

in August 1978.

 

The pair

were the last

of four women

in the group

either to be paroled

or to die behind bars.

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2019/may/25/
move-9-black-radicals-women-freed-philadelphia

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2019/may/25/
move-9-black-radicals-women-freed-philadelphia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8 August 1978

 

Move - Powelton Village section of Philadelphia

 

 

Philadelphia erupts

in one of the most

dramatic shoot-outs

of the black liberation

struggle

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/jul/31/
a-siege-a-bomb-48-dogs-and-the-black-commune-that-would-not-surrender

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/jul/31/
a-siege-a-bomb-48-dogs-and-the-black-commune-that-would-not-surrender

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joanne Chesimard / Assata Shakur

 

A leading figure

in the 70s

Black Liberation Army,

Shakur was given

life for murder

in 1977.

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/jul/13/assata-shakur-civil-rights-activist-fbi-most-wanted

 

 

 

leader

of the black

radical movement

who escaped in 1979

from a New Jersey prison

where she was serving

a life term

for murdering

a state trooper

http://www.nytimes.com/1987/10/12/nyregion/
fugitive-murderer-reported-in-cuba.html

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/stage/2017/may/09/
assata-taught-me-review-black-panther-assata-shakur

 

http://www.npr.org/2015/04/13/
399351658/how-young-people-went-underground-during-the-70s-days-of-rage

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/22/nyregion/
christie-wants-president-to-demand-that-cuba-return-a-fugitive.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/jul/13/
assata-shakur-civil-rights-activist-fbi-most-wanted

 

http://www.npr.org/2013/05/07/
181914429/fbi-most-wanted-terrorists-list-who-is-assata-shakur

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1987/12/02/nyregion/
killer-says-he-helped-in-chesimard-s-escape.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1987/10/12/nyregion/
fugitive-murderer-reported-in-cuba.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Two women with bags of food

at the People’s Free Food Program,

one of the Panther’s survival programs,

Palo Alto, California, USA, 1972

 

Power to the People

- the Black Panthers by photographer Stephen Shames

G

Mon 1 Oct 2018        07.00 BST

Last modified on Mon 1 Oct 2018        07.01 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2018/oct/01/
power-to-the-people-the-black-panthers-by-photographer-stephen-shames

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The NYPD officers

Joseph Piagentini, left, and Waverly Jones,

who were murdered by Herman Bell and others

in Harlem in 1971.

 

Photograph: New York State Senate

 

The Black Panthers still in prison After 46 years,

will they ever be set free?

 

Over two years,

Ed Pilkington

has interviewed eight people imprisoned

since the 1970s black liberation struggle

that rocked the US.

 

As they near 50 years inside,

will America’s black radicals ever be freed?

G

Mon 30 Jul 2018        09.00 BST

Last modified on Mon 30 Jul 2018        09.01 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2018/jul/30/
black-panthers-prison-interviews-african-american-activism

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Members of the Black Panthers,

including Leonard Hayes holding a flag inscribed “Blood,”

marching on Centre Avenue near Elmore Street. Hill District.

 

Circa 1970-75.

 

Charles (Teenie) Harris

 

Teenie Harris Archive, Carnegie Museum of Art

 

Past and Present Collide in Pittsburgh

NYT        By Maurice Berger        Jun. 2, 2015

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/06/02/past-and-present-collide-in-pittsburgh

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ericka Huggins

 

 

 

Ericka Huggins is released from prison

after the case against her

for the murder of Alex Rackley

was dismissed,

May 1971.

 

Photograph: Dave Pickoff/AP

 

Black power’s coolest radicals

(but also a gang of ruthless killers)

O

Sunday 18 October 2015        09.30 BST

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2015/oct/18/
black-powers-coolest-radicals-black-panthers-vanguard-of-the-revolution-stanley-nelson-interview

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attica inmate revolt        New York        September 1971

 

 

 

In Brooklyn in 1971,

people honor the six black prisoners killed

at Attica Correctional Facility

with the black power salute.

 

Credit Jean-Pierre Laffont

 

Looking Back on the Grit and Glamour of New York

NYT

Nov. 7, 2018

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/07/
lens/looking-back-on-the-grit-and-glamour-of-new-york.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On Sept. 10, 1971,

striking inmates

at the Attica State Prison

protested

brutal treatment

they had endured

at the hands

of corrections officials.

 

Three days later,

the authorities

stormed the prison

with deadly

consequences.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/31/
obituaries/phylis-bamberger-dead.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/topic/subject/attica-inmate-revolt-1971

https://www.nytimes.com/topic/organization/attica-correctional-facility

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/07/
lens/looking-back-on-the-grit-and-glamour-of-new-york.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/31/
obituaries/phylis-bamberger-dead.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/19/
opinion/attica-prison-torture.html

 

https://www.npr.org/2017/02/05/
513591489/scholar-says-prison-uprisings-usually-come-after-basic-needs-arent-met

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/04/
books/review/inside-the-new-york-times-book-review-the-attica-uprising.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/04/
books/review/blood-in-the-water-attica-heather-ann-thompson.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/24/
books/prying-loose-the-long-kept-secrets-of-attica.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2015/may/22/
new-attica-documents-reveal-inmate-torture

 

https://www.npr.org/templates/story/
story.php?storyId=1128640 - September 7, 2001

 

https://www.npr.org/templates/
story/story.php?storyId=1068891 - January 8, 2000

 

Attica! - Dog Day Afternoon (3/10) Movie CLIP (1975) HD

https://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=lB6Gk5EtunI

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1975/09/22/
archives/screen-lumets-dog-day-afternoon.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1974/12/15/
archives/reverberations-of-1971-attica-prison-riot-persist-3-years-later.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1971/10/04/
archives/the-attica-revolt-hour-by-hour-a-misunderstanding-sparked-uprising.html

 

https://www.nytimes.com/1971/09/15/
archives/-unity-a-haunting-echo-from-attica-unity-a-haunting-echo-from.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

George Lester Jackson        1941-1971

 

 

 

George Jackson’s funeral

at St. Augustine’s Church, Oakland, California, 1971

 

Power to the People

- the Black Panthers by photographer Stephen Shames

G

Mon 1 Oct 2018        07.00 BST

Last modified on Mon 1 Oct 2018        07.01 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2018/oct/01/
power-to-the-people-the-black-panthers-by-photographer-stephen-shames

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

George Lester Jackson

(...)

was an African-American

author.

 

While serving a sentence

for armed robbery in 1961,

Jackson became involved

in revolutionary activity

and co-founded

the Maoist-Marxist

Black Guerrilla Family.

 

In 1970,

he was charged,

along with two other

Soledad Brothers,

with the murder

of prison guard

John Vincent Mills

in the aftermath

of a prison fight.

 

The same year,

he published

Soledad Brother:

The Prison Letters

of George Jackson,

a combination

of autobiography

and manifesto

addressed

to a black American

audience.

 

The book

would become

a best-seller

and earn Jackson

personal fame.

 

In 1971,

Jackson took

several guards

and two inmates

hostage

in a bid to escape

from San Quentin

Prison.

 

However,

the incident ended

with Jackson

being shot

and killed by a guard,

in addition to the deaths

of 5 hostages.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Jackson_(activist)


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jonathan Peter Jackson        1953-1970

 

 

 

A memorial mural for Jonathan Jackson,

who was killed on 7 August 1970,

during an attempt to kidnap

California superior court judge Harold Haley

and three others

in exchange for the freedom

of his brother, George Jackson,

in Roxbury, Massachusetts, 1970

 

Photograph: Stephen Shames

 

From Black Panthers to Black Lives Matter – in pictures

G

Thursday 15 September 2016        13.00 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/culture/gallery/2016/sep/15/
black-panthers-black-lives-matter-gallery-stephen-shames-pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jonathan Peter Jackson (...)

initiated

the armed kidnapping

of Superior Court judge

Harold Haley,

prosecutor

Gary Thomas,

and three jurors

from a courtroom

in Marin County,

California,

in August 1970,

when he was 17.

 

Fleeing with the hostages,

Jackson demanded

the Soledad Brothers'

release from prison.

 

Black activists

for prisoner rights

and for civil rights,

the three Soledad Brothers,

none in the courtroom

that day,

included Jackson's

elder brother

George Jackson.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jonathan_P._Jackson

 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jonathan_P._Jackson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A rally in support of the Connecticut Black Panthers in 1970.

 

Sostre’s activism would make him

an international symbol for prisoners’ rights.

 

Credit David Fenton/Getty Images

 

Overlooked No More:

Martin Sostre,

Who Reformed America’s Prisons From His Cell

 

The lawsuits he filed from behind bars

in the 1960s and ’70s

challenging harsh prison conditions

laid the groundwork for prisoners

to defend their rights even today.

NYT

April 24, 2019

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/24/
obituaries/martin-sostre-overlooked.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Huey Newton Speaks

At Revolutionary People’s Party Constitutional Convention

in 1970.

 

Photograph: David Fenton/Getty Images

 

The Black Panthers still in prison After 46 years,

will they ever be set free?

 

Over two years,

Ed Pilkington has interviewed

eight people imprisoned

since the 1970s black liberation struggle

that rocked the US.

 

As they near 50 years inside,

will America’s black radicals ever be freed?

G

Mon 30 Jul 2018        09.00 BST

Last modified on Mon 30 Jul 2018        09.01 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2018/jul/30/
black-panthers-prison-interviews-african-american-activism

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1970s

 

blaxploitation / blaxploitation pictures

 

 

The 1970s

produced the genre

that would later

come to be known

as 'Blaxploitation'.

 

The film genre

emerged

during this decade

as films were made

specifically with

an urban black audience

in mind.

 

The term

'Blaxploitation'

emerges from a fusion

of the words black

and exploitation.

 

These movies

were larger-than-life,

action-packed,

and full of funk

and soul music.

 

Known not only

for their exciting nature,

these films also involved

progressive social

and political commentary.

 

From Pam Grier

to Bill Cosby,

check out

who delved

into this genre

and what the actors

have been doing

since the '70s ...

http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/watn-photos/blaxploitation-stars-gallery-1.51536


 

http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/watn-photos/
blaxploitation-stars-gallery-1.51536

 

http://film.guardian.co.uk/quiz/questions/0,,345846,00.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/16/movies/16mcgee.html

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2008/oct/04/is.this.it.pam.grier

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Armed members of the Seattle chapter

of the Black Panther Party standing on the state Capitol steps

protesting a proposed law limiting the ability to carry firearms

in a “manner manifesting an intent to intimidate others.”

 

Olympia, Wash. February 1969.

 

Photographer Unknown/Washington State Archive

 

Photographing Civil Rights, Up North and Beyond Dixie

By Maurice Berger        NYT        Oct. 18, 2016

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/10/18/
photographing-civil-rights-north-beyond-south-dixie/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black Panthers protest

outside the New York City courthouse in 1969.

 

Photograph: David Fenton/Getty Images

 

The Black Panthers still in prison After 46 years,

will they ever be set free?

 

Over two years,

Ed Pilkington

has interviewed eight people imprisoned

since the 1970s black liberation struggle

that rocked the US.

 

As they near 50 years inside,

will America’s black radicals ever be freed?

G

Mon 30 Jul 2018        09.00 BST

Last modified on Mon 30 Jul 2018        09.01 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2018/jul/30/
black-panthers-prison-interviews-african-american-activism

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Members of the Black Panther party

stand behind tables ready to distribute free clothing to the public

in New Haven, Connecticut, 1969.

 

Photograph: David Fenton/Getty Images

 

The Black Panthers still in prison After 46 years,

will they ever be set free?

 

Over two years,

Ed Pilkington

has interviewed eight people imprisoned

since the 1970s black liberation struggle

that rocked the US.

 

As they near 50 years inside,

will America’s black radicals ever be freed?

G

Mon 30 Jul 2018        09.00 BST

Last modified on Mon 30 Jul 2018        09.01 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2018/jul/30/
black-panthers-prison-interviews-african-american-activism

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All Power to the People, 1969,

by Emory Douglas

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2008/oct/25/
emory-douglas-black-panthers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Trial:

The City and County of Denver

vs. Lauren R. Watson”

 

a six-hour

documentary (...)

produced

for public television

in 1970.

 

The film followed

the criminal proceedings

against Mr. Watson,

a Black Panther Party member

charged with resisting arrest

and interfering

with a police officer

after a Denver patrolman

stopped his speeding car

in 1968.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/21/
movies/robert-m-fresco-a-filmmaker-and-writer-dies-at-83.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/21/
movies/robert-m-fresco-a-filmmaker-and-writer-dies-at-83.html

 

http://www.examiner.com/article/
lauren-watson-the-rise-of-a-radical

 

http://digital.denverlibrary.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15330coll22/id/64672/rec/2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eldridge Cleaver

 

 

 

Eldridge Cleaver,

the party’s minister of information

and author of the best-selling prison memoir

“Soul on Ice.”

 

Jeffrey Blankfort/Long Shot Factory

 

[ Undated ]

 

Review: ‘The Black Panthers’

Captures a Militant Movement’s Soul and Swagger

The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution

NYT

SEPT. 1, 2015

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/02/
movies/review-the-black-panthers-captures-a-militant-movements-soul-and-swagger.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kathleen Neal Cleaver

 

 

 

Kathleen Cleaver,

photographed in Oakland, 1968.

 

Now a professor of law,

she was the wife of Eldridge Cleaver.

 

Photograph courtesy of Jeffrey Blankfort

 

Black power’s coolest radicals

(but also a gang of ruthless killers)

O

Sunday 18 October 2015        09.30 BST

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2015/oct/18/
black-powers-coolest-radicals-black-panthers-vanguard-of-the-revolution-stanley-nelson-interview

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kathleen Cleaver,

communications secretary

and the first female member

of the party’s decision-making central committee,

talks with Black Panthers from Los Angeles

at the Free Huey rally in DeFremery Park.

Oakland, California, July 28, 1968

 

Photograph: Copyright Stephen Shames

Courtesy Steven Kasher Gallery

 

Power to the People

- the Black Panthers by photographer Stephen Shames

G

Mon 1 Oct 2018        07.00 BST

Last modified on Mon 1 Oct 2018        07.01 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2018/oct/01/
power-to-the-people-the-black-panthers-by-photographer-stephen-shames

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2019/feb/17/
black-panthers-photo-gallery-1960s-san-francisco-art-institute

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2018/oct/01/
power-to-the-people-the-black-panthers-by-photographer-stephen-shames

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2015/oct/18/
black-powers-coolest-radicals-black-panthers-vanguard-of-the-revolution-
stanley-nelson-interview

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black Panthers salute

during a rally in support

of jailed member Huey Newton,

in Provo Park, Berkeley, California,

1968.

 

Power to the People

- the Black Panthers by photographer Stephen Shames

G

Mon 1 Oct 2018        07.00 BST

Last modified on Mon 1 Oct 2018        07.01 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2018/oct/01/
power-to-the-people-the-black-panthers-by-photographer-stephen-shames

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black Panthers line up

at a Free Huey rally in DeFremery Park in west Oakland in 1968

 

Photograph: Stephen Shames/courtesy Stephen

 

Power to the People

- the Black Panthers by photographer Stephen Shames

G

Mon 1 Oct 2018        07.00 BST

Last modified on Mon 1 Oct 2018        07.01 BST

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2018/oct/01/
power-to-the-people-the-black-panthers-by-photographer-stephen-shames

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On May 2, 1967,

Black Panthers

amassed at the Capitol in Sacramento

brandishing guns to protest a bill

before an Assembly committee

restricting the carrying of arms in public.

 

Self-defense

was a key part of the Panthers' agenda.

 

This was an early action,

a year after their founding.

 

Related

http://www.nytimes.com/1989/08/23/
obituaries/huey-newton-symbolized-the-rising-black-anger-of-a-generation.html

 

Walt Zeboski/AP

 

The Black Panthers' History in 10 photos

Did Man Who Armed Black Panthers Lead Two Lives?

by Richard Gonzales        NPR        October 03, 2012        4:38 PM

http://www.npr.org/2012/10/03/161408561/did-man-who-armed-black-panthers-lead-two-lives

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An early Black Panthers poster, circa 1966

 

Auction of rare items

from African American history – in pictures

G

Thursday 10 March 2016        15.08 GMT

http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/gallery/2016/mar/10/
auction-rare-african-american-history-items-swann-galleries

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mumia Abu-Jamal

 

 

https://www.npr.org/2018/12/28/
680781150/mumia-abu-jamal-granted-right-of-appeal-after-decades-in-prison

 

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2018/jul/30/
intoxicating-freedom-gripping-fear-mumia-abu-jamal-on-life-as-a-black-panther

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jalil Muntaqim

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2018/jul/30/
black-panthers-prison-interviews-african-american-activism

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bobby Seale

 

 

 

Bobby Seale

with Marlon Brando [ right ]

in Oakland in 1968.

 

PBS Distribution

 

Review: ‘The Black Panthers’

Captures a Militant Movement’s Soul and Swagger

The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution

NYT

SEPT. 1, 2015

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/02/
movies/review-the-black-panthers-captures-a-militant-movements-soul-and-swagger.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black Panther Professor: Bobby Seale and D'Angelo in Oakland            NYT        26 June 2015

 

 

 

 

Black Panther Professor:

Bobby Seale and D'Angelo in Oakland

The New York Times        26 June 2015

 

Bobby Seale co-founded the Black Panther Party.

 

The R&B star D’Angelo speaks out

on racial injustice in his new album.

 

The two met in Oakland, Calif.

 

Produced by: Zackary Canepari and Ora DeKornfeld

Watch more videos at: http://nytimes.com/video

 

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=72Dfp-PzOLE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bobby Seale

was the co-founder

of the Black Panther Party

for Self Defense

along with

Huey P. Newton.

 

After serving

for three years

in the US Air Force,

he was court-martialed

and received

a bad conduct discharge.

 

He soon entered

Merritt College

in Oakland, California

where he met Newton.

 

It was in October 1966

when Seale and Newton

created the BPP and wrote

the Ten-Point Program.

http://www.pbs.org/hueypnewton/people/people_seale.html

 

 

http://www.pbs.org/hueypnewton/people/
people_seale.html

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/world/gallery/2009/oct/25/
black-panthers-howard-l-bingham

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Elbert Howard        1938-2018

 

 

 

Mr. Howard speaking at a sidewalk news conference

in Washington in 1970.

 

CreditCharles W. Harrity/Associated Press

 

Elbert Howard, a Founder of the Black Panthers, Dies at 80

NYT

July 26, 2018

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/26/
obituaries/elbert-howard-a-founder-of-the-black-panthers-dies-at-80.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(...) a founder

of the Black Panther Party and,

as its spokesman,

in the thick of some

of the most tumultuous events

of the late 1960s and early ’70s

— but who was most enthusiastic

about its social-service

and community-organizing work —

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/26/
obituaries/elbert-howard-a-founder-of-the-black-panthers-dies-at-80.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/26/
obituaries/elbert-howard-a-founder-of-the-black-panthers-dies-at-80.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leo Branton Jr.        1922-2013

 

California lawyer

whose moving

closing argument

in a racially and politically

charged murder trial in 1972

helped persuade

an all-white jury

to acquit

a black communist,

the activist and academic

Angela Davis

 

(...)

 

Mr. Branton,

a black veteran

of World War II

who served

in a segregated Army unit,

represented prominent

black performers,

including Nat King Cole

and Dorothy Dandridge,

argued cases on behalf

of the Black Panthers

and the Communist Party,

and filed numerous cases

alleging police abuse.

 

But the case

with which

he was most

closely associated

was that

of Ms. Davis.

 

(...)

 

Ms. Davis,

a 28-year-old

former instructor

at the University

of California,

Los Angeles,

was accused

of murder,

kidnapping

and conspiracy

in the 1970 death

of a state judge

who was shot with

one of several weapons

she had bought.

 

The year before,

Ms. Davis had lost

her teaching job

after she expressed

support for

the Communist Party.

 

After the charges

were filed,

she became a fugitive,

one of the F.B.I.’s

10 most wanted.

 

She said the weapons

had been stolen from her.

 

Her flight

had been

an important part

of the prosecution’s

case.

 

But Mr. Branton,

who had argued

numerous cases

of police abuse

in the 1950s,

urged jurors to view

her behavior

in the context

of centuries

of slavery,

racism and abuse

against blacks.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/28/us/
leo-branton-jr-who-defended-angela-davis-dies-at-91.html

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/28/us/
leo-branton-jr-who-defended-angela-davis-dies-at-91.html 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kwame Ture / Stokely Carmichael        1941-1998

 

 

 

From right,

Floyd McKissick of the Congress of Racial Equality;

the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.;

and Carmichael,

leader of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee,

in 1966.

 

Associated Press

He Cried Out ‘Black Power,’ Then Left for Africa

Peniel E. Joseph on His Biography of Stokely Carmichael

NYT

MARCH 3, 2014

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/04/books/peniel-e-joseph-on-his-biography-of-stokely-carmichael.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

flamboyant

civil rights leader

known to most Americans

as Stokely Carmichael

 

(...)

 

(he) is best remembered

for his use of the phrase

''black power,''

which in the mid-1960's

ignited a white backlash

and alarmed

an older generation

of civil rights leaders,

including

the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

 

(...)

 

Though

his active participation

in the struggle

for civil rights

lasted

barely a decade,

he was

a charismatic figure

in a turbulent time,

when real violence

and rhetoric

escalated

on both sides

of the color line.

 

Stokely Carmichael

was inspired

to participate

in the civil rights

movement

by the bravery

of those blacks and whites

who protested

segregated service

with sit-ins

at lunch counters

in the South.

 

''When I first heard

about the Negroes sitting in

at lunch counters down South,''

he told Gordon Parks

in Life magazine in 1967,

''I thought they were just

a bunch of publicity hounds.

 

But one night

when I saw

those young kids on TV,

getting back up

on the lunch counter stools

after being knocked off them,

sugar in their eyes,

ketchup in their hair

-- well, something

happened to me.

 

Suddenly

I was burning.''

 

(...)

 

As a SNCC

[ Student Nonviolent

Coordinating Committee ]

field organizer

in Lowndes Count

in Alabama,

where blacks

were in the majority

but politically powerless,

he helped

raise the number

of registered black voters

to 2,600 from a mere 70,

or 300 more than the number

of registered whites.

 

Displeased

by the response

of the established parties

to the success

of the registration drive,

he organized the all-black

Lowndes County

Freedom Organization,

which, to fulfill

a state requirement

that all parties

have a logo,

took a black panther

as its symbol.

 

The panther

was later adopted

by the Black Panther Party.

 

The young

Mr. Carmichael

was radicalized

by his experiences

working

in the segregated South,

where peaceful protesters

were beaten, brutalized

and sometimes killed

for seeking

the ordinary rights

of citizens.

 

He once recalled

watching

from his hotel room

in a little Alabama town

while nonviolent

black demonstrators

were beaten

and shocked

with cattle prods

by the police.

 

Horrified,

he said that he screamed

and could not stop.

http://www.nytimes.com/1998/11/16/us/
stokely-carmichael-rights-leader-who-coined-black-power-dies-at-57.html

 

 

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/freedomriders/people/stokely-carmichael

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4508288

https://kinginstitute.stanford.edu/encyclopedia/carmichael-stokely

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/04/
books/peniel-e-joseph-on-his-biography-of-stokely-carmichael.html

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/
how-should-we-remember-activist-stokely-carmichael/

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1998/11/16/us/
stokely-carmichael-rights-leader-who-coined-black-power-dies-at-57.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1996/04/14/
weekinreview/conversations-kwame-ture-formerly-stokely-carmichael-
still-ready-for-revolution.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Huey Percy Newton        1942-1989

 

 

 

Huey Newton

co-founded the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense in 1966

in Oakland, California, with Bobby Seale.

 

This 1970 photo

shows Newton in Philadelphia.

 

Rusty kennedy/AP

 

The Black Panthers' History in 10 photos

Did Man Who Armed Black Panthers Lead Two Lives?

by Richard Gonzales        NPR        October 03, 2012        4:38 PM

http://www.npr.org/2012/10/03/161408561/did-man-who-armed-black-panthers-lead-two-lives

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Huey Newton, centre,

on his return from China,

with Elaine Brown on the left.

 

Photograph: Bettmann/Corbis

 

[ Undated ]

 

Black power’s coolest radicals

(but also a gang of ruthless killers)

O

Sunday 18 October 2015        09.30 BST

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2015/oct/18/
black-powers-coolest-radicals-black-panthers-vanguard-of-the-revolution-stanley-nelson-interview

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The lawyer and civil rights activist Mark Lane, left,

with the Black Panther leaders Huey Newton, center,

and David Hillard, at a news conference

in Jane Fonda’s East Side apartment.

 

Leonard Detrick/New York Daily News Archive via Getty Images

 

[ Undated ]

 

Review: ‘The Black Panthers’

Captures a Militant Movement’s Soul and Swagger

The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution

NYT

SEPT. 1, 2015

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/02/
movies/review-the-black-panthers-captures-a-militant-movements-soul-and-swagger.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

co-founder

of the Black Panther Party

and a leader

of a generation of blacks

in the 1960's

 

(...)

 

Dr. Newton,

who founded

the Black Panther Party

with Bobby Seale,

became one

of the most charismatic

symbols of black anger

in the late 1960's.

 

After his conviction in 1967

in the death

of an Oakland police officer,

radicals

and many college students

took up the rallying cry

''Free Huey.''

http://www.nytimes.com/1989/08/23/us/
huey-newton-killed-was-a-co-founder-of-black-panthers.html

 

 

 

With the most vivid

image of him a poster

- the Black Panther

defense minister

poised on

a throne-like

rattan chair,

a spear in one hand,

a rifle in the other -

it would be easy

to see Huey Newton

living and dying

by the gun.

 

A fuller picture

is more complex.

 

Huey Newton,

the son

of a Louisiana sharecropper

who had also been a rebel,

was, in his own words,

''a street kid

with an education.''

 

And as hard-won

as his street wisdom

had been,

so too had come

his book learning.

 

Illiterate

when he graduated

from high school,

Dr. Newton taught

himself to read,

went to college

and attended

law school.

 

Nine years ago,

after a decade

as one of the nation's

most charismatic

symbols of black anger,

he earned a Ph.D. degree

in social philosophy

from the University

of California

at Santa Cruz.

 

His dissertation was titled:

''War Against the Panthers:

a Study of Repression

in America.''

 

But somehow Dr. Newton

never escaped the streets.

 

And after years

in which he battled

drug and alcohol abuse,

after many encounters

with the law,

he was shot to death

early yesterday

at the age of 47 on a street

in Oakland, Calif.

 

(...)

 

Huey Percy Newton,

who was named after

the populist governor

of Louisiana, Huey Long,

was born in New Orleans

on Feb. 17, 1942,

the son of Armelia

and Walter Newton.

 

His father

was a sharecropper

and Baptist minister

who once was

almost lynched

for talking back

to white bosses.

http://www.nytimes.com/1989/08/23/
obituaries/huey-newton-symbolized-the-rising-black-anger-of-a-generation.html

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/projects/cp/obituaries/archives/
huey-newton

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2019/feb/17/
black-panthers-photo-gallery-1960s-san-francisco-art-institute

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2018/oct/01/
power-to-the-people-the-black-panthers-by-photographer-stephen-shames

 

http://www.theguardian.com/world/gallery/2009/oct/25/
black-panthers-howard-l-bingham

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1989/08/23/
obituaries/huey-newton-symbolized-the-rising-black-anger-of-a-generation.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1989/08/23/us/
huey-newton-killed-was-a-co-founder-of-black-panthers.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black Power movement        Angela Davis

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/profile/angela-davis

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2018/oct/01/
power-to-the-people-the-black-panthers-by-photographer-stephen-shames

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/17/
arts/aretha-franklin-dead-civil-rights.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/culture/gallery/2016/sep/15/
black-panthers-black-lives-matter-gallery-stephen-shames-pictures

 

http://www.theguardian.com/global/2014/dec/14/
angela-davis-there-is-an-unbroken-line-of-police-violence-in-the-us-
that-takes-us-all-the-way-back-to-the-days-of-slavery

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/28/us/
leo-branton-jr-who-defended-angela-davis-dies-at-91.html

 

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2007/nov/08/
usa.gender

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1968

 

Life with the Black Panthers

 

 

With their guns, uniforms

and talent for political theatre,

the Black Panthers

topped the FBI's list

of 'threats to national security'

in the 60s.

 

In 1968

Howard Bingham

spent six months

trailing

and photographing them

http://www.theguardian.com/world/gallery/2009/oct/25/
black-panthers-howard-l-bingham

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/world/gallery/2009/oct/25/
black-panthers-howard-l-bingham

 

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2009/oct/25/
black-panthers-photographs-howard-bingham

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black Panther Party for Self-Defense - founded 1966

 

 

In the late 1960s,

black protesters

show a new militancy,

very different

from the nonviolence

activists originally

adopted.

 

In 1966,

the Black Panther Party

forms in Oakland,

California.

 

Armed

with law books,

breakfast programs,

and guns,

the group

aggressively monitors

police actions

in the black community,

serves the poor and needy,

publishes a newspaper,

and earns a following.

 

Its founders,

Bobby Seale

and Huey Newton,

present

a ten-point program

for improving social

and economic conditions

for African Americans.

 

Soon,

their movement

spreads to 25 cities

across the nation.

 

As they question

and monitor

police actions,

the Panthers'

boldness and militancy

make many in the white

and the law enforcement

communities nervous.

 

Carrying

loaded weapons

in public is legal

in California,

where Ronald Reagan

is governor.

 

But the Panthers'

appearance,

fully armed,

makes lawmakers rush

to ban the practice.

 

In 1969,

the F.B.I.

names the group

the number one threat

to the nation's

internal security.

 

Some law

enforcement officials

feel this gives them

justification

to break the law

and destroy

the Panther organization.

 

In Chicago

in December 1969,

two Black Panther Party leaders

are killed in a pre-dawn raid

by police acting on information

supplied by an FBI informant,

William O'Neal.

 

The men,

Fred Hampton

and Mark Clark,

are executed

and four of the seven

other people

in the apartment

are wounded.

 

All surviving Panthers

are charged with assault

and attempted murder.

 

Though the police insist

they shot in self-defense,

a controversy grows

when activists

present evidence

that the sleeping Panthers

put up no resistance.

 

Although the police

are never tried,

the charges against

the Panthers are dropped,

and later the families of the dead

win a $1.8 million settlement

from the government.

 

The extent of the FBI's

counterintelligence program,

COINTELPRO,

will be uncovered by activists

in 1971.

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/eyesontheprize/story/17_panthers.html

 

 

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/eyesontheprize/story/17_panthers.html

http://www.pbs.org/hueypnewton/people/people_hoover.html

http://www.pbs.org/hueypnewton/actions/actions_survival.html

http://www.pbs.org/hueypnewton/actions/actions_formation.html

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/ng-interactive/2018/jul/30/
america-black-radicals-timeline-in-pictures

http://theblackpanthers.com/home/

 

 

https://www.mediapart.fr/studio/documentaires/international/
le-meurtre-de-fred-hampton-documentaire-requisitoire-sur-la-mort-d-un-leader-des-black-panthe

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2018/oct/01/
power-to-the-people-the-black-panthers-by-photographer-stephen-shames

 

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2018/jul/30/
black-panthers-prison-interviews-african-american-activism

 

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2018/jul/30/
intoxicating-freedom-gripping-fear-mumia-abu-jamal-on-life-as-a-black-panther

 

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2018/jul/30/
black-panther-radicals-still-in-jail

 

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/ng-interactive/2018/jul/30/
america-black-radicals-timeline-in-pictures

 

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/16/us/
black-panthers-50-years.html

 

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/09/26/
stories-from-the-black-panthers-unfinished-revolution/

 

https://www.theguardian.com/culture/gallery/2016/sep/15/
black-panthers-black-lives-matter-gallery-stephen-shames-pictures

 

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/09/08/
reconsidering-the-black-panthers-through-photos-stephen-shames/

 

http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/gallery/2016/mar/10/
auction-rare-african-american-history-items-swann-galleries

 

 

 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2015/oct/18/
black-powers-coolest-radicals-black-panthers-
vanguard-of-the-revolution-stanley-nelson-interview

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/02/
movies/review-the-black-panthers-captures-a-militant-movements-
soul-and-swagger.html

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/22/
opinion/the-black-panthers-revisited.html

 

 

 

 

http://www.npr.org/2012/10/03/
161408561/did-man-who-armed-black-panthers-lead-two-lives

 

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2011/oct/08/
black-power-mixtape-danny-glover

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/24/nyregion/
24tabor.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/gallery/2009/oct/25/
black-panthers-howard-l-bingham 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2005/feb/12/usa2

 

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=3508022 - July 19, 2004

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1998/11/16/us/
stokely-carmichael-rights-leader-who-coined-black-power-dies-at-57.html

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jFWHNpfjByQ

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Black Panthers' History in 10 photos

 

 

http://www.npr.org/2012/10/03/
161408561/did-man-who-armed-black-panthers-lead-two-lives

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black Power activist H. Rap Brown

 

 

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2002/03/13/national/main503687.shtml

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Emory Douglas

 

minister of culture

and in-house artist

for the Black Panthers

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2008/oct/25/
emory-douglas-black-panthers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Richard Aoki        1938-2009

 

 

http://www.npr.org/2012/10/03/
161408561/did-man-who-armed-black-panthers-lead-two-lives

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Related > Anglonautes > History

 

USA > 20th century > 1920s-1970s > Civil rights era

 

 

America, USA > 17th, 18th, 19th, 20th century

Slavery, Racism, Civil war, Abraham Lincoln

 

 

America, USA > 18th, 19th century

 

 

USA > 19th century > Emancipation Proclamation - 1863

 

 

United Kingdom > Slavery

 

 

 

 

 

Related > Anglonautes > Vocapedia

 

slavery, eugenics,

race relations, racism, segregation, civil rights

apartheid

 

 

 

 

 

Anglonautes > Arts > Photography > Photographers > 20th century > USA

 

Fred Baldwin

 

Ernest C. Withers    1922-2007

 

Gordon Parks    1912-2006

 

James "Spider" Martin    1939-2003

 

Grey Villet    1927-2000

 

 

 

 

 

Related > Anglonautes > Arts > Music > Soul

 

Aretha Frankin    1942-2018

 

 

 

 

 

Related

 

UK > British Black Panthers

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/apr/09/
british-black-panthers-drama-photography-exhibition